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NRSP Programme Update

Table of Contents Summary of Achievements ............................................................. 3 Salient Features of NRSP.............................................................. 4 Social Mobilization: NRSPs Vision for Rural Development .......................... 5 Gender and Development .............................................................. 14 Microfinance & Enterprise Development Programme ................................ 16 Micro Health Insurance Program ..................................................... 22 Urban Poverty Alleviation Project (UPAP)............................................25 NRSP Institute of Rural Management ..............................................29 Physical Infrastructure and Technology Development (PITD) ...................... 34 Social and Human Protection Sector ................................................. 39 Social Sector Services ................................................................ 45 Environment and Natural Resource Management .................................... 67 Monitoring Evaluation and Research ..................................................72 Partnerships for Economic Empowerment ............................................ 74 Summary of Current Projects.........................................................78 List of Tables
Table 1: Summary of Achievements as of July, 2011...................................................................................... 3 Table 2: CO Formation as of July, 2011 .......................................................................................................... 6 Table 3: CO Grading as of June and July, 2011 ............................................................................................... 7 Table 4: CO Membership as of July, 2011....................................................................................................... 8 Table 5: Cumulative Poverty Ranking % of CO Members as of July, 2011...................................................... 9 Table 6: Savings of CO (Rs. Million) as of July, 2011..................................................................................... 10 Table 7: Local Support Organizations (LSO) update as of July, 2011............................................................ 11 Table 8a: MEDP Progress Overview as of July, 2011 .................................................................................... 19 Table 8b: No. of Loans by Type till July, 2011 ............................................................................................... 20 Table 8c: Active Loans and Receivable from COs ......................................................................................... 20 Table 8d: Credit Disbursement by type till July, 2011................................................................................... 21 Table 8e: Credit Disbursement by District till July, 2011............................................................................... 21 Table 9: Micro Insurance Progress as of July, 2011 ...................................................................................... 23 Table 9a: Insurnace Clients(Dependents Included) as of July, 2011 ............................................................. 23 Table 9b: Region wise insurance cases and premium collected as of July, 2011.......................................... 24 Table 9c: Amount Reimbursed against claims as of July, 2011 .................................................................... 24 Table 10: UPAP Disbursement and Recovery Data Zone wise as of July, 2011............................................. 26 Table 11a: NRSP IRM Programme Level Summary of Community Training. July, 2011 ............................ 30 Table 11b: IRM Programme Level Summary of Staff Training as of July, 2011 ............................................ 31 Table 11c: NRSP IRM Community Training for the month of July, 2011.................................................... 32 Table 11d: NRSP IRM Total Staff Training for the month of July, 2011 ..................................................... 32 Table 12: Region wise Summary of Community & Staff Training by type as of July, 2011........................... 33 Table 13a: National Programme for Improvement of Watercourses in Canal & Barani Areas ................... 36 Table 13b: Status of National Programme for Improvement of Watercourses in Canal & Barani Areas..... 36 Table 13c: Physical Infrastructure Schemes Progress as of July, 2011 (Since inception) .............................. 37 Table 13d: CPIs Progress Region wise by Direct Input as of July, 2011........................................................ 38 Table 14: SDDNCF progress of June, 2011 ................................................................................................... 41 Table 15: End of Honour Crime status .......................................................................................................... 44 Table 16: Adult Literacy Movement Programme as of July, 2011 ................................................................ 47 Table 17: PALLS Project Achievements as of July, 2011................................................................................ 47 Table 18: Region Wise Enrolment and No. of Schools currently operating and supported by NRSP............ 48 Table 19: Quality Education for all (QEFA) Achievement as of July, 2011 .................................................... 49 Table 20: School Council Capacity Building Programme as of July, 2011..................................................... 51 Table 21: PPAF Supported Community/Government Schools July, 2011...................................................... 52 Table 22: Baluchistan Education Support Project (BESP) July, 2011............................................................. 53

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 23: PESP project status as of July, 2011:............................................................................................. 53 Table 24: UCBPRP project status as of July, 2011......................................................................................... 54 Table 25 NRSP ILO IPEC CACL II Project status against key project deliverables as of July, 2011 ................ 55 Table 26: GFATM Round 7 Target Vs Achievement as of July 2011 ............................................................. 56 Table 27: Detail of ITNs Region wise Distribution: (as of July 2011)............................................................. 56 Table 28: Meeting Community Needs for Eye Care Activities status as of July 2011 ................................. 57 Table 29: Services offered at NRSP PPAF Community Health Centers as of July 11 ..................................... 57 Table 30: KMC BADIN (As of July, 2011)....................................................................................................... 58 Table 31: PPAF CECP Progress ..................................................................................................................... 58 Table 32: PPAF LHV based clinics status as of July 2011 .............................................................................. 59 Table 33: RHC Khoski Badin Beneficiaries since December 2010 till July 2011 ............................................ 59 Table 34: Details of TBA trainings: ............................................................................................................... 59 Table 35: Details of Activities under Naya Qadam (as of July 2011): ........................................................... 60 Table 36: PWFLs (People with functional limitations) Progress ................................................................... 60 Table 37: FALAH Identification of Pax for sensitization session ................................................................... 62 Table 38: Positioning of Family Planning as a Health Intervention, Project Status as of July, 2011 ............ 63 Table 39: MCH Services offered at NRSP managed BHU in Swat ................................................................. 64 Table 40: GAVI Progress as of July 2011....................................................................................................... 65 Table 41: The activities in July 2011 are as follows, ..................................................................................... 65 Table 42: Environment and Natural Resource Management as of July, 2011.............................................. 69 Table 43: Livestock Monthly Progress Report as of July, 2011 ..................................................................... 70 Table 44: Landless Harees Project Progress................................................................................................. 74 Table 45: Rewarding Innovations at the District Level (Project Progress).................................................... 76 Table 46: Rewarding Innovations at the District Level (Project Recipients, Costs and Contributions) ......... 76 Table 47: SM Project Progress ...................................................................................................................... 80 Table 48: SLBAP Progress ............................................................................................................................. 81 Table 49: Plan Milk Value Chain Project, Progress as of July, 2011.............................................................. 82 Table 50: Progress Update of AFP as of July 2011........................................................................................ 84 Table 51: Progress Update of Small Grants Program as of July 2011 .......................................................... 85

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Summary of Achievements
Table 1: Summary of Achievements as of July, 2011 Community Organizations (COs) Formed Men Women Mixed Water Users Associations CO Membership Men Women CO Savings (Rs.) Men Women No. of LSO Credit Disbursed (Rs.) Disbursed to Men (Rs.) Disbursed to Women (Rs.) No. of Loans Loans to Men Loans to Women Portfolio (Rs.) Active Loans Men Women Micro Insurance (No. of Insurance Cases) Premium Collected (Rs.) Community Members Trained Men Women Staff Members Trained Men Women Physical Infrastructure Schemes Completed Households Benefited Total Cost Community Schools Established Current No. of Active Schools Students Enrolled Boys Girls Adult Literacy Movement (No. of Groups) No. of Graduates Men Women 2,266,999 1,369,675 3,798,137,556 332,802 89,304 243,498 2,183,363 274,040,990 997,050 520,865 476,185 37,156 25,050 12,106 23,038 945,406 4,924,017,393 504 233 16,894 8,853 8,041 1077 23,737 2,174 21,563 130,268 68,334 53,278 7,185 1,471 1,950,754 1,025,537 925,217 1,306,794,188 1,107,106,269 199,687,919 406 55,299,650,912 37,141,023,202 18,158,627,710

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Salient Features of NRSP

Salient Features of NRSP It is a home grown organization, registered as a Company Limited by Guarantee under Section 42 of the Companies Ordinance (1984) Government of Pakistan provided seed capital to establish NRSP in 1992 NRSP core operations are managed from the income of an endowment fund. NRSP is a Not for Profit Organization NRSP is autonomous and independent NRSP has no pre-conceived package for delivery of services or supplies NRSP is a Gender Sensitive development organization NRSP has no political agenda

NRSPs Objectives, Strategy and Approach Objective: To foster a countrywide network of grassroots level organizations to enable rural men & women to plan, implement and manage developmental activities and programmes for the purpose of ensuring productive employment, poverty alleviation and improvement in the quality of life. Strategy: To harness the potential of men and women to help themselves. Approach: Social guidance.

Key Assumptions (1) People have tremendous potential and willingness to identify and prioritise development activities. (2) There is at least one Activist in each community who is willing to mobilize the community.

This Programme Update details NRSPs progress since its inception, and for the month of July 2011, in forming new COs, providing training and capacity building for CO members and staff members, and credit disbursement. Sector-wise achievements are also given.

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Social Mobilization: NRSPs Vision for Rural Development


NRSP works to release the potential abilities, skills and knowledge of rural men and women, to enable them to articulate their aspirations and to effectively marshal the resources they need to meet their identified needs. The purpose is poverty alleviation enabling people to break the cycle of poverty, which begins with lack of opportunity, extends to the well-known miseries of economic and nutritional poverty and leads new generations to endure the same conditions. The process is social mobilization - bringing people together on new terms for a common purpose. The conceptual tools are social guidance (recruiting local men and women who will take on a leadership role), advocacy, capacity building and awareness raising. The programmatic tools are training, support to institutions, micro-credit, infrastructure development, natural resource management and productive linkages. NRSPs vision is manifested in expanded opportunities for income-generation; community schools which provide quality primary education, community owned and managed infrastructure schemes, improved agricultural productivity and higher returns for labour and so on. From the widest perspective the vision is manifested as the first stage of a transformation of civil society. Social Mobilization, the core of NRSPs philosophy Social mobilization is based on acknowledging that the community is the center of all development activities. It is only informed and engaged community members who can plan and undertake sustainable grass roots development. NRSP utilizes the following steps in mobilizing rural men and women: 1. Programme introduction: The process of social mobilization in a new Union Council begins with a series of dialogues with community members, explaining the purpose of the organization and the mutual obligations which CO formation entails. These dialogues: Help to establish rapport and build trust between the NRSP Social Organizers and the villagers. Enable potential CO members to identify the socio-economic and infrastructural opportunities available in their communities. Every effort is made to include both men's and women's perspectives as the dialogues proceed. Help identify potential areas of effective intervention, as defined by the men and women of the community. Once identified, the opportunities are grouped into sector- specific categories. 2. Situation analysis: As part of the entry process, the Social Organizer completes a 'Situation Analysis', which covers demographic trends, economic data (household income, agricultural and other earnings), employment data, the institutions (schools, hospitals etc.) found in the area, the amount and condition of land, health and education facilities and physical infrastructure and the state of the agricultural economy. The situation analysis utilizes primary and secondary sources (interviews, Census data, etc.) and is valuable as a benchmark, as a tool for entry level planning and for eventual programme expansion. 3. CO Formation: The NRSP staff ask people to form Community Organizations (COs) which will function as a platform for development. Each CO then elects a President and a Manager. The NRSP staff and the CO members identify an Activist from amongst the CO members. 4. Poverty Profile: It is the process in which villagers are identified according to their own definitions of economic wellbeing. This gives NRSP a good idea of the scale of poverty in the area and enables NRSP to match its intended interventions with local needs. The categories are: Khushal: Well to do Guzara accha ho jata hai: Better off Guzara bhot mushkil se hota hai: Very poor Guzara mushkil se hota hai: Poor Dusroon ke sahare zinda rehte hain: Destitute. 5. Micro investment plans: Once a CO has been formed, the Social Organizers help the members to draw up micro-investment plans (MIPs). Established at three levels, household, group and the village, these help the CO members to identify their economic needs in concrete terms and to plan ways to improve their economic standing.

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 2: CO Formation as of July, 2011


Hub Office District By the end of June-11 5,097 3,122 2,700 1,257 12,176 6,325 7,772 3,113 17,210 6,986 6,969 13,955 2,856 2,856 8,565 5,866 14,431 1,456 2,181 736 1,503 298 19 14 6,207 2,734 1,905 1,916 1,611 8,166 3,640 700 682 2,686 2,772 459 128 1,661 12,728 1,763 664 908 566 3,901 34,535 1,045 1,308 1,300 146 3,799 129,964 During July-2011 9 4 1 14 2 9 182 193 44 44 5 5 18 11 18 47 1 1 304 As of July 2011 Women Mix WUAs 2,360 1,449 1,105 421 5,335 2,766 3,547 1,422 7,735 6,986 6,969 13,955 733 733 6,242 4,457 10,699 403 442 65 100 50 5 1,065 1,071 863 761 760 3,455 821 179 164 521 915 63 36 455 3,154 763 416 404 311 1,894 4,178 166 254 602 53 1,075 53,278 958 69 266 107 1,400 696 640 465 1,801 6 6 67 25 92 2 2 637 300 373 198 1,508 256 151 121 392 267 41 67 274 1,569 175 33 153 25 386 339 28 53 1 82 7,185 123 123 35 35 376 937 1,313 1,471

Men 1,788 1,604 1,333 730 5,455 2,865 3,594 1,408 7,867 2,038 2,038 2,221 1,384 3,605 1,051 1,739 671 1,403 248 19 9 5,140 1,026 742 782 658 3,208 2,581 370 397 1,784 1,590 355 25 950 8,052 825 216 351 230 1,622 30,018 475 117 645 92 1,329 68,334

Total 5,106 3,122 2,704 1,258 12,190 6,327 7,781 3,295 17,403 6,986 6,969 13,955 2,900 2,900 8,565 5,866 14,431 1,456 2,181 736 1,503 298 19 14 6,207 2,734 1,905 1,916 1,616 8,171 3,658 700 682 2,697 2,772 459 128 1,679 12,775 1,763 665 908 566 3,902 34,535 1,045 1,308 1,300 146 3,799 130,268

Rawalpindi

Mianwali

Bahawalpur** R.Y.Khan* D.G.Khan

Malakand

AJ&K

Badin

Turbat

NRSP-Bank**

Closed

ICT / RWP Attock Chakwal Jehlum Sub Total Khushab Bhakkar Mianwali Sub Total Bahawalpur Bahawalnagar Sub Total R.Y.Khan Sub Total D.G.Khan Rajanpur Sub Total Malakand Mardan Charsadda Swabi Swat Buner Nowshera Sub Total Kotli Poonch (Rawalkot) Muzaffarabad Bagh Sub Total Badin Hyderabad T. Muhammad Khan Mirpurkhas Matiari T.Allah Yar S.Benazirabad Thatta Sub Total Kech / Turbat Gawadar Panjgoor Awaran Sub Total NRSP-Bank Bahawalpur - BRDP Mardan Sialkot Sukkar Sub Total

Grand Total

*SPEP Project Area st ** Bahawalpur figures are separated from Bank from March 1 , 2011

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 3: CO Grading as of June and July, 2011 July - 2011


Grading Hub Office Districts A Total ICT/ RWP Rawalpindi ATK CHK JLM Total Mianwali KHB BHK MWL Total LDR Bahawalpur VRI BHP BHN RYK R.Y.K* Total RYK Total D.G.Khan DGK RJP Total MKD MRD Malakand CSD SWB SWT BNR Total KTI AJ & K RWK MZD BGH Total BDN HYD TMK Badin MPK MTI TAY NWS THT Total TBT Turbat GWR PGR AWN Grand Total 3,378 1582 868 255 673 691 292 371 28 8,398 281 51 5,229 2,835 2 234 234 562 275 287 474 107 266 17 50 34 1472 585 174 526 187 1,872 820 44 73 309 213 164 41 208 355 275 80 17,436 B 6,170 2308 1516 1886 460 15,134 5073 6866 3195 19,243 1,365 781 7,735 7,671 1,691 1,313 1313 10609 6275 4334 4,336 986 1,389 467 1,279 196 19 4480 1415 1266 1038 761 6,219 1,278 439 454 1,013 1,911 219 85 820 2,827 907 446 908 566 70,331 C 1,564 667 439 373 85 777 444 264 69 3,717 216 190 1,264 2,042 5 340 340 1529 1127 402 710 125 299 196 79 11 1315 498 229 311 277 2,019 790 110 114 561 59 27 2 356 434 341 93 12,405 D 1,078 549 299 190 40 801 518 280 3 17,146 2,024 2,127 5,147 6,142 1,706 712 712 1731 888 843 673 238 227 56 95 57 904 236 236 41 391 2,665 770 107 41 814 589 49 295 286 240 46 25,996 12,190 5,106 3,122 2,704 1,258 17,403 6,327 7,781 3,295 48,504 3,886 3,149 19,375 18,690 3,404 2,900 2,900 14431 8,565 5,866 6,193 1,456 2,181 736 1,503 298 19 8171 2,734 1,905 1,916 1,616 12,775 3,658 700 682 2,697 2,772 459 128 1,679 3,902 1,763 665 908 566 126,168 Grand Total Turbat Badin AJ & K Malakand D.G.Khan R.Y.K* Bahawalpur Mianwali Rawalpindi** Total ICT/ RWP ATK CHK JLM Total KHB BHK MWL Total LDR VRI BHP BHN RYK Total RYK Total DGK RJP Total MKD MRD CSD SWB SWT BNR Total KTI RWK MZD BGH Total BDN HYD TMK MPK MTI TAY NWS THT Total TBT GWR PGR AWN Total Hub Office Districts A 3,378 1582 868 255 673 691 292 371 28 8,398 281 51 5,229 2,835 2 234 234 562 275 287 474 107 266 17 50 34 1472 585 174 526 187 1,872 820 44 73 309 213 164 41 208 355 275 80 17,436 B 6,156 2299 1516 1882 459 14,941 5071 6857 3013 19,243 1,365 781 7,735 7,671 1,691 1,313 1313 10609 6275 4334 4,336 986 1,389 467 1,279 196 19 4475 1415 1266 1038 756 6,172 1,260 439 454 1,002 1,911 219 85 802 2,826 907 445 908 566 70,071 C 1,564 667 439 373 85 777 444 264 69 3,717 216 190 1,264 2,042 5 340 340 1529 1127 402 710 125 299 196 79 11 1315 498 229 311 277 2,019 790 110 114 561 59 27 2 356 434 341 93 12,405 D 1,078 549 299 190 40 801 518 280 3 17,146 2,024 2,127 5,147 6,142 1,706 712 712 1731 888 843 673 238 227 56 95 57 904 236 236 41 391 2,665 770 107 41 814 589 49 295 286 240 46 25,996 12,176 5,097 3,122 2,700 1,257 17,210 6,325 7,772 3,113 48,504 3,886 3,149 19,375 18,690 3,404 2,856 2,856 14431 8,565 5,866 6,193 1,456 2,181 736 1,503 298 19 8166 2,734 1,905 1,916 1,611 12,728 3,640 700 682 2,686 2,772 459 128 1,661 3,901 1,763 664 908 566 125,908

June - 2011
Grading Total

Grand Total Excluding Closed Regions (Bahawalpur BRDP, Mardan, Sialkot, Sukkar) *SPEP Project Area

Category Criteria A B C D Regular Meetings & Saving, CO initiative taken, 95% Credit Recovery Regular Meetings & savings, 95% Credit Recovery, local initiatives not taken, dependent on NRSP Inconsistent Meetings & saving, Credit overdue but likely to be recovered, not ready for any activity No meetings & Savings, Inactive after specific intervention, not ready for any activity

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 4: CO Membership as of July, 2011


Hub Office District
ICT / RWP Attock Chakwa l Jehlum Sub Total Khushab Bhakkar Mianwali Sub Total

By the end Of June-11 79,630 52,764 48,467 22,226 203,087 107,858 117,968 54,458 280,284 144,593 134,589 279,182 31,063 31,063 114,904 84,263 199,167 20,272 30,781 12,926 23,493 6,488 269 283 94,512 47,184 37,016 41,491 30,454 156,145 71,904 11,473 10,095 43,051 32,018 5,613 1,292 27,642 203,088 38,439 15,882 14,892 9,360 78,573 335,953 25,834 35,081 21,237 2,236 84,388 1,945,442

During July-11 154 57 15 226 30 158 3,395 3,583 495 495 157 157 344 267 228 839 12 12 5,312

Men

As of July, 2011 Women 42,518 23,545 20,725 8,030 94,818 50,856 54,631 27,800 133,287 144,593 134,589 279,182 6,395 6,395 87,086 63,934 151,020 4,970 5,791 815 1,505 1,022 94 14,197 23,587 20,954 20,709 16,583 81,833 17,957 4,718 3,814 11,777 8,961 1,100 703 10,857 59,887 18,597 11,250 7,961 5,522 43,330 41,522 4,132 5,105 9,683 826 19,746 925,217

Total 79,784 52,764 48,524 22,241 203,313 107,888 118,126 57,853 283,867 144,593 134,589 279,182 31,558 31,558 114,904 84,263 199,167 20,272 30,781 12,926 23,493 6,488 269 283 94,512 47,184 37,016 41,491 30,611 156,302 72,248 11,473 10,095 43,318 32,018 5,613 1,292 27,870 203,927 38,439 15,894 14,892 9,360 78,585 335,953 25,834 35,081 21,237 2,236 84,388 1,950,754

37,266 29,219 27,799 14,211 108,495 57,032 63,495 30,053 150,580 25,163 25,163 27,818 20,329 48,147 15,302 24,990 12,111 21,988 5,466 269 189 80,315 23,597 16,062 20,782 14,028 74,469 54,291 6,755 6,281 31,541 23,057 4,513 589 17,013 144,040 19,842 4,644 6,931 3,838 35,255 294,431 21,702 29,976 11,554 1,410 64,642 1,025,537

Rawalpindi

Mianwali

Bahawalpur**

Bahawalpur Bahawalnagar Sub Total


R.Y.Khan Sub Total D.G.Khan Rajanpur Sub Total Malakand Mardan Charsadda Swabi Swat Buner Nowshera Sub Total Kotli Poonch (Rawalkot) Muzaffarabad Bagh Sub Total Badin Hyderabad T. Muhammad Khan Mirpurkhas Matiari T.Allah Yar S.Benazirabad Thatta Sub Total Kech / Turbat Gawadar Panjgoor Awaran Sub Total NRSP-Bank Bahawalpur - BRDP Mardan Sialkot Sukkar Sub Total

R.Y.Khan*

D.G.Khan

Malakand

AJ & K

Badin

Turbat

NRSP-Bank**

Closed

Grand Total

* SPEP Project Area ** Bahawalpur figures are separated from Bank from March 1st, 2011

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 5: Cumulative Poverty Ranking % of CO Members as of July, 2011


Hub Office District Well to do Better off Poor Very poor Destitute

Rawalpindi

Mianwali

Bahawalpur

R.Y.Khan* D.G.Khan

Malakand

AJ & K

Badin

Turbat

ICT / RWP Attock Chakwal Jehlum Khushab Bhakkar Mianwali Lodhran Vehari Bahawalpur Bahawalnagar R.Y.Khan R.Y.Khan D.G.Khan Rajanpur Malakand Mardan Charsadda Swabi Swat Buner Kotli Poonch Muzaffarabad Bagh Badin Hyderabad T. Muhammad Khan Mirpurkhas Matiari T.Allah Yar S.Benazirabad Thatta Kech / Turbat Gawadar Panjgoor Awaran
Grand Total

3% 4% 1% 4% 11% 10% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 2% 2% 6% 3% 1% 12% 7% 0% 2% 4% 7% 4% 1% 6% 2% 1% 0% 0% 0% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% 2%

9% 11% 3% 17% 32% 33% 24% 10% 4% 5% 4% 8% 10% 18% 18% 25% 17% 19% 30% 21% 0% 12% 14% 14% 15% 6% 16% 11% 5% 2% 4% 3% 9% 16% 6% 0% 0% 12%

65% 52% 58% 34% 39% 41% 44% 76% 86% 72% 68% 78% 79% 50% 50% 63% 73% 77% 37% 63% 0% 55% 60% 42% 57% 45% 49% 58% 55% 91% 62% 83% 45% 53% 76% 100% 100% 61%

23% 31% 38% 42% 16% 15% 24% 13% 5% 22% 24% 14% 10% 25% 25% 6% 7% 3% 18% 9% 0% 29% 19% 31% 21% 42% 30% 29% 40% 6% 33% 14% 29% 30% 17% 0% 0% 23%

1% 2% 0% 2% 2% 1% 3% 0% 5% 1% 3% 0% 0% 5% 5% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 2% 3% 5% 3% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 13% 0% 1% 0% 0% 2%

* SPEP Project Area

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 6: Savings of CO (Rs. Million) as of July, 2011


Hub Office District
ICT / RWP Attock Chakwal Jehlum Sub Total Khushab Bhakkar Mianwali Sub Total Bahawalpur Bahawalnagar Sub Total R.Y.Khan Sub Total D.G.Khan Rajanpur Sub Total Malakand Mardan Charsadda Swabi Swat Buner Nowshera Sub Total Kotli Poonch (Rawalkot) Muzaffarabad Bagh Sub Total Badin Hyderabad T. Muhammad Khan Mirpurkhas Matiari T.Allah Yar S.Benazirabad Thatta Sub Total Kech / Turbat Gawadar Panjgoor Awaran Sub Total NRSP -Bank Bahawalpur - BRDP Mardan Sialkot Sukkar Sub Total Grand Total

By the end Of June-11 44.63 101.33 76.69 19.57 242.22 51.99 31.70 5.83 89.52 5.21 9.09 14.29 96.74 96.74 32.28 60.23 92.51 2.56 5.40 1.26 2.41 0.77 0.04 0.03 12.48 7.30 24.09 3.92 15.78 51.09 28.60 5.33 6.88 9.27 33.60 2.99 0.59 14.45 101.72 8.73 1.93 0.44 0.88 11.99 554.86 3.61 4.43 23.94 1.24 33.22
1,300.63

During July-11 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.02 0.19 0.21 0.02 0.10 0.12 5.34 5.34 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.07 0.11 0.02 0.03 0.17 0.34 0.06 0.01 0.07 6.16

As of July, 2011 Men 31.72 73.98 60.99 13.99 180.68 35.38 24.52 4.24 64.14 95.90 95.90 26.92 50.22 77.14 1.82 4.58 1.14 2.33 0.60 0.04 0.01 10.53 3.04 11.55 1.84 4.92 21.34 21.67 3.37 4.96 6.91 28.55 2.40 0.14 7.98 75.98 4.90 0.77 0.24 0.51 6.41 550.86 2.86 2.19 18.23 0.85 24.13
1,107.11

Women 12.91 27.35 15.70 5.59 61.55 16.61 7.20 1.78 25.59 5.23 9.19 14.41 6.18 6.18 5.36 10.01 15.37 0.75 0.82 0.12 0.08 0.17 0.02 1.95 4.26 12.57 2.11 10.88 29.82 7.05 1.98 1.92 2.39 5.06 0.59 0.45 6.64 26.07 3.89 1.18 0.21 0.37 5.65 4.00 0.75 2.24 5.71 0.39 9.09
199.69

Total 44.63 101.33 76.69 19.58 242.23 51.99 31.72 6.02 89.73 5.23 9.19 14.41 102.08 102.08 32.28 60.23 92.51 2.56 5.40 1.26 2.41 0.77 0.04 0.03 12.48 7.30 24.11 3.95 15.79 51.16 28.71 5.35 6.88 9.30 33.60 2.99 0.59 14.62 102.06 8.79 1.95 0.44 0.88 12.06 554.86 3.61 4.43 23.94 1.24 33.22
1,306.79

Rawalpindi

Mianwali

Bahawalpur***

R.Y.Khan*

D.G.Khan

Malakand

AJ & K

Badin

Turbat

NRSP-Bank***

Closed

* SPEP Project Area ** Saving withdrawn which was deposited as credit collateral amount ** *Bahawalpur figures are separated from Bank from March 1 , 2011
st

10

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 7: Local Support Organizations (LSO) update as of July, 2011


3 Thattha 1 2,301 780 1,521 34% 43 7 36 16 17 3 56% 24 12 12 50% 1,526 9 1,517 99% 1,825 2 1,823 100% 278 45 233 119 36 83 70% 525 504 21 4% 283 283 0% 4,431 407 4,024 4,024 100% 4,146 400 3,746 3,746 100% 1,070 180 890 110 776 4 88% 246 46 200 40 110 50 80% 1,653 79 1,574 1,333 241 15% 526 21 505 488 17 3% 101 5 96 96 0% 91 91 0% 76 6 70 70 0% 72 72 0% 18 18 0% 177 171 6 3% 2 12 0.60 0.2 1.30 1.30 1.30 0 43 468 1 60 1 657 24 1 196 0.90 1.3 13.00 108 108 0% 2 7 24 24 0% 2 0.10 2.00 2.00 10.00 1 1 48 12 312 0 1 32 9 297 1 0.50 0 8 2 125 1 4 35 0.60 0.4 7.00 3.00 10.00 13.00 3 16.00 4 Bahawalpur 47 154,736 96,666 58,070 62% 5 Bahawalnagar 37 97,708 69,851 27,857 71% 6 D.G. Khan 19 72,772 33,954 38,925 47% 7 Rajanpur 5 15,524 11,475 4,049 74% 8 Malakand 13 44,583 23,283 21,300 52% 9 Mardan 9 16,086 7,746 8,340 48% 10 Charsada 2 2,721 1,400 1,321 51% 11 Swat 1 2,849 1,190 1,659 42% 12 Sawabi 15 55,191 36,474 18,717 66% 2,166 80 2,086 2,008 78 4% 619 616 3 0% 217 214 3 1% 15 0.10 1.00 0.7 14.00 0.50 14.50 14.50 4 59 14 536

1 Badin 6 26,044 9,775 16,268 38% 56 10 46 18 6 22 61% 25 14 11 44% 13 7 6 46% 13 7 6 46% 6 0.70 0.70 329 329 100% 4 4 577 2 575 100% 2 105 32 73 70% 49 1 34 12 22 65% 8 1

2 Mir Pur Khas 1 4,033 810 3,223 20%

620 83 537 167 118 252 69%

269 191 78 29%

84 54 30 36% 5 10 0.07

0 2.00 2.00 2 4.00 0 0 94 57 1,169 3.00 3.00 4 7.00 4.00 4.00 2 5.70 3 3.00 0 3 65

0.50 0.5 0.80 1.70 2.50 1 3.80

1 1 5 -

S.No. Name of District No. of LSOs Total H/H of District No. of Organized H/H in District No. of unorganized H/H of District %age of Organized H/H District Number of member organizations in LSO Total No. of VDOs Total COs No. of Male Cos No. of Women COs No. of Mix COs % Women and Mix COs in LSO LSO General Body members Total Men Women Women membership %age in GB LSO Executive Body Members Total Men Women Women membership %age in EB LSO Leaders Trained No. of Paid Staff Governance fund Amount Transferred (million) Use of Governance fund As Endowment fund (fix deposit) Rs Million Monthly Income from Fix Deposit As Credit Revolving fund Rs Million Benefficary H/hs Financial grant from NRSP Benefficary H/hs Management LSO Registration status No. of VRPs contracted Total Paid workers Number of Cos to be formed/reactiviated by VRPs

111

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

13 Kotli 19 39,303 27,487 11,816 70%

14 Sudhnoti 4 6,517 4,875 1,642 75%

15 Muzaffarabad 29 71,114 50,113 23,101 70%

16 Bagh 19 55,611 30,413 25,198 55%

17 Poonch 25 47,632 27,445 20,187 58%

18 Hatian Bala 7 23,965 12,046 8,269 50%

19 Neelum 6 16,583 11,704 4,879 71%

20 Rawalpindi 24 51,193 30,280 20,913 59%

21 Jhelum 3 9,457 3,490 5,967 37%

22 Attock 19 53,904 24,268 29,636 45%

23 Chakwal 17 44,447 19,286 25,167 43%

24 Bhakar 10 41,857 21,949 19,908 52%

1,845 194 1,651 527 593 531 68% 151 84 67 44% 67 43 24 36% 5 14 0.16 0.55 2.00 12.00 12.00 2.00 2.00 0 7 36 37 587 12.00 7 9 45 36 756 2 30 30 243 5 2 18 10 114 7 5 46 41 184 1.32 0.30 1.33 347 211 136 39% 80 335 201 134 40% 82 193 113 80 41% 40 64 36 28 44% 51 85 59 26 31% 28 1,204 678 526 44% 1,124 633 491 44% 471 257 214 45% 140 94 46 33% 356 256 100 28% 639 350 289 45% 218 118 100 46% 1 67 1.89 7.67 2.00 2.00 2.00 7 95 60 1,767 9 3 105 59 46 44% 24 18 6 25% 3

269 23 246 130 83 33 47%

2,564 366 2,198 889 695 614 60%

1,870 160 1,710 797 769 144 53%

1,426 128 1,298 415 639 244 68%

352 50 302 149 110 43 51%

573 52 521 306 215 41%

1,346 171 1,175 350 566 259 70%

203 44 159 105 35 19 34%

1,550 149 1,401 659 716 26 53% 499 225 274 55% 216 117 99 46% 5 1.33 1.31 3.08 3.08 3.08 41 624

1,147 85 1,062 499 462 101 53% 352 208 144 41% 102 73 29 28% 51 30 0.84 2.6 2.63 2.63 2.63 51 53 474

1,249 101 1,148 451 596 101 61% 249 162 87 35% 88 64 24 27% 1 6.00 3.47

955 499 456 48%

298 164 134 45% 78 69

0.57 4.65

4.00

4.00

4.00 9 29 24 209

12.0 12.0

3.47 3 6.07 49 10 294

0 4 117 107

S.No. Name of District No. of LSOs Total H/H of District No. of Organized H/H in District No. of unorganized H/H of District %age of Organized H/H District Number of member organizations in LSO Total No. of VDOs Total COs No. of Male Cos No. of Women COs No. of Mix COs % Women and Mix COs in LSO LSO General Body members Total Men Women Women membership %age in GB LSO Executive Body Members Total Men Women Women membership %age in EB LSO Leaders Trained No. of Paid Staff Governance fund Amount Transferred (million) Use of Governance fund As Endowment fund (fix deposit) Rs Million Monthly Income from Fix Deposit As Credit Revolving fund Rs Million Benefficary H/hs Financial grant from NRSP Benefficary H/hs Management LSO Registration status No. of VRPs contracted Total Paid workers Number of Cos to be formed/reactiviated by VRPs

1,234

12

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

S.No. Name of District No. of LSOs Total H/H of District No. of Organized H/H in District No. of unorganized H/H of District %age of Organized H/H District Total

27 Gawadar 11 29,025 8,603 12,585 30%

28 Kech 25 57,791 30,440 27,351

29 punjgur 14 31,437 16,872 14,565 54%

30 Awaran 5 10,391 8,232 2,159 79%

406 1,127,071 647,833 468,183 57%

108 565 471 104

378 10 368 155 206 7 58%

811 140 671 252 340 79 62%

406 58 348 160 176 12 54%

32,493 3236 29,365 11,257 16,412 2836 66%

229 143 86 38% 514 228

295 165 130 44%

86 56 30 35%

13,413 6,816 7,339 55%

60 46 14 23% 135 59 4 0.65 0 1.07 2.00 3.07 0.84 0.84 2 3.07 3 2 15 0.20

99 68 31 31% 3

45 32 13 29% -

4485 2390 2289 51% 495 251 27.53

25 26 Mianwali Khushab 6 7 20,400 21,896 12,490 14,436 7,910 5,680 61% 66% Number of member organizations in LSO Total 563 807 No. of VDOs 33 40 Total COs 530 767 No. of Male Cos 210 292 No. of Women COs 213 394 No. of Mix COs 107 81 % Women and Mix COs in LSO 60% 62% LSO General Body members Total 443 459 Men 307 251 Women 136 208 Women membership %age in GB 31% 45% LSO Executive Body Members Total 106 439 Men 73 170 Women 33 269 Women membership %age in EB 31% 61% LSO Leaders Trained 1 No. of Paid Staff 3 Governance fund Amount Transferred (million) 5.00 4.00 Use of Governance fund 1 0 As Endowment fund (fix deposit) Rs Million 2.25 0.62 Monthly Income from Fix Deposit 2.60 As Credit Revolving fund Rs Million 4.85 0.62 Benefficary H/hs 1 Financial grant from NRSP 4.85 1.46 Benefficary H/hs Management 2 LSO Registration status No. of VRPs contracted 48 28 Total Paid workers 12 4 3 88 3 168 197 766 8 8 15 9 2 5 5 296

57.92 32.94 90.86 33 118.96 0 55 1,137 539 11,886

Number of Cos to be formed/reactiviated by VRPs

13

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Gender and Development


Gender Mainstreaming Policy NRSPs Board of Directors approved the Gender Mainstreaming Policy in its 36th meeting on Sep 28, 2004 and advised NRSP to operationalize the Policy immediately. The Policy document evolved out of serious deliberations by the NRSP management. The draft document was prepared on the basis of organizational experience spread over 12 years. Before presenting it to the Board of Directors it was widely shared with the regional and sectoral professionals of NRSP. The draft was revised several times to attain a widely shared and owned document incorporating feedback and comments received as a result of regional consultations. NRSPs Vision of Gender Mainstreaming NRSP has identified gender as a crosscutting theme. This requires that gender be integrated into policy planning, programming, implementation and evaluation of activities. NRSP believes that its efforts to reduce poverty cannot achieve their full potential unless the organization addresses the constraints that limit the capabilities of men and women to improve their standard of living and quality of life. Key aspects of this are: 1) Recognizing and harnessing the full potential of rural men and women 2) Increasing their productive capacity 3) Reducing barriers, which limit mens and womens participation in society. NRSP acknowledges Gender Mainstreaming a means of consciously raising the visibility and support to womens contributions to poverty alleviation. This is different from assuming that women will benefit equally from gender- neutral development intervention. The Guiding Principles of NRSPs Gender Policy are as follows: Gender Integration: NRSP realizes that addressing gender inequality as a crosscutting theme requires that womens views, perceptions, needs and aspirations shape the development agenda as much as those of men. Diversity and Intersection: Gender equality requires recognition that every policy, program and project affects women and men differently. Partnership between men and women: Partnership between men and women is inevitable to enlarge choices. It involves working with men and women to bring about changes in attitudes, behavior, roles and responsibilities at home, in the workplaces, communities and the society at large. Empowerment: Empowerment enables women and men to identify unequal power relations and unequal access to and control over resources and the implications of unequal power relations for a prosperous society. Empowerment begins with consciousness raising and leads to self-realization. Gender Equality/Equity: an effort to promote sustainable humane development Achieving gender equality does not mean that women become the same as men. Rather, it is a conscious effort to ensure that ones rights or opportunities do not depend on being male or female. NRSP is aware that its efforts and contributions to poverty reduction must be coupled with actions to eliminate gender inequalities in order to promote sustainable humane development. The Goal and Objectives of NRSPs Gender Mainstreaming Policy: to support the achievement of humane governance in order to reduce poverty and ensure sustainable humane development. From this goal, NRSP derives the following Objectives: To integrate gender equality concerns into policies, planning, programming, implementation and evaluation of activities in all areas. To develop institutional mechanisms (organizational structures, culture) and sector specific strategies to carry forward the gender integration process. To establish linkages with other RSPs, and governmental and non- governmental organizations striving to achieve gender equality.

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Organisational Gender Diagnosis by Oxfam Novib of NRSP Regional, sector heads, MER and HR Professionals were invited for a collaborative institutional workshop on the 29th and 30th of January 2008 to incorporate their input, in terms of of approach and methodology. The above mentioned workshop is part of an Organisational Gender Diagnosis being carried out by Oxfam Novib of its partner organizations. Since all its EQ projects are phasing out therefore before winding up its EQ projects and activities, Oxfam Novib has planned a quick assessment of the gender related achievements of its partner organisations during this period. The purpose is to find out about ...What is achieved and what needs to be done? The main objective of this exercise will be to find out what kind of support systems and mechanisms are in place for mainstreaming gender within the organisations, and whether or not these systems are in practice. Different Gender Analytical tools to identify weak and strong areas will be used, in order to achieve the ultimate objective of acquiring gender mainstreaming at all levels.(The resource persons for this workshop were Shama Dossa and the Gender Focal Person Oxfam Novib) the workshops were coordinated by Gender & Development Unit at the NRSP Head Office Level. (Gender audit carried by NRSP GAD and was also shared with Oxfam Novib along with other necessary material e.g TheGender Mainstreaming Policy etc. Women Inclusion Interventions After doing a thorough analysis of trends region wise and sector wise, reviews of the Gender Mainstreaming Policy of NRSP, projects and programme activities, field visits of all the regions and carrying out a gender analysis, the conclusion was reached that interventions being carried out currently in NRSPs programme and project areas i.e adult literacy, teacher training, TBAs, enterprise development etc. are well thought out, realistic and need based. Therefore a work plan and budget was submitted to the CEO NRSP which was approved instantly. A budget of more than 59 million was approved to carry out the above mentioned interventions. Building in house capacity of gender trainers in RSPs. RSPN initiated a Training of Trainers (ToT) from Sep2008. It was a 6 month long training programme where NRSP, SRSP and PRSP staff (selected) participated. The ToT module was designed by a consultant of International repute and the ToT went through different stages, which were: Sept 1. Step 2. 7- day gender training (on different concepts of gender and development). 2- day gender training facilitated by ShIzreh for SRSP core staff observed by the ToT participants from SRSP. Step 3. 2-day training by ShIzreh for NRSP regional and district managers observed by the ToT participants from NRSP. Step 4. 2-day training by each ToT groups (RSP wise) observed by Shazreh Hussain accompanied with feed back. 3 men and 1 woman was nominated from NRSP.

The above mentioned Training of Trainers has enabled NRSP to have the inhouse capacity to train its staff according to international standards. The selection of male trainers was a conscience effort by the GAD Section (NRSP Head Office) in order to render the training more effective by creating ownership by the men staff and community members. Below is an update of GAD activities:

Male 301

Female 179

Total 480

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Microfinance & Enterprise Development Programme


The Community Organizations (COs) fostered by NRSP prepare Micro Investment Plans. Members prepare household-level MIPs and the CO prepares a group Micro Investment Plan. An analysis of the MIPs shows that while the COs as grassroots institutions are generally interested in carrying out social sector projects such as schools, roads, and drinking water and sanitation schemes, individual members are most interested in carrying out income-enhancing activities. This usually requires training or financial capital sometimes both to begin or expand an income generating activity. NRSP has created a programme of skills enhancement and a credit line to meet these householdlevel needs. MEDP primary role is to ensure that the credit funds are available to the poor households through the COs. The sections other major responsibilities include developing information systems that help assess the efficiency, out-reach capability, repayment behaviors and financial viability of the programme. Credit Package & Ceiling NRSP does not have a preconceived package, although credit is provided only for productive activities. This encourages the COs to utilize natural resources and human capital. These productive activities typically include: Agricultural inputs; seeds, fertilizer, pesticide etc. Livestock Small business/enterprise development Lift irrigation, land-leveling and other productive infrastructure Based on its extensive experience NRSP regulates the credit ceiling for different activities and different Regions. Thus the ceiling for the first time borrower is Rs. 10,000. However, the Regions are allowed to set different ceilings for different areas and COs to a maximum of Rs. 30,000. NRSP attempts to keep the credit size at the lowest possible limit so that the credit programme covers the maximum number of poor households and the risk to those households is minimized. Credit Appraisal. Because the COs are primarily responsible for assessing the character of intended borrowers, it is the CO which assesses the credit worthiness of CO members applying for a loan. The CO submits the loan application to NRSP in the form of a Resolution, which must be signed by at least 75% of the CO members. The CO undertakes the responsibility of verifying the proper utilization of the loan and its repayment. The SOs appraises the credit requests and July seek help from other professional staff, for example Engineers, if the Resolution requires a technical feasibility study. Collateral. NRSP extends micro credit to economically marginal men and women who have no material collateral. The COs, however, exert social pressure in case of loan default. Because each loan request is signed by at least 75% of the CO members, each member acts as a guarantor for all other members. To facilitate the COs and their members in the repayment of their loans in difficult times, NRSP encourages the COs to practice regular savings before requesting a loan. However, to ensure that this does not discourage the poorest CO members, the ceilings for mandatory savings are flexible. Saving and Internal Lending. The habit of saving is a prerequisite for CO membership, as is regular attendance in the fortnightly meetings. Once the members savings (which are deposited in a bank account in the name of the CO) reach a substantial amount, the process of internal lending begins with the unanimous will of the CO. The CO then forms a credit committee, which appraises the loan requests. The CO extends credit to its members from its saving pool on its own terms and conditions. NRSP trains the COs in accounting and financial management. Enterprise Development. NRSP facilitates the COs in developing new enterprises and improving existing ones through its Vocational Training Programme (VTP) and Natural Resource Management Programme. As part of the VTP, the CO members are trained in business development and financial management.

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Separation of the Micro Credit Programme from Social Mobilization. In order to improve the quality of COs and the loan portfolio, it was decided in 2003 to make structural changes in the micro credit assessment, delivery and recovery model. A new social mobilization and credit delivery scheme has been introduced. Finalised after a successful pilot test, its principles are derived from the Urban Poverty Alleviation Programme (UPAP). Credit Appraisal in the New Model. The appraisal process in the new model focuses on assessing the character and trustworthiness of intended clients. Previously, NRSPs appraisal process focused primarily on the financial feasibility of the proposed activity and the COs guarantee. However, NRSP has learned from experience that the character of a client plays a greater role in his or her repayment performance than his or her ability to generate a profit from the business or activity for which the loan is taken. Character assessment includes whether the client is honest and responsible, as well as confirmation of his or her whereabouts. Two independent appraisals are conducted. The Field Worker (FW) collects CO Resolutions for rural credit in the CO meeting and then carries out an appraisal at the home of the intended client. This is called Social Appraisal because it focuses on confirming the whereabouts of the client and on his or her character. The second appraisal, referred to as a Technical Appraisal, is done by the Credit Officer, who confirms the accuracy of all the information collected by the Field Worker during the Social Appraisal. The Credit Officer also checks the financial viability of the proposed activity. The Credit Officer gets help from the Engineer or other specialists such as the enterprise development staff, if required. In both appraisals, however, the focus remains on the assessment of the potential clients behavior and reputation for honesty. This double appraisal at the household level helps the NRSP staff get to know the borrower and lets his or her family members know about the clients obligations to NRSP. The FW is not authorized to reject a credit application on his/her own. That decision lies with the Senior Credit Officer (SCO). If the Field Worker and Credit Officer disagree, the SCO makes the decision, after hearing both opinions. Principles of Recovery Monitoring. Recovery monitoring is the most important process in the new system. The new system requires daily recovery planning. This requires the preparation of daily recovery targets based on the due date of each installment. In the new model, the SCOs primary duty is to develop daily monitoring reports and to ensure that a client who does not pay his or her installment on time is reminded of the obligation to repay. It is the SCOs responsibility to focus on finding ways and means of ensuring timely recovery. Recovering amounts due is the responsibility of the credit unit and they should make every effort to ensure payment. They must also understand clearly they are not allowed to link the recovery of credit with assessments of the quality of the COs. Characteristics of Credit Staff. The model recognizes the importance of on-the-job training and monitoring to build staff capacity. The FWs are the front line workers responsible for maintaining close contact with the COs and their members. This requires a large number of honest and responsible FWs who can meet all the COs and their members. The FWs must be a local, trustworthy person. The Credit Officer must guide the FWs. The SCO must be able to train and monitor a large cadre of FWs and Credit Officers. In the new model, once a Social Organizer helps people to form a CO, and a credit request is initiated, the credit process from that point on is in the hands of the Credit Officer and the CO and its members. This means that the Social Organizer is free to concentrate on other activities, including health and education, training and natural resource management, as the CO requires. Village Branches. So that FWs have frequent contact with community members, one-room Village Branches (VBs) are established by the SCO at appropriate locations, typically at the centre of one or more Union Councils. The location and number of VBs in a Union Council is determined by the size and proximity of the potential clientele. The VB is the smallest administrative unit responsible for coordinating with the COs and their members on a daily basis. It is also a recovery-collection hub. The FWs and the Credit Officer keep the VB open during office hours according to a fixed schedule, which is posted in the office. According to this schedule, the FWs allocates time for CO meetings, recovery follow up, and appraisals and recovery collection. The Credit Officer monitors the FW in this respect. The SCO arranges periodic surprise visits to ensure proper office procedures and compliance with the agreed schedule. The FWs degree of mobility depends on the type of terrain and the settlement pattern. In areas with high population density, the FW visits COs

17

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

and clients on foot, and in areas where the population is scattered the FW is provided with a motorcycle. Women FWs work only in areas that have a high population density. For areas with smaller populations, the Social Organizers will continue providing credit services. Women credit officers will have vehicles at their disposal to ensure they reach far flung areas, except in densely populated areas, where they will travel on foot. Application of the New Model Currently, the new model is operating in the Hyderabad, Badin, Mardan, Malakand and Rawalpindi Regions. Current reports are showing the following outcomes: the entire staff has become more authorized on doing the assigned work in a planned manner the credit staff is implementing all credit activities systematically the social organization process has accelerated the SOs do not feel overworked despite forming a larger number of COs disbursements have increased considerably repayments have improved significantly and all new loans are showing 100% recovery It is important to note that the changes are in the management structure only: the principles and the structure of the credit programme remain the same. For example, the service charge, repayment schedules and credit ceilings are the same. Credit only goes to individuals, as is the case in the existing programme. The CO still initiates the request for credit and its members benefit from it. The concept of social pressure through group formation still prevails, because the credit is given on the recommendation of the CO, which also undertakes the responsibility for repayment. Principles of the New Credit System. A set of principles embodies internal checks and balances to ensure that the new model complies with established policies and procedures. These principles and procedures mean that the Rural Credit programme will be fully independent of social mobilization. Internal Controls. In the new set up, the Credit MIS is not accessible to Credit Officers or Field Workers. The accounting staff reports directly to the Regional General Manager and to Finance and Accounts at the head office. However, in order to ensure the correct posting of data in the MIS, the Credit Officers are authorized to check the daily posting from the receipts. The other principles are: that CO formation and credit delivery are two distinct processes which must take place independently of each other. that only those COs should have access to the rural credit programme which are recognized by the Rural Credit section as viable institutions. For this purpose, the Rural Credit section will register the COs with NRSP, rather than the person who formed the CO. that the credit should always reach the intended client, who must acknowledge receipt of credit from NRSP that the staff responsible for credit should be able to focus exclusively on credit operations and should be able to implement a strategy that leads to 100%, on-time recovery that the organizational structure, such as location of offices and staffing patterns, should make it possible to pursue clients effectively that the entire process should be more transparent that all credit disbursement and recovery activities should be implemented in a planned manner that the system should allow performance-evaluation of staff on the basis of predefined criteria. For example, the SOs will be evaluated on the quality and performance of the COs they form, and the credit staff on the credit outreach and the quality of the loan portfolio.

18

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 8a: MEDP Progress Overview as of July, 2011 Total Disbursement (Rs.) Agriculture (Rs.) Livestock (Rs.) Enterprise (Rs.) S.I.I.E (Rs.) No. of Loans Men Women Agriculture Men Women Livestock Men Women Enterprise Development Men Women Small Infrastructure Individual Enterprise (SIIE) Men Women Beneficiary COs * Men Women Mixed No. of Active Loans Receivable From COs (Rs.) Recovery Rate No of Covered Districts No. of Districts in which MEDP is Operational Attock, Badin, Bagh, Bhakkar, Chakwal, D.G. Khan, Gujrat, Gwadar, Hyderabad, ICT, Jhang, Jhelum, Khushab, Kotli, Mardan, Mianwali, Mirpurkhas, Muzaffarabad, Nowshera, Peshawar, Poonch, Rahim Yar Khan, Rajanpur, Rawalpindi, Sargodha, Sudhnati, Swabi, Tando ohd Khan, Thatta & Turbat, (NRSP- Bank Districts: Bahawalnagar, Bahawalpur, Khanewal, Lodhran, Multan, Pak Pattan, Sahiwal, Tando Allah Yar, Toba Tek ingh, Vehari, Shaheed Benazirabad & Matiari
* It includes Credit Groups

46,894,428,843 31,043,492,801 6,831,237,046 8,906,446,480 113,252,516 2,991,647 2,266,999 724,648 1,853,158 1,798,259 54,899 499,235 238,484 260,751 633,482 225,253 408,229 5,772 5,003 769 173,528 80,727 88,890 3,911 205,064 2,870,843,451 99.1% 59

42 (NRSP=30 + Bank=12)

19

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 8b: No. of Loans by Type till July, 2011


Men % 97% 48% 36% 87% 76% Women 54,899 260,751 408,229 769 724,648 % 3% 52% 64% 13% 24% Total 1,853,158 499,235 633,482 5,772 2,991,647

Agriculture Inputs Livestock Development Enterprise Development SIIE Total

1,798,259 238,484 225,253 5,003 2,266,999

Table 8c: Active Loans and Receivable from COs


Districts
Rawalpindi/ICT Attock Chakwal Jhelum Khushab Bhakkar Mianwali Bahawalpur Sahiwal Rahim Yar Khan D.G. Khan Rajanpur Malakand Urban-Malakand Charsadda Mardan-Malakand Swabi Swat Rawalakot Kotli Bagh Muzaffarabad Badin Thatta Hyderabad ILO-Hyderabad Urban-Hyderabad Matiari Mirpurkhas Turbat Malakand Murabaha Mardan Murabaha Swabi Murabaha BRDP (Bahawalpur) Mardan Sialkot Total Shaded areas closed regions

Active Loans Men


4,829 1,141 2,006 2,326 1,906 7,197 6 15,596 291 14,429 5,797 10,913 420 3,709 578 31 4,980 1,178 1,706 78 1,768 4,203 3,644 12 81 479 89,304

Women
7,098 12,942 5,966 12,551 26,073 5,286 15,804 1,914 15 1,701 3,087 1,914 29 1,422 55 849 593 1,164 1,420 621 12,100 2,351 793 12 115,760

Total
11,927 14,083 7,972 14,877 27,979 12,483 15,810 17,510 306 16,130 8,884 12,827 449 5,131 578 86 5,829 1,771 1,164 3,126 699 13,868 6,554 4,437 24 81 479 205,064

Receivable from COs


130,090,719 141,484,898 86,675,046 155,415,046 276,972,851 155,507,853 177,521,482 309,976,520 2,464,276 408,160,956 189,451,173 271,308,601 2,091,586 57,223,674 4,717,881 13,977,772 50,706,307 14,214,375 8,928,423 45,583,172 7,365,870 170,397,527 123,012,908 60,398,216 270,105 583,941 6,342,273 2,870,843,451

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 8d: Credit Disbursement by type till July, 2011


Type of Credit Agriculture Inputs Livestock Development Enterprise Development SIIE Total Men
30,444,631,885 3,307,976,946 3,288,529,705 99,884,666 37,141,023,202

Amount (Rs.) Women


598,860,916 3,523,260,100 5,617,916,775 13,367,850 9,753,405,641

Total
31,043,492,801 6,831,237,046 8,906,446,480 113,252,516 46,894,428,843

Average Loan Size (Rs.)


16,743 13,643 14,007 19,641 15,658

Table 8e: Credit Disbursement by District till July, 2011 Districts Rawalpindi/ICT Attock Chakwal Jhelum Khushab Bhakkar Mianwali Bahawalpur Sahiwal Rahim Yar Khan D.G. Khan Rajanpur Malakand Urban-Malakand Charsadda Mardan-Malakand Swabi Swat Rawalakot Kotli Bagh Muzzafarabad Badin Thatta Hyderabad ILO-Hyderabad Urban-Hyderabad Matiari Mirpurkhas Turbat
Malakand Murabaha Mardan Murabaha Swabi Murabaha

By the end of June 2011


1,010,472,675 1,304,795,236 824,130,482 1,070,236,500 1,859,038,269 1,751,085,933 1,049,337,000 16,030,472,420 7,314,319,600 2,601,844,083 2,389,873,010 2,376,270,000 547,178,900 278,926,725 302,898,730 1,128,059,930 246,790,000 137,748,000 163,886,035 543,017,350 161,318,000 105,993,000 460,237,041 130,839,100 322,133,000 1,005,800 782,922,000 952,519,000 363,322,732 125,679,100 3,535,450 14,198,208 13,075,416 12,930,500 34,571,418 158,727,200 46,573,387,843

During July-2011
22,747,000 19,095,000 14,446,000 24,883,000 54,277,000 37,749,000 38,596,000 28,648,000 13,074,000 26,140,000 3,740,000 9,470,000 3,471,000 3,375,000 1,181,000 4,962,000 14,345,000 842,000 321,041,000

Total
1,033,219,675 1,323,890,236 838,576,482 1,095,119,500 1,913,315,269 1,788,834,933 1,087,933,000 16,030,472,420 7,314,319,600 2,630,492,083 2,402,947,010 2,402,410,000 547,178,900 278,926,725 302,898,730 1,128,059,930 246,790,000 137,748,000 167,626,035 552,487,350 164,789,000 105,993,000 463,612,041 132,020,100 327,095,000 1,005,800 797,267,000 952,519,000 364,164,732 125,679,100 3,535,450 14,198,208 13,075,416 12,930,500 34,571,418 158,727,200 46,894,428,843

Bahawalpur-BRDP Mardan Sialkot Total


Shaded areas closed regions.

21

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Micro Health Insurance Program


General The Hospital and Accidental Death insurance scheme, launched in November 2005 in partnership with the Adamjee Insurance Company, was designed for the RSPs CO members. The terms and conditions of the insurance scheme were negotiated by RSPN. According to the agreement, NRSP collects the premium and the insurance claims from its CO members and submits them to Adamjee, which then processes the claims and makes payments to the insured CO members through NRSP. The health insurance compensation has an upper limit of Rs. 25,000, which includes in-patient hospitalization expenses incurred due to illness or accidental injury. The life insurance policy, which also has ceiling of Rs. 25,000, is applicable in case of death or permanent disablement resulting from accidental bodily injury. Each client pays an annual fee of Rs. 250 (including a Rs 42 service charge) and is limited to the individual policy holder (i.e. it does not extend to other family members). At the end of first year of micro insurance programme NRSP analyzed the insurance programme, based on the feedback from the field teams. The analysis showed that the majority of the claims were for less than Rs 15,000. The revised programme, designed to increase client coverage, has the following features: the cost of the premium has been reduced to Rs 100 the coverage includes funeral expenses for death from natural causes. Revised Insurance Agreement: Linking the hospitalization and accidental death insurance with the micro credit programme NRSP signed a direct agreement with Adamjee Insurance Company in January, 2006. Under this agreement NRSP loan clients and their spouses both have separate benefits of hospitalization limits up to Rs. 15,000 and in case of accidental death or disability they have coverage of Rs. 15,000. In addition to this an additional grant up to Rs. 15,000 in case of natural death of loan client as safety for the outstanding credit balance and funeral charges. Since July 2008 child birth is also covered in the policy having a sub limit of Rs 7500/All NRSP loan clients between 18 and 65 years are eligible for this insurance policy. The premium payable to Adamjee per loan client and his /her spouse for per policy period is Rs. 100/. This premium is embedded in the credit processing fee. The agreement stipulates that the insurance is to be for the maximum of 12 months. Insurance cover starts from the date of the credit cheque. Micro Health Insurance for Entire Family a new addition in the policy Keeping in view the success of the Micro insurance Programme, NRSP and Adamjee moved ahead and revised the existing micro insurance agreement in July 2009. According to the revised agreement all family members of credit client (includes spouse and children up to 18 years) can avail insurance facility with in the existing premium of Rs 100/-. This facility of family insurance cover is applicable from 1st August 2009. With the inclusion of family coverage in the policy without increase in the premium amount, the policy is become more beneficial and attractive for the loan clients. As mentioned earlier there is no separate premium for family however; following are the benefits. Each family member is covered for Rs. 15,000 which includes all in hospital charges and day care treatment Earning member of the family who is also head of the household (and availed loan) also covered for the accidental death, permanent disability up to the limit of Rs 15,000/Funeral expenses for credit client only in case of natural death for Rs 15,000/-

22

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Key Features of Micro Insurance Product The insurance product has the following main features: Part of regular Micro Finance activities carried out by NRSP therefore has a big reach Administration cost factored into the premium Wide range coverage of community organization in all programme areas. Health education workshops Claims processing co-ordinated by a NRSP facilitator and monitored by Medical officers MIS which helps in analyzing the claim data for product and programme innovations; Speedy claims settlement (20 to 25 days); Regular feedback collected from the NRSP members regarding the product and its significance, during community organization meetings Main Achievements Following are the main achievements of the micro insurance programme Out reach increased Cost negotiated Inclusion of new benefits Child birth coverage Transportation cost reimbursement Entire family coverage Condition of 24 hospitalization has been waived off and now day care treatment is also covered Table 9: Micro Insurance Progress as of July, 2011 Total # of Person Insured Total # of Insurance Cases Total # of Beneficries Men Women Premium Collected (Rs.) Total # of Claims received at HO Claims Approved Claims in verification process Claims Rejected Claims Reimbursed to the Clients Amount Reimbursed (Rs.)
*Note: Adjusted figures are incorporated

1,736,626 2,183,363 3,605,077 2,289,629 1,315,448 274,040,990 15,517 12,749 1,184 1,584 12,749 129,492,485

Table 9a: Insurnace Clients(Dependents Included) as of July, 2011


Region Turbat Mardan RY Khan Rawalpindi AJ&K Mianwali Badin DG Khan Bahawalpur Grand Total Insurnace Clients(Dependents Included) 3,755 118,199 39,760 107,438 50,220 268,336 142,175 60,849 945,894 1,736,626

23

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 9b: Region wise insurance cases and premium collected as of July, 2011
Region Turbat Mardan RY Khan Rawalpindi AJK Mianwali Hyderabad DG Khan Bahawalpur Grand Total Insurance Cases Male Female Total Cases Premium collected Male Dependents Female Total Beneficries

1,978 107,701 82,927 53,450 31,272 69,411 44,369 121,486 1,175,085 1,687,679

1,493 23,198 10,423 64,306 15,030 217,621 71,923 39,045 52,645 495,684

3,471 130,899 93,350 117,756 46,302 287,032 116,292 160,531 1,227,730 2,183,363

708,610 16,702,260 13,375,880 15,087,490 5,966,910 34,226,450 13,994,750 18,406,700 155,571,940 274,040,990

233 557 9,218 14,990 5,993 110,546 84,297 7,966 368,150 601,950

208 265 11,652 11,859 6,061 34,853 58,545 1,478 694,843 819,764

3,912 131,721 114,220 144,605 58,356 432,431 259,134 169,975 2,290,723 3,605,077

Table 9c: Amount Reimbursed against claims as of July, 2011


Claims Detail Region Turbat Mardan RY Khan Rawalpindi AJ&K Mianwali Badin DG Khan Bahawalpur Grand Total Claims Processed 130 792 523 407 332 2,090 1,418 631 9,194 15,517 Claim Reimbursed 85 644 427 314 235 1,607 1,022 499 7,916 12,749 Claim Rejected 45 148 79 37 83 432 310 115 335 1,584 Claims in verification process(NRSP & Admjee) 17 56 14 51 86 17 943 1,184 Claim Paid to clients 85 644 427 314 235 1,607 1,022 499 7,916 12,749 Amount Reimbursed 1,096,456 5,750,443 5,251,284 3,461,233 2,064,061 17,220,966 10,032,137 5,823,241 78,792,664 129,492,485

Percent Re-imbursed (Total Amount paid to clients/Total Premium Collected)


155% 160% 110% 60% 10% 40% 34% 39% 23% 35% 50% 72% 32% 51% 47%

24

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Urban Poverty Alleviation Project (UPAP)


UPAP began its operations in Sep 1996 in the urban and peri-urban areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad. Since then it has been testing various strategies and adopting the best ones to cope with the field realities. Having successfully established UPAP as a micro credit delivery model, NRSP decided to initiate UPAP operations in some of Pakistans major cities. The first expansions were in Faisalabad and Karachi in 2002. The programme has since expanded to Multan. UPAP establishes low cost settlement offices and disburses credit to women using the solidarity group method. Three or more women can form a group. The credit facility can be used for family enterprises. Men can also use the facility but they must be family members whose income comes into the hands of the borrowers. This strategy saved UPAP from any major incidents of fraud or default. Alongside the solidarity group approach UPAP also adopted the individual approach on the pattern of the Orangi Pilot Project to cater to the needs of small-scale entrepreneurs and manufacturers who do not live in areas where there is a UPAP settlement office. For expansion purposes UPAP has found the solidarity group approach more successful. Women and men living with their families are generally trustworthy. The experience of UPAP reveals people living in its operation areas have both noble and wicked tendencies and either of them is likely to come up depending upon circumstances. It is however noteworthy that only a small minority exists that remained noble or wicked under all circumstances. Thus, UPAP believes any credit disbursement strategy is likely to succeed which ensures effective supervision and pursuance of borrowers. This can be done through regular monitoring and by developing a relationship of respect with the community. The recovery rate of UPAP so far testifies to this belief. The Objectives of UPAP are: To improve the quality of life of disadvantaged and low income people To develop an indigenous model of poverty alleviation in the urban areas of Pakistan To provide the urban poor, focusing on women but not excluding men, with access to credit To alleviate poverty of low-income households by organizing women, encouraging them to save and increasing their access to resources through credit To create income generating self-employment opportunities for women To explore the possibility of establishing a specialized bank based on the experience of the pilot project CREDIT DISBURSEMENT APPROACHES Solidarity Group Three or more like-minded women with comparable social and economic conditions form a group. Once a group is formed it meets weekly. During the meeting each group member saves an amount, through cutting her expenditures, equivalent to the weekly recovery installment of the credit amount that she intends to borrow. After five weeks the weekly saving amount is given to one of the members through a draw. Thereafter this process continues. Four weeks after group formation credit is disbursed to one of the women. After the group has ensured that this woman has utilized the credit properly credit is disbursed to another woman. Usually, in each weekly meeting the credit is disbursed to the next member. Individual: Any micro level manufacturer living only where UPAPs settlement office does not exist can take credit on the personal guarantee of an honest and competent client of UPAP. UPAP PROGRAMME MONITORING UPAP has developed an efficient monitoring system. Its MIS developed in Oracle generates number of reports revealing both disbursement and recovery positions on a daily and monthly basis. Monthly staff meetings and daily diary are a regular feature of UPAPs monitoring system. They help bring the staff on the same wavelength regarding programme issues.

25

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 10: UPAP Disbursement and Recovery Data Zone wise as of July, 2011

Zone-2 (Part-1)
Faisalabad 2 3,266 12,315 31,037 404,679,500 417,464,050 357,031,210 60,360,976 71,864 47,648,290 5,937 25,100 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 30,421 6,586 6,368 25,048 100.00% 100.00% 50,364,115 50,270,589 39,554 35,901 70,413,985 59,930,420 73,693,632 65,918 54,055,025 6,843 31,169 100.00% 100.00% 415,901,885 351,070,411 432,528,475 486,355,424 411,036,732 506,288,025 466,266,000 401,341,000 486,583,500 382,289,000 396,270,657 338,414,590 57,811,452 44,615 43,874,410 5,490 24,339 100.00% 99.98% 37,007 31,416 38,012 29,829 11,898 12,160 7,425 10,565 3,170 3,475 2,278 2,737 2,428 7,809 15,119 194,532,000 178,876,849 150,378,186 28,471,695 26,968 44,098,266 5,730 9,384 16 99.92% 100.00% Faisalabad 3 Faisalabad 4 Faisalabad 5 Faisalabad 6 Jhang Lahore 1 3,609 13,138 18,190 261,226,000 267,151,400 226,562,572 40,527,178 61,650 34,223,241 4,205 13,935 99.81% 100.00%

Faisalabad 1

Number of Groups

3,770

Number of Members

14,527

Number of Credit Cases

32,919

Amount Disbursed (Rs.)

416,651,000

Amount Recovered (Rs.)

432,106,776

Principal Recovered (Rs.)

368,941,867

Service Charge Recovered (Rs.)

63,113,291

Excess recovered (Rs.)

51,618

Principal Balance (Rs.)

47,709,133

Current Cases

6,174

Closed Cases

26,745

Expired Cases

Cumulative Recovery Rate

100.00%

On time Collection Rate

100.00%

26

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Zone-2 (Part-2)
Lahore West 3,565 13,056 16,724 224,308,000 221,700,183 187,951,830 33,714,588 33,765 36,356,170 4,529 12,195 1 100.00% 100.00% 99.82% 100.00% 20,908 5,781 4,823 14,166 100.00% 100.00% 48,597,866 40,981,868 34,741 21,931 55,220,517 38,089,209 317,153,188 215,697,632 216,396,100 38,154,024 78,845 41,354,900 4,832 14,517 100.00% 100.00% 372,408,446 253,808,772 254,628,969 366,312,000 256,679,500 257,751,000 26,747 18,989 19,349 32,001 428,593,000 442,733,454 378,392,642 64,276,002 64,810 50,200,358 6,175 25,826 100.00% 100.00% 9,798 15,442 8,119 8,900 2,661 4,026 2,366 2,432 Multan 1 Multan 2 Multan 3 Multan 4 Sub Total Zone-2 42,207 153,521 366,544 4,818,790,500 4,916,646,256 4,190,843,367 725,107,566 695,323 626,733,273 77,992 288,410 17 99.96% 100.00%

Lahore 2

Number of Groups

2,424

Number of Members

8,369

Number of Credit Cases

19,205

Amount Disbursed (Rs.)

271,579,000

Amount Recovered (Rs.)

275,816,519

Principal Recovered (Rs.)

234,422,779

Service Charge Recovered (Rs.)

41,330,597

Excess recovered (Rs.)

63,143

Principal Balance (Rs.)

36,999,042

Current Cases

4,519

Closed Cases
-

14,657

Expired Cases

Cumulative Recovery Rate

99.93%

On time Collection Rate

100.00%

27

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Zone-1

Gujranwala Sargodha Sialkot

Karachi 1 4,201 17,842 27,844 406,788,000 435,589,270 371,188,984 64,343,161 57,125 35,599,016 4,171 25,869 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 99.98% 99.98% 100.00% 40,267 39,569 5,872 6,137 47,174,086 49,311,190 39,777,382 5,126 30,569 100.00% 99.99% 127,572 103,488 59,428 80,989,471 82,311,974 67,868,059 57,011,559 82,158 37,416,602 4,994 25,042 100.00% 100.00% 541,548,303 536,046,031 426,340,618 345,799,898 622,665,346 618,461,493 494,268,105 402,893,615 237,623,396 201,305,340 36,284,406 33,650 45,604,660 6,405 14,179 100.00% 100.00% 588,808,569 585,480,500 466,118,000 383,216,500 246,910,000 30,040 46,167 45,732 35,695 30,036 20,584 11,935 11,492 8,324 14,079 17,546 12,680 9,045 17,864 226,382,000 215,366,886 181,206,427 34,124,953 35,506 45,175,573 5,521 12,343 100.00% 100.00% 3,467 3,405 2,518 3,595 4,128 3,377 2,776

Karachi 2

Rawalpindi 1

Rawalpindi 2

Rawalpindi 3

Rawalpindi 4

Sub Total Zone 1

Grand Total

Number of Groups

3,115

30,582 114,880 278,483 3,586,431,569 3,727,646,086 3,198,899,274 528,173,776 573,036 387,322,836 49,746 228,683 100.00% 100.00%

72,789 268,401 645,027 8,405,222,069 8,644,292,342 7,389,742,641 1,253,281,342 1,268,359 1,014,056,109 127,738 517,093 17 99.98% 100.00%

Number of Members

11,937

Number of Credit Cases

24,521

Amount Disbursed (Rs.)

306,598,000

376,130,000

Amount Recovered (Rs.)

300,230,060

400,547,915

Principal Recovered (Rs.)

253,957,116

341,506,557

Service Charge Recovered (Rs.)


50,589

46,249,424

58,990,769

Excess recovered (Rs.)

23,520

Principal Balance (Rs.)


4,002 23,842 100.00% 100.00%

52,640,884

34,623,443

Current Cases

7,518

Closed Cases

17,003

Expired Cases

Cumulative Recovery Rate

100.00%

On time Collection Rate

100.00%

28

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

NRSP Institute of Rural Management


Human Resource Development (HRD) plays a significant role in the development. Acting as a catalyst, it makes on-going and multi-faceted contributions to increase the overall wealth of the nation. We believe that Skill enhancement is one of the major factors in achieving optimal rural development. The HRD component of the NRSP was established in 1992 to meet the need for capacity building by teaching new skills or by enhancing existing skills and capacities. With the steady growth in its area of operations, HRD has become a highly reputed independent institute: the NRSP Institute of Rural Management (NRSP IRM). IRMs Objectives are To enhance peoples productivity and to consolidate the human capital base to optimize the utilization of labor. To upgrade the technical and managerial skills of rural men and women, so as to increase production and minimize losses. To improve the utilization of local resources and reduce dependency on external resources To build self-confidence. To strengthen village based skills to enhance productivity and increase returns. Training portfolios. In response to the dilemma of human poverty, IRM has been running both staff and community training portfolios. The following programmes are included in the Community Training portfolio: Community management training programme. Vocational training programme. Natural resource management training programme. Enterprise development training programme. Social sector training programme. The Staff training portfolio ensures capacity building through three programmes: Management development training programme, Micro finance training programme and Intern training programme. The Managerial-training programme ensures the level of management skills required for proper functioning of the community organizations. These programmes are led by professionals who have knowledge of the fields, the community issues, and training along with their respective qualification. The Vocational Training Programme, begin in 1997, enhances the technical skills of community members and contributes to self-employment. The Natural Resource Management Training Programme strives for optimal utilization of available resources at the local level and provision of assistance to reduce dependency on external resources. The section provides support to members engaged in agriculture, livestock, poultry, water resource development and management, and forestry and rangeland management. The programme endeavors to develop and strengthen local capabilities for sustainable resource management by preventing losses in natural resources, productivity enhancement and environmental rehabilitation. The Social Sector Training Programme plays a pivotal role by providing training and assistance in health and education. These training programmes are provided in collaboration with governmental and non-governmental institutes and organizations.

29

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update Table 11a: NRSP IRM Programme Level Summary of Community Training. July, 2011
Programme Activities CMTP NRMTP SSTP PITD EDTP Vocational Training Occupational Training Seminar Refreshers Activist Workshops Subject Specialist Workshop Appropriate Technology Exposure Visit Capacity Building Support to LGO 2001 Relief & Rehabilitation SSS Workshops Grand Total Men 71,403 20,555 31,603 15,691 1,364 28,301 2,257 159 7,844 122,191 124,412 160 3,149 19,403 43,096 29,277 520,865 Women 84,926 18,258 20,488 1,105 1,091 30,929 56,812 173 3,681 93,305 83,083 4,111 2,156 7,610 68,457 476,185 Total* 156,329 38,813 52,091 16,796 2,455 59,230 59,069 332 11,525 215,496 207,495 160 7,260 21,559 50,706 97,734 997,050

*Cumulative total since inception ** Other Organizations training figures are not updated after June 30, 2010 Note that the full details of each Training Programme for Staff and Community members are available from Mr. Tahir Khan at NRSP IRM Ph: 051-2822752, Email: info@irm.edu.pk

30

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 11b: IRM Programme Level Summary of Staff Training as of July, 2011
Training Course A/V training Computer Training Computerized Design of DWSS Conflict Management Design & Organization Of Training - DOT Communication & Presentation Skills Institutional Building at the Grassroots ( IDGR ) External Training Film Making Study Visit Gender and Development General Training Office Management/Equipment Training Profile for Achieving Creativity & Techniques ( PACT ) Planing Workshop Participatory Rural Appraisal-PRA Sectoral Training Social Organization Training Time Management Training Need Assessment Training of Trainer Environment & NRM OTW Field Staff OTW Interns OTW Management Team OTW Support Staff Refresher Workshop Finance and Accounts Micro Credit Credit Appraisal & Recovery Techniques (CART) RSP Orientation Training for MCOs of ADBP Credit Appraisal GEF Programme Enterprise Development Programme - EDP Training of Monitors - TOM Sustainable Community Management Seminar & Workshop Social Mobilization Training Community Mobilization Training Write Shop Train The Trainer - TTT OTW (Subject Specific) Social Apprialsal Techniques Training of Trainer (Subject Specific) Calculating Sustanibality Indicators Workshop Executive Diploma in English Language Proficiency First Aid Training Stratagic Human Resource Management Logical Framwork Analysis Monitoring & Evaluation Teacher Training Loan Portfolio Management Operational Risk Management Client Appaisal Techniques Post Graduate Diploma in NGO & Leadership Management Post Graduate Diploma in Human Resource Management Disaster Response Management Training HRD Member Committee Meeting Women Leadership-WLP/YPLP Leadership Management Development Training - LMDT Administration & Logistic Management Project Cycle Management-PCM Developing Core Compentencies(Writing & Speekaing Skills) Driver 1st Aid, Road Safety & Attitudinal Training Master in Rural Development-MRD Career Counseling & Job Hunting Building High Perfomance Team Final Assessment ISO Training Personal & Professional Development Orientation Training Workshop on strategic Development Plans Exposure Visit Total Men 14 378 12 218 13 828 345 44 71 49 778 1,174 195 35 581 120 231 328 79 146 712 56 437 1,626 80 39 3,058 442 337 759 765 17 117 446 74 9 68 1,348 1,281 44 230 11 1,300 21 1,550 18 135 64 6 8 118 2,719 88 55 68 19 7 203 70 219 22 81 130 148 32 18 13 155 6 160 2 20 25,050 Women 1 46 105 6 389 152 22 4 8 458 373 15 18 184 18 69 152 14 85 126 27 201 879 6 2 2,274 23 49 286 375 2 32 12 23 6 19 755 407 7 60 2 341 2 573 1 26 6 3 3 16 2,946 9 6 14 5 6 16 22 136 47 11 21 3 19 12 19 10 43 86 4 8 12,106 Total 15 424 12 323 19 1,217 497 66 75 57 1,236 1,547 210 53 765 138 300 480 93 231 838 83 638 2,505 86 41 5,332 465 386 1,045 1,140 19 149 458 97 15 87 2,103 1,688 51 290 13 1,641 23 2,123 19 161 70 9 11 134 5,665 97 61 82 24 13 219 92 136 266 22 92 151 151 32 37 25 174 16 43 246 6 28 37,156

* Other Organizations training figures are not updated after June 30, 2010

31

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update Table 11c: NRSP IRM Community Training for the month of July, 2011
Programme Activities CMTP VO/LSO Management NRMTP Agriculture Training Commercial Poultry Livestock Management Advance CLEWs SSTP Health & Sanitation TBA Training Teachers Training School Management Skill Training (PESRP) Step-1(2 Days) Vocational Training Civil Surveyor Driving Mobile Set (Cell Phone) Repoaring Grand Total Men 17 17 1,016 1,004 12 54 41 13 62 18 31 13 1,149 Women 3 3 1,277 1,259 18 56 3 32 13 8 1,336 Total 20 20 2,293 1,004 12 1,259 18 110 3 32 54 21 62 18 31 13 2,485

Table 11d: NRSP IRM Total Staff Training for the month of July, 2011
Programme Activities
Training of Trainer Social Mobilization Training Total

Men
415 44 459

Women
7 7

Total
415 51 466

32

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 12: Region wise Summary of Community & Staff Training by type as of July, 2011
H/O

Programme Activities Managerial Training

NRM-A Training

NRM-B Training

NRM Training

Vocational-A Training

Vocational-B Training

Vocational Training

SSS Training

Activist Workshop

Exposure Visits

CPI Training

Disaster Management

SSS Workshops

Total Community Members Trained

Total Staff Trained

No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax Men Women Total No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax Men Women Total No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax No. of Pax (Men) No. of Pax (Women) Total No. of Pax Men Women Total Men Women Total

AJK 7,319 7,522 14,841 2,322 2,405 4,727 10,421 9,769 20,190 12,743 12,174 24,917 5,002 4,022 9,024 641 3,460 4,101 5,643 7,482 13,125 15,184 5,617 20,801 10,461 8,908 19,369 89 108 197 1,251 340 1,591 42,402 7,328 49,730 5,399 7,802 13,201 100,491 57,281 157,772 1,200 371 1,571 1,986 846 2,832

BDN 8,059 2,520 10,579 5,437 8,569 14,006 21,154 7,281 28,435 26,591 15,850 42,441 1,444 1,944 3,388 382 3,781 4,163 1,826 5,725 7,551 230 325 555 17,436 9,452 26,888 372 143 515 2,541 208 2,749 2,203 2,192 4,395 59,258 36,415 95,673 1,358 287 1,645

RWP 12,626 8,046 20,672 2,664 4,077 6,741 9,471 5,406 14,877 12,135 9,483 21,618 3,050 7,971 11,021 632 20,854 21,486 3,682 28,825 32,507 3,077 3,127 6,204 14,448 7,158 21,606 82 12 94 1,538 61 1,599 367 588 955 47,955 57,300 105,255 1,642 615 2,257

TBT 6,948 7,163 14,111 888 659 1,547 10,951 12,027 22,978 11,839 12,686 24,525 753 728 1,481 33 203 236 786 931 1,717 2,631 2,245 4,876 5,343 4,367 9,710 359 150 509 939 116 1,055 594 195 789 9,719 28,148 37,867 39,158 56,001 95,159 513 137 650

DGK 2,879 19,483 22,362 1,369 205 1,574 4,946 23,072 28,018 6,315 23,277 29,592 745 1,405 2,150 97 6,597 6,694 842 8,002 8,844 431 367 798 926 12,246 13,172 112 2,669 2,781 2,881 307 3,188 872 10,136 11,008 15,258 76,487 91,745 285 314 599

RYK 426 426 1 1 149 824 973 150 824 974 158 1 159 158 1 159 2,062 1,645 3,707 1,560 1,560 471 471 4,827 2,470 7,297 260 54 314

MKD 3,250 760 4,010 1,036 199 1,235 5,793 1,426 7,219 6,829 1,625 8,454 2,883 2,654 5,537 280 2,726 3,006 3,163 5,380 8,543 69 69 17,994 1,608 19,602 284 18 302 704 704 832 498 1,330 33,056 9,958 43,014 647 145 792

BWP 6,240 8,750 14,990 3,243 40 3,283 26,872 6,917 33,789 30,115 6,957 37,072 3,234 866 4,100 28 339 367 3,262 1,205 4,467 1,961 2,051 4,012 18,007 93 18,100 89 71 160 3,091 4 3,095 1,222 1,222 62,765 20,353 83,118 1,009 513 1,522

MLI 19,944 18,505 38,449 2,986 1,368 4,354 30,995 12,666 43,661 33,981 14,034 48,015 2,649 6,292 8,941 127 18,411 18,538 2,776 24,703 27,479 3,475 3,842 7,317 30,759 22,183 52,942 752 707 1,459 2,261 69 2,330 100 87 187 9,885 14,830 24,715 103,933 98,960 202,893 1,179 373 1,552

Other* 28,750 17,490 46,240 332 63 395 64 44 108 396 107 503 9,459 4,745 14,204 21 92 113 9,480 4,837 14,317 2,552 1,145 3,697 1,901 26,818 28,719 1,010 233 1,243 14 14 3,041 3,041 44,103 53,671 97,774 14,478 8,338 22,816

Closed 2,209 524 2,733 437 673 1,110 3,596 3,651 7,247 4,033 4,324 8,357 288 1,392 1,680 16 349 365 304 1,741 2,045 55 55 3,515 645 4,160 10,061 7,289 17,350 493 113 606

Total 98,650 90,763 189,413 20,715 18,258 38,973 124,412 83,083 207,495 145,127 101,341 246,468 29,665 32,020 61,685 2,257 56,812 59,069 31,922 88,832 120,754 31,603 20,488 52,091 122,350 93,478 215,828 3,149 4,111 7,260 15,691 1,105 16,796 43,096 7,610 50,706 29,277 68,457 97,734 520,865 476,185 997,050 25,050 12,106 37,156

No. of person trained by N-IRM for other organization after June 2010 are not being reported

33

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Physical Infrastructure and Technology Development (PITD)


NRSPs Physical Infrastructure and Technology Development (PITD) section became operational by the end of 1993. Its purpose is to offer guidance to the COs in technical and construction related initiatives. NRSP acts as an intermediary and facilitates linkages of the COs with donor agencies, including Government Departments, involved in the provision of infrastructure services in rural areas. The Objectives of this section are to: Involve local community members in the identification, planning, execution and monitoring of physical infrastructure schemes. Enhance capacity of local community. Make efficient and productive use of local resources. Demonstrate the acquired skills and capacities of the community to other agencies. Create a sense of ownership and responsibility. Facilitate the process of community needs assessment and prioritization. Develop a transparent system during the execution of infrastructure schemes. Create effective linkages between communities and other agencies. Introduce low cost technologies. PITD Procedures 1. Survey of priority schemes As part of the Micro Planning exercise, the Community Organizations (COs) identify those village activities which they are willing and able to implement. These activities include infrastructure projects. NRSP engineering staff attends the general body meetings of the COs and holds detailed discussions in order to assess the capacity of COs to implement the schemes they have identified as necessary. NRSP ensures that the community identifies those schemes, which it has the capacity to implement and monitor. NRSP engineers conduct feasibility surveys and social and technical appraisals in collaboration with the local community. 2. Assessment of Schemes for Implementation In addition to assessing the technical aspect of a scheme, a social feasibility assessment is also done to ascertain the ability of CO to resolve conflicts, if any, before the initiation of the scheme. 3. Cost Estimation Cost estimates for the schemes are prepared jointly by community members and NRSP engineers according to the market rates of labour and material needed. The NRSP Social Organizer and Engineer mobilize the community for resource generation by themselves. In some cases, the communities opt to fund schemes from their own savings, supplemented by credit from NRSP. 4. Preparation of Portfolio of Schemes and Financial Support PITD prepares a portfolio of all the schemes that are identified as priority community projects. The NRSP management takes responsibility for creating linkages or mobilizing resources for the community to implement these projects. When NRSP is able to mobilize the necessary financial resources or to create linkages with the concerned government and/or private developmental organizations a second round of dialogue is carried out with the COs to see if the schemes for which funding is available still rank as the communitys priorities. The CO is then informed in the meetings whether the scheme merits financial assistance. If it does, the CO is informed about the source, type and conditions of financial and technical assistance. The amount of contribution and commitment from donors and the COs are equally important and are therefore carefully discussed during the meetings.

34

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

National Programme for Improvement of Watercourses in Pakistan: The Punjab Component In July 2004, the Government of Pakistan launched 5-year National Programme for improvement of water courses in Pakistan, allocating more than Rs.66 billion to line 86,003 watercourses. Of these 86,003 watercourses, 30,000 are located in Punjab. To achieve this, the Government of Punjab, through its Agriculture Department, engaged PRSP and NRSP to line 2,000 watercourses (bricks and cement). This includes operational costs @9.63% of the grant from the Government of Punjab in 28 Districts (19 PRSP Districts and 9 NRSP Districts). Of these 2,000 watercourses, a minimum of 1,600 were to be lined in canalirrigated areas and a maximum 400 in rain-fed areas of these Districts. Based on the number of unlined watercourses located in the operating Districts of PRSP and NRSP, it was agreed that in canal-irrigated areas, PRSP would undertake to line 916 (57%) of the watercourses and NRSP would be responsible for 684 (43%). In the rain-fed areas, both will make efforts to meet the target. Later it was also agreed among Government of Punjab Department of Agriculture, PRSP and NRSP that: a) PRSP and NRSP would line another 1,000 watercourses in the remaining Districts (300 in 3 PRSP Districts and 700 in 4 NRSP Districts) and b) the Department of Agriculture will provide funds to PRSP/NRSP for undertaking more than these Projects. The work of lining watercourses started in Sep2004. Overall, NRSP has to complete a minimum of 684 schemes in canal-irrigated areas and 700 in rain-fed areas over four years: Sep2004 Sep 2008. Approximately 400,000 rural people will benefit from the Projects knowledge sharing and substantial economic, financial and social inputs. It has been experienced that watercourse improvement results in reduction of water losses up to 40%, gain in delivery efficiency to the tune of 38.5%, enhancement of cropping intensity by nearly 18%, and an overall increase in crop yields by 20%. The Project will work to establish one Water Users Association (WUA) around each watercourse. All Project committees and leadership established and trained for the WUAs will ensure that women and the poor, preferably from the same village, participate in the initiative. The Project will ensure the active involvement of the members of the WUAs in the overall agricultural development. Farmers and irrigators interests shall be enhanced by ensuring 80% to 85% attendance in the meetings and training programmes, and by ensuring that the benefits of the services and training courses to be delivered through this project reach 100% of the project beneficiaries.

35

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 13a: National Programme for Improvement of Watercourses in Canal & Barani Areas Year Wise Status (Water Courses) NPIW (Canal Area)
Bahawal nagar Lodhran Vehari Khushab Bhakkar Attock Jhelum Rawalpindi R.Y. Khan R.Y.Khan (JDW) Sub Total

NPIW (Canal & Barani Areas)


26 12 18 25 5 4 1 5 1 2 5 7 33 1 6 3 2 11 6 8 51 50 50 26 20 22 9 35 6 7 169 38 49 31 31 18 24 11 10 10 6 10 137 37 37 17 6 5 3 9 1 3 63 39 18 24 21 14 12 20 5 11 176 35 35 35 12 37 37 27 27

NPIW (Barani Area)


Chakwal Sub Total

D.G. Khan

RaJuly Pur

Bahawal pur

Grand Total

Target

25

18

35 15 37 27 43 43

140 84 148 151 151 151

316 147 285 320 202 184

Year (Sep, 2004 To Sep, 2005)

Achievement (FCR Verified by NESPAK)

Target

17

13

Year (Sep, 2005 To Sep, 2006)

Achievement (FCR Verified by NESPAK)

14

Target

Year (Sep, 2006 To Sep, 2007)

Achievement (FCR Verified by NESPAK)

Table 13b: Status of National Programme for Improvement of Watercourses in Canal & Barani Areas

Target from Sep, 2007 To Sep, 2008 D.G.Khan 1


26 12 1 1 1 53 1 1 1 1 80

Bahawalpur 1

NPIW (Canal Area) R.Y.Khan Khushab (JDW) 1 10


87 75 10 10 10 10 20 20 1 1 1 1

Bhakkar 1
52 31 1 1 1 1

Total Canal Area 14


265 191 14 14 14 13

Number of water courses identified based on verbal agreement with willing users/ owners Number of WUAs registered

Number of estimate submitted

Number of water courses initiated

Number of water courses completed by NRSP

Number of water courses Verified by NESPAK

36

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 13c: Physical Infrastructure Schemes Progress as of July, 2011 (Since inception)
Direct Input (Other than PPAF)*
CO Contribution Holds to CO Contribution Contribution Cost Schemes Holds to CO Total Cost House Disbursement Approved CO Total No of House Disbursement Approved Contribution No of Scheme s

Direct Input (By PPAF)

Total (Direct Input)


CO Contribution Total Cost

No of Schemes

House Holds

Disbursement to CO

Funding Agencies Share

SCHEMES INITIATED 80,105,988 235,760,368 58,703,371 58,823,902 6,988,851 440,382,480 76,986,435 225,879,242 55,689,250 58,823,902 6,409,235 423,788,064 2,219,335,373 4,393 382,941 1,226,677,170 1,258,299,812 310,784,294 91,746,745 399 62,321 248,240,066 245,996,414 22,381,424 268,377,838 1,569,084,106 372,210,570 800 166,020 314,285,285 319,216,401 81,356,313 400,572,714 425,107,811 342 60,744 101,206,156 102,248,289 22,716,072 124,964,361 826,463,736 1,833 50,560 426,538,956 450,655,689 152,366,465 603,022,154 503,806,511 1,019 43,296 136,406,707 140,183,019 31,964,020 172,147,039 2,929 3,753 1,260 1,366 578 9,886 2,299,713,100 5,293 407,580 1,445,783,419 1,584,967,226 SCHEMES COMPLETED 337,242,859 1,922,210,085 10,919 698,471 123,332 110,245 123,777 208,716 101,784 667,854 94,815,003 593 67,980 298,372,736 313,305,051 26,456,855 339,761,906 780 107,860 372,210,570 1,023 173,122 381,971,269 427,842,908 87,202,235 515,045,143 1,589 215,818 439,187,031 450 64,349 137,392,575 154,921,347 25,893,294 180,814,641 1,393 129,245 872,956,173 1,975 52,625 445,852,485 483,526,573 158,727,480 642,254,053 3,959 114,300 1,054,270,834 504,399,408 689,530,783 382,798,620 3,235,248,212 553,528,473 1,018,234,705 463,212,989 621,844,799 331,549,368 2,988,370,334 520,544,323 1,252 49,504 182,194,354 205,371,347 38,962,995 244,334,342 3,198 131,248 604,248,567 645,809,682 1,120,722,378 535,405,007 741,229,576 401,131,203 3,444,297,846 567,003,095 1,051,240,183 471,666,850 632,603,069 331,333,924 3,053,847,121 119,068,983 394,487,848 84,596,665 146,026,137 33,445,706 777,625,339 108,950,455 378,245,707 78,405,322 140,180,215 28,790,659 734,572,358 764,878,665 1,515,210,226 620,001,672 887,255,713 434,576,909 4,221,923,185 675,953,550 1,429,485,890 550,072,172 772,783,284 360,124,583 3,788,419,479

Drinking Water Supply

1,946

81,744

422,054,213

440,438,335

Agriculture

1,984

61,675

608,418,349

637,195,805

Communication

943

64,896

367,006,833

380,483,660

Sewerage and Drainage

566

42,696

307,559,514

313,386,668

Others

187

39,880

84,425,884

87,826,152

TOTAL

5,626

290,891

1,789,464,793

1,859,330,620

Drinking Water Supply

1,910

80,036

417,121,766

426,820,076

Agriculture

1,920

59,685

591,695,749

600,584,494

Communication

918

63,033

362,006,833

369,418,561

Sewerage and Drainage

566

42,696

307,559,514

313,386,668

Others

179

39,463

83,309,302

85,337,510

TOTAL

5,493

284,913

1,761,693,164

1,795,547,309

By Linkages
CO Contribution Cost Holds to CO Contribution Total House Disbursement Approved CO Contribution

By Credit
Total Cost No of Schemes House Holds

G. Total (Direct input + Linkages + Credit)


Disbursement to CO Approved Contribution CO Contribution Total Cost

No of

House

Disbursement

Schemes

Holds

to CO

Funding Agencies Share

No of Scheme s

SCHEMES INITIATED 12,670,348 52,145,080 10,480,957 1,026,105 134,402,829 210,725,319 1,192,653,290 5,865 7,612 790,180,635 43 44 5,485,826 2 2 88,671,793 6 537 213,608,575 5,772 6,399 94,706,461 42 630 370,000 113,252,516 560,000 40,000 980,000 115,202,516 370,000 113,252,516 560,000 40,000 980,000 115,202,516 3,837 10,478 1,657 1,820 6,838 158,701 133,498 144,407 217,338 349,550 24,630 1,003,494 662,531,136 1,189,763,289 559,584,358 693,989,804 1,002,606,391 4,108,474,978 727,845,795 1,282,185,873 613,595,843 745,689,297 1,056,909,009 4,426,225,817 132,109,331 559,885,444 95,637,622 147,092,242 168,828,535 1,103,553,174 859,955,126 1,842,071,317 709,233,465 892,781,539 1,225,737,544 5,529,778,991

Drinking Water Supply

597

26,823

58,282,569

82,036,113

Agriculture

747

12,799

135,492,455

161,463,495

Communication

258

14,625

55,184,950

78,190,836

Sewerage and Drainage

229

1,518

4,459,021

4,459,721

Others

6,015

241,646

619,807,771

655,777,806

TOTAL

7,846

297,411

873,226,766

981,927,971

SCHEMES COMPLETED 11,072,485 48,885,446 3,710,590 1,026,105 131,388,057 196,082,683 1,020,395,398 771,238,026 5,485,826 2 43 5,865 15,009,914 6 180,802,888 5,772 47,858,744 42 630 6,399 537 2 44 7,612 370,000 113,252,516 560,000 40,000 980,000 115,202,516 370,000 113,252,516 560,000 40,000 980,000 115,202,516 3,415 10,105 1,330 1,597 6,591 23,038 145,042 124,661 129,100 210,236 336,367 945,406 586,302,601 1,133,641,403 473,954,819 626,303,820 941,314,371 3,761,517,014 603,789,354 1,183,157,625 482,966,174 637,062,790 971,183,893 3,878,159,836 120,392,940 540,383,669 82,675,912 141,246,320 161,158,716 1,045,857,557 724,182,294 1,723,541,294 565,642,086 778,309,110 1,132,342,609 4,924,017,393

Drinking Water Supply

444

21,080

32,774,128

36,786,259

Agriculture

580

8,017

115,406,698

131,917,442

Communication

64

4,786

10,741,830

11,299,324

Sewerage and Drainage

229

1,518

4,459,021

4,459,721

Others

5,970

234,539

609,765,003

639,849,969

TOTAL

7,287

269,940

773,146,680

824,312,715

37

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 13d: CPIs Progress Region wise by Direct Input as of July, 2011.

Region

No. of CPIs Initiated 2,389 1,915 475 1,023 1,012 376 2,615 329 785 10,919

BHHs

Disbursement (Rs.) 678,785,743 425,736,059 195,153,697 280,906,287 349,413,266 130,768,326 954,523,005 106,074,852 113,886,977 3,235,248,212

Donor Share (Rs.) 710,653,099 467,077,821 201,705,099 288,799,026 355,957,029 142,567,218 1,036,200,532 110,226,501 131,111,521 3,444,297,846

CO Share (Rs.) 210,685,544 145,939,481 47,002,917 37,468,566 132,449,086 28,690,845 97,752,950 44,501,750 33,134,200 777,625,339

Total Cost (Rs.) 921,338,643 613,017,302 248,708,016 326,267,592 488,406,115 171,258,063 1,133,953,482 154,728,251 164,245,721 4,221,923,185

No. of CPIs Completed 2,233 1,679 475 1,000 927 344 2,163 325 740 9,886

Rawalpindi Mianwali Mardan AJ&K Bhawalpur D.G.Khan Badin R.Y.Khan Turbat Total

220,461 86,151 93,611 54,932 47,473 18,096 113,958 8,908 54,881 698,471

38

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Social and Human Protection Sector


NRSP aims to reach and serve the poorest and most vulnerable community members and to bring them into the mainstream of Rural Support Programme development. NRSP is committed to advocacy and action focussed on the right to social protection, based on the assumption that the destitute and the vulnerable have the right to have their basic needs met; to be protected from hazardous working conditions, the right to a good education, the right to earn a decent living, the right to decent shelter and the right to protection from physical and economic exploitation and violence. If those needing social protection are children, they have the right to develop to their fullest potential, in preparation for lifelong well-being. These assumptions are in line with NRSPs mandate, as articulated in the Articles of Association. Social protection consists of policies, programmes and advocacy for the poorest and most vulnerable members of society; i.e. those requiring protection because they are unable to speak or act on their own behalf and those least likely to recover from social and economic shocks. Loss of the major breadwinner, loss of a parent, single parent households, women headed households, a natural disaster and or the loss of livelihoods due to climatic and ecological factors and absence of any assistance, big family size slums dwellers, nomads, migrants (internal and external) these are the factors which result in the form of illiteracy, ignorance, drug addiction wide scale unemployment and violation of human rights with the child and women rights. Vulnerability affects everyone but is greater for the poor who face large risks from shocks to their income-earning capacity due to natural and man-made disasters, crime and violence, unemployment, old age, exclusion and discrimination, gender inequality. Poverty cannot be described it can only be felt. One knows more about poverty when he is hungry and cannot purchase food, he and his children want new clothes but they cant purchase it because of low income, hes sick and doesnt have money to have medicine, he wants to send his children to school but cant bear educational expenditures. etc. In short, the poor need to feel empowered with skills and voices to overcome their fear of isolation.1 The ADB (2003) defines ADB as encompassing labor markets, social insurance, social assistance, micro-insurance schemes, and child protection. Although social protection is congruent with NRSPs mandate, it can be distinguished from a development programme insofar as it (a) identifies and reaches only the poorest and most vulnerable and (b) does not require a financial contribution from the participant. This lack of requirement for a financial contribution does not preclude other kinds of contribution, such as, for example, voluntary contributions of time and knowledge. Nor does it preclude contributions some time after the recipient has been involved in a programme and is deemed to be able to contribute. Ideally, social protection in the context of development (as distinct from disaster or conflict situations) should enable some people (whether direct beneficiaries of a social protection programme or their family members) to eventually enter NRSPs mainstream poverty reduction and development programme. In defining eligibility for social protection at NRSP, the first principle is that of no exclusion. The only exception would be anyone engaged in practices that harm others. Indicators related to income and capacities in relation to economic will need to be developed. Anyone under 18 and over 65 would be eligible. Social protection must be understood as holistic and comprehensive. Social protection needs encompass a spectrum of possible interventions. The most vulnerable families typically have material, nutritional and social needs. Many have been stigmatized because of their poverty and dependence. Many will require systematic and fairly intensive guidance and support, if they are to become independent and to re-enter the socio-economic mainstream. NRSPs social mobilization principle and practices will provide the best possible means of implementing a successful social protection programme. Social protection needs are specific to stage in the life cycle. The needs of children are different from those of competent adults, and different again from those of the elderly who find themselves without caregivers. It will be necessary to ensure that dependence on safety nets is not permanent, for those able to graduate from NRSPs social protection programmes. For those who

Social Protection and Risk Management.

39

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

are able to graduate, benchmarks for the various stages of participation (full support, economic interventions, training programmes, degrees of independence, etc.) will have to be established. It is assumed that everyone in an extremely poor and vulnerable household will need some help. The family, then, should be treated as a unit, and the specific needs of its members be addressed. Projects under the Program 1. Project: Socio Economic Development of the destitute and neglected childrens families (SDDNCF) Project Period Project Area Project Budget Funding source Project Districts Total Beneficiaries November 01, 2008 to November 31, 2011 Punjab, Pakistan 360.44 Million Government of Punjab (Home Department & Child Protection Welfare Bureau) Lahore, Rawalpindi, Gujranwala, Multan and Faisalabad 10,250 Households

It is a Public Private Partnership which aims at to reduce poverty and improve social economic conditions in the project area by creating productive employment especially for the destitute and neglected childrens families, disadvantaged and vulnerable segments of society. The main objective of the project is to facilitate 10,250 families in rehabilitation and empowering them economically. This broad objective can be summarized into immediate objectives i.e. to build the capacities of the most vulnerable families which include parents, brother, sister, guardians and persons with disabilities for economic and social empowerment through skills training, IGA and improved access to services including microfinance services. Government of Punjab has taken an initiative in Feb 2005 towards rescue, protection and welfare of these destitute and neglected children through establishing Child Protection and Welfare Bureau under the Punjab Destitute and Neglected Children Act 2004. CPWB in collaboration with the NRSP has devised a comprehensive intervention plan for this neglected part of the society to assist them in getting out of this cycle. Project Beneficiaries Project beneficiaries are the families of the children who are rescued by the CPWB and or those families identified through cluster based approach with score less than 30 on the Poverty Score Card. Project Objectives The main objective of this pilot project is to facilitate 10,250 families in rehabilitation and to empower them economically. The overall objectives of the proposed project in quantitative terms are; Socio economic development of 10,250 (2050 per district) Destitute and Neglected Childrens Families Assessment of 2,750 (550 per district) vulnerable persons/families and provision of Income Generation Grants. Assessment of 3,750 (750 per district) destitute, neglected childrens family members for vocational and technical skills. Assessment and provision of credit for 3,750 (750 per district) clients for enterprise development and other related activities. Project Components 1) Grant for Income Generation Activities 2) Vocational and Technical Skills Training 3) Provision of Micro-credit

40

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 14: SDDNCF progress of June, 2011


Activities Grant IGAs Trainings Micro-credit Targets (As of June 2011) 2,750 3,750 3,750 Progress as of June, 2011 2,653 3,903 4,125

The project is closed on June 30th, 2011. Small House-cum Garden Plots for Eradication of Poverty in Punjab, Project Donor: Partners: Agriculture Department, Government of the Punjab National Rural Support Programme Concerned District Governments Duration: Location: Total Cost: Total beneficiary: July 2010 to June 2013 (three years) Bahawalpur, Bhawalnagar, Muzaffargarh & Rajanpur Rs: 261.753 million 1,845 Plots (2 kannal /plot) in House cum Garden Project in four Districts Agriculture Department, Government of the Punjab

A Project Steering Committee (PSC) headed by Mr. Justice (Retd.) Khalil-ul-Rehman is overseeing the project. The other members of PS are Members Colonies Board of Revenue, Secretary Agriculture, Secretary Livestock & Dairy Development Department, Dr. Rashid Bajwa, Chief Executive Officer- NRSP, Chief Economist P&D Board, DCO of concerned districts. Planning & Evaluation Cell of Agriculture Department works as Secretariat of this PSC. In addition to PSC at provincial level, Project Coordination Committee (PCC) at district level in each Project districts have also be constituted comprising of the: District Coordination OfficerChairman, Executive District Office (Agriculture) Member/ Secretary, Executive District Officer (Revenue) Member, Executive District Officer (F&P) Member, Executive District Officer (Building) Member, Deputy Director, MEU Member, Representative of NRSP Member. Project Objectives To provide an opportunity for enhancing the living standards through augmenting income generating resources. To reduce migration to big cities mainly due to lack of employment opportunities in the rural areas. To practice a strategy to gradually bridge the gap between the rich and the poor in poverty hit area of southern Punjab. To set a model for alleviation of poverty for the poorest of the poor and to break vicious circle of poverty. Role of Project Partners National Rural Support Programme (NRSP) is responsible for the following activities: Prepare the list of beneficiaries on the basis of Poverty Score Card and get it verified from revenue staff at district level. Prepare the Master Plan for each new settlement. Social mobilization for familiarizing the concept of reducing poverty and other programme activities (as per plan). Construction of physical infrastructure as per approved plan, at all locations

41

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Board of Revenue is responsible to allot the land for the project on receipt of the proposal from project District Governments and draft the terms & conditions of allotment in consultation with PSC and notify it. This task has been accomplished. However, BOR has been requested to indicate more areas for similar projects in other districts. District Governments are responsible to identify the land, send the case to BOR for transfer of land to the project authority, verify the list of beneficiaries identified by NRSP as per procedures mentioned above and submit the same to PSC. The sites in the project districts have been notified which are included in this document. Agriculture, Livestock and Forest Departments will develop their respective project interventions for implementation through their functionaries by imparting training on the request of NRSP as and when required. DCOs will supervise and monitor the project activities through Project Coordination Committees to be established under this project. Progress (July 2011) Project Closed on June 30, 2011. Project has achieved its 100% targets by consuming 81% budget and 83% time. Submitted MPR to CP&WB Project extension case is still under process at home department so it is decided that new contract will issued on extension of project. Submitted Financial Report to CP&WB Coordination with CP&WB and Home Department regarding TPV Report Series of meetings with CP&WB Project Coordinator for the TPV Report. Data compilation and reconsolidated at districts level Support to Livestock & Dairy Development Department Punjab, Lahore Pakistan is basically agriculture based economy country; livestock sector is contributing overall 11.7% of the GDP. Pakistan is marked in first five countries that produce milk in the world. Livestock & Dairy Development Department (LDDD) caters to the requirements of livestock sector in the province. Livestock is increasingly becoming a very important sector of national economy, contributing even more than all the other agricultural crops combined. Livestock & Dairy Development Department strives to ensure growth and development of livestock sector in the province thus contributing to national food security, economic uplift, rural development, poverty alleviation, employment generation and foreign exchange earnings. NRSP-SHPP has very strong liaison with LDDD Punjab for capacity building of their staff from Director Generals to support staff. NRSP-SHPP is designed and conducted more seven training events for LDDD Punjab from last six months. The details of training events are as under:
Sr# 1 2 3 4 5 6 Training Training on Management & Professional Skills Development (Support staff) Training on Management & Professional Skills Development (Directors and Managers) Training on Management & Professional Skills Development (Directors Generals, Managers) Training on Procurement & Financial Management (Mangers and financials officers) Training on Management & Professional Skills Development (Veterinary Officers) Farm Management & Administrative Management Skills Training (Farm Managers) Dates January 21-23, 2009 February 1-4, 2011 February 5-7, 2011 March 13-15, 2011 April 19-23, 2011 June 01- 04, 2011 Participants trained Men Women 18 19 25 21 18 23 02 04 02 0 03 0

42

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Sr# 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Total

Training Media Management & Livestock Extension Services (District Livestock Officers) Media Management & Livestock Extension Services (District Livestock Officers) Media Management & Livestock Extension Services (District Livestock Officers) Media Management & Livestock Extension Services (District Livestock Officers) Training of Trainers for Livestock & Dairy Development Department Training on Information Technology for Support Staff of PRI Staff Training on Community Mobilization & Extension Services through Effective Service Delivery & Modern Business Approaches in Poultry Sector

Dates June 3-5, 2011 Oct 13-15, 2011 Dec 30, 2011 to Jan 1st, 2011 March 03-05, 2011 March 15-18, 2011 April 2011 18-20,

Participants trained Men Women 23 23 28 29 14 19 20 280 0 0 9 05 06 01 00 32

May 09-12, 2011

Private Public Partnership - End Honor Crimes Project Donor: Partners: Duration: Location: Total Cost: Total beneficiary: National Commission on the Status of Women Islamabad Pakistan National Commission on the Status of Women and Rozan April 2009 to June 2011 Two Districts one Punjab Province- Rajanpur and second Sindh ProvinceMir Pur Khas, Sindh Three Millions and twenty six thousands only (Rs: 3,026,000) 214 community members and stakeholders

The National Commission on the Status of Women with the financial support of the United Nations Fund for Women Development (UNIFEM) designed a project End Honor Crimes for the district Rajanpur, Punjab and Mir Pur Khas, Sindh province. NRSP is an implementation partner of the NCSW. Under this project NRSP conducted a detailed baseline survey of the project districts, focusing on state and non-state participants through dialogues, interviews, and discussion with community contributions. On the basis of situation analysis and finding of the study, NRSP with technical support of Rozan, developed a comprehensive training module for the stakeholders including community, police department, judiciary, Civil Society organizations, religious leaders and doctors to build their capacity in ending honor crimes in these districts. Project Objectives To Assess the perception of local community, lawyers, judges, Police and other stakeholders about Honor Crimes and also appraise the prevalence rate of honor crime in project districts To create awareness among the stakeholders about End Honor Crime through training and promotional material To aware the stakeholders about criminal law amendment act 2004 To get aware the stakeholder to play their role to End Honor Crimes Key project deliverables Benchmark assessment on honor crimes at district Rajanpur (Punjab) & Mirpur Khas (Sindh) completed Training Need Assessment performed for the stakeholders Designing of training programme

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Development of Training Modules for the community and law enforcement agencies representatives Implementation of Training Programme at both selected districts A total number of 94 women (Community 27, Stakeholders 67) have been sensitized on the issue in five training events. A total number of 120 men (Community 55, Stakeholders 65) have been trained in five training events. Two Provincial Interfaces has been carried out one in Islamabad and second in Karachi Preparation on the National Interface is under progress Working on document of policy recommendation Table 15: End of Honour Crime status
Sr 1 Activities Benchmark assessment on honor crimes at district Rajanpur (Punjab) & Mirpur Khas (Sindh) & Submitted to NCSW Training Need Assessment & submitted to NCSW Targets 1 Achieve ments 1 Districts Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur & Mirpur Khas Rajanpur (conducted at Islamabad) Mirpur Khas (Conducted at Karachi) Islamabad Islamabad Province Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind Punjab & Sind

Design of Training Programme Development of Training Module on End Honor Crimes for Community Members. Printed and disseminated Development of Training Module on End Honor Crimes for officials. Printed and disseminated Development of IEC material

Training for community on End Honor crimes Training for Official (Stakeholders) on End Honor Crimes Interface on end Honor Crimes at Provincial Level (Punjab)

80

104

7.1

80

110

Punjab

8.1

Interface on end Honor Crimes at Provincial Level (Sind) Interface on End Honor Crimes at National Level Preparation of Policy Recommendation to NCSW

Sind Islamabad Islamabad

8.2 9

1 1

1 1

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Social Sector Services


NRSPs core activities revolve around its philosophy of harnessing peoples potential, in that, NRSP organizes the communities to plan and implement various activities according to their priorities and willingness. NRSP experience has shown that at the household level people prioritize income generating activates (agriculture, livestock, small businesses etc) while at the village level, they prioritize drinking water, health and education related activities as their needs. In Pakistan provincial governments and projects have established a large network of health and education facilities. However due to various reasons of which lack of appropriate accountability mechanism is a major reason, these facilities are not able to deliver quality services to the target population. Therefore in terms of access and quality these institutions have not been very effective. Recognizing the fact that government has provided a huge infrastructure for health and education, NRSP attempts to build the capacity of communities through the network of Community Organizations (COs) so that they are able to access services that can be provided by the facilities established by the government. Along with this bottom up approach of increasing community participation through capacity building and forging linkages, NRSP also implements small pilot projects where it takes over health and education facilities and manages them for a specific period to demonstrate how such facilities can be made effective through better management practices and community participation. In case of remote areas where no government facility for education/health exists, NRSP encourages the COs to set up small community driven initiatives such as community schools, community health centers etc as an adhoc arrangement. NRSPs experience shows that at a later stage such community-run schools and health centre are either absorbed into mainstream government facilities or convert into private enterprises which are run and managed by some progressive community entrepreneurs. NRSPs experience further shows that access and quality of social sector services (drinking water, sanitation, health and education) can be assured through effective community participation. However, community participation is effective when it is about such projects that do not involve complex procedures and technologies. For example it is within the capacity of rural communities to participate in the management of government schools in terms of increasing enrollment, reducing teachers absenteeism, constructing missing facilities, creating awareness for better health/hygiene practices, constructing streets, managing small drinking water supply schemes through the forum of community organizations. Constructing full school buildings or hospitals or managing hospitals involves complex procedures e.g. architecture, knowledge about medical science etc. NRSP therefore focuses on construction of small infrastructure, management of simple operations and creating awareness through the COs. Some examples of initiatives already taken by NRSP are: Establishing and supporting Community Schools / Non formal schools Supporting Community Participation in Managing School Affairs through SMCs / School Councils / VEC etc Capacity Building of SMCs /School Councils / VEC Capacity Building of Primary School Teachers; Managing selected and limited number of government health facilities as role models with the objective of replicating these models by the government departments; Managing selected and limited number of government schools as role models with the objective of replicating the lessons learned through the government departments; Capacity building and awareness raising through health education and outreach programmes with focus on o mother and child health o prevention of various diseases e.g. malaria Social marketing e.g. Mosquito Nets (ITNs / LLINs) Community Led Total Sanitation pilot projects; and Above all forging linkages of COs with a number of government agencies to create access of COs to different services. Future Directions: NRSP will continue focusing on a bottom up approach of building the capacity of COs as effective receiving platform for accessing various services for which government has established a wide

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network of extension departments. NRSP will also continue forging linkages between COs and government department as a sustainable way of increasing efficiency of government departments and increasing awareness among the people. In order to increase effectiveness and efficiency of existing structures and systems related to the delivery of services in health and education sector, NRSP will also implement pilot projects where it will perform as a service provider. But this role will aim at disseminating lessons learned to the concerned government and private service providers. The niche of NRSP programme will remain forging linkages, capacity building of communities and community participation. Over the last many years especially during working in the earthquake affected areas for reviving health and education, NRSP has learned that improving access to education and health requires nurturing a large number of community volunteers and paid local level workers. Without this social capital it is beyond the capacity of any organization to reach out a large number of people and provide them a number of services. In order to nurture the community volunteers and local workers NRSP has decided to set aside resources in all projects for the training of community extension workers. NRSPs participation in social sector projects is guided by the principles of community participation, sustainability and effectiveness. Over the last many years, NRSP has learned that effective community participation requires organizing people at mohalla level, village level and union council level. A three tiered organization structure comprising the mohalla level COs clustered into Village Organizations (VOs) and then federated at the Union Council as the Local Support Organization (LSO) enable the people to pool resources according to the size of activities in which they participate. NRSP will encourage the formation of COs, VOs and LSOs and will build the capacity of LSOs to supervise and manage COs and VOs through community volunteers called the Community Resource Persons (CRPs) or Community Extension Workers. In summary NRSPs social sector services division will focus on the following: Forging linkages between organized communities and Government/ Non Government Service Providers; Ensuring community participation in various projects through COs,VOs and LSOs; Increasing community awareness of key issues through a cadre of CRPs, Community Workers etc Facilitating the government in implementing its social sector programs; Managing and running health and education outlets as pilots for designing and implementing more efficient systems for the delivery of services; Increasing access to basic education and basic health facilities in remote and hard to reach areas through community owned set up; and Capacity building of local institutions and community organization in the field of primary health and education Here is a brief description of various interventions which NRSP has carried out or still implementing through project and programme. If any body is interested in knowing further details then they should refer to the sector.

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Education and Adult Literacy Adult Literacy Programme The goal of the programme is to motivate and support people so that they are able to read and write and can perform better in their daily lives. People who are willing to learn are identified by NRSP staff in and around community organizations or by the consultant firms hired by NRSP. Eligibility for intending learners should be as young as ten years of age and there is no upper age limit. Learners attend the two hour session for three months, after which they are able to read a newspaper and write a letter. Learners are also able to understand and practice basic mathematical functions. Initially NCHD and later Pakistan Education Research and Development (PERD) provided technical input. NRSP also managed this programme from its own resources while in some cases donors also supported the programme e.g. ILO in Mardan and Attock and JDW Sugar Mills in Rahim Yar Khan. Now NRSP is trying to mainstream the adult literacy programme in the regions. Here is a statistical summary of the programme carried out under adult literacy programme. Table 16: Adult Literacy Movement Programme as of July, 2011
District RY Khan Mardan Malakand Swat Swabi Attock Bahawalpur Turbat (Kech) Gwadar Hyderabad Mirpurkhas Rajan Pur Total No. of Groups in functional Literacy programmes 189 119 104 105 102 71 135 122 20 20 40 50 1077 Men 486 36 10 156 0 22 602 275 80 25 482 0 2174 No. of Graduates Women 2528 3090 2427 2293 2559 1842 2544 1858 350 490 321 1261 21563 Total 3014 3126 2437 2449 2559 1864 3146 2133 430 515 803 1261 23737

As a step toward making literacy programmes more purposeful and valuable, NRSP initiated an innovative literacy training programme model of its own with support from a VSO Volunteer. This project is called PALLS (Programme on Adult Literacy and Life Skills). It was pilot tested in one Union Council (Litten) in the Bhakkar District. PALLS uses a combination of relevant curriculum based on the National Literacy Curriculum, systematic teaching methods, creative use of teaching/learning materials, and mobilization of community resources. This programme was later extended to UC Qamar Mashani in Mianwali district as well. Learners and graduates summary from this programme is given below. Table 17: PALLS Project Achievements as of July, 2011
S# 1 2 3 Currently Enrolled Learners 4 Total Graduates 5 Men Women Men Women Literacy Centers Established Teachers Identified and trained Men Women Activities People Assessed Men Women Achievements 8,044 4,720 3,324 110 105 45 60 976 691 285 2,899 1,256 1,643

Community Schools NRSP works with the COs to establish community schools. In many rural and in few peri-urban communities, community schools are the only primary schools available to children. Government

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schools are either too far or do not offer quality education. Community schools offer affordable education to children of poor families who cannot afford the fees of private schools. Community members form a Village education Committee (VEC) which supports the schools activities. VEC members are mostly parents of the students, and teachers or administrators. The VEC administers the school, determines the students fees and generates the necessary economic resources. VEC members also set the salary of school teacher and arrange parent-teacher meetings. In many communities, community schools have only one room and one teacher. The teacher must be a local person with a reasonable education. The school generally has more than one class managed by single teacher. NRSP has established linkages with the Government and with donor agencies for these schools. The Community Schools were earlier established in partnership with a UK-based NGO called Learning for Life (LFL). After the LFL project, NRSP has continued supporting some community schools. NRSP has also established few community schools from its own funds. Action Aid Pakistan supported nine schools in D.G. Khan and PRSP funded nine schools in Lodhran under Establishment of New Primary School through Community Participation project, supported by Government of Punjab. PPAF and BEF are also providing support for many community schools. Since 1992, NRSP has established 504 Community Schools in villages where CO members have identified access to education as a priority. At present, 233 schools are functional. Table 18: Region Wise Enrolment and No. of Schools currently operating and supported by NRSP
Active Schools Currently Supported by NRSP 22 6 1 10 5 10 10 64 Currently Supported by Donors 3 12 16 9 3 7 17 12 27 11 2 5 124 Community Self Help Basis 9 4 13 1 10 4 _ 4 45 No. of students currently enrolled Total 25 18 9 4 13 17 10 3 7 17 12 27 11 20 4 5 10 10 6 5 233 Boys 691 477 674 236 669 1,300 398 240 446 340 153 590 256 595 90 145 579 448 337 189 8,853 Girls 489 419 807 245 533 1,254 355 155 186 362 148 518 177 624 79 148 524 403 390 225 8,041 No of Teachers Currently employed Men 20 10 10 4 12 32 8 2 6 13 8 24 13 15 0 5 7 12 11 0 212 Women 22 17 65 21 65 74 9 1 1 4 0 10 9 52 5 4 62 51 25 25 522

Region

Districts

No. of Established Schools

DG Khan Rawalpindi Bahawalpur

Hyderabad

DG Khan Rajanpur ICT/Rawalpindi Attock Chakwal Bahawalpur Lodhran Badin Thatta MP Khas Jamshoro Hyderabad Kech Gawadar

74 23 50 18 29 19 21 41 1 28 5 7 56 12 27 11 27 4 13 10 10 11 7 504

Turbat

Awaran Pangoor Poonch Kotli Muzaffarabad Sudnuti Muzaffarabad Bagh Khushab Mianwali Bhakkar Grand Total

Support to Government Schools The Government of Pakistan at Provincial level and the Government of AJK have asked NRSP to take leading role in reviving the community participation in their school systems. NRSP has undertaken many projects in this regard. Few of these projects are mentioned below. QEFA Project - Rahim Yar Khan NRSP signed a MOU with Rahim Yar Khan (RYK) District Government in July 2002 for the implementation of the Quality Education for All (QEFA) project. The project aims ensure quality

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education for all in government primary and masjid maktab schools in UC Rasool Pur through public private partnership. JDW Sugar Mills, is supporting NRSP in the implementation of this project by sharing the cost. Community participation is the main theme of the project. Teachers are imparted joyful learning techniques through teacher trainings. Local teachers are hired in schools where the number of students is high or where schools were initially closed due to non availability of teachers. Few abandoned school buildings were turned into functional schools and now running as non formal schools. Support is provided to make the school environment child friendly. Basic facilities such as drinking water, latrines, etc are provided by the School Council with the support of NRSP, Jamal Din Wali (JDW) Sugar Mills, and District Government. This initiative proved so successful that Punjab Government decided to expand this project through Punjab Education Sector Reform Programme (PESRP). PPAF also supported 41 of these schools PPAF is providing support for improving the physical facilities as well as quality of education by the capacity building of teachers. Rceently this project was extended to another UC Kot Karam Karam Khan, while NRSP management was also extended to similar projects in Ghotki with the support of JDW Sugar Mills. The table below provides complete details of this project. Table 19: Quality Education for all (QEFA) Achievement as of July, 2011
QEFA/PP AF Rasool Pur 50 1 1 14 16 1 11 6 5588 3125 2463 88 56 32 76 23 53 137 77 60 128 78 50 105 36 30 15 17 43 22,163,93 7 22,163,93 6,774,628 6,774,628 QEFA Kot Karam Khan 19 Achievements NEF JKT Project Project 2004-10 2006-10 Dist RYK Dist RYK 10 18 1 1 1 3 532 301 231 10 7 3 2 2 10 8 2 1 2 3434 2480 954 6 6 0 36 7 29 6 2 4 0 15 TEF Project 2009-10 Dist Ghotki 44 1 28 5 7 3835 2377 1458 2 2 0 88 71 17 47 44 3 175 168 7 0 21

Activities Total Schools GBSS GBHS GGHS GBES GGES GBPS GGPS GCMS GMMS Schools Re-opened No of Students Enrolled (Current) Boys Girls Total No of Teachers (Current) Male Female Teachers Appointed by the Project Male Female Total Teachers Trained through NRSP Male Female School Council Members Trained Male Female Physical Condition of Schools Improved BY JDW Sugar Mills Ltd. By DG RYK BY PESRP BY NRSP BY PPAF Fund spent by project for school improvement Programme Share of JDW Sugar Mills

Total 141 0 2 0 3 2 53 25 2 16 13 15663 9983 5680 137 92 45 203 101 102 231 152 79 339 271 68 106 74 30 15 18 43 56,564,303 56,564,303

2 1 10 4 2 2274 1700 574 31 21 10 1 0 1 31 21 10 36 25 11 0

1 19,324,92 6 19,324,92

1,562,740 1,562,740

6,738,072 6,738,072

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As of July 2011

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Activities

QEFA/PP AF Rasool Pur 7 8,299,668 359,873 11,681,34 8

QEFA Kot Karam Khan

Share of PESRP Share of NRSP Share of PPAF Share of School Council

2,446,392 4,328,236 -

Achievements NEF JKT Project Project 2004-10 2006-10 Dist RYK Dist RYK 6 19,324,92 1,243,885 6 318,855 -

TEF Project 2009-10 Dist Ghotki

Total

6,738,072 -

38,052,943 4,328,236 678,728 11,681,348

Punjab Education Sector Reform Programme (PESRP) School Council Capacity Building Programme (SCCBP) Phase II After the successful completion of the pilot project, the School Council Capacity Building Project (SCCBP) has been expanded to 35 Districts of Punjab. NRSP and PRSP are implementing organizations .NRSP is implementing this project in 14 Districts of Punjab (Rawalpindi, Chakwal, Jehlum, Attock, Bhakar Khushab, Mianwali, D.G.Khan, Rajan Pur, Bahawalpur, Rahim Yar Khan, Lodhran, Vehari and Bhawalnagar). Capacity building of the school councils shall be implemented in 3 phases in which every school council will have one year of interaction with RSP staff for their capacity building. Capacity Building of School councils primarily aims at developing the capacity of newly constituted school councils; and hence enabling them to perform their stipulated role in a benefiting manner. Although this project looks similar to the pilot project but is different in many circumstances. This phase does not include any specifically allocated funds for SC to use and meet their major needs. PMIU has ensured transfer of SC funds to all schools across Punjab (@ Rs 20000 per primary school, Rs 50000 per elementary school, per year) and expects that all schools will have funds for day to day operations in schools. Major areas covered in the project are: 1. Social mobilization for having effective School Councils 2. Capacity building of entire population of SC members ( Including School Head Teachers) 3. Capacity building of District Education Officers from Executive District Officer (Edu) down to Assistant Education Officer (AEOs). (Newly added from previous project). The project is aimed to achieve following specific indicators: An overall increase in primary class enrolments @ 5% in the first year and 10% in subsequent years; An overall decrease in dropouts @ 20% per year; Increase in completion rate in the primary cycle by 10% per annum. Primary completion rate July be calculated as the total number of students completing or graduating from the fifth class, divided by the number of children whose age is equal to official graduation age. Improvement in quality through teachers training, provision of teaching guides and teaching materials; Reduction in teachers absenteeism by 20% measured from the Core Welfare Indicators Questionnaire results. A new set of indicators have been developed in consultation with the PMIU PESRP for observing the usefulness of capacity building and social mobalisation exercise. The major areas include Community Mobilization and Public Awareness, SC Members Training, Availability of essential Documents at School, Enrollment campaign, Civil Works Inspection and Hygiene education. PESRP PMIU has attached financial tag to each of these areas indicators and RSPs will be awarded funds on achievement of these indicators. NRSP has to provide support for more than 15900 schools in fourteen districts. Two phases have been completed while 3rd phase is also started

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Table 20: School Council Capacity Building Programme as of July, 2011


Total S No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Reporting Indicator Total Schools High school with primary section Girls Primary Schools Boys Primary Schools Girls Elementary Schools Boys Elementary Schools Majid Maktab Schools Community Model Schools Schools could not be intervened due to any reason (Closed, None functional, Merged, Upgraded etc) Non functional Schools Non functional Schools made functional Base line data collection Community Members (3-5) contacted At least 80 % of Parents and Community informed of the Larger Community Meeting LCM held in schools with less than 200 Enrollment LCM held in schools with more than 200 Enrollment Total Schools where LCM held School Councils Formed Notification of School Councils School Council Members Men Women School Councils with Seven Members School Councils with more than Seven Members No of Schools where at least 7 members completed the SC training SC members training (In house) No of participants in training Men Women SC members training (In School) No of participants in training Men Women Head Teacher provided leadership training EDOs, DEOs & Dy.DEOs provided Orientation Training AEOs provided 2 Days exclusive Orientation Training Invoice Submitted to DMOs for completion of Task Schools Verified by DMOs team Unit No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools Target 14,064 195 5,434 5,711 779 728 692 144 Achievement % Achievement

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 21.1 21,2 22 23 24 25 25.1 25.2 26 27 27.1 27.2 28 29 30 31 32

No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Members No of Members No of Members No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools No of Schools Total Men Women No of Schools Total Men Women No of Schools PAX PAX No of Schools No of Schools

381 437 437 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 14,064 148 267 14,064 14,064

437 355 13,351 13,351 13,351 11,034 2,317 13,351 13,351 13,351 97,041 55,388 41,653 11,266 2,100 13,351 13,351 51,641 25,919 25,722 13,351 38,726 22,872 15,854 13,559 148 267 12,512 6,567

100% 81% 95% 95% 95%

95% 95% 95%

95% 95%

95%

96% 100% 100% 89% 47%

Community Empowerment through the Provision of QFE (Supported by PPAF and NRSP) PPAF and NRSP entered into a partnership for community empowerment through the provision of quality formal primary education, in July 2005. The project started with four formal private primary schools which were established in the most disadvantaged districts of Punjab District Khushab and District Bhakkar. These schools were meant for poor segment of the communities which had marginal facilities of education. The commitment has been to provide a good quality school closer to the vision of the ideal school of the community. This programme was later expanded in Bahawalpur and Rahim Yar Khan Districts. During the implementation, the project focuses on the genuine need of the community. Communities which have schools in the radius of 1.5 to 2 kilometers are not included in the project. Community must have willingness to manage the school affairs and they must gradually increase their share in the finances for the school through payment of school fees or through donations.

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The schools are made operational in places which are provided by the people in the community (houses or rented buildings etc). PPAF and NRSP support them in making the schools functional and as attractive as any private education institution. Teachers are recruited locally by the school committees while PPAF supports them by providing salary and funds for their capacity building. NRSP carried out teacher training through CRI and IRM, institutions short listed by PPAF. PPAF also provided support to 41 government and non formal schools in district Rahim Yar Khan, in January 2007. PPAF has also provided funding for support of more community schools and government schools from its social mobilization and SCAD Programme. Table 21: PPAF Supported Community/Government Schools July, 2011
Community Schools (Data also mentioned in Community School Table Above) Enrollment Teachers No. of District Community Boys Girls Total Male Female Schools Bhakkar 5 220 287 507 4 9 Khushab 2 117 234 252 2 10 DG Khan 5 526 365 891 7 22 Rajan Pur 4 116 72 188 0 4 Bahawalpur 16 1626 1525 3151 7 71 Awaran 7 126 132 258 6 1 Panjgoor 3 53 40 93 2 1 Total 42 No. of Government Schools 10 9 6 7 4 3 11 50 92 2784 2655 5340 Government Schools Enrollment Boys 2446 2062 329 298 120 150 521 5926 8710 Girls 1672 394 669 300 80 30 494 3639 6294 Total 4078 2456 998 598 200 180 1015 9525 14865 28 118 Teachers Male 84 71 2 06 3 3 21 190 218 Female 46 10 25 11 1 0 8 101 219 Total 130 81 27 17 4 3 29 291 425

Total 13 29 4 78 7 3 134

District Bhakkar Khushab Bahwalnagar Bahawalpur Awaran Panjgoor Badin Total Grand Total

Establishment and Support for Community Schools under BESP The Balochistan Education Foundation (BEF) is an Executing Agency for the Balochistan Education Support Project (BESP) with the financial support of World Bank. The main objective of the project is to promote public-private and community partnerships to improve access to quality primary education in Balochistan, particularly for girls. The three project components being implemented by the Implementation Partners (IPs) are (1) Establishment of New Community Schools in Rural areas, (2) Support to Private schools (3) Capacity Building. NRSP is one of the selected Implementing Partners (IPs), for the implementation of project in four districts Kech, Gawadar, Panjgoor & Awaran of Balochistan Under the Community Schools Implementation Partner (CIP), NRSP is responsible for following tasks: (a) Mobilize and ensure the community participation in the selection of Parent Education Committee (PEC) (b) Support PEC for their registration. (c) Build the capacity of PEC members in Management & Finance. (d) Assist PEC in the establishment and running the school. (e) Provide on-site classroom support to teachers. (f) Establish a baseline of School, Community and PEC.

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(g) Monitor enrollment, attendance (teacher & student), community participation and physical conditions of school; and (h) Monitor the quality of learning. NRSP conducted need assessment of the area and have established community schools. N-IRM is involved in training of PEC members and teachers under a separate agreement with BEF (that covers all the project districts in Balochistan beyond NRSP as well). Table 22: Baluchistan Education Support Project (BESP) July, 2011
Activity Needs identified for Community Schools Baseline surveys conducted in villages Village identified as feasible for Community Schools PEC Formed Membership in PEC Men Women PEC Registered Accounts Opened for PECs Meetings held with PECs Follow up / support / monitoring visits to Schools besides meetings Schools which received funds from BEF for class room / school setup School which utilized the funds from BEF for class room / school setup Schools which received funds from BEF for operations Schools which utilized funds from BEF for operations Teachers Identified Men Women Agreement Done with Teachers Men Women Students Enrolled in schools Boys Girls PEC members trained by TIP (No of Schools) Men Women Teachers Trained Men Women Achievements 72 64 62 62 434 291 129 62 62 62 101 62 62 62 62 68 57 11 68 57 11 2,594 1,379 1,215 62 242 70 31 27 4

NRSP is expecting extension of project for another one year with inclusion of infrastructure support for schools as an additional role Primary Education Support Project in District Lasbela: NRSP is implementing this project with the financial assistance of UNICEF, the project aims at enhancing primary enrollment and reducing dropouts in Lasbela District. NRSP is serving as a catalyst to actively engage individuals, communities and institution in participatory processes that will contribute to their enhanced capacity for effective decision making, resulting in improved schools and quality of education. Project achievements are listed below. Table 23: PESP project status as of July, 2011:
# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8.1 8.2 8.3 10 11 12 13 Particulars/ Activities Programme Orientation Schools' Survey Meetings for PTSMCs Formation / Reactivation Up Grading GPS Establishing PGS Trainings of PTSMCs Selection of CFS Enrollment Campaign (Seminars, Community Meetings, Enrollment walks Seminars Community Meetings Enrollment walks Distribution of Material School Monitoring & Follow up Celebrating of Teacher Day Schools' Competition Total Target 2 324 362 10 28 662 140 Achieved 2 312 238 10 9 360 70

14 60 2 870 870 2 37

09 40 2 577 677 1 17

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As of July 2011

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# 14 15 16

Particulars/ Activities Monthly Planning & Review Meetings Formation & Quarterly Meetings of DECU SDP and Small Matching Grants

Total Target 24 9 67

Achieved 18 6 27

Union Council Based Poverty Reduction Programme UCBPRP - Education Component This project is a sub project of UCBPRP project which is funded under a PC-1 by Government of Sindh. Project started in October 2009 and is expected to complete in July 2011. SRSO which is the responsible organization for the execution of this project identified NRSP as key partner to implement this project based on its past experience in similar endeavors. This project focuses on making quality education available to children in remote areas of Shikar Pur and Kandhkot. NRSP was assigned the task of identifying of non functional schools and making them functional for the better community based management and provision of necessary operational and material support. Identification of these schools proved to be a tough task, as many schools were declared functional by local education officials and it was difficult to convince them about on the site situation problem. Parents on the other hand were willing to send their children to school even in school buildings with poor conditions. Local communities are organized in SMCs and provided training for managing the school affairs. Presence of sufficient children, female capable teacher and premises for starting a school are preliminary conditions for making schools functional. Project also tries to accommodate girl students in 2nd shift in existing schools which otherwise dropout due to co education or overcrowding of schools due to limited space or availability of teachers etc. NRSP is also introducing Early Childhood Concept in some of the schools in this area on pilot basis in the project area. Training and mentoring of teachers are a major component for this project which will be conducted by NRSP IRM team. Project achievements in the project are listed below. Table 24: UCBPRP project status as of July, 2011
Achievement Non Functional School made Functional nd 2 Shift started for girls in schools Early Childhood Education Center Children Benefitted Boys Girls Teachers Trained Shikarpur 55 9 4 4144 1581 2555 102 Kandhkot 47 15 5 3980 1016 2964 95 Total 102 24 9 8124 2597 5519 197

Elimination of Abusive Child Labour in District Sukkur through Education, Vocational Training & Family Social & Economic Empowerment (NRSP-ILO IPEC CACL-II Project) Government of Pakistan has ratified ILO conventions 138 & 182 that call for elimination of child labour of all types from Pakistan by year 2016. In line with its commitments with international community, Government of Pakistan has requested ILO for technical and financial assistance to implement such model projects on child labour elimination that can be scaled by Government of Pakistan countrywide. In this connection, ILO IPEC and European Commission have launched a project in District Sukkur that focuses the elimination of Abusive Child Labour in different hazardous sectors like motor garages, auto mechanic/automobile workshops, welding plants and workshops, date & cotton picking, confectionary and furniture factories, exploitative domestic child labour, stone crushing & rag picking etc. It is planned till February 2013 after initiation in December 2009. Currently it is being implemented by NRSP in Sukkhur district. NRSP is responsible for the implementation of field level activities directly with project beneficiary children and their families. Other stakeholders, that facilitate the implementation of the project, include District Government Sukkur, Employers & Workers federations, media, local community and civil society organizations. NRSP has established a project office at Sukkur with a project manager and team of professionals. The project is being supervised from NRSP head office, Islamabad. Project aims to contribute to the elimination of child labour with special focus on the elimination of the abusive/worst forms of child labour from Pakistan. Project beneficiaries include 3,250 children and 2,000 families for different interventions

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Table 25 NRSP-ILO IPEC CACL-II Project status against key project deliverables as of July, 2011
Activities Baseline for identification of child labouers & families Designing & development of NFE curriculum Identification of NFE children Identification of families of child labourers Training of NFE teachers Establishment of NFEs Enrolling NFE children (age 5-14 years) Enrolling NFE children (age 5-14 years) in WFCL Enrolling NFE children (age 5-14 years)in Siblings Mainstreaming of NFE learners into formal schools Training of Literacy teachers Establishment of Literacy Centers Enrollment of Literacy learners (age 15-17 years) Health Screening of child labourers Vocational training for Literacy learners Providing tool kits to vocational training graduates Establishment of Mother Groups CMST to Mother Groups (Pax.) Providing Business Management training to mothers Providing vocational training to mothers Providing livestock management training to mothers Providing Micro Health Insurance to Child Labourer families Total Project Targets 01 01 1,250 2,000 40 40 1,250 750 500 1,250 40 80 2,000 3,250 2,000 1,000 120 240 1,250 750 1,250 2,000 Achievement 01 01 1,250 2,000 43 40 1522 (664 Boys+858 Girls) 1188(527 Boys+661 Girls) 334(137 Boys+197 Girls) 55 38 890 2245

60 115 142

Scaling up Rural Sanitation in 3 Flood affected districts of Sind for Child Protection and Survival through WASH Interventions NRSP is implementing this project with the financial support of Plan International. Project Interventions includes mobilizing communities towards open defecation free status, formation of village and sanitation committees, linkages construction of emergency latrines, defecation trenches, sanitation facilities and provision of bathing cubicles during the immediate response, benefiting .6 million people. Project is also supporting the installation and maintenance of hand washing facilities, de-slugging of sanitation facilities and community reconstruction of sanitation facilities in areas of return through provision of materials incentives. Project focuses on early recovery measures for returned families on longer-term sustainable sanitation interventions including behavioral change interventions through social mobilization in communities. SRSO is the sub implementing partner of NRSP in this project and responsible for implementing this project in district Ghotki and Jacbabbad whereas NRSP is implementing this project in district Thatta. During the month of July, CRPs were identified and trained. Village mapping is being completed. IEC material development work shop was organized al Plan Office Islamabad. Activity plans were collected and finalized.

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Health Malaria Control Programmes NRSP has played key role in making communities aware about protection possibilities from Malaria which is considered to be a disease of poor. It not only had partnership with various projects such as GFATM Round 2 and 7 , but also continued the awareness raising and provision of protection tools such as LLINs even after project through mainstreaming of these interventions. GFATM Round-7, Malaria Pakistan NRSP was selected as sub recipient by Directorate of Malaria Control (Principal Recipient for GFATM Round 7 Malaria in Pakistan) to carry out one of the major project component of LLIN Distribution and awareness raising campaign. Objective of GFATM Round -7 Malaria is to reduce prevalence of Malaria in highly endemic districts of Pakistan. NRSP became partner in July 2008 and is directly working itself through the network of COs and government health facilities providing maternal and child health care or malaria support services in four districts (Gawadar, Kech /Turbat, Mardan, Thatta) while in two districts it is working through SSRs TRDP ( in Tharparkar) and SRSO (in Khairpur). RSP has two major responsibilities in the project. One is to generate awareness among communities to take precautionary measures against malaria (including LLINs) and second to distribute LLINs to pregnant women and children through MCH centers - RDT centers / Microscopy centers in public sector and other outlets established by RSPs. Table 26: GFATM Round-7 Target Vs Achievement as of July 2011
Indicator Description Number of LLINs Free distributed to pregnant women or children under 5 Sub Activities # LLINs special outlets # VISIT To Health Facility # of LLIN distributed to target group at the Health facility level # of LLIN distributed to target group at the Special OUTLETS-NRSP Sub Total Sub Activities # of LLINs orientation workshops Meeting with health service providers Meeting with opinion Leaders Training of staff / Activist CO Meeting on proper utilization of LLINs and timely treatment seeking behavior Puppet shows for awareness about Malaria & proper utilization of LLINs Cumulative Events Targets Actual result 36 27 484 489 359,533 348,593

Number of opinion leaders, health care providers and decision makers reached through community based seminars on target population's awareness on increased update, proper utilization of LLIN and timely treatment seeking behavior

97,317 93,986 456,850 442,579 Total Participants (Cumulative) Men Women 5,885 9,548 2,350 1,053 1,158 549 484 157

1,672 2,192

2,585 3,732

This project is being merged with another phase of GFATM Round 10 Malaria grant with addition of new districts and continuation of present programme activities. Social marketing of LLINs: NRSP is using the revolving fund that was generated from the sale of ITNs for purchasing more nets and sale among communities. NRSP purchased 13,700 LLINs (Long Lastic Insecticide Nets) and distributed some of them free in flood affected regions in Turbat. Rest were distributed among districts for social marketing. The details of LLINs distributed in other Regions and Districts are as under Table 27: Detail of ITNs Region wise Distribution: (as of July 2011)
# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Region /District Rawalpindi Mianwali Bahawalpur RY Khan DG Khan Muzaffarabad Hyderabad Mardan Total Received 800 800 3,000 600 1,000 121 1,700 1,600 Total Sold 51 774 3,000 593 802 806 433 Free Distribution 568 Lost, Stolen or Damaged 3 4 25 Balance in Stock 746 22 7 198 121 1194 1,142

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# 9 10

Region /District Head Office Turbat Grand Total

Total Received 79 4,000 13,700

Total Sold 57 42 5,990

Free Di t ib ti

3,658 4,226

Lost, St l

32

Balance i St k 22 0 3,452

NRSP also planned distribution of LLINs under PPAF SCAD and Social Mobilization Health programme. Districts of Badin in Sindh and Awaran and Punjguur in Baluchistan were selected for this task. Purchase and distribution process was completed and 20000 LLIN were distributed among communities. Meeting Community Needs for Eye Care: Awareness about eye care and its treatment has been taken as one of the important tasks by NRSP for poor people in the rural areas. NRSP initially started this activity with Munawar Memorial Hospital (MMH) in Chakwal and is always making endeavours to expand this activity with the support of PPAF and other donors across other programme districts. NRSP has been engaged with MMH, LRBT and Shifa Eye Trust for implementation of this programme in various districts. NRSP organizes the eye camps where patients are provided check up and support while patients for cataract or other surgeries are screened and later provided direct support for surgery by the partners or linked with proper health facilities for treatment and fallow ups.
Table 28: Meeting Community Needs for Eye Care-Activities - status as of July 2011
District Chakwal Attock Rahim Yar Khan Jhelum Badin Khushab Bhakar Bhawalnagar Bhawalpur Rajan Pur DG Khan Total Partner MMH MMH Shifa Eye Trust Shifa Eye Trust LRBT LRBT MMH LRBT SHIFA LRBT LRBT No of Eye Camps 353 10 11 1 4 6 9 4 4 2 2 406 No of Patients Screened Men 14,508 263 3,328 100 764 868 415 855 1,676 230 255 24,162 Women 16,473 297 3,752 200 635 1,009 574 1,005 2,220 305 578 28,848 Patients provided cataract Men Women 1084 1143 8 12 274 7 50 58 84 76 77 23 36 1777 310 3 52 70 85 57 72 31 41 1876

Community Health Centers- Supported by PPAF NRSP is managing a Community Health Centre in Bhattian (Kotli Sattian) with the support of PPAF. The agreement was signed in July 2005. Through Community Health Centers, basic health services with special attention to mother and child health services are being provided to remote under-privileged rural populations. The in-house curative services were earlier complemented with outreach health education component. The outreach education component was closed in September 2007 due to funding limitations. PPAF could not provide funds from July 2009 to June 2010 for this project and NRSP supported the facilitiy on its onw. However PPAF resumed its support in July 2010. Table 29: Services offered at NRSP-PPAF Community Health Centers as of July 11
# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Category Number of male general patients [above 18] Number of female general patients (excluding antenatal & postnatal cases) [above 18] Number of male children [0-18 yrs] Number of female children [0-18 yrs] Number of infants (<1 yr) Number of antenatal cases Number of post natal cases Total number of deliveries Minor O.T Total OPD Total 7253 21118 3575 2736 1249 4273 226 485 840 41755

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Rehabilitating & Making Functional the Kario Medical Centre (KMC), Badin Kario Medical Center is a 20 bed hospital, in public sector responsible for providing health care to the people of Kario Ghanwar in Badin. Hospital was in poor condition due to weaknesses in management and utilization of services. Earlier British Petroleum USA had supported in its construction and refurbishment, but all had gone in vain after so many years of neglect and poor management by health authorities. British Petroleum Pakistan again decided to rehabilitate it but this time through NRSP to help create a model for benefit of the local communities in their business area. NRSP signed a MOU with District government Badin for taking over and management of health facility in July 5, 2006. A separate MOU was signed with BP Pakistan for providing support for rehabilitation and refurbishment of the health facility. DG provided operational funds for the facility in August 2008 Meanwhile NRSP has completed rehabilitation of the health facility and started operations after recruitment of required staff. KMC Badin has been made functional with fully equipped laboratory and all necessary equipment. Project funds are being transferred to NRSP byDG Badin, but there are operational delays. Now a fresh efforts are being made to access funding from DG or some other donor to continue with same standard of services in the area. Table 30: KMC-BADIN (As of July, 2011)
Activity Curative Care Male Female Old Cases Total Cumulative 19,482 28,818 494 48,794

PPAF-CECP BOT for Health and Education Facilities in Earthquake Affected Areas NRSP and PPAF joined hands to reconstruct, furnish and operate two health facilities in AJK. Funds were provided by Corporate Centre of Philanthropy USA (CECP) as relief aid for earthquake affected areas. An RHC at Ali Soojal in district Poonch Rawalakot and a BHU at village Rangla in District Bagh were selected. NRSP completed the construction and refurbishment work and then these health facilities were managed by a team of doctors at both the facilities. These facilities are now better equipped and staffed for provision of services which is reflected in huge increase in the OPD services being registered. After expirty of PPAF grant these facilities were handed back to district health officials as per agreement with them. Table 31: PPAF-CECP-Progress
Data Related to OPD Number of Total Male Patients (Above 15) Number of Total Male Patients (1-15) Number of Total Female Patients (Above 15) Number of Total Female Patients (1-15) Number of Total Infants (Male + Female) Number of Total Antenatal Cases Number of Postnatal Cases Number of Referrals Number of Deliveries at Facility Number of Children Vaccinated RHC Ali Soojal 10,957 5,908 13,709 6,072 2,592 1,193 186 21 174 7298 BHU Rangla 12,261 6,292 10,408 7,558 1,892 3,204 237 151 109 7689 Total 23,218 12,200 24,117 13,630 4,484 4,397 423 172 283 14987

Other Health Initiatives supported by PPAF NRSP is undertook various initiatives with the help of PPAF under SCAD and social mobilization health component in the districts of Badin, Awaran, Punjgoor,Bahawalpur, Bahawalnagar, Rajan Pur, DG Khan, Khushab and Bahkkar. Activities include: Distribution of LLIN for poors. 20,000 LLINs has been distributed among poor communities in districts of Badin and Awaran and Punjgoor. LHV Based Clinics NRSP established LHV based clinics for improvement of MNCH status for poor communities in remote areas. It is a kind of extension of its earlier model of CHC, which has relatively higher cost. NRSP is planning to use this centers as RH centers and will link communities with it for this service. These centers are located in Khushab, Bhakkar, Bahawalpur (2) , Rajan Pur (2), DG Khan (2) , Awaran and Punjgoor. These centers are equipped with necessary equipments and a pool of

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medicine has been provided to the communities. They will charge fees to make the centre financially viable over long term basis. Table 32: PPAF LHV based clinics status as of July 2011
Facility Name LHV based clini Shah Wala LHV based clini Vig Sadar LHV based clinic Lal Bazar Jhaoo LHV based clinic Gwargo LHV based clinic Basti Cheena LHV based clinic Basti Noshehra LHV based clinic Basti Reekra LHV based clinic Jakhar Imam Shah LHV based clinic 19/DNB LHV based clinic 06/DNB LHV based clinic Moosa Colony Total number of patients treated in 11 LHV based clinins District Khushab Bhakkar Awaran Panjgoor RajanPur RajanPur DG Khan DG Khan Bahawalpur Bahawalpur Bahawalpur Beneficiaries Total 3531 2983 2082 1411 1902 1473 1862 1585 3717 3110 5881 29537

Support for Government Health Facilities: NRSP identified RHC Khoski in Badin for rehabilitation and later management for the benefit of he poor communities. Rrehabilitation work has been completed. The building was earlier in very bad condition but now community has undertaken considerable improvement in the building. This newly rehabilitated facility is functional after provision of equipment and some additional staff by PPAF funding. The patients benefitting from the RHC has increased with satisfaction of the services offered to them from the improved facility. Table 33: RHC-Khoski Badin Beneficiaries since December 2010 till July 2011
Facility Name RHC Khoski Badin Men 3534 Women 4716 Beneficiaries Boys Girls 4750 5074 Total 18074

TBA Training: NRSP has completed out this campaign in line with its policy objective of improvement in MNCH status for poor. This course is for 30 days with more than two weeks of attachment for women already working in this field in rural areas. This component is being carried out by IRM team at Rawalpindi and at district level. Table 34: Details of TBA trainings:
S. # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Total District Awaran Punjgoor Turbat Gawadar Badin Rahim Yar Khan Bahawalpur Bahawalnagar Rajan Pur Dera Ghazi Khan Mianwali Bhakkar Khushab Kotli Rawalakot GAVI David & Lucile Packard Foundation PPAF 25 25 15 40 53 83 83 57 44 34 51 7 17 24 PAIMAN Total No of TBAs trained in district 25 25 15 40 53 83 83 57 44 34 51 7 17 534

53

442

15

Naya Qadam Trust Supporting the PWDs (People with Disabilities) (Kashmir Limbs Project previously) Numerous people lost their limbs due to the devastating earthquake in October 2005. There was a tremendous need to provide such patients sufficient artificial limbs to bring them back into an active, productive and normal life. In this regard NRSP contacted Dr. Waqar, a UK based Pakistani

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doctor to assists patients with artificial limbs. After Dr. Waqar appreciated the idea of initiating such a project and provided funding for implementation of the project named Kashmir Limbs and Rehabilitation Center which was established at NRSP compound in Muzaffarabad. The team searched for patients in different Union Councils and registered patients. Kashmir Limbs was started as a 12-bed hospital in March 2006, in a warehouse at NRSP office. It provided services to earthquake affected areas. Later NRSP with the help of Dr. Waqar formed a trust namely Naya Qadam Trust. Naya Qadam Trust aimed to provided services to people from all over Pakistan and AJK with centre located at Sihala (Rawalpindi) with the capacity to have mobile delivery unit as well. NRSP was able to access technical assistance of Bhagwan Mahaveer Vikland Sahayata Samiti (BMVSS) of India. Now this center is fully functional and providing relief to many individuals. Local suppliers have been identified for supply of materials used in the artificial limbs, while a mobile prosthetic unit was also established with the funding of Oxfam Novib. Table 35: Details of Activities under Naya Qadam (as of July 2011):
Activity No. of patients registered No. of patients treated Follow-up of patients No. of patients provided wheel chairs No. of patients provided with Tricycles No. of Patients provided with Crutches No. of patients provided with calipers Repair cases of calipers Replacement of Prosthetic cases (started from Jan 2010) Men 1,715 1,617 302 134 5 308 71 15 63 Cumulative as of May 2011 Children Women Boys Girls 261 63 41 235 50 26 62 26 5 78 2 2 5 52 39 5 12 20 11 6 3 11 3 Total 2,080 1,928 395 216 10 404 114 24 77

Support for PWFLs (People with functional limitations) Funded by PPAF NRSP implemented PPAF Disability project in the 16 union councils of District Bagh and Rawalakot as part of PPAF funded Reconstruction and Rehabilitation (R&R) project. The approach of the project was Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) that focused on empowerment of PWFLs and their families. In this project PPAF / NRSP also collaborated with ERRA to strengthen the interventions and avoid duplication of services. Project has three components. 1. Provision of services of mobilization and empowerment of PWFLs and their families 2. Capacity building for services providers and civil society organizations 3. Linkage of PWFLs with service providers Following activities have been carried out under this project Training of the Staff (DSWs) Identification of PWFLs in the area Awareness raising sessions / medical camps Information collection about DSPs (Disability service Providers) in District Preparation of rehabilitation plan for people with PWFL and their referral to service providers Capacity building of PWFLs Table 36: PWFLs (People with functional limitations) Progress
Project Activities Total Number of PWDs identified Total Men Total Women Total Children No of counseling session conducted Men Women Number of Rehabilitation plan implemented Total PWD referred Rawalakot 1,509 721 577 211 765 340 425 1435 150 Bagh 5,249 2,582 2,504 163 420 220 195 1,622 3,349 Total 6,758 3,303 3,081 374 1,177 556 616 3,057 3,499

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Project Activities Medical Camp Arranged (Events) Men participants Women participants Awareness Raising Workshops conducted Skill Training of PWFL (Events) Attendant ship Training (Events) Assistance provided through linkages # of patients provided wheel chair/tricycle through NRSP Naya Qadam Project # of patients provided limbs, calipers, crutches through NRSP Naya Qadam Project # of patients provided Visual Aid through Global Management Team # of patients provided Hearing Devices through Global Management Team # of patients provided Orthotic Devices through PIPOS # of patients referred to different hospitals

Rawalakot 9 714 605 40 13 8 58 114 325 185 139 150

Bagh 12 1,322 1,223 24 25 8 60 44 583 251 522 137

Total 21 2,036 1,828 59 38 16 118 158 908 436 661 287

This project was given extension in the district of Rawalakot.


Project Status in Rawalkot Extended Phase as of July 2011 S# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Activity Total HHs assessed Total No.of PWDs identified Total Men PWDs identified Total women PWDs identified Number of Children with Disability (CWDs) identified? Skill Trainings No.of Medical Camps arranges No of Pwds attended camp No.of rehablitation plans formed Cumulative Project Achievements M F Total 5,642 5,642 1,185 1,169 2,354 251 376 627 21 21 2 2 2 1,807 1,807 1807 2,744 2,744 2744 1,185 1,169 2,354 251 376 627

DFPAP-FALAH (Family Advancement on Life and Health) Project Supported by USAID Diversification of Family Planning Activities in Pakistan (DFPAP)/ FALAH was a five year project funded by USAID focusing on twenty districts of Pakistan. Population Council lead the implementing consortium with other national and international organizations included Constella Futures, Greenstar, HANDS, JPHIGO, Mercy Corp, Save the Children and RSPN. The consortium works under the leadership of the Govt., particularly Ministry of Population Welfare and Health and involves both public and private sectors extensively. Rural Support Programmes Network (RSPN) is one of the consortium partners and implemented FALAH project in 7 of the 20 districts. Being a part of RSPN, NRSP (National Rural Support Programme) implemented DFPAP/FALAH Project in 4 districts of Pakistan. These districts included Turbat (Kech), Gawadar, Thatta and DG Khan. Result A: Demand Creation for FP and Birth Spacing Result B: Revitalization of High-quality Birth Spacing and FP Services in the Public Health Sector Result C: Reinforcement of High-quality Family Planning and Birth Spacing Services in the Private Sector Result D: Social Marketing of Family Planning Commodities Currently NRSP is partner in two districts working on Results A. These districts are Thatta, DG Khan. Project interventions starts with identification of Married Couples through community facilitators identified during introductory dialogues.These married couples are sensitized through group meeting on Birth spacing methods arranged by NRSP-FALAH mobilizers with the help of Community facilitator in the field. The details regarding listing of married couples and their support for understanding the birthspacing and linkage with service providers is listed below

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Table 37: FALAH-Identification of Pax for sensitization session


S. # 1 2 3 4 Total Dialogues conducted M Thatta D.G. Khan Turbat Gawadar Total 124 144 130 127 225 W 123 145 141 120 268 M (pax) 1606 1610 1526 1454 3216 W (Pax) 1665 1850 2180 1846 3515 Total community based volunteers (CBV) identified M W T 117 117 234 117 117 234 129 143 272 127 117 234 234 234 468

Districts

S. # 1 2 3 4

Distri cts Thatta D.G. Khan Turbat Gawa dar Total

Regist ered MWR As 8,092 9,750

Religious leader and Notables 90 100

Training of CBVs M 8 7 W 8 7 M (Pax) 116 129

Group meetings with MWRAs and Husbands W W W M M (Pax) (pax) (Pax) 118 370 345 6,718 6,318 124 562 266 134 406 192 120 1063 9,173 4246 1995 22132 5,214 2262 1283 15077

No of clients who adopted Birth Spacing Method 945 1573

17,842

190

15

15

245

242

1332

2518

Positioning of Family Planning as a Health Intervention (Sponsored by David & Lucile Packard Foundation) The project aims to pilot a program of integration of reproductive health and family planning component in the mainstream community development activities carried out by RSPs, in the remote areas of District Rajanpur and Rahim Yar Khan. NRSP started this project in collaboration with David and Lucile Packard Foundation for three years. Sensitization of family members is done through social mobilization by the community organization and their activists leading to increased awareness among the people of these two districts. NRSP social mobilization with micro finance program and Reproductive Health/Family Planning act as two prong strategy to benefit population of these areas. NRSP is utilizing the social capital that includes Activists, COs, VOs and LSO for the implementation of project activities. An extensive baseline survey was conducted. Its findings supported in formulation of project strategies. The activities for the implementation of project included: 1. 2. 3. 4. Couple registration Awareness raising of couples through CRPs in multiple sessions about RH Linkages of interested couples with the service providers both in public and private sector Capacity building of TBAs for improvement in maternal health services and working as an agent for RH services 5. Capacity building of service providers for effective delivery of RH services 6. Advocacy with local and provincial government for improvement of RH services in rural areas

Project team of social organizers works closely with Community Resource Persons in the area and CO members for listing of couples and awareness raising campaigns. Awareness raising is also conducted through puppet shows. Project team not only monitors the quality of dialogues conducted by CRPs but also keeps track of couples adopting various methods of FP / Birth Spacing.

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Table 38: Positioning of Family Planning as a Health Intervention, Project Status as of July, 2011
Districts No. of UCs Intervened No. of CRPs Trained 210 200 410 No. of sessions conducted Couples Registered Men 4,813 3,960 8,773 MWRA 4,835 3,960 8,795 No. of participants Men 22,080 13,834 35,914 MWRA 22,348 14,264 36,612 Couples which adopted Methods after Project Intervention 668 2,365 3,063

Rahim Yar Khan Rajanpur Total

38 23 61

23,000 17,623 40,623

Location Wise Training TBA Training Client Centered Approach Leadership in RH Post Abortion Care SHRH of Adolescent Other Staff Training etc Total Rahim Yar Khan 111 16 2 3 6 138 Rajan Pur 100 5 2 6 5 118 Head Office 22 8 1 6 37 17 7 9 33 Total Men Women 211 26 5 10 11 263 Total 211 43 12 10 20 296 16 7 9 32 19 5 7 8 39 NRSP Staff Men Women

Category Wise Service Providers Public Private 211 6 3 2 3 9 216 5 5 Men Women 211 3 3 3 220

NRSP also organizes health camps with focus on RH. So far 608 women have benefitted in these camps. NRSP is also trying to link up various projects with our current project interventions for complementing the project efforts and generating good impact. Support for People of Pakistan by David & Lucile Packard Foundation in Emergencies Rehabilitation of damaged health Facilities in the flood affected areas of DG Khan and Rajanpur Packard Foundation had been very generous to provide support for people of Pakistan during various crisis situation. It also provided funds for rehabilitation of damaged public health facilities in the flood affected districts of Pakistan. They funded renovation and service provision through NRSP for five health facilities which were identified by the concerned district governments. These facilities included: BHU Yaroo (DG Khan) BHU Sheroo (DG Khan) BHU Thull Shumali (Rajan Pur) BHU Jahan Pur (Rajan Pur) BHU Hazrat Wala (Rajan Pur) The project aimed to improve the access of the communities in the flood affected areas to quality health services. Project support is being provided in the form of renovation of infrastructure, provision of equipment, medicine, staff and training of staff. NRSP has completed the renovation of these facilities and equipment has also been placed there. NRSP has now started service delivery through additional staff hired by it for supporting the already present staff.
DG Khan S. No MCH Services Offered Since January 2011 BHU Yaroo Since Jan 2011 5,746 696 555 127 26 BHU Sheroo Since Jan 2011 63 36 48 0 1 BHU Thull Shumali Since Jan 2011 8,454 1039 853 287 31 Rajan Pur BHU Jahan Pur Since Jan 2011 0 0 0 0 0 BHU Hazrat Wala Since Jan 2011 0 0 0 0 0 Total As of May, 2011 13,265 1,558 1,307 355 57

1 2 4 5 6

No of OPD patients No of Antenatal Done No of Pregnant women given TT Vaccination No of FP clients No of deliveries conducted

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DG Khan S. No MCH Services Offered Since January 2011 BHU Yaroo Since Jan 2011 129 1000 BHU Sheroo Since Jan 2011 7 56 BHU Thull Shumali Since Jan 2011 52 630

Rajan Pur BHU Jahan Pur Since Jan 2011 0 0 BHU Hazrat Wala Since Jan 2011 0 0

Total As of May, 2011 137 1,573

7 8

No of Postnatal done No of Children vaccinated

Supporting health interventions for IDPs at BHU Baidara, Swat: David & Lucile Packard Foundation showed keen interest in supporting the initiatives undertaken by NRSP for the support of IDPs from Swat conflict. NRSP proposed provision of RH services through mobile and at public health facilities through competent female service providers. Foundation agreed to fund 40000 US$ for the proposed project. The project was initiated in September, 2009. The main objectives of this project included; to ensure the availability of quality health support especially for women, to create awareness among men and women about RH and to rehabilitate the IDPs in their hometowns. NRSP was assigned BHU Baidara by DG Swat for this purpose. Health facilitiy was renovated , equipment and medicines were provided while a LHV was hired for provision of services. The project went very successful and there was tremendous increase in OPD and RH service provision to women and children. NRSP later also supported DHQ Saidu Sharif in getting some equipment for the maternity ward under this project. Table 39: MCH Services offered at NRSP managed BHU in Swat
S. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Services Offered No of OPD patients Men Women Children No of Antenatal Done No of Pregnant women given TT Vaccination No of Children vaccinated As of May, 2011 36,361 6,469 19,396 10,496 1,864 1,267 10,512

Support of The David&Lucile Packard Foundation for improving Organization Effectiveness Packard Foundation provided an OE grant of US$ 48023 for bringing improvement in its IT section which provides support to all the sectors of NRSP and is in the change process to support the programme activities which are now at very large scale and are so diversified in nature. A consultant firm has been hired by NRSP for this purpose which is working with IT section. Partnership with GAVI: NRSP entered into partnership with GAVI alliance with their financial support initially for 18 months (Technical Partners include UNICEF & WHO). NRSP started implementing mother and child health care initiatives through GAVI Project in rural remote population and semi urban areas of the 04, selected Districts of Baluchistan and AJ&K regions of Pakistan. The districts were Turbat, Gwadar in Baluchistan and Kotli and Rawalakot in AJK. The project tried to improve maternal, newborn and child health of the population, improve and sustain immunization coverage, particularly accessing deprived populations and also improve community knowledge on these issues. NRSP focused on the following strategies, Increased awareness, and promote positive maternal and neonatal health behaviors around key MNH indicators namely routine EPI with special focus on TT vaccination, ANC, clean and safe delivery through social mobilization. Increase access to the Maternal and Newborn Care through community involvement in maternal and child health services and facilitate district health department for provision of services in target districts. Capacity Building of Local activists and CO members to work for Maternal & Neonatal Health under GAVI Project in targeted District. Facilitate COs/VDOs/LSOs to design and implement innovative strategies to increase awareness and accessibility for maternal & neonatal and reproductive health services for the sustainability of project interventions.

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Project was later restricted to Rawalakot and Turbat /Gawadar districts and was extended till December 2011. Table 40: GAVI Progress as of July 2011
S. no 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Activities Beneficiaries Annual Targets Targets Achieved Male Female Children Community sensitized to promote positive MNH bahaviour 16 10 12 3 20 3 1 17 10 12 3 20 3 1 3 Routine 4 1 1 260 475 2025 12 206 302 14 1250 174 1037 3640 657 728 123 Total 0 1608 529 2358 331 583 118

Awareness sessions on MNH key messages Facilitate EPI for fully immunize Street Puppetry Training & shows TT vaccination campaign Awareness session on TT vaccination/MNH Medical Camps Provide support to the district to improve EPI through addressing missed opportunities and defaulters cases

CMAM & IYCF Community Based Management of Acute Malnutrition &Infant and Young Child Feeding The overall objective of this project is to reduce the rate of Global Acute Malnutrition in children of 6-59 months old and PLW(Pregnant and Lactating Women)to below 10% in the 5 target districts at the end of the 9 month period, and through this reduce malnutrition related mortality and morbidity. Under the overall objective of the project, NRSP proposed to implement Community based interventions for the management of acute malnutrition in 85 Union Councils in the 5 Districts of Punjab. Their division is as follows, D G Khan Rajanpur RYK Mianwali Bhakkar : : : : : 20 Union Councils 29 Union Councils 12 Union Councils 12 Union Councils 12 Union Councils

The program implementation will continue in partnership with Department of Health (DoH) and WFP. NRSP is responsible for implementing activities related to the project. The main activities related to the project are: 1- Community Outreach Component 2- Outpatient Therapeutic Program (OTP) 3- Supplementary Feeding Program (SFP) 4- Referral/follow-up to Stabilization Centers (SC). Table 41: The activities in July-2011 are as follows,
Districts DGKhan Rajanpur RYK Mianwali Bhakkar Total Children Under 5 screened 40879 31700 24677 11855 13738 Total PLW screened 8800 1021 8381 2648 4381 Under 5 Children enrolled in SFP 2824 4081 740 678 1104 PLWs enrolled in SFP 999 657 593 235 534 Under 5 Children enrolled in OTP 599 1451 456 107 283

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Districts DGKhan Rajanpur RYK Mianwali Bhakkar

SFP Child 509 1422 279 850 567

CURED OTP Child 309 434 274 205 194

PLW 273 502 60 64 146

Default (Need More Attention) SFP OTPChild PLW Child 113 62 52 358 234 210 39 35 37 135 54 37 22 18 9

Earlier NRSP also implemented this programme in Swat , Swabi, Mardan areas after IDP crisis in that region. These programmes are now closed. The achievements of these programmes are listed below.
Total Children U5 screened 51166 SFP CURE SFP Child 5733 Total PLW screened 21346 U5 Children enrolled in SFP 6555 OTP Default SFP Child 25 CURE OTP Child 1174 Default OTP Child 22 CURE PLW 3090 PLWs enrolled in SFP 3549 U5 Children enrolled in OTP 1432 PLW Default PLW 15

Family Nutrition Component Of Plan Milk Value Chain Project (PMVCP) The main objective of Family Nutrition Component of Plan Milk Value Chain Project is to increase the nutritional status of children and women by awareness raising about milk consumption at household level and inclusion of various other available means. Project is being conducted in 100 villages of Vehair, with the support of PLAN International which is supporting another livestock development project in the same area. NRSP is responsible for assessment of the nutritional patterns and current practices in the area and to raise awareness in communities to ensure proper use of milk / milk products by children and women. NRSP has carried out the survey and an awareness raising campaign has been designed which would be carried out through CRPs in the local communities. CRPs have already been identified for this purpose. Disaster Risk Reduction Programme: NRSP is implementing a project of Disaster Risk Reduction in district Gawader, Region Turbut, funded by world Food Program. The purpose of this project is to run School Safety Program for 100 Primary schools students and teachers through IEC material on Prepare disaster preparedness and response information. To develop this material 2 manuals and one set of Flip charts showing disaster preparedness in local context of Pakistan is in the Process of development and printing Process.

66

As of July 2011

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Environment and Natural Resource Management


The quality of the relationship between ecological and social systems defines, to a large extent, the quality of community life and the ability of communities and their institutions to sustain themselves. The links between poverty and the environment are bi-directional: environmental degradation, whether occurring naturally or as a result of human interventions, threatens the livelihoods of the rural poor most of whom depend directly on agriculture, livestock and poultry, horticulture and orchard management to earn a living. Basic nutritional needs can not be met when crop yields are reduced because of poor soil quality. Home-based enterprises requiring natural resources must be abandoned when those resources are no longer available or affordable. Similarly, poverty has negative environmental effects when the poor must resort to unsustainable practices - cutting down trees and polluting water supplies, for example - in order to survive. Whatever its cause, environmental degradation affect the poor and vulnerable first, because they have fewer social or economic resources with which they meet their needs and little to fall back on in times of scarcity. In many areas environmental degradation has created a new class of poor people those whose resource-based livelihoods have been severely damaged. Renewable Energy for a Clean and Green Future NRSP is committed to help farmers harness freely available renewable sources of energy. Thus helping to reduce fuel costs, increase productivity and halt the depletion of natural resources. In September 2005 NRSP installed solar-powered LED lights and 12-volt batteries in 28 households in village Markhal, Talagang. The homes are all adjacent to each other in a single lane. The Project is part of a Pehli kiran (first light) project. The 180-household village is 42 km from the NRSP FU Talagang office. There is no other source of electricity in this under-developed area. Before the actual installation, ENRM staff members discussed the details of the installation, care and use of the lighting equipment and the maintenance required. A 4-member committee has been established to look after the project. Every household deposited Rs 1,000 in a CO account before the lights were installed and each will deposit Rs 150 per month for the next two years. The money will be used to replace the solar battery, which has a projected life of two years and any bulbs which require replacement. Three Effective Micro-organism Fermenters which function to speed the decomposition of manure used as fertiliser and reduce urea fertiliser requirement by almost 50% have been installed so far, one in Hyderabad and two in Lodhran. Before the fields are irrigated, the fermenter is filled with water, manure and organic waste. The EM medium, a liquid, is added to the fermenter to speed the decomposition process. NRSP contributed Rs 56,000 to the cost of the 3 EM fermenters. Tree Planting. All Government Departments, NGOs and private institutions are encouraged to actively participate in national tree planting campaigns launched twice every year. NRSP holds workshops in its Field Units and Regional offices and encourages its CO members to plant trees. In 2003-04, with the financial support of Barani Village Development Project, NRSP facilitated the planting of 225,000 fruit and forest plants in the rain-fed Potohar areas. It also facilitated the planting of 18,500 fruit trees: community members paid the total cost of Rs 10,500. Livestock Vaccination Camps are frequently held at Field Unit offices. These help farmers to learn more about preventive and curative measures for livestock diseases. During 2003-04, over 61,000 animals were vaccinated in these camps. New Initiatives: Sulphuric Acid Generator In 2003-04, NRSP introduced two units of a new technology called a Sulphuric Acid Generator (SAG) in the Bahawalpur / Lodhran / Vehari Region. The SAG treats saline water as it leaves the tubewell and makes it suitable for irrigation. The SAG machine adds sulfur granules to tubewell water, thereby restoring the pH balance of the water.

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

NRSP purchased two SAGs from a private firm called Sweet Water Pakistan, each costing Rs. 200,000. The sites were selected according to the salinity /alkalinity of the groundwater. The NRSP staff determined that the annual expenditures of SAG machine irrigating 10 acres of land for two crop seasoning amounts to Rs. 10,000. The increase in yield of these 10 irrigated acres amounted to Rs. 50,000. In Vehari, the yield of one farmers 10-acre cotton crop increased by 3 maunds per acre. Although it is a relatively small increase in yield with in one year, it is a good beginning and bodes well for future crops. The farmer with the second machine increased his wheat yield by 5 maunds per acre, resulting in additional income of Rs 1,750 in the rabi season. Wheat seed multiplication During the 2005 Rabi season the TASSCO Seed Corporation in Hyderabad contacted NRSP for the multiplication of high-yielding varieties of wheat seed (TJ-83). TASSCO provided 3,600 Kg of seed (enough to seed 298 acres) free of cost and the CO members agreed to return the same quantity of seed after harvesting. NRSP also requested 2,100 Kg of wheat seed for Mardan Region: it was distributed to 24 farmers. The Rawalpindi Region also purchased 2,000 packets of high-quality winter-vegetable seeds on behalf of its CO members in all Field Units from the Ayub Research Station in Faisalabad. CO members bought the packets for Rs 22/ each. Fruit Tree Plantation The NRSP Rawalpindi Hub Office has distributed one million saplings and vines among its COs, since its inception. During the spring plantation campaign in 2005, 14,332 fruit saplings were distributed in Pindi Gheb, Attock, Talagang, Julyd and Pind Dadan Khan Field Units. NRSP-IRM also conducted workshops on spring plantation. The fruit plants distributed were mosami, shakri, lemon, guava, apricot, almond, grapes and pomegranate. Solar Electrification in Dandar village Dandar is a small village of Union Council Dandar located at a distance of 180 Km from the regional office Turbat. It is a small mountainous area with extreme heat and dryness in summer. Temperature rises up to 51 degree centigrade in summer. It is an extremely under developed area and people do not have any fixed source of livelihood. There is absence of many basic necessities of life like water, sanitation system, and electricity. NRSP through linkages with Alternate Energy Development Board provided electricity to 120 Households through solar units. Each solar unit includes 6 bulbs, 1 fan and 1 solar geyser. By this intervention the local people are very happy and thankful for providing electricity with charges of Rs.200 per month for 25 years. It is a low cost activity in this far-flung area of Kech District. After this intervention the 5-neighbor village's community organizations (COs) submitted resolutions for the provision of solar energy electrification. Rice Crop Demonstration Plots NRSP Hyderabad Region established 7 demonstration plots of 7 acres and provided 7 mounds of rice seed varieties i.e. Sarshar, Aeri-6 and local variety to 7 cas of District Badin on sharing bases. Aresta Agro Chemical and Engro Chemical Pakistan Ltd. provided technical assistance and pesticide for insect pest control. The COs member provided fertilizer and labor for looking after 7 demonstration plots. The average yield of local varieties is 45 to 60 monds per acre, whereas the average yield of Sarshar, Aeri-6 varieties is 60 to 90 monds per acre. As a result, 12 to 35 monds per acre yield increased as compare to local varieties.

68

As of July 2011

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Table 42: Environment and Natural Resource Management as of July, 2011


# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 Activities Amount of improved seed arranged in Kg/Packets Amount of Fertilizer bags arranged Amont of pesticides arranged in kgs/ltrs No of poultry units arranged No of forest Saplings arranged No of fruit saplings arranged No of orchared established No of saplings raised No of nurseries established No of guidance/demonstration plots established No of animals vaccinated No of poultry chicks vaccinated No of villages underwent soil testing Units of agri-machinery supplied No of workshop/field days in agriculture No of workshop/field days in livestock No of workshop/field days in poultry Breed improvement bulls No of workshop/field days in forestry Urea Mineral Molasses Blocks Bucket kit/Abairee kit Mini Dam Established Dugwells Drip irrigation system ponds Deworming a.Large animals b.Small animals Artificial insemination containers arranged Biogas plant installed Energy Efficient Stoves E.M Fermentor IPM Pest Control Card Distribution Salt Model Solar Geyser Solar LED light units installed Quantity
5,005,393 3,117,020 1,112,888 2,809,065 1,421,607 1,671,708 1,987 8,850,937 1,326 6,484 2,254,919 1,948,136 1,090 527 5,258 5,027 820 1,476 24,166 94,910 24,588 545 3,074 85 1,008 393,703 302,777 5,687 269 1,567 2 8,102 28 160 776

Households
246,742 143,134 49,050 30,440 45,899 45,663 2,682 9,066 5,833 79,559 716,054 464,038 1,225 2,489 104,737 57,728 9,134 2,898 3,695 15,927 2,448 2,372 8,057 116 2,103 29,640 29,745 1,525 283 1,845 2 500 28 160 1,243

COs
34,064 16,267 3,914 5,535 8,587 7,518 729 912 449 6,724 43,096 6,687 376 434 12,703 9,606 1,454 1,053 670 5,043 490 204 2,164 65 595 10,102 5,515 273 103 377 2 72 26 57 176

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Table 43: Livestock Monthly Progress Report as of July, 2011


Activities No. of RLOs working No. of DVMs working No. of CAs working No. of CLEWs trained (Male) No. of CLEWs trained (Female) No. of CLEWs working/active (Male) No. of CLEWs working/active (Female) No. of CLEWs working with NRSP (Male) No. of CLEWs working with NRSP (Female) No. of CLEWs working Independently (Male) No. of CLEWs working Independently (Female) No. of WLFs training events No. of WLFs Trained No. of active WLFs No.of Awareness Raising Sessions by WLFs - No. of DVM Clinics visited - No. of DVM Clinics record reviewed - No. of days in field - No. of meetings held with Provincial depts - No. of meetings held with District depts No. of case studies prepared No. animals treated - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep - Goat - Poultry - Others No. of animal surgeries performed - Minor surgeries - Major surgeries No. animals dewormed - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep - Goat - Poultry - Others No. animals dipped - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep - Goat - Poultry - Others No. animals vaccinated - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep - Goat - Poultry - Others No. animals Inseminated - Buff - Cattle No. of CO meetings attended - No. farmers participated (Male) - No. farmers participated (Female) No.of livestock Camps Arranged Gross Income Generated **Income from sale of medicines (Rs) Income from sale of vaccines (Rs) Income from sale of semen (Rs) Income from DVM services (Rs) Income from any other activity (please specify)(Rs) No. of animals provided first aid - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep Jul,11 5 10 22 922 31 654 21 253 10 45 34 46 1 11,424 2,399 2,680 2,471 3,514 342 18 39 33 6 35,534 6,982 8,027 9,169 8,880 1,813 663 13,836 2,324 2,006 3,973 3,940 1,503 90 40,513 7,347 7,600 8,144 10,377 7,045 321 127 194 4,431 2,410 2,021 21 850,914 712,831 53,731 40,540 43,812

770 1,143 615

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Activities - Goat - Poultry - Others No. animals dewormed - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep - Goat - Poultry - Others No. animals vaccinated - Buff (Cow/Bull) - Cattle (Cow/Bull) - Sheep - Goat - Poultry - Others No. animals Inseminated - Buff - Cattle Beneficiary Data* Households covered No. of Beneficiaries Male Female Note: Note: Beneficiaries will include all those benefited through the activities of RLOs, DVMs, CLEWs & WLF

Jul,11 800 167 5 6,320 2,549 1,838 846 1,087 17,665 4,545 2,684 4,113 6,323 102 77 25 10,702 66,257 34,644 31,613

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Monitoring Evaluation and Research


The Monitoring, Evaluation and Research (MER) section is responsible for systematically documenting programme implementation and collecting the data that makes it possible to assess the impact and effectiveness of NRSP activities. The Flow of Data Quantitative data recording begins with the CO itself, which records all details of its activities, including its minutes, resolutions adopted, and Minutes, in a Karwai (proceedings) Register. The Field Units collect ground-level data about every CO the number of members, the savings they have accumulated, the training courses their members have taken, their NRM activities, the TBAs who have been trained, and the amount of micro-credit borrowed and repaid, and so on. Data collected in the Field Units flows in to the District Offices and then to the Regional offices, where it is verified and consolidated into a Monthly Progress Report (MPR). The Regional MPRs and the sectoral data (MEDP, HRD, PITD, SSS, and NRM) are consolidated into a single monthly Programme Update at the Head Office. Qualitative data is captured in case studies and assessment studies, which describe the impact of NRSP interventions on individuals and projects. Pre-Project Analysis The MER section prepares Project proposals that identify the activities relevant to the purpose and intended outcomes of the Project. The Situation Analysis is a useful tool to assess the development needs and potential of an area. A Situation Analysis makes it possible to identify relevant and feasible Project interventions for specific social, economic and/or environmental contexts. The data in the Situation Analysis also serves as a benchmark for evaluations, enabling us to measure rates of growth, how well we are meeting established targets, and so on. Monitoring and Information Systems Effective monitoring of the quantitative aspects of the mainstream NRSP Programme and the Projects is accomplished through MIS systems. These include MIS for Social Mobilization, PITD, HRD, Micro-credit, Micro-health insurance. The Monthly Progress Reports generated from these MIS provide the data for the monthly Programme Update. The Human Resource Development MIS, which makes it possible to track Regional training activities, has been extended into all the Regions. In a related activity, the training data recorded in Regional offices since NRSPs inception has been entered into the HRD regional MIS in every Region. This makes it possible to establish a computerized database which reaches back to the first ever training courses offered by IRM. With this in place, trend analysis, cost effectiveness studies, and gender-focused analysis become much simpler to accomplish. Other MIS databases developed include one for the GFATM (Insecticide Treated Nets) Project, and one for the relief activities. Assessments and Evaluations In NRSP Evaluation is done both externally and internally. i. External Evaluations: These are done by external agencies and donors, which are for whole of the programme, region specific and / or for specific projects undertaken by NRSP. These studies include Assessing the Economic Impacts of NRSPs Micro credit Program in Bahawalplur by Sustainable Development Policy Institute SDPI, 2009 Impact and Portfolio Assessment of the Micro-credit Program in the NRSPs Dera Ghazi Khan (DGK) and Barani Village Development (BVD) Project by Sustainable Development Policy Institute SDPI, 2009 Impact Assessment of Sugarcane Productivity Enhancement Project conducted by an Independent Consultant (Mr. Mansoor Hasan Khan), 2006 Post Project Evaluation Report of Community Based Disaster Risk Management Project by an Independent Consultant (Mr. Mansoor Hasan Khan), 2009

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End of Project Evaluation Post Disaster Livelihoods Reconstruction Project by an independent Consultant (Mr. Zafar U Ahmed), 2008 Interim Evaluation of NRSP by UNDP, 1998 Impact Assessment of CPI by PPAF, 2002 Community Schools Project Evaluation Study by Learning for Life Community Organizations and Rural Development: Experience in Pakistan by Mehmood Hassan Khan. ii. Internal Evaluation: Internal evaluation is done through Impact Studies and Social Audits. a) Impact Studies These are conducted periodically to assess the impact of various sectoral or project level interventions undertaken. These impact studies are primarily conducted by MER professionals. Some recent impact assessment studies include: Impact evaluation study of repeat credit cases (Urban Poverty Alleviation Programme) Impact assessment survey of NRSP's credit operations in Vehari Assessment of Micro-enterprise Development - Credit Utilization The Impact of NRSP Credit on Maize Crop: A Case-Study in ICT Impact assessment of micro-credit intervention for poverty alleviation of ex-footballstitcher families (Sialkot) Impact assessment of micro-credit intervention in enterprise development (A case study of Sialkot Region) Impact studies of Peter Engine & land leveling Impact assessment study of cotton production technology training Utilization of vocational training & its impact in the Rawalakot Region Utilization of vocational training & its impact in the Turbat Region Case study on impact assessment of interventions undertaken by CO Alfalah (Islamabad Capital Territory) Case-study on impact assessment of interventions undertaken by CO Markazi ICT) Impact of NRSP Credit on Basmati Rice Production in Khushab Credit Utilization and Impact Analysis on Income in Sialkot

73

As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Partnerships for Economic Empowerment


1 Implementation of Support Package of Government of Sindhs Grant of State land to Landless Harees Government of Sindh 28-months (July 09 July 11) 6 Districts of Sindh Province Thatta, Badin, Mirpur Khas, Nawab Shah, Sanghar, Matiari Rs 365,452,362/- (NRSP Component) 1,769 Landless Harees

Donor: Duration: Location: Total Cost of Project: Total beneficiary:

The project is being implemented in 17 Districts of Sindh Province and NRSP is one of the implementing agency besides with SRSO and TRDP. NRSPs responsibility is Social Mobilization, capacity building of the beneficiaries and organizing the Cooperatives of the Landless Harees under Cooperative Society Act. Proposed Beneficiaries: The project aims at socioeconomic rehabilitation of 1,769 such landless Haree households that have been provided state land by Government of Sindh. These include 85% women. Project Objective: Socioeconomic rehabilitation of landless harees through the provision of state land, agriculture inputs and skills for poverty elimination. Key Project Deliverables Identification of 1,769 haree households Establishment and capacity building of 59 Cooperatives of Harees Registration of 59 Cooperatives of the Harees Preparation of 1,769 land development plans Conducting poverty scorecard Social and technical appraisal of 1,769 harees for the distribution of land development cash grants Provision of agriculture inputs seed, fertilizer, pesticides, weedicides Extension services for improved crop management practices Capacity building of Cooperatives in office management and productive linkages development Linking 1,769 hare households with the micro health insurance programme of Government of Sindh NRSP has established 9 Social Mobilization Units in the project districts and has also brought on board entire project staff. The project update progress is presented in the following table. Table 44: Landless Harees Project Progress
Activities Identification of Harees Poverty scorecard, Land Development & Assessment Planning Total Eligible Harees Distribution of Land Development Cash Grants Provision of Agri. inputs (seed, fertilizers) Establishment of COs/Cooperatives of Harees Cooperative/Cos Total Project Targets 2,239 2,239 1,558 1,423 1,379 240 700 Thatta 1,133 845 845 765 739 98 175 Badin 830 588 588 519 515 107 192 Mirpur Khas 186 78 78 78 73 13 42 District wise Progress Nawab Sanghar Matiari Shah 59 12 15 36 36 36 31 10 25 12 12 12 12 7 11 11 11 7 5 Hyderabad 4 3 3 2 Total 2,239 1,573 1,573 1,423 1,377 240 434

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Activities Management Training Cooperative Book Keeping Training Cooperative Planning Training Agriculture Workshops/Experience Sharing Cooperative Members Exposure Visits Linking Harees with Government of Sindhs Micro Health Insurance Scheme No of Haree Members below 23, PC,Provide Poultry Unit of 5 Birds No of Haree Members below 23, PC,Provided set of Four Fruit Plant Saplings No of Haree Members below 23, PC,Given Micro Drip Family Nutrition Kit No of Haree Member House and Land GPRS as per SUPARCO Provided to BOR

Total Project Targets 236 236 1,404 472

Thatta

Badin

Mirpur Khas 92 -

Sanghar

District wise Progress Nawab Matiari Shah 25 12 7 -

Hyderabad

Total

257 -

248 -

641 -

618

316

302

618

600

251

226

72

28

12

11

600

265

78

81

55

28

12

11

265

550

191

234

74

28

12

11

550

1,325

738

450

78

36

12

11

1,325

* The difference is such cases/hrees who have still not qualified for the project interventions. The major obstacles are either litigation cases or are land patches that have no access to irrigation water. There are some other minor factors as well. The project interventions will be advanced all such Haree families who will overcome the existing impeding factors to fulfill the project requirements.
2 Rewarding Innovations at the District Level: USAID Project in Sindh

This USAID Rewarding Innovations initiative, implemented by RSPN, is intended to create new opportunities for District governments to respond to locally-prioritized development needs in partnership with private sector firms. USAID provides a maximum of 75% of the money needed: the remaining amount (at least 25%), which July include money, land, labour and materials, is raised by the local Government and its private sector partners. NRSP is one of the partners in the Project: NRSPs involvement in the Project activities in Sindh is described below. Rounds I and II: Publicising the Project The Rewarding Innovations Project was formally launched at a Workshop held in Hyderabad in July 2004. 118 people attended, including 12 District Council members, 21 Tehsil Council members, and 4 Union Council members. In addition, 5 private sector representatives and 73 people from the NGO sector and the public at large attended. The details of the event had been well publicized in the local print media to ensure that the process was open to all. Of the 61 project proposals put forward, two were awarded grants, after they were approved by the Technical Committee. The second round of attracting proposals was held in Sukkur and Nawabshah in Sep 2004. 74 people attended the Workshop. Of these, 8 were representing District Councils, 5 were from Tehsil Councils, 4 from Town Councils and 29 from Union Councils. Two people from the private sector attended and 26 members of the public. 64 proposals were submitted, and 8 were approved by the technical committee and awarded grants. Of the proposals submitted in Round II, 44 (30%) were from Union Councils. Of the total proposals submitted in round-II, 44% were from Union Councils. Six proposals listed below were finally approved. Two projects: Sulphuric Acid Generators by TMA Kotdeji District

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As of July 2011

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Khairpur and drinking water supply scheme by UC Sinjhoro District Sangher were withdrawn by the applicants before signing the formal agreements. Cost of two projects: Construction of two water tanks in villages of Taluka Kunri District Umerkot and Education in Katcha (School improvement project) UC Bago Daho District Ghotki, were revised due to cancellation of some components of the project. The initial cost is replaced with the revised cost in table 11b. All eight projects of round I & II, under this program have successfully been completed by January 31, 2005. A formal closing workshop has been scheduled in the end of July 2006 in order to share the experiences in implementation of the program. The workshop would be attended by the project applicants and the private partners from all four provinces. Table 45: Rewarding Innovations at the District Level (Project Progress)
Project and Date of Agreement Thalassaemia Centre July 2004 Improving and Reconditioning road July 2004 Educating the underserved Union Council Makli Dec. 2004 Water Supply schemes Dec. 2004 Construction of 16 water tanks in villages of Taluka Kunri Dec. 2004 Improving and extending drainage facilities in Kazi Ahmed Town Dec. 2004 Rural Water supply Scheme, Garho Gogh July. 2005 Education in Kacha (School Improvement Project) Dec. 2004 Sulphurous Acid Generators Drinking Water Supply Scheme, July Mohammad Khaskheli Location and District Badin Qasim-abad Hyderabad Makli, Thatta Jhimpir, Thatta Grant Recipient D. G. Badin DG Hyderabad USAID Grant Amount (Rs M) 2.80 1.40 Grant Amount Released as of Dec 2005 (Rs M) 2.80 1.40 Progress (%) 100 100 Completion Date Nov 2005 Oct 2005

UC Makli

1.79

1.79

100

Dec 2005

UC Jhimpir

2.01

2.01

100

Oct 2005

Kunri, Umarkot

TMA Kunri

2.41

2.41

100

Dec 2005

Kazi Ahmed Nawabshah

DG Nawabshah

2.63

2.63

100

Dec 2005

Rohri Sukkur

TMA Rohri

1.42

1.42

100

Nov 2005

UC Bago Daho Daharki Ghoki Kotdiji Khairpur Sinjhoro Sanghar

UC Bago Daho TMA Kotdiji UC Jhol

1.69

1.69

100

Dec 2005

1.96 0.24

0 0

0 0

Dec 2005 Dec 2005

Table 46: Rewarding Innovations at the District Level (Project Recipients, Costs and Contributions)
Project Thalassaemia Centre Improving and Reconditioning road Educating the under-served Union Council Makli Water Supply schemes Local Govt. D. G. Badin D. G. Hyderabad UC Makli Thatta UC Jhimpir Thatta Private partner Mirza and Pangrio Sugar Mills Abdullah Builders Thatta Cement Company Limited General Kiryana Julyant Secondary Partner TCCCB Project Costs and Contributions (Rs M) Local Private Secondar USAID Total Govt partner y partner Grant Cost 1.21 1.20 Heaven Health & Education Wefare Society Kohistan Welfare 0.50 1.00 0.30 2.80 1.40 4.81 3.60

0.60

0.85 0.07

1.79

3.24

0.30

0.30

2.01

2.68

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Project

Local Govt.

Private partner

Secondary Partner Association

Project Costs and Contributions (Rs M) Local Private Secondar USAID Total Govt partner y partner Grant Cost

Construction of 16 water tanks in villages of Taluka Kunri Improving and extending drainage facilities in Kazi Ahmed Town Rural Water supply Scheme, Garho Gogh Education in Kacha (School Improvement Project) Sulphurous Acid Generators Drinking Water Supply Scheme, July M. Khaskheli

TMA Kunri Umarkot D. G. Nawabsha h TMA Rohri Sukkur UC Bago Daho & Daharki Ghotki TMA Kotdiji UC Jhol Sanghar

Sharif Solvent Plant

0.79

0.07

2.41

3.22

Habib Sugar Mill Nawabshah GNS Cotton Ginning Factory Engro Chemical Pakistan Limited Sweet Water Ltd. Lahore Diamond Cotton Factory Sahar Welfare Society

0.70

0.18

2.63

3.50

0.38

0.09

1.42

1.90

0.08

0.51

1.70

2.29

0.26 0.05

0.26 0.02 0.02

2.09 0.24

2.61 0.33

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Summary of Current Projects


Prime Ministers Special Initiative for Livestock Donor: Duration: Target Population: Total Budget: NRSP Share: Objectives: 1. Government of Pakistan through Ministry of Food, Agriculture & Livestock. Five Years (July 07 to January 11) 13 Million Households in 79 RSPs covered Districts Rs. 1,696.402 Million Rs. 552.092 Million Livestock Productivity Enhancement through provision of livestock production extension and veterinary services at farmers doorsteps targeting 13 million rural poor in 1,963 Union Councils in 79 Districts through: a. 290 DVMs to oversee training and support supervision b. 29 District Livestock officers to oversee district operations c. A cadre of 7,250 self-employed Community Livestock Extension Workers (CLEWs) created d. Four new livestock intensive districts in Balochistan added for RSPS with a specific focus on livestock activities. Rural Livestock Assets creation a. Additional milk production to the tune of 12.17 Million liters annually after completion of the project. b. 0.2 M tons annual additional meat production after completion of the project Poverty Alleviation

2.

3.

Primary Health Care Revitalization, Integration & Decentralization in Earthquake Affected Areas (PRIDE) Donor Location of the Project: Project Start: Project Duration: Project Budget: International Rescue Committee through USAID District Bagh, Tehsil Bagh & Haveli 01st of September 2007 Until 30th of Sep 2011 (3 years) US$ 546.340

Under the PRIDE project NRSP focus on the implementation of the PRIDE Community Mobilization Strategy in 14 UCs of Tehsil Haveli and Bagh. Its objectives are increasing the demand for quality health services by communities, awareness rising about the services that should be available to communities, creating mechanisms by which communities can prioritize and address their health needs and forming of participatory forums. Mother and child healthcare, addressing the needs of the most vulnerable and a gender equality based representation are core areas of concern in the PRIDE project. Mechanism for involvement of the communities has been drawn and for this purpose forums will be established at different levels in the communities which will also be linked with each other as well as the government institutions. The tyre of the forums is composed of VHFs (Village Health Forums), UHF (Union Health Forums), THF (Tehsil Health Forums) and a DHF (District Health Forum). Health Management Committees (HMCs) will also be formed at BHU and RHC level and later on at Tehsil HQ and District HQ level. These committees will review relevant health issues on a regular basis PPAF Disability Project Donor Location of the Project: Project Start: Project Duration: Project Budget: PPAF District Bagh and District Rawalakot 1st of September 2007 Until 30th of Sep 2011 (3 years) Pk, RS. 49,618,680

The CBR (Community Based Rehabilitation) of PWDs (People with Disabilities) project is the out come of the initiative taken by World Bank that has appointed PPAF to carry out the activities in

78

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the 34 UCs where PPAF and its partner organizations are already engaged in reconstruction & rehabilitation activities. In this project PPAF will also collaborate with ERRA to strengthen the interventions and avoid duplication of services. This Project has been underway since 3rd September, 2007. In AJK, the project is being implemented in the 16 Constituent UCs of Districts Bagh & Rawalakot, where NRSP is serving as the PO (Partner Organization) of PPAF. The project aims at filling in some of the gaps in service provision to person with disabilities (PWDs) in the earthquake effected PPAF UCs. It will pilot a community based approach to rehabilitation offering a learning experience for the Govt.s strategy that envisages Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) as a core aspect of its disability policies. It will also contribute to building local capacity to address disability issues. Social Mobilization Project Donor: Duration: Location: Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund (PPAF) 2 years (July 2008-June 2011) 6 districts of Punjab (Bahawalpur, Bahawalnagar, DGKhan, Rajanpur, Mianwali, Khushab) and 2 districts of Balochistan (Awaran and Panjgur) Rs.882, 804,560/Rs.95, 622,050/-

Total cost of Project: Vocational training cost:

Project objective: mobilization of poor households into well-managed, transparent and accountable COs. Mobilization of these COs to form federation at village and Union Council level as (Village organization andLocal Support Organiztion respectively) to leverage public and private sector resources and services, and link to the local government (e.g., the prime ministers LivestockProgramme; line agencies at districts and Tehsil level; banks and commercial enterprises) Proposed beneficiaries: Increasing the effectiveness of social mobilization in terms of empowerment of women, poor and vulnerable ensuring the transparency, accountability and equitable distribution of resources. At least 50 % of the CO members in each revenue village will be poor and 40% will be women should be included in the COs. Key projects deliverables 500,160 household will be organized into COs Formation of 25,008 Community Organizations Federation of COs into 1,771VOs Formation of 39LSOs Outcome indicators: Institutional development (COs,VOs,LSOs) Equity and inclusion of (women and poor) coverage of revenue villages Accountability and transparency Capacity building for collective actions (savings,financial literacy, internal lending, O&M systems,self initiatives of community) Civic action to improve living conditions (village development plans,public services initiatives etc) Improved public services (disaster preparedness,linkages with public and private sectors, identification of households eligible for social safety net program) Awareness of civic rights and responsibilities (sensitization about civic and constitutional rights, registration of CNIC, votes, birth etc; and Gender inclusion (CNIC for women, school improvement for girls, registration of birth and deaths etc training on issues such as the rights inheritance, rights related to marriage, divorce etc.

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NRSP Programme Update

Table 47: SM Project Progress


Activities No. of FUs where activities started Number of SMTs No. of Project Union Councils intervened Total COs formed No. of Men COs No. of Women COs formed No. of Mix COs Total Number of VOs Number of LSOs CO Level Trainings CMST events Total Participants men participants Women participants Activist Workshops events Total Participants men participants Women participants Activist exposure visits events Total Participants men participants Women participants VO (activists leaders training, training of VO leaders for annual planning ,Training of VO book keeper) Men Women Social Development CNIC made with the facilitation of PO Number of CO members facilitates as voters LSO leader (Activist Training, LSO leaders for annual planning,book keepers) Men women Under extension Phase: CO level Trainings Total Pax trained VO level Trainings Total Pax trained Total Project Targets 43 89 367 25,008 25,008 1,771 39 2,501 50,016 0 50,016 325 17,506 5,252 12,254 72 8,502 2,551 5,951 2,657 1,019 1,873 0 0 0 78 78 78 5,002 100,032 1,594 31,887 Achievement 43 89 367 34, 512 4,535 28,453 1,524 3,590 126 2,226 52,722 5,783 46,939 1,770 41,556 12,710 52,503 4,461 11,266 1,942 9,324 9,267 2,061 7,206 0 564,026 75,826 154 45 109 3,416 118,693 1,253 32,875

Sustainable Livelihood Barani Area Project (SLBAP) Donor: Duration: Location: Sustainable livelihood in Barani Areas Project

6 years (July 2005-June 2011) The project is implemented in 206 selected union councils (over 75% Barani) in ten Barani Districts of the Punjab province. Total cost of Project: 3516 million Project objective: The overall goal/objective of project is poverty reduction in the rain fed areas of the Punjab Through improved livelihood opportunities and improved governance. More specific/immediate objectives are: To improve socioeconomic status of poor population through better resource management through improved productive, physical and social infrastructure identified by the elected UCs members and the civil society. To reduce poverty of the marginal and poor population through targeted community based initiatives and support to off-farm income generation activities. To improve the literacy and level of skills through vocational training, especially to the unemployed especially women. This project consists of two main components: a Targeted Poverty Alleviation (TPA) designed to scale up ongoing poverty targeted activities currently being undertaken by NRSP in the project area, a UC development Component (UCDC) designed to identify and implement demand driven medium scale interventions

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Proposed beneficiaries NRSP has been contracted to implement targeted poverty alleviation component in 106 selected union councils of six Districts commencing from 1st July 2005. The component will mainly support interventions and activities that will increase the household income through supporting community based and or group based small scale infrastructure and other interventions resulting increase in crop and livestock productivity, and increasing off farm income of poor families. An agreement was signed between the NRSP and SLBAP, ABAD, P&D department Govt. of Punjab on 8th September 2005. By virtue of this agreement, NRSP has been engaged to implement the targeted poverty alleviation component (TPAC). NRSP has undertaken tried and tested principles of social mobilization in order to reduce poverty. Key projects deliverables NRSP has already undertaken activities, which directly target the poorer sections of the population. NRSP under this project will scale up these activities. These activities mostly consist of small-scale poverty alleviation interventions targeting directly at small beneficiary groups of both men and women community organizations. These activities are demand based and will include such small scale livelihood activities as the provision of dug-wells, water course lining, the provision of livestock for multiplication, the provision of basic school house along literacy and skills training classes and the minor water resource conservation and irrigation infrastructure on localized bases. A total of 11 to 12 such projects will be undertaken with average total cost of Rs. 180, 000 per project. The 20 % cost of the project will be born by the beneficiary themselves in terms of cash and labor. The accounts keeping and fund management training to the CO office bearers are the integral part under this component prior to the distribution of funds to potential beneficiaries. Table 48: SLBAP Progress
Activities No. of villages with complete profiles No. of villages with complete poverty ranking No. Ucs with complete UC profiles Social Mobilization Number of Program Introductions Number of COs Formed TOTAL Number of Men COs Formed Number of Women COs Formed Number of Mix COs Formed No. of Community Management Skill training events Activists trained for CMST No. of fund Management and account keeping training(FMAK) No. Of activists trained in FMAK training No. activists workshop No. activists workshop participants Small Scale Infrastructure Schemes (SSIs) Approved and Initiated No. of SSIs completed Off Farm Income Generating Activities Training Need Assesment (TNA) reports Training Cariculum Development Training of Community Members Livelihood Assest Status Tracking Number of H/hs surveyed Total Project Targets 1,024 1,024 106 1,024 2,438 1,417 721 300 0 4,876 0 2,438 0 22,578 1,590 1,590 0 6 5 1,550 4,876 Achievement 1,042 1,042 106 7,811 6,091 2,721 2,409 961 322 7,366 258 4,112 712 30,030 2,093 1,855 0 6 5 1,712 1 4,153

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NRSP Programme Update

Plan Milk Value Chain Project, Vehari Plan Milk Value Chain Project (PMVCP), Vehari is an EU funded Project. The project aims at promotion of modern animal husbandry and improved commercial dairy practices among rural subsistence/semi subsistence livestock farmers. The project has the following components: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Provision of breeding services Provision of veterinary services Feed & fodder development Provision of milk management & marketing services Organizational development (Capacity building of FMC management committees members) 6. Family Nutrition NRSP is implementing Veterinary Services and Feed & Fodder Development Components. The Veterinary Services component aims at achieving improved livestock productivity per unit animal of subsistence farmers through provision of animal health services at the village level. The component aims at reducing mortality by 2% in the project areas; achieve 100% immunization in the selected villages; carry out regular de-worming in the project villages; reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics by the farmers; and prepare a cadre of 200 Village Veterinary Workers (VVWs). The Feed & Fodder Component aims at achieving improved milk production per unit animal of subsistence/semi-subsistence farmers through introduction of better feeding practices, encouraging 100 percent farmers to incorporate fodder in cropping pattern, to use feed supplements in milk producing animals; make silage for use in scarcity periods. The component also aims at installing Feed Mixers to encourage use of blended and balanced rations; Water Troughs to provide ad lib water availability; distribute instruments and train farmers in adopting improved feeding practices. Table 49: Plan Milk Value Chain Project, Progress as of July, 2011
Sr # 1 2 3 4 5 Activity Three rounds of Vaccination in 100 Villages Three rounds of Deworming in 100 Villages Training of VVWs Construction of Model Barns Construction of Biogas Plants Training of FMC members in improved feed & fodder practices, silage making Farm Inputs i) Distribution of fodder seeds for demonstration plots ii) Distribution of UMBs Installation of Feed Grinder/Mixers (Mini Feed Mill) Construction of Water Troughs Distribution of Farm Instruments (Drenching Guns) Project Targets 400 400 200 15 15 3,000 Achievements as of June, 11 292 292 200 Six completed, Civil Work is in Progress on 2 Model Barns Six completed, Civil Work is in Progress on 2 Biogas Plants alongwith Model Barns 3,510 (2,571 men + 939 women) 100 7,014 100 received & 100 have been installed. The 49 water troughs have been completed. 100 Feed & Fodder Development Component

Veterinary Services

100 6,000 100 100 100

7 8 9

As of July, 2011 in vaccination and de-worming campaigns the following number of animals were treated, vaccinated and de-wormed No. of animals Treated: 9,000 No. of animals Vaccinated: 308,493 No. of animals De-wormed: 138,981 Total House Hold Covered: 27,172

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As of July 2011

NRSP Programme Update

Small Grants and Ambassadors Fund Program (SGAFP) The Government of the United States and Pakistan signed a five-year Partnership Agreement on September 30, 2010 to:

1. Improve the Government of Pakistans capacity to address the countrys most critical infrastructure needs; 2. Help the Government of Pakistan to address basic needs and provide improved economic opportunities in areas vulnerable to extremism; and 3. Strengthen Pakistans capacity to pursue economic and political reforms that reinforce stability.
The Small Grants and Ambassadors Fund Program (SGAFP) stems from this Partnership Agreement. Funded by USAID, NRSP is implementing this project as Prime Implementing Agency. Other two sub-partners are RSPN and KPMG. Project Outline Objective: Project Area: Project Duration: Project Funds: Donor Agency: Contract Number: Implementing Agency: Other Partners:

To empower grassroots organizations and community groups working to strengthen the fabric of civil society in Pakistan All the four provinces, AJK, FATA and Gilgit-Baltistan 5 years (Sep. 2010 Aug. 2015) USD 50 Million (PKR 4250 Million @ 1USD=PKR 85) USAID 391-C-10-100-01189-00 NRSP Prime implementing agency 1) RSPN to ensure outreach and quality 2) KPMG to ensure financial scrutiny and transparency

SGAFP Components The Small Grants and Ambassadors Fund Program have two components viz. Small Grants Program and Ambassadors Fund Program. A. Small Grants Program SGP The Small Grants Program will primarily, but not exclusively, focus on multi-year projects that will support innovative and unique project ideas submitted by Pakistani NGOs, civil society groups & communities. B. Ambassadors Fund Program AFP Ambassadors Fund Program will support local self-help initiatives of less than one year, for which communities & civil society groups should be willing to contribute approximately 25% of the total project cost. Below table provides additional information on both the AFP & SGP components.
Funding Limits (USD) 250,000 * 100,000 * Duration 1-3 years Up to 1 year Stipulated No. of Grants 88 220 Grantee Contribution Not mandatory but encouraged Mandatory

SGP AFP

* In exceptional cases it may exceed with the approval of USAID. NRSP is implementing the SGAFP through a separate project office at Islamabad. SGAFP has developed Grants Manual, application guidelines, website, FAQs, Branding and Marking Strategy and M&E framework for the Grantee Organizations. Additional information about the SGAFP can be sought from its website www.sgafp.org.pk A summary of the updated progress of both the components is presented below. Whereas cumulative progress update showing all steps of Grants processing under both the components is given in below tables.

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Table 50: Progress Update of AFP as of July 2011


A. Ambassador's Fund Programme Cumulative 1 1.1 1.2 2 2.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.2.1 2.1.2.2 2.1.2.3 2.1.2.4 2.2 3 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4.1 3.4.2 3.5 3.5.1 3.5.2 3.5.3 3.5.4 3.5.5 4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Flow of applications Applications received on application format Applications received on other than application format Status of Received Applications Aplications assigned for desk review Applications still in desk review process Applications that have completed project processing cycle Non-Compliant applications sent back to applicants Cases Transmitted to USAID Applications taken back by applicants for different reasons (e.g multiple aplications submitted) Applications referred to other USAID projects Applications that still have to undergo desk review Status of the Applications Processed after Desk Review Institutional assessment undertaken Applications reviewed by TEC Applications referred back by TEC to Grants section for additional information/editing/improvement Applications transmitted to USAID Recommended for award Recommended for non-award USAID GRC Decision on transmitted applications Awarded Non-awarded Cases referred back by USAID for additional infromation/improvement/ reconsideration in SGP Cases in process at USAID Non-Award letters issued by USAID Award of Contract and Project Implementation Number of projects initiated (contracts signed) Number of Grantees received funds Number of Granteee organizations visited (Monitoring Visit) Projects completed Funds Approved and Disbursed Total amount of funds approved by USAID for the awarded cases (PKR) Total amount of funds of the contracts signed with Grantees (PKR) Total amount of funds received from USAID (PKR) Funds transferred to Grantees (PKR) 557 154 378 29 349 236 59 49 5 179 135 62 4 59 33 26 53 26 26 2 5 26 26 25 10 2 164,593,805 155,243,353 127,678,649 89,787,348

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Table 51: Progress Update of Small Grants Program as of July 2011


B. Small Grants Programme Cumulative Flow of applications Concept papers received on prescribed format LSOs NGOs/CBOs & Others* Concept received on other than prescribed format Status of Received Concapt Papers Concept papers assigned for desk review Concept papers that are still in desk review process Concept papers that are out of system after desk review Concept papers for which SGAFP issued Non Compliant Letters Concept papers taken back by applicants for different reasons (e.g multiple 2.1.2.2 aplications submitted) Concept papers sent to USAID with summary for an initial feedback (for no 2.1.2.4 further action/approval for next stage) 2.1.2.4.1 Concept papers sent back to applicants for "no further action" (by USAID) Concept papers sugested by USAID to be considered for Ambassador's Fund 2.1.2.4.2 Program 2.1.2.4.3 Concept papers approved by USAID for full application 2.1.2.4.4 Concept papers in process at USAID 2.2 Concept papers that still have to go under desk review Status of Concept Papers for Full Applications 3 Aplicants required to submit full aplications on prescribed format (after USAID 3.1 approval) 3.2 Number of applications received on prscribed format 3.3 Desk review by SGAFP 3.4 Desk review by KPMG 3.5 Institutional assessment by SGAFP 3.6 Institutional assessment by KPMG 3.7 Applications reviewed by TEC Applications referred back by TEC to Grants section for missing 3.8 information/editing/improvement 3.9 Applications transmitted to USAID 3.9.1 Recommended for award (by SGAFP) 3.9.2 Recommended for non-award (by SGAFP) 3.1 USAID GRC Decision on transmitted applications 3.10.1 Recommended for award 3.10.2 Recommended for non-award 3.10.3 Cases referred back (to SGAFP) by USAID for reconsideration 3.10.4 Non-Award letters issued by USAID 3.10.5 Cases in process at USAID 4 Award of Contract and Project Implementation 4.1 Number of projects initiated (contracts signed) 4.2 Number of Grantees received first installment 4.3 Number of monitoring visits made to Grantees who have received first installment 4.4 Number of monitoring visits by FOOs 4.5 Number of monitoring visits by SGAFP Project Office, Islamabad 4.6 Projects completed 5 Funds Approved and Disbursed 5.1 Total amount of funds approved by USAID for the awarded cases (PKR) 5.2 Total amount of funds received from USAID (PKR) 5.3 Total amount of funds of the contracts signed with Grantees (PKR) 5.4 Funds transferred to Grantees (PKR) * Others include RSP fostered VOs, COs 1 1.1 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.2 2 2.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.2.1 299 10 289 3 162 18 144 93 8 40 13 7 16 4 137

16 9 7 5 7 5 7

4 4 3 1 2 1 1 1

21,252,220 21,252,220 1,653,580

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As of July 2011

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