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12th International Architecture Exhibition

People meet in Architecture Biennale Architettura 2010 Exhibition

Marsilio

Fondazione La Biennale di Venezia President Paolo Baratta Board Giorgio Orsoni, vicepresident Giuliano da Empoli Amerigo Restucci Luca Zaia Audit Committee Marco Costantini, president Marco Aldo Amoruso Stefania Bortoletti Silvana Bellan, substitute member General Manager Andrea Del Mercato Director of Architecture Section Kazuyo Sejima

12th International Architecture Exhibition Director Kazuyo Sejima Artistic Advisors Yuko Hasegawa Ryue Nishizawa Collaborators Sam Chermayeff Jack Hogan Satoshi Ikeda Graphic design Mevis & Van Deursen in collaboration with Tomas Celizna Layout Tomas Celizna, Sandra Kassenaar and Min Oh Exhibition photography Dean Kaufman

La Biennale di Venezia and its collaborators for the 12th International Architecture Exhibition: Giovanni Alberti Francesco Amoresano Agnese Antonini Chiara Giuseppina Attore Chiara Augliera Valentina Baldessari Pietro Barbini Cinzia Bernardi Marina Bertaggia Angela Bianco Massimiliano Bigarello Nicola Bon Andrea Bonaldo Caterina Boniollo Valentina Borsato Angelo Boscolo Francesca Bovo Joern Rudolf Brandmeyer Silvia Bruni Emanuela Caldirola Michela Campagnolo Giulio Cantagalli Claudia Capodiferro Graziano Carrer Caterina Castellani Antonio Cataldo Maria Elena Cazzaro Gerardo Cejas Maurizio Celoni Marzia Cervellin Gianpaolo Cimarosti Maria Cristina Cinti Federica Colella Annamaria Colonna Enrico Contestabile Maria Cristiana Costanzo Luigi Cuciniello Giacinta Dalla Piet Erica De Luigi Lucia De Manincor Francesco di Cesare Alvise Draghi Giovanni Drudi Alessandra Durand De La Penne Monica Fabbro Davide Ferrante Elena Ferro Marcella Fiori Roberta Fontanin Cristiano Frizzele Giuliana Fusco Bruna Gabbiato Silvia Gatto Matteo Giannasi Jessica Giassi Andrea Goffo Cristina Graziussi Stefania Guerra Antonio Ibba Laura Lamborghini Arianna Laurenzi Michela Lazzarin Maria Cristina Lion Savino Liuzzi Manuela Luc Dazio

Paolo Lughi Enzo Magris Francesca Manea Giada Manfrin Michele Mangione Vera Mantengoli Stefano Marchiante Michela Mason Pina Maugeri Elisa Meggiato Silvia Menegazzi Alessandro Mezzalira Elisa Miorin Elisabetta Mistri Sandra Montagner Francesca Montorio Nicola Monaco Veronica Mozzetti-Monterumici Piero Novello Carlotta Olivetto Massimo Ongaro Fabio Pacifico Emanuela Padoan Elisabetta Parmesan Paola Pavan Eva Peccenini Manuela Pellicciolli Daniela Persi Maddalena Pietragnoli Marta Plevani Antonietta Possamai Lucio Ramelli Luigi Ricciari Maya Romanelli Roberto Rosolen Silvia Rossetti Debora Rossi Ilaria Ruggiero Delia Sadi Micol Saleri Sara Salmaso Adriana Rosaria Scalise Cristiana Scavone Michele Schiavon Paolo Scibelli Elena Seghetti Antonella Sfriso Tommaso Speretta Nadia Spirito Michela Stancescu Fiorella Tagliapietra Sandro Tolin Elena Tondello Giulia Tosetto Lucia Toso Maurizio Urso Giorgio Vergombello Leonardo Viale Sara Vianello Alessia Viviani Francesco Zanon Leandro Zennaro Gloria Zerbinati Jasna Zoranovic Giorgio Zucchiatti Rossella Zulian

Thanks to Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, Adecco, United Colors of Benetton, Azienda Agricola Il Follo

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Paolo Baratta

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Paolo Baratta

Exhibition

La Biennale is interested in architectural research in the present, in architecture as art that helps build the res publica , the spaces in which we live and organize our civilization, the spaces in which we recognize ourselves, the spaces we possess without being owners of them, but that are part of our condition as men and society. In observing the dominant trends of recent years, it seems that there is a prevailing use of architecture as art for self representation and self celebration (of economic power, of political prestige), along with a need for advertising communication rather than any desire to interpret modern society and the ideals it can imagine and propose. And the great progress made in design and construction technologies has often been used to this end. It is more than ever hoped that a more articulate and effective clientele may develop, whether private or public, from which demands and requests of architecture that currently seem muted or ignored may emerge. An architecture exhibition can help by using its own language. This is not only documentation but also visual excitement, which leads to perceiving and considering new possibilities that differ from the everyday and the usual. Aaron Betskys 2008 exhibition was characterized by a kind of joyful pessimism. Pessimism because of the little faith that seemed placed in the architecture of buildings before the immense, impersonal urban spaces now compromised by the increasing urban sprawl. Joyful because it envisaged the application of widespread creativity, mobilizing designers, artists and creators of images to give recognizable signs to the spaces, capable of personalizing them and thus able to recompose a perceptible relationship between the space, the individual and the community. With Kazuyo Sejima we go back to a more serene faith in architecture, precisely as the art of building spaces in which man as individual and community may realize his ideals and establish his society. In her simple presentation she speaks of the design process as a study to identify the functions and uses of the spaces involved, to then establish the connections that must link the various parts through transparencies or diaphragms (physical and psychological), suggested by the utmost attention to man, nature and the quality of social life. The exhibition design is consistent with her premises: it is centered on an alternation of models and views that see the exhibition space as one to be interpreted and used. The apparently lower number of participants, each in their own dedicated space, is then intended to

indicate to the visitor the advisability of stopping rather than hurrying, of distilling feelings rather than seeking effects.

People meet in Architecture also means that we become people in architecture; it is precisely in the res publica that man crowns his own efforts to construct his society.
In complying with our rule that there be only one curator, Ryue Nishizawa accepted the role of Kazuyo Sejimas artistic consultant; partners in the SANAA studio, by happy coincidence they were this year awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize. This years exhibition is the twelfth, and the history of past exhibitions may already be an object of reflection in itself. These different experiences can enlighten us on the direction to follow in future. Partly for this reason we asked the directors of past editions of La Biennale Architecture to come back for one full day to talk to us and our visitors on their choice of subject, in open seminars where reference will certainly be made to their Biennale, which can thus live again in the memory and in current reflection as still vibrant experiences. We then set out on a new experience by initiating a direct relationship with Italian and foreign universities, offering the chance to plan organized visits (for students and teachers), ending with a seminar. We wrote to architecture departments, but not only: also to departments of engineering, sociology, design and communication, and have received very positive replies. We have already signed 27 protocols and are about to finalize others. Groups from Italian universities and from a certain number of foreign universities in various parts of the world, from Great Britain to Georgia, will be here. The aim is to make La Biennale a place where a small part of the universities research and study curriculum systematically takes place. I end this note with my thanks to all those who have worked on this exhibition, to our sponsors, to all who contributed to its realization and to those who have allowed us to maintain its high quality, primarily the Ministry of Culture, which takes part in the exhibition with the Italian Pavilion (this year curated by Luca Molinari) in its renewed dimension.

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Kazuyo Sejima

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Kazuyo Sejima

Exhibition

The 2010 edition of La Biennale is an exhibition about finding architecture; to reconsider the potential of architecture in contemporary society. The twenty-first century has begun and many things have changed; people, cultures and economies have never been as connected as they are today. Due to advances in technology, we have started to connect with other people in a completely different way, forming relationships indirectly as through the internet. In this new intangible world I believe that architecture occupies a unique and important place. Architecture has always been a reflection of the collective consciousness, a physical encapsulation of the evolving lifestyles. Our new perceptions of life arise from this changing society and develop according to which region, culture or city they are from. We believe that the existence of these impressions will become far more influential in our future. This exhibition allows people to acknowledge various ideas from diverse backgrounds and will reflect the present, which in itself encapsulates future potential. We hope that this show will be an experience of architectural possibilities; about an architecture created by different approaches, expressing new ways of living. An architecture exhibition is a challenging concept as actual buildings cannot be exhibitedmodels, drawings and other objects must take the place of buildings. As an architect, I feel it is part of our profession to use space as a medium to express our thoughts. Each participant is given his or her own space and acts as his or her own curator. The Palazzo delle Esposizioni largely consists of white rooms with varying proportions. In the Arsenale, all rooms are quite distinct from each other. The sizes of the rooms vary, the wall textures are different due to erosions over time and some rooms have additional white walls. Each exhibition space is its own new site and each participant is making a new project within a unique architectural context. All of the participants show their understanding of and response to the theme, demonstrating their position through the mediation of space. In this way the atmosphere of the exhibition will be reached through multiple viewpoints rather than through a single orientation. It is a backdrop for people to relate to architecture, for architecture to relate to people, and for people to relate to themselves. This exhibition selection criterion has identified architects, artists and engineers, each of whom propose a different relationship between architecture and people. This is because space is not solely designed by architects but rather that built forms are realized

through collaborations with other professionals. Likewise, the users of a building play a large role; they determine both the practicality of a building and have a chance to join in the creative process. Thus, in the Venice Biennale, visitors are important collaborators. Matthias Schuler of Transsolar, in collaboration with Tetsuo Kondo, for example, has proposed a cloud. It is an installation that forces people into a new reading and experience of space. A small change in the room transforms the cloud and the environment. This installation illustrates the mutability of space. raumlaborberlin has made a temporary space like a soft balloon. It is dynamic architecture that can re-shape itself in response to any condition. As well as being an exhibition object, it will also be an actual built form used as a lecture hall and a caf. People can experience the co-existence of a surreal architectural place and ordinary everyday activities. Smiljan Radic and Marcela Correa are exhibiting a large stone which has a space carved out big enough for just one person. This piece was created after the recent earthquake in Chile and is proposed as a prototype for an idealistic social space in the futurewhere individuals can find their own space of retreat. R&Sie(n) have an installation that relates to human cycles through a lighting project, which speaks about how we perceive space. We have also invited many other architects to study their own work in films that we will show in an attempt to explore how people within space make the space itself. Visitors can react in very different ways towards each installation. The Palazzo delle Esposizioni and Arsenale are treated similarly, both opened up to natural light, but the work is very diverse, making it possible for everyone to find their own approach. We hope that people can compose their own relationship with architecture. We would like to thank all of the participants for their efforts, La Biennale for its great enthusiasm and guidance, HyundaiCard for its financial support of technical equipment, Sony Corporation / Italia S.p.A. for their support of the film project, Permasteelisa for accomodating the students, the Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum Foundation for their support, Rolex for their support, all of the supporters mentioned on the individual participant pages, Yuko Hasegawa + Ryue Nishizawa for their advice and all of the SANAA staff responsible for La Biennale including Sam Chermayeff, Jack Hogan and Satoshi Ikeda.

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Kazuyo Sejima

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Kazuyo Sejima

Exhibition

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Biennale Architettura 2010

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Contents

Exhibition

Catalogue production Marsilio Editori General coordination Martina Mian Editing coordination Clara Pagnacco Technical coordination Pier Giorgio Canale Lorenzo Pieresca Translations Giacomo Caruso Adelaide Cioni Floriana Pagano Flavia Pesci Viviana Tonon Editing in.pagina srl

Essays 23 28 Maurizio Lazzarato Capitalisme et production de subjectivit Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architctural program Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

326 328 Index 335 345

Wim Wenders Cerith Wyn Evans

Biographies of Exhibitors Exhibited Works

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Exhibition 48 54 58 64 70 78 86 92 100 104 106 112 120 126 136 142 144 150 158 166 172 178 184 190 198 206 210 214 222 226 232 234 240 248 252 260 266 272 278 282 288 294 302 318 Aires Mateus e associados Amateur Architecture Studio AMID.cero9 Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation ARU/Architecture Research Unit Atelier Bow-Wow Berger&Berger Lina Bo Bardi Studio Andrea Branzi Janet Cardiff Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand Aldo Cibic dePaor architects architecten de vylder vinck taillieu Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim) Peter Ebner and friends Olafur Eliasson Sou Fujimoto Architects Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio junya.ishigami+associates Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Christian Kerez Luisa Lambri Walter Niedermayr Noero Wolff Architects Hans Ulrich Obrist OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen Valerio Olgiati OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture OpenSimSim Piet Oudolf Pezo von Ellirichshausen Architects Renzo Piano Building Workshop Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Cedric Price Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa raumlaborberlin R&Sie(n) Tom Sachs selgascano Studio Mumbai Architects Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Transsolar & Tetsuo Kondo Architects

2010 Fondazione La Biennale di Venezia Ca Giustinian San Marco 1364/a 30124 Venezia www.labiennale.org ISBN 978-88-317-XXXX

Essays

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Biennale Architettura 2010

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Maurizio Lazzarato Capitalisme et production de subjectivit

Exhibition

In contemporary capitalism, subjectivity is the product of a mass industry linked at a planetary level. It is also the first and most important of capitalist productions, for it conditions and comes into the production of all other goods. Subjectivity is a key good, whose nature is combined, elaborated and manufactured in the same way as a motor car, electricity, or a washing machine. The crisis we have been experiencing for forty years, prior to being an economic crisis, prior to being a political crisis, is a crisis of the production of subjectivity. The technical, economic, and political processes unraveling after the first oil crisis do not find intermediaries of subjectification. The old reactionary subjectifications like nationalism or revolutionary subjectifications such as the working class no longer attract subjectivity. This defect of subjectification has asymmetrical consequences, because if capitalist society can adapt to passiveness, demotivation, and a prostration of subjectivity, it is not however a question of a critical policy. What is meant by production of subjectivity or subjectification process? The production of subjectivity puts everything but solely linguistic performances into play: ethological, spectral, semiotic, economic, aesthetic, physical dimensions, existential territories, and immaterial worlds, none of which can be reduced to the semiotics of language. Nor can subjectivity be reduced, as phenomenology and psychoanalysis would like, to pulsions, affects, intra-subjective instances, and inter-subjective relations. Technical (computer, mass media, and media) and social systems modulate and format subjectivity, acting not only on memory and sensitivity, but also on unconscious illusions. This non-human part of subjectivity cannot be reduced to intra- and inter-subjective relations, and these have a fundamental role given that the mutation of subjectivity is primarily non-discursive. The processes of subjectification or semiotization are not centered on individual agents nor on collective (intersubjective) agents, as sociology would have it. The production of subjectivity is a collective process, but the collective does not include other than individuals and elements of human subjectivity. The collective unfolds both beyond the individual in an extrapersonal dimension (mechanical, economic, social, technological, and other systems) and prior to the person (preverbal intensities that reveal a logic of affects and mechanical intensities). In capitalism, one always works and produces within a collective concatenation and for a collective concatenation. In economic production, in social production (by the unemployed, the student, the user, etc.), in communicational production, there is actually never an

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Maurizio Lazzarato Capitalisme et production de subjectivit

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Maurizio Lazzarato Capitalisme et production de subjectivit

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individual, not even a collection of individuals (intersubjectivity) that works, communicates, produces. In the same way, it is never an individual who thinks, it is never an individual who creates, but an individual in a network of institutions (schools, theaters, museums, etc.), of technologies (books, libraries, electronic networks, etc.), of sources of funding controlled by public and private policies. An individual immersed in traditions of thinking or in aesthetic practices struggling with a circulation of signs, ideas, and works that force him or her to think and create. So, in order to chart the components that come into a process of subjectification, it is first necessary to detach subjectivity from the subject, from the individual, and also from the human being, in the same way in which one can no longer consider the power of enunciation as being exclusive to man and his subjectivity. Flix Guattari sees no reason to reject the existence of the equivalent of a subjectivity, of a non human in itself (which he will call protosubjectivity) and a power of enunciation (which he will call protoenunciation), to living and material concatenations. He refuses to grant human subjectivity an existential statute of exception and asks us to consider that other instances exist that are different from that of the consciousness, sensitivity, and language of the identified subject that can act as vectors of subjectification or as sources of enunciation. Subjectivity can be distinct for an individual, a group of individuals, but at the same time it can also be sustained by concatenations of space, by plastic architectural concatenations, or any other cosmic concatenation. That which Marx and the classical economists defined as production tends to be identified with the production of subjectivity, consisting of semiotic systems and systems of action and passions, but also crossed by forces of territorialization and deterritorialization. The territory (not the space, not the environment) makes the concatenation. The territory is fabricated through elements related to time, body, social life, language, space, etc., that are linked in a new territorialness that is existential, material, imaginary, and mythical. At precisely the time the concatenation is territorialized, it is defeated by lines of deterritorialization that open it up to other concatenations or to a future land. The production of subjectivity implies at the same time tracing the material and symbolic outlines of territories and inventing lines of escape, constructing exit and return pathways, practicing vagabondage and fabricating an in itself and an own house. This is the

importance Guattari gives the function of architecture and the architect. As the architect would no longer have the sole objective of being the artist of constructed forms, but would propose being also the revealer of virtual desires for space, places, pathways and territories, he must analyze the relations of individual and collective corporeality [...] become an artist and a craftsman of past sensitive and relational experiences [...] an analyst of certain specific functions of subjectification. On this basis, and along with numerous other social and cultural actors, he could constitute an essential link within the multiheaded concatenation of enunciation, capable of analytically and pragmatically assuming the contemporary production of subjectivity.1 These productions no longer have political economy as a model, because it is necessary to enter into and operate in the field of a subjective economy. Its references are, rather, art and execution, its time is that of the event and its meaning that of the creation of something new in a radically democratic framework. Why is completion of the production of subjectivity aesthetic-political? In the 1980s, Foucault and Guattari, following different directions, noted that the production of subjectivity and the relationship in itself are the contemporary political problems. Each person in his own way discovers a new dimension that cannot be reduced to relationships of power and of knowledge. The relationship in itself (Foucault), as power of self-positioning and existential assertion (Guattari), derives, in the dual sense of breaking out and changing direction, from the relationships of power and of knowledge. If the subjective dimension derives from the relationships of power and of knowledge, it is not dependent on them. The relationships of power and of knowledge are doubled by a force of self-assignation, of self-positioning that, removing itself from power and knowledge places and constitutes the condition of the invention and creation of free men. The rules of the production of self are not those written and prescribed by the systems of power, but the optional and procedural ones that are invented establishing sensitive territories (Guattari), producing the otherness of an other life and of another world (Foucault). This leads not to cognitive, linguistic, or political paradigms in the classical sense of the term, but to aesthetic tools and paradigms, Guattaris aesthetic paradigm and Foucaults aesthetic of existence.

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Maurizio Lazzarato Capitalisme et production de subjectivit

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Maurizio Lazzarato Capitalisme et production de subjectivit

Exhibition

But in no case must the aesthetic paradigm or the aesthetic of existence mean or lead to an aestheticization of the social. If Guattari refers to art, he does so not referring to the technique of producing objects or works, or of passively represented images, but to a practice able to return to the point of the emergence of subjectivity and to start from the break with the dominant meanings of which we are prisoner, to open a process that gives consistency, direction, meaning, and expression to this emergence. The production of subjectivity, like certain aesthetic experiences, involves three kinds of problem that concern the social action, political action, the practices of constitution, and something new: the polyphony of enunciation; that is, the attainment of the heterogeneity of voices and of verbal and nonverbal semiotics, human and nonhuman, that take part in its constitution. Secondly, there is procedural creativity; that is, the putting back into permanent question the identity of the object and of the subject. The process does not have a preliminary model of subjectivity and function to which to conform. Thirdly, it is a process of self-production, able to produce its own rules and its own existential coordinates. The subjects and the objects, and also the means of expression and the contents, the rules, and the regulations are produced inside and by the process itself. To make a radical democracy of subjectification real, it is necessary that the production processes do not refer to any outside authority or power (economic, political, or religious). The work (which may be artistic, political, social, etc.), prior to having an aesthetic sense, a function, a social utility, must document and show the process of selfproduction that constitutes it. The driving forces of these dynamics cannot be needs as in social theory, nor interests as in economic theory, but desire. By desire we do not mean a simple pulsing, a simple libidinal energy, but the power to act in a concatenation. Desire always means constructing a concatenation, desire always means acting in and for a collective or a multiplicity. One never desires a person or a thing, but the concatenations in which and for which the person or the thing exist. One does not desire someone or something, but the worlds and possibles that they enfold. Desire means constructing the concatenation that explains the possibles and the worlds that a thing or a person enfold. One has desire only when there is a possible, a proliferation of possibles, when, starting from the break of previous balances, relations appear that were impossible before. Desire thus means acting far from equilibrium. The source of capitalisms productivity lies not primarily in the division of labor, in specialization, competition, or knowledge, but in the fact that it activates, captures, and exploits an economy of the possible, or an economy of desire. The strength

of capitalism lies in the fact that it has integrated something of the function of desire into its own function. Our epoch imposes new tasks on us. What, then, are the conditions of a break at a time when the production of subjectivity is the first and most important capitalist production? What are the specific tools for producing subjectivity to avoid its industrial and mass-produced manufacture by companies and the State? What is the model and what are the methods of organization for a process of subjectification that must arrange the microphysics of power with the macropolitical dimension?
1 Flix Guattari, Lnonciation architecturale, in Cartographies schizoanalytiques , Paris: Galile, 1989, p. 291.

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program I. The intellectuality of the post-theory age

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Exhibition

The environment surrounding us is changing. This change is influenced to an unprecedented degree by media and information, necessitating alterations to the architectural program. Of course, not only architecture has to change. Culture in general, including art, and life in society in general are also changing. New questions arise, such as how we should view humans as part of nature and the world, and in the midst of complex networks. Here, traditional ideologies and ideas cease to function, and in a post-theory age the power of practice and of actuality/events increases. At a time when there are no conventional norms, what can we actually rely on? One important factor in the process whereby the experiences of each individual are crystallized into bodymind or new rationality is collective knowledge premised on the networking and sharing of information, or in other words the cooperation of minds. As noted by Maurizio Lazzarato, the Internet not only molds public opinion and brings about similar judgments but has become an important mechanism in creating collective perceptual forms and giving rise to forms that express and organize a collective intellect. What is important here is a plurality (diversity) of perception and a plurality (diversity) of intellectuality.1 In the context of the synergizing of this diversity of perception and diversity of intellect, bodymind is an important key concept. Experience and space that incite latent sensibilities and knowledge are required in order to enhance bodymind. Here, the concept of the individual and that of the collective need to coexist. As, for example, when individuals have distinctiveness on the Internet on account of their electronic signature yet create temporary solidarity within networks. This is because this intellectuality is formed in the context of the constant self-knowledge that we are part of the world. Here, the shared magnetic field is neither the traditional local community nor a historical relationship with the land. Rather, it is a space where these complex relationship form layers, or in concrete terms where one can get a real sensephysically or pseudo-physically (virtually)that one is together with others. The body and the expansion of its energy produce the space, and the body along with its movement produces itself in accordance with the rules of the space. Once could also describe this as the creation of space in the context of relations to which the self belongs or that are continually creating the self. Lazzaratos argument that the relation between self and other should be understood neither as a relation between sub-

ject and object nor as a relation between subjects, but as an eventlike relation between possible worlds turns the traditional viewpoint on its head. 2 The theme of this exhibition, People meet in Architecture, is an attempt to reconsider the traditional concept of architecture by looking at the possibilities of the new order or the creative programs that emerge when people gather and relate to each other within this space. That is to say, this concept of architecture embraces not only buildings but also the acts of creating all manner of spaces, including representational spaces, that encourage these effects. II. Things that rewrite the architectural program Modern architecture has traditionally used machines as a metaphor in considering architecture in accordance with the concept of planning. Modern planning theory has condensed the various diverse and complex actions of humans into the simple and abstract concept of functions and matched them with particular spaces in an attempt to logically derive space from actions. Architecture was replaced by a simple spatial schema in the form of the combination of spaces corresponding to each of these functions. Modern planning theory was predicated on the work of cutting and dividing the pure, ordered internal world from the chaotic external world and on the act of leaving a clear boundary between the internal and the external. However, the main factors giving contemporary society its fluidity are the various aspects of the various accompanying actions that have until now been abstracted, which are incompatible with planning. The networked society has dismantled not only regional boundaries but also information media boundaries. Media are used differently in new formats on a daily basis, changing the functions of places where people gather, such as movie theaters, conference venues and universities. The merging and reorganization of architectural programs is now essential. The walls (boundaries) defining the relations of completed architectural programs, such as those between inside and outside, architecture (manmade) and environment (natural), public and private, physical and virtual, need to be dissolved or the boundaries made more flexible and fluid. Well then, if we pursue studies of social circumstances, nature and the information environment, will we be able to foresee the necessary functions derived from the complex and diverse actual activities of individuals and incorporate these into the program? This is possible to a certain extent, but anticipating these completely is impossible. The complex factors that need to be considered in creating an ar-

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Exhibition

chitectural program in the form of the existence of people and users have always been viewed as a hazy image. Henri Lefebvres statement, The users space is livednot represented (or conceived). When compared with the abstract space of experts (architects, urbanists, planners), the space of the everyday activities of users is a concrete one, which is to say, subjective, 3 is clearly a statement of fact, but reflecting this in the geometry and abstraction process of architecture is no easy matter. So where is the methodology or key leading to architecture that embraces the possibilities of relational architecture and creative programs? It is thought-provoking that Lefebvre expresses the restoration of the body in terms of the restoration of sensory-sensual space, and calls for the restoration of space for the non-visual in the form of speech, the voice, smell and hearing. Later, he also considers rhythms. 4 Non-visual tendencies are a feature of the architecture of Kazuyo Sejima, and of SANAA. SANAAs architecture has a non-visual ambiguity that in visual terms approaches dissolution, yet at the same time it has a mysterious strength that confuses, unsettles and suspends the judgment of the viewer while ensuring meaning is constantly fluid and not fixed to one place. A moving, fluid sensibility. At the beginning of her career, Sejima responded to the sheer weight of the cosmology of architecture (which left her more or less nonplussed) by wondering if it might not be possible to also achieve through architecture the gentle floating sensation of wearing a skirt. As Toyo Ito has also pointed out, Sejima observes intuitively the times in which she lives and diagrammatizes them directly without passing through the detours of existing conventional architectural concepts. Her medium is her own body, her post-ideological bodymind, which practices an extraordinarily rich life. 5 Non-visuality could be described as a new dimension of reality mediated through consciousness. Much of this reality is created by means of perception via different receptors, interfaces and media. To the extent that they reflect such virtual space consciousness, SANAAs architectural spaces are often described as lacking texture or flavor, filled with android-like people, hollow or a fictional dream with no foundation. There is a large discrepancy here between different concepts of what it is that makes something human. That there are many users who feel SANAAs buildings are relaxed, human spaces that liberate their consciousness is probably clear from the fact that regardless of whether the buildings themselves (21st Century Museum

of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa; EPFL; etc.) are liked or not, they do attract people (many of whom drop in for no particular purpose). For example, what attracts them is not the transparency of Modern architecture, but an evolved transparency, a use of glass that shows film-like, multilayered reflections; a layout that baffles users and at the same time provides them free choice; and the curvilinear not as a sculptural form, but as a device for drawing out new behavior in people walking within these spaces. The role of architects living in the present is to live among these people and make clear to them the extent to which their own spaces can suggest new ways of living. These suggestions reflect unchanged the richness and circumstances of the lives of the architects concerned. The diverse intellectuality of architects interpreting and abstracting the diverse perception of usersperhaps relations between users and architects could also be transposed in the same way. Lina Bo Bardi could be described as one of Sejimas precursors. In the 1950s and 1960s, while following in the tradition of rationalism and Le Corbusiers functionalism, Bo Bardi was inspired by the Brazilian people who have freedom of movement, the freedom to be rid of institutions,6 something not enjoyed by people in the West, and began incorporating actions and events into a new architectural program. While observing and reflecting directly the circumstances in Brazil and the lives of the Brazilian people, she bricolaged and rediscovered such concepts as Modernism and functionality. She began her drawings for the SESC Pompia arts center, of which she was also the artistic director, with a mental picture of a river and people playing alongside it. She imagined what kinds of activities would unfold in this space, using nature as a metaphor to portray the atmosphere of the surroundings rather than the building itself. Her interpretation of its corporeality can be inferred from the following comments she made upon observing Japanese architecture during her visit to Japan. In Eastern civilizations such as those of Japan and China, there is a co-existence between a cultural stance of the body (the body as spirit) and the physical act. This co-existence is also found in Brazil.7 Through both her architectural and artistic programs, Bo Bardi sought to draw out the latent sensibilities and intellectuality of the masses. The architects body is unique given the one-time-only nature of life, although on an unconscious level it is connected to the world. The translation into practice of Lefebvres declaration that the users space is livednot represented (or conceived) is aided by abundant site surveys and countless studies, interpretations of the results, and bricolage-like methods that involve scouring and applying freely and non-hierarchically data and methodologies from the past.

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Exhibition

The numerous study models that are built to help the designers imagine at the design stage living in the space and that are a hallmark of SANAA, for example, could be described as a method of awakening in the bodies of Sejima and the members of her team; a sense that they are participants in the architectural spatial experience. Here, a conceptual program as a set of diagrams is dropped into the living space, serving as a dummy lived space. III. The politics of the move from photographs to video, from symbols to the expression of actions with multiple meanings In 1932, the Museum of Modern Art in New York held its first ever architectural exhibition, the International Exhibition of Modern Architecture, and established its Department of Architecture and Design headed by Philip Johnson. Since then, architectural exhibitions have also been a process whereby photography and architecture are put into the context of modern art. Based on the premise that modern architecture is machinery, images captured using the device of photography have been used with the aim of presenting the norms and universality of deterministic modernism. Focusing mainly on building exteriors, structures and forms, people were absent from almost all of these photographs. Of course, some of the photographs did capture architecture and people. But the aim of such photographs was usually to record events that took place at the building concerned, and few of them captured at a conscious level the relationship between architectural space and people. Those that do have been the works not of architectural photographers, but rather the conceptual photographic works of contemporary artists. Thomas Struths Pantheon , which epitomizes the concept of this exhibition, can be viewed as a continuation of the Museum series. Struth, who was influenced by Bernd and Hilla Bechers typologies, seeks to distance himself from his own subjective and discover and probe that which emerges from the photographic plane. He calls the street scenes that are captured by removing his subjectivity unconscious places. If photographs are stripped of subjectivity and the details captured uniformly with a deep focus, the freedom with which the viewer can read the results is increased. Because in this sense the photographs have no subject. The photographs of cities shot from the perspective of urban anthropological typologies were relatively dry. In his Museum series, Struth sought to depict the trembling of emotions and sensibilities by capturing together with the famous works on display the people gazing intently at them. The photographs capture both the composition of the works and the emotions and reactions of the people. According to Struth, by incorporating into the photographs

the paintings as well as the positioning of the people the old paintings come to life in the present. Looking at it a different way, the consciousness shared within the space concerned is captured as an event within that space. Frankly speaking, the same could be said of a photo taken in an art museum by someone with a camera phone who tries to photograph a painting but ends up with people in the frame. The world is portrayed more realistically when it is represented not by a single painting (an icon) but by fragmentary images (an index) sent by mobile phone. This reflects the current state of affairs in which index-like things (traces, recordings) have greater potential than icons (images) or symbols (meanings/words) to convey the richest aspects of contemporary society. This exhibition features two other artists who have contributed photographic works: Luisa Lambri and Walter Niedermayr. Niedermayr is known for his series focusing on ski fields and hospital interiors, but nearly all of his works feature compositions with white backgrounds or spaces over which various tools and people engaged in various activities are scattered in the form of colorful, indeterminately shaped incidental details. A sense of unreality and floating emerges as a result of this process of abstraction. The presence and actions of the people surface symbolically in the white space, which is neutral and has no sense of distance. In his architectural photographs of SANAAs work, too, Niedermayrs approach of seeking to panoramically capture the movement and atmosphere of the interior space is accompanied by a feeling of translucency and a floating sensation. The sense of immateriality of his photographs, or the unique sense of materiality in which space seems to diffuse into minute particles, is well suited to representing shared conscious space. This is because by rendering the space translucently in the form of particles, he calls to mind not a hard nothingness but something non-visual. His work for this exhibition, which focuses on public spaces in the Islam world, also features people abstracted as incidental details. Luisa Lambri is known for her minimalist style and selective framing. She has concentrated on photographing minimalist buildings with distinctive openings by the likes of Mies van der Rohe and Oscar Niemeyer. According to Lambri, she decides which part of a building to take as her subject matter based on her experiences inside the space, and on which of these experiences is the most memorable. In the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, for example, she focused on the windows between the galleries and the corridors, which helped her regain her bearings when she became unsure of her location. Each of these parts could be described as an index of the building concerned, refined as a result of Lambris abstraction of her own experiences. Her photographs at this exhibition take as their subjects Niemeyers

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Exhibition

Casa das Canoas, where Lambri photographed fragments of the dense tropical planting visible through the gaps between the exterior ceiling and the thin columns supporting it, the tropical garden at Renzo Pianos Menil House, visible through a wall of fogged glass, and a vertical garden in a courtyard at SANAAs 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa. The theme of these photographs is the relationship between the geometry of modern architecture and the organic energy of the greenery designed to define its boundaries, between architectural space and nature. The boundaries are loosely defined, with nature permeating the space and the space permeating nature. Her ambiguous, mellow experiences of these boundaries become Lambris representation of these architectural spaces. In the sense that they serve as an image of the world being streamed online, the videos that anyone can shoot, upload, and publish could be described as an even more vivid index. Since the days of Le Corbusier, various films and videos have been made on the theme of architecture as documents of architecture in the form of movie sets and of the relationship between architects and architecture, for example. At this exhibition, however, a different approach to that of these existing films and videos is presented, with space viewed as an internal representation of the people who inhabit it. Such an approach contributes to enriching the representation of space. 8 Fiona Tan takes memories and spaces that amass new memories as her theme in a work inspired by her encounter with the new architecture (the Inujima House Project) that arose on the island of Inujima as the old women who live there continued to go about their daily life. Wim Wenders focuses on the relationship that is in the process of forming between a new experimental architectural space, the Rolex Learning Center in Lausanne, and its users, mostly students of EPFL. The thoughts of the students in the space can be heard as if we were listening to a vast choir of voices. In turn, the building itself is communicating with the users, and those who have an ear for it can hear it talk to them directly. One could say that this dialogue appeals not so much to the sense of hearing but to the depth of our consciousness. Together, these works form an index-like visual record of the relationship between the users, captured on film shot by the participating architects themselves, and the buildings the architects designed. Their aim is to capture the new representations that are discovered as a result of living in these spaces. All of the scenes are representations of an emerging architectural program, an index of lived space.

IV. Models and mockups as representations of architecture Models represent both developing thought processes and samples of parallel possibilities. I have already touched on the sense of participation aroused during the study process by the physicality of models. Here I will discuss models presented to an audience as representations. In The Savage Mind , Claude Lvi-Strauss comments as follows on the role of models: The choice of one solution involves a modification of the result to which another solution would have led, and the observer is in effect presented with the general picture of these permutations at the same time as the particular solution offered. He is thereby transformed into an active participant without even being aware of it. 9 Full-scale (1:1) models are often presented as detail mockups. The presentation of actual buildings was common in the early days of architectural exhibitions. At this exhibition, various levels of models are presented, from rigid structural models (Christian Kerez) and dioramas with an emphasis on miniature people and scenery (Aldo Cibic) to objet-like models that represent concepts metaphorically (Smiljan Radic) and models that present parts of projects in full-scale, the multiple fragments forming a single installation (R&Sie(n)). These models all imagine actual structures, but their form differs depending on what (program, structure, message, etc.) is most central to the representation. Unique among them are the full-scale mock-ups created by artist Do Ho Suh and Thomas Demand, both of whom worked in collaboration with architects. In Demands works, all the surfaces, structures, interiors and so on are reduced to the homogeneous smooth textures of paper, removing their spectacularity. His works are an example of the mediafication of architecture through its transformation into another medium. Architecture or interior space takes on a feel usually associated with another sense, as a result of which it loses a certain inherent reality but at the same time gains strong impact in the context of the new medium. Demand was inspired by the powerful image of defiance of the so-called Nail House, the building with a tiny restaurant on the ground floor that was the last building to remain standing in opposition to the forced demolitions as part of Chongqings urban redevelopment, news of which was disseminated around the world via the Internet. Demand appropriated this image of the building in the media for a proposal that involved the actual reconstruction of the restaurant beneath a road bridge in Switzerland. Here, the faade design was appropriated as a symbol of resistance.

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Yuko Hasegawa The sensibility, emotion and fluidity of the architectural program

Exhibition

Do-ho Suh + Suh Architects installation, Blueprint , comprises a fullscale, fabric faade of Do-ho Suhs New York townhouse, reflecting in the floor above which it floats. This 1:1 scale reflection is in fact a composite relief of two other faadesthat of the traditional Korean hanok in which Do-ho and Eulho Suh grew up and that of a typical Venetian villablurring the boundaries between the place with which the artist identifies and the place he now is. Tom Sachs, who views Le Corbusier as a popular icon of Modernism, emphasizes the iconic nature of his work by reproducing it in the form of a minimalist model made from monochrome resin. It is removed from the context of universal design and placed on the same level as contemporary pop icons such as McDonalds and Hello Kitty, giving it new life/meaning. Through this appropriation and placement, Le Corbusiers architecture is recycled as contemporary information. On account of the handwork and bricolage-like methods involved, models stir the imagination of viewers through slight shifts in meaning. This is another way in which architecture is lived. V. Conclusion. Into the clouds If this exhibition points to one form that reflects the age in which we live, it is probably Matthias Schulers Cloud. This project represents not only a cloud as a natural phenomenon, but is also a metaphor for the paradigm known as cloud computing. The image is of servers that exist in a network being able to access the services provided by the servers concerned without any of them being aware of it. In other words, although actual software and hardware exist in a cloud, the contents are invisible and are of no particular concern. This mechanism, which enables users to request solutions from an unspecified large number of participants in a cloud, is also a metaphor for the co-creation and collaboration that emerges in the field of consciousness of people who share places/space. By occasionally climbing the stairs and thrusting themselves above the clouds, individuals can clearly demonstrate their presence. Architecture is used as metaphor in many places. The state of affairs in which social networking sites such as Google, YouTube, and Japans Nico Nico Douga and Pixiv have become platforms not only for individual creativity but also for anonymous group creativity, and the creation of new knowledge could be called architecture. Here, too, the technological intervention of the engineers of this architecture (program control and network engineering) has begun to be matched by an opposing emotional, human intervention. Like Janet Cardiffs polyphonic sound work, the Cloud expresses the concept of this exhibition in a more marginal, more indirect and

diffuse, yet impactful way. Emotion and sensibility form a cloud of consciousness that drifts across and fills the space. Here one can find space that transcends representation, an archetype of an everchanging architecture.
1. Translated from the Japanese edition of Maurizio Lazzarato, La politica dellevento (or. Italian ed.: Soveria Mannelli: Rubbettino Editore, 2004), trans. by Mahoro Murasawa and Tomonori Nakakura, Kyoto: Rakuhoku Shuppan Publishers, 2008, p. 229. 2. Ibidem , p. 316. 3 Henri Lefebvre, The Production of Space (or. ed.: La production de lespace , 1974), trans. by Donald Nicholson-Smith, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1991, p. 362. 4 Ibidem , p. 363. 5 Translated from the Japanese edition of Toyo Ito, Blurring Architecture , Tokyo: Seidosha Inc., 2000, p. 379. 6. Lina Bo Bardi SESC Pompeia Leisure and Culture Centre, So Paulo, Brazil 1977, in a+u Architecture and Cities , vol. 341, February 1999, p. 56. 7 Ibidem . 8. Henri Lefebvre, The Production of Space , cit., p. 40. 9. Claude Levi-Strauss, The Savage Mind (or. ed.: La pense sauvage , 1962), trans. by John and Doreen Weightman, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968, p. 24.

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Biennale Architettura 2010

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Exhibition

People meet in Architecture. The statement is at once deceptively simple and infinitely suggestive. Is it a declaration of fact or of potentiality? A description of action or circumstance? Is it an observation or a directive? Does it describe an event specific in place and time, or an ontological condition of architecture? Or is it axiological? The verb, one senses, is carefully chosen. To meet is to come together and interact in a certain waya way that involves connection, recognition, even engagement. So, people meet in architecture, they engage with one another in a particular way; they connect. Architecture, one might infer, sponsors a very particular kind of physically embodied engagementit has social and political agencyit is where people meet. In a time when people increasingly communicate through different media in a non-physical environment, Sejima has said, it is the responsibility of the architect to create actual spaces for physical and direct communication between people.
Why is this a critical position for architecture today? Architectural practice has been radically transformed by new technologies of visualization and communicationfrom the way in which buildings are designed, to how they are fabricated, and how the structures themselves perform once they are built. Innovative technologies not only provide new tools for design, they also open up a vast new field of possibilities for exploring and imagining architectural form and space. At the same time, they open up a space of uncertainty at the center of the design process itself. Architectural design occurs at a huge remove from the materiality and scale of the built work. Architects always work in some other medium, material, and scale from the physical object ultimately being produced. At every stage, the process of conceiving and producing architecture is mediated. Mediation, one could say, is a fundamental condition of architectural conception, production, and reception. Consequently, changes in techniques of visualization, as for example when new technologies become available to architecture, introduce a new element of unpredictability that destabilizes the critical relationship between conception and production in architecture. Current parametric and algorithmic modeling processes that seek to combine indeterminacy with control directly engage the issue of uncertainty. They make it possible to produce works of dazzling morphological complexity with relatively simple procedures. Parametric design processes are a rich and exciting field of formal research, but so far, they do not bridge the gap between innovative design and production processes. Architecture today (as at other moments when technical innovation and especially new techniques of visualization have been critical factors in design, in the 1920s, for example), is conceived as situated at the intersection of the material and the virtual, as fundamentally mutable, continuously negotiating, adapting to, and interacting with equally dynamic and mutable physical, social, and technological,

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Exhibition

environments. The new and emerging technologies of communication and information transfer continue to widen the cognitive gap between modes of knowing the worldbetween information and experienceand to multiply their contradictions. This is why the theme People Meet in Architecture is important for architecture todayespecially if we take it as a call to reflect on the cultural significance, not just the formal possibilities, of the new media and global networks and the social environments they create, and a call to posit architectures agency in the media-dominated world of the early Twenty-first century. It is critical if we take seriously the challenge to consider how architecture might clarify new values, and stake out a position towards new social and natural environments. So, how does the Biennale respond to its own theme and challenge? It does so principally by assembling architects as well as climate engineers, video and media artists, poets, filmmakers, photographers, critics, landscape and urban designers, curators, and fabric designerswhose practices constitute a broad conception of the disciplinary milieus of contemporary architectural culture. Many of the projects are collaborative and staged as controlled experimentsa cloud is generated, a working studio in Mumbai is airlifted to Venice, space is shaped with light, water vapor, sound, vegetation, fabric. Time is given substance through stop frame photography and stroboscopic light. The past takes its place with the present and reminds us of the dreams of different times and alternative futures. The interdependency of space and time are explored through projection, movement, and images (still and moving) that reveal both the complex subjectivity of perception and the intersubjectivity of experience that is sharedin the spaces of architecture as it is in the context of the exhibition itself. Throughout the exhibition the worlds of information and experience collide, intersect, and multiply their contradictions. It is the role of architecture, this Biennale suggests, to engage and proliferate those contradictions, not to resolve them. The emphasis is on experiment, on collaboration, on the generation of new forms of practice and formats for architectural knowledge. But most of all, emphasis is on architectures cultural milieus. This is where the criticality and disciplinary relevance of the theme, People Meet in Architecture, is to be found. The inclusiveness of 12th Architecture Biennale is clearly not about disciplinary dissolution or the blurring of boundaries. It is not a call for architects to become artists, filmmakers, climate engineers, urban planners, or ecologists. Instead, it would seem to be a summons for architecture to engage directly with the cultural smoothness of the information societyto engage the cultural implications of the world of information; of its extraterritorial spatial and economic logics, flexible and porous boundaries, and social dynamics. Sejima herself has said that Although informa-

tion society is invisible, I think that architecture must have some sort of relationship with such a society. I dont know what type of answer there might be It seems clear that if architecture is to engage the media environment as a framework for experimental design practices, it needs to do so in its own terms. Architecture needs to engage its own codes, practices, and history to stake out a position that is critical in relation to the physical, technological, and cultural conditions of its making. Architecture, in other words, can produce new social and political meanings within the terms of its own practices. It is through those practices and by exposing what is present (to borrow Walter Benjamins words) that it can generate new understanding and enter into the processes of societys transformation. The operative concept in this notion of architectural agency is a kind of engagement that entails reciprocity; that is dialogic and does not move towards resolution but instead continuously establishes meaningful contact with and connection to alterity. It can be understood in terms of the socio-spatial dialectic described by Henri Lefebvre as the production of space. Space here is neither an object nor a subject, but rather a social reality a set of relations and forms. Space, in other words, is a concrete abstraction with material consequences. Its social production is negotiated in terms of a three part dialectic (une dialectique de triplicit) between perceived space, conceived space, and lived space, that produces an other spacea new condition. Lefebvres theory of the production of space provides a useful framework for understanding the instrumental agenda of the Biennale and its operative concept: atmosphere. Like so many of SANAAs favorite descriptors, atmosphere has many meanings. It can pertain to the physical properties, visual effects, organizational logic, scalar relations, and programmatic density of a work. It can describe relations between inside and outside, qualities of boundary, light and air, reflection, refraction, connection, and the ways in which they are experienced. They elaborate: Atmosphere has two meanings for us. One relates to the surroundings of the building and the other has to do with space. One does not exist before the building is constructed. The other exists before the building is constructed. Atmosphere, in other words, is not a thing, but a condition that is both negotiated and durational. It is an emergence that arises out of a multiplicity of interactions between the built object and its physical and social environments. Atmosphere actualizes architectures agency. It is a form of knowledge that is particular to architecture itself, but that also changes the way in which we understand our world, and our ability to act in it. Atmosphere actualizes difference. The process of engagement and transformation entailed in the

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Exhibition

creation of atmosphere can be related to the process, which the German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk describes as explicitation, a process by which some latency (physical, social, phenomenal) is rendered explicit through engagement. For Bruno Latour, Sloterdijks concept of explicitation offers a means of conceptualizing design in terms of action, as intervention and interpretation, a process that never begins from scratch, but is always working on something that already existseven if only as an issue, or a problem. (The most intelligent designers, Latour notes, never start from a tabula rasa .) In this schema, design itself has a very particular kind of agency. Rather than objects, it generates projects; it produces practices of innovation. Everything, Latour claims, has to be (and is continuously being) designed and redesigned, including nature. To collaborate in the production of architecture is to assume responsibility both for shaping our understanding of the world and for intervening in its ecologies. Many of the projects included in the Biennalefrom Rem Koolhaass ahistorical conceptualization of preservation, to Piet Oudolfs landscape, and Francois Roches experiments with bodies moving in lightspeak to this conception of design as encompassing both the natural and built environment. But none speaks more directly to this claim than Matthias Schuler and Transsolars Cloudscapes . Generated in the spaces of the Arsenale, and penetrated by Tetsuo Kondos elegant ramp, the Cloud makes it possible for visitors not only to feel its moisture and heat on their skin, but to climb under, into, and over the Cloud itselfto experience it simultaneously as dense vapor, bounded space, and tactile form that moves, mutates, and shifts its boundaries and position in response to human action. Schulers project actualizes the very notion of atmosphere as a negotiated condition by translating the terms of engagement of the exhibition itself from binary subject-object relations to the multiply diffuse terms of environment, ecology, and hybrid networks. Agency conceived in terms of atmosphere likewise links design to responsibility. This is not insignificant. For all the emphasis on the physical instantiation of architectural ideas, on effect, and apparent resistance to theorization, entailed in the concept of atmosphere, it nevertheless implies a position that is critical in terms of its social and ethical commitments. This position has little in common with the affect-driven, non-oppositional stance of the post-critical and its antidialectical terms of engagement. Atmosphere puts a distance between the work and its author that opens the work to experience; that allows the user to enter into the process of production of the architecture. At the same time, the openness to experience and the experimentalism inherent in the concept of atmosphere is also antithetical to the determinism implicit in the negative-dialectics of critical architecture.

Commitment to experimentalism is one of the distinguishing features of a number of contemporary practices, from OMA, Herzog & de Meuron, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and SANAA, to Aranda\Lasch and Atelier Bow-Wow. The method of work they employ involves the generation of hundreds of physical and digital models in the process of developing the design of any project. This process is often seen as aligning this work with art rather than architecture practices. But, the process actually has much more in common with the experimental methods of scientific investigation than it has with avantgarde art practices. In science, experimentation is an operation carried out under controlled conditions in order to discover something unknown, to test a hypothesis, or law. It is a protocol adopted in uncertainty. Experimentation is about discovery. In architecture, Manfredo Tafuri claimed that experimentalism is constantly taking apart, putting together, contradicting, and provoking Its innovations can be bravely launched towards the unknown, but the launching pad is solidly anchored to the ground Whereas for the avant-gardes, Tafuri suggests, the problem of checking the effects on the public has little importance. [The] real task [of experimentation] is not subversion but widening. But, in architecture just as in science, it is not enough to launch the experiments: one has to examine and then act on the results (the atmospheres) they produce if the experiments are to generate new knowledge. The built work in this formulation has its own agency; it produces its own knowledge beyond the projections of the hypothesis. As Otto Wagner, the Viennese architect of the fin-de-sicle put it a century ago: the built work of architecture produces effects that frequently act like a revelation to the creator of such works. They are, as it were, the counterpoint of the architecture. What Wagner conceived as the counterpoint of architectureits capacity to produce its own form of knowledgecorresponds to SANAAs conception of the cognitive instrumentality of architecture to generate atmosphere, a new form of experience. It also relates to what Mies van der Rohe called the betonte Leere (emphatic emptiness) of his houses of the 1920sthe performativity of the architecture, its openness to experience and disparate acts of inhabitation and usethat make the architecture itself ever-present, immanent. Whether conceived as counterpoint, immanence, or atmosphere, the generation of a third or other condition is predicated on the actuality of the built work of architecture in physical space. Yuko Hasegawa has described it as simply want[ing] to place the architecture and observe what will happen, rather than predicting and planning what effect it will have on the surrounding environment. [The designer] cannot possibly grasp the whole by completing the physical building. The architectural design reveals itself in time and is given its wholeness through the relationship with the people who

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Eve Blau Agency in Atmosphere

Exhibition

use the building and the surrounding environment. The experiment, in other words, does not end with the design and construction of the work. Instead, the work as such only really begins to exist fully once it enters the world of lived experience. So too in the spaces of the Arsenale and Palazzo dell Esposizioni: Very broadly, the process by which we design can be brought to bear on the contemporary and future architectural discussion we can select and arrange works such that they are understood as they are rather than as representations. This can be manifested with an architecture grounded in its use by people. The collective challenge is to instigate relationships with people; to speak to how we perceive space, and to examine how people within space make the space itself through a broad range of media and design practices. The atmosphere of the exhibition is a collective work produced through multiple view points rather than a single orientation. But all are oriented around the proposition that each relationship has its roots in actuality, physical space. Situated at the point of intersection between the material and the socialwhere the objective and subjective meetatmosphere is both highly unstable and continuously transforming the conditions of its own making. The particular solution always seems to suggest other viable options. Each condition seems to contain its opposite latent within it: transparency of opacity, openness of closure, independence of connection, regularity of flexibility, clarity of obscurity. The contradictions that proliferate in the ongoing process of exploration are what Tafuri identified as the widening capacity of experimental architectural practices that combine control with indeterminacy and open-endedness. Each new problem is the occasion for rethinking fundamental architectonic relationshipsof part to part, part to whole, organization to structure, materials to techniques, light to space, surface to volume, edge to boundary, interior to exterior as well as for recalibrating scalar relationships between building, city, landscape, and territory. This is architecture conceived in the active terms of communication, information flow, and interactionthat finds the global in the local and seeks the collective in the personal. While focusing on the particular conditions of site, program, materials, and structure, it engages with the larger cultural and economic conditions of its makingthe smoothness and connectivity of the world of informationinventing new hierarchies that produce hybrid, flexible environments; exploring action-based logics for organizing space that give their users the agency to inhabit them as they wish. In this, the 12th Architecture Biennale engages the cultural implications of the profound shift that is occurring in what media theorists call the current media ecosystem. The media environment, we are

told, is in the process of radical changefrom a system in which the traffic in ideas and cultural products moves in one direction (from broadcaster to consumer) to a system that is multidirectional and in which users are active producers. New complex relationships are emerging between old and new media, physical and virtual environments; but the ultimate ecological impact on the media ecosystem is unknown. The political implications are equally unclear; whether the decentralized explosion of user-generated content signals (as some claim) a re-energizing of the Habermassian public sphere and/or the end of privacy, remains an open question. Economically, however, it would seem that we are witnessing a radical shift in the means of cultural production, including architectural culture. In this context the challenge to architecture and its users to rethink categories, to generate new hierarchies, and to imagine ideas that have far reaching effects, implicit in the Biennale theme, is all the more urgent. There is a politics to this call to promote a new disparate freedom that is inherent in contemporary culture. It is a call to action and reflection on the ways in which we, as a society can create architecture in which people meet.

Exhibition

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Aires Mateus e associados Voids

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Aires Mateus e associados Voids

Exhibition

Space is a void, a pocket of air that must be contained to define a limit. This precision coincides with an indispensable existence around it which grants identity. To design spaces is to design the possibilities of life, with limits made material. Space is defined by form, texture, color, temperature, smell, and light. Also as a void, a mental process of control over construction where space is at the core: adding subtraction, building excavation. It shifts the center of experience from form to life. At the forefront, space: nearly autonomous, nearly absolute.
Team: Francisco and Manuel Aires Mateus Jorge P Silva, Anna Bacchetta, Josep Pons, Alice Dolzani Construes, Antonio Martins Sampaio, Lisboa With the additional support of: Fundao EDP, DGArtes

Aires Mateus e associados, Santa Marta Lighthouse Museum in Cascais, 2001-2007. Photo FG+SG

Aires Mateus e associados, Santa Marta Lighthouse Museum in Cascais, 2001-2007. Photo FG+SG

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Aires Mateus e associados Voids

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Aires Mateus e associados Voids

Exhibition

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

Aires Mateus e associados, House in Coruche, diagram of closed spaces, ground floor plan, roof top, faade and section, 2005

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Aires Mateus e associados Voids

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Aires Mateus e associados Voids

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Amateur Architecture Studio Decay of a Dome

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Amateur Architecture Studio Decay of a Dome

Exhibition

I intend to apply a very light structure, the shape of which is similar to the dome of western buildings. But its construction principle is very like traditional Chinese buildings. It does not need a base, so the construction wont cause damage to the ground. It contains the fewest kinds of components possible, the simplest construction principles. It will be both quickly constructed and dismantled; it is therefore also easy to move. The construction will need many hands to participate; a group of people to assemble; even those who know little about architecture shall participate. Before the construction in Venice, I want to invite people to participate in the construction at a chosen site in my city. The process could be recorded and be part of the exhibition. The most interesting point of the work is that it will change its shape as its height increases. The rational construction becomes a nastic construction. I name the work Decay of a Dome. It is a structure without connections, but is able to hold weight. It follows only one principle; it uses only one kind of stick with the same section. It turns out to be a dome space, as if floating in the sky. Factory-produced bamboo sticks and the rough pine wood used in packing boxes at Venice port are used, with a section of eight by eighty centimeters and length of two meters. To construct a ten-meter-long, eight-meter-wide and four-meter-high dome will require about 140 wooden sticks. If the diameter of the structure is seven meters, with five levers, the height will be 3.5 meters. If constructed with seven levers, the height could be as high as five meters with a width of eight meters, in which case, the base might easily decay and twist. The height will then be reduced to four meters and kept stable. As an architect with a philosophical Tao background, I am interested in the relationship between decay and adaption. It is similar to the decay of buildings through time, a status close to nature. I intend to measure the dome after its decay to check the position of the sticks and construct it again in the exhibition. The structure can be completed within one day if twenty people work together and the materials have been prepared well, as fast as construction speed in China now.
Team: Wang Shu, Vito Bertin, Lu WenYu Amateur Architecture Studio, Decay of a Dome , looking up from the bottom of the model, 2010. Photo Lu Wenyu

TxT oVEr IMAGE BoTH EnG AnD ITA

Amateur Architecture Studio, Decay of a Dome , 2010

Amateur Architecture Studio, Decay of a Dome , 1to4 scale construction experiment, 2010. Photo Lu Wenyu

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Amateur Architecture Studio Decay of a Dome

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Amateur Architecture Studio Decay of a Dome

Exhibition

Amateur Architecture Studio, Decay of a Dome , 2010

Amateur Architecture Studio, Vertical courtyard apartment, 2001-2003. Photo Lu Wenyu

Amateur Architecture Studio, ningBo History Museum, 2003-2006. Photo Lu Wenyu Amateur Architecture Studio, Decay of a Dome , 2010

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AMID.cero9 Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte

Biennale Architettura 2010

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AMID.cero9 Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte

Exhibition

The main feature of the Jerte Valley is its single-species cherry orchards, which practically cover the whole area. Its renowned high quality stalk-free fruit grows on terraces, defined by stone walls that span the width of a single tree. In recent years, the Jerte cherry crop has become a tourist attraction when the blossom becomes a natural spectacle that briefly transforms the landscape. A continuous blanket of white flowers covers the valley in early spring, drawing throngs of visitors who form traffic jams amongst flowering cherry trees, a surreal, dream-like landscape. For the Cherry Blossom Festival, we propose the construction of a modern chapel; a building that forges an intense bond with the landscape through its presence, its position, its volume, and its material; an assertive building that does not forgo a relationship with the entire valley, using its scale to establish a point of reference in it. A hybrid between a cave drilled with big holes where light enters in the midst of the flowering cherry trees and an interior space defined by its structure and light; a building that can remain closed for months. The building space is defined by a family of five elements: the concrete ambulatory ring, the steel and mixed membrane shell, the basement, and the concrete ramps and stairs. The lightweight roof is composed of a crinoline fabric with slender steel rods in rhomboidal patterns, and a triple cross-ventilated membrane stretched across the metal structure. It alludes to the beauty, fragility, and evanescence of the cherry blossom and the festivities that have emerged around it. The shell is a three-dimensional structure made of slender interwoven steel components that behaves like a dome. Its cladding is a continuous three-layer membrane that adapts to the initial geometry using differently sized tessellates, depending on the curvature of the surface. The tessellation geometry is warped by the inclusion of these discontinuities until variable patterns appear, arranged in a strangely continuous way. At the points of discontinuity, the surface turns back towards the interior, thickening and forming large open vessels that reinforce the surface on the edge of the apertures. These large-format items, bathed in red paint on the inside, are suspended from the space, feeding light and views of the valley into this camera obscura .
Team: Cristina Daz Moreno, Efrn Garca Grinda, Luis Cabrejas Guijarro, Jorge Saz Semolino, Eva Urquijo ortiz, Jos Quintanar Iniesta, Mireia Luzrraga, Alex Muio, Margarita Martnez, Manu Jimenez, Paula Garca-Masedo Client: Junta de Extremadura, Consejera de Cultura y Turismo With the additional support of: State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad (SEACEx), KAnTrILA, S.L. (Construction Company), BoMA (Structural Management), Diagonal 80 (Digital Printing) and IASo (Membrane Consulting)

AMID.cero9, Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte (Spain), 2010

AMID.cero9, Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte (Spain), 2010. Photomontage

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AMID.cero9 Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte

Exhibition

AMID.cero9, Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte (Spain), 2010. Photomontage

AMID.cero9, Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte (Spain), internal view of the main model, 2010

AMID.cero9, Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte (Spain), 2010

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AMID.cero9 Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte

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AMID.cero9 Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte

Exhibition

AMID.cero9, nave Industrial para Diagonal 80 , 2006-2009. Photo Ignacio Bisbal

AMID.cero9, nave Industrial para Diagonal 80 , 2006-2009. Photo Ignacio Bisbal

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Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation Modern Primitives

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation Modern Primitives

Exhibition

Architecture is Best organized from Crystals At every moment, the process of building architecture is a rehearsal for how matter in the universe assembles itself. our current era of assembly is the age of the crystal. The energy storage potential in crystals (periodic, aperiodic, and chaotic) is vast and differentiated. Computation itself is siphoned through the crystals of silicon chips. our own designs at Aranda\Lasch tend towards crystallographic constructions of space, using its language of lattices and cells to describe growth. This language of modularity has useful affinities to architecture at large since it describes the ways solid-state matter (like a metal or a diamond) is structured. It is possible to imagine both crystal structures and architecture structures as modulated assemblies where simple low-level rules and unfolding symmetries determine large scale organizations. Also, the particularities of a design project share something with the nuances of any rock. Both become specific not just from the rules embedded within it that direct its growth but also through external pressures that curb this growth, causing it to react, hybridize, synthesize, or otherwise change pattern. In other words, crystals are specific, shaped by circumstance; they each carry a shadow of the universal tucked into their idiosyncrasies. There is no more vital and organizing force for architecture than the productive dis-symmetries of crystallographic structure.
Benjamin Aranda, Chris Lasch, nathan Browning Project Team: Michael Fimbres, Matt Ihms, Maria Anna Kowalska, Brian Lee, Justin Pasternak, rishi Sapra, Lindsey Wikstrom, Spencer Woodward With the additional support of: Fendi, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Johnson Trading Gallery, Arizona State University School of Architecture + Landscape Architecture Aranda\Lasch, Modern Primitives , 2010

Aranda\Lasch, Modern Primitives , 2010

Aranda\Lasch, Modern Primitives , 2010 Aranda\Lasch, Modern Primitives , 2010

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Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation Modern Primitives

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation Modern Primitives

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation Modern Primitives

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation Modern Primitives

Exhibition

Aranda\Lasch, Grotto, 2005

Aranda\Lasch, Fauteuil , 2007. Photo noah Kalina

Aranda\Lasch, Quasiconsole , 2008. Photo Johnson Trading Gallery

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

Biennale Architettura 2010

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

Exhibition

Saemangeum Island City is a phased plan of eight new islands, to be built on reclaimed land along the southwest coastline of the Yellow Sea in the Province of Jeollabukdo, South Korea. In the interest of the feasibility of land reclamation, the islands have been shaped to the lakebed topography. The experience of being on an island and close to water is an important urban design generator. Studies of viewing distances and proportions of the water bodies in Cadiz, the archipelago of Stockholm, and Venice helped us to make judgments about the experience one will have of the water spaces between islands. The relationship of the beauty of the mountains to the south, the natural archipelago of rocky islands along the sea wall, and the former tidal sea shores at Saemangeum, with the artificiality of the proposed new islands will generate a poetic landscape. City of Civility The aim is to provide a framework of good public spaces in the city. In Saemangeum, this means high quality water spaces in the city. The quality of the public realm sets the standard of civility of the city and raises the design ambition of the citizens. The proposal is like a collage and translation of well proven and adaptable city structures from around the world. The idea is to make the city as a whole an attractive destination for newcomers and visitors. City of Coexistence We have tried to reduce the need for single functional zones in the city, such as bed-towns, business parks, or self-contained tourist resorts. Diverse functions are situated close to each other, compatibility permitting. This increases the potential for adaptability and change in the economy, and it reduces the wastefulness of daily commuting between zones in the city. Dense urban districts where people live and work will coexist with the beauty of the open landscape of farm fields, lakes, and mountains.
Architecture research Unit, London Metropolitan University (Florian Beigel, Philip Christou, Alexander Bank, Thomas Bates, Bumsuk Chung, Thomas Gantner, Alexander Gore, Kalle Soderman, Sina Zekavat, Jonathan Connolly); ArU Students (Minji Baik, Chris Drummond, Minsun Kang, So Jung Min, nicola read, Jiehwoo Seung, Joshua Williams) Collaborators: Economic and Cost (Athar Hussain, London School of Economics; Fran Tonkiss, London School of Economics; Max Lee, Davis Langdon & Seah Korea Co. Ltd); Environment (Jonathan Cook; Qingwei Ma, The City University, London); renewable Energies (Helmut Mueller, University of Dortmund; AbuBakr S Bahaj, Southampton University; Werner Jager, Hydro Building Systems; Eung-Jik Lee, Semyung University; Mat Santamouris, national and Kapodestrian University of Athens; Jrgen Schmid, University of Kassel; Christian rehtanz, Dortmund University); Video Animation (Tapio Snellman, neutral, London; Christian Grou, MichelAngelo Ziccarelli); Venice installation (Barry McCann, Steve Blunt, James Firman, Kang Woon-gu) Clients: Jeollabukdo Provincial Government; Saemangeum Task Force of the Central Government of South Korea, under the direction of South Korean President Lee Myung-bak; Urban Design Institute of Korea

Bumsuk Chung ArU, Saemangeum Island City, overlooking the Airport City, the central lagoon, 2008

nicola read ArU, Saemangeum Island City, agriculture in the city, tourists visiting the tulip fields, 2008

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

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ArU, Saemangeum Island City, synthesis plan, drawing, 2008

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

Biennale Architettura 2010

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ArU/Architecture research Unit Saemangeum Island City, Korea

Exhibition

Philip Christou ArU, Saemangeum Island City, view of the Harbour City towards the new Sea Port and the Gogunsan archipelago of islands beyond, 2008

ArU, Apartment in Clerkenwell, London, 1999. Photo Helene Binet

ArU, YoulHwaDang Publishing House, interior of the rare Book Library, Paju Book City, Korea, 2009. Photo Jonathan Lovekin

Philip Christou ArU, Positive People Publishing House, Paju Book City, Korea, 2007

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Atelier Bow-Wow House Behaviorology

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Atelier Bow-Wow House Behaviorology

Exhibition

The architectural language of Atelier Bow-Wows work developed as a result of the dialog between the clients lifestyle and site conditions. Gae House is for a writer and housewife. They spend most of their time at home and wanted a vertical connection between their own private but open spaces over different levels. House Tower is a house for the manager of an import stationary store and his wife who works in a fashion house. They have a beautiful collection of clothes, records, and books. nora House is for a married couple with two children. They required a kitchen, garden, and natural ventilation. Sway House is for an art director and illustrator who were waiting for their baby to be born. They wanted a small music room for the husband and a studio for the wife, as well as an outdoor bath. Ikushima Liberary is a house for a journalist couple and their three children. They had a large collection of books and wanted a house that is generous in the sense of being able to invite their neighbors in. House & Atelier Bow-Wow is a house and architectural studio. It has nine split levels to create flexible spaces for different activities and uses. Tread Machiya is a house for a banker, housewife, and their two children. The kitchen is the center of the house, acting like the masters quarters of a ship to care for the family. Bokutei is a house for an editor, housewife, and their two children. They have a plan to eventually transform it to a guesthouse, curry shop stand, and performance space for their artist friends. Tower Machiya is a house for a man, wife and two children. The mans dream is to become a tea master in the future. The entire house is a series of small living spaces that act as the approach to the tearoom on the top floor. Double Chimney is a villa project by an investor company in Karuizawa. We wanted the clients for this house to be the wind and the heat. Crane House is a villa for a married couple. They wanted a radiant space to escape their weekly urban lives and unwind in the surrounding forest. Pony Garden is a house for a woman whose dream is to live with a pony after retirement. The project is mostly a garden for the pony, where they can spend all their time together.Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, Momoyo Kaijima
Team: Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, Momoyo Kaijima Takahiko Kurabayashi, Shinpei Tazaki, Yoshiko Iwasaki, oak Structural Design office, Kudo Komuten

Atelier Bow-Wow, Ikushima Library, interior, Kokubunji, Tokyo, 2008

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Atelier Bow-Wow, Tread Machiya, section perspective drawing, Meguro, 2008

Atelier Bow-Wow, Bokutei, Sumida-ku, 2008

Atelier Bow-Wow, House Tower, Shinagawa, 2006

Atelier Bow-Wow, Double Chimney, Karuizawa-nagano, 2008

Atelier Bow-Wow, nora House, Sendai, 2008

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Atelier Bow-Wow, nora House, interior, Sendai, 2008. Photo Hiroyasu Sakaguchi A to Z

Atelier Bow-Wow, Double Chimney, Karuizawa-nagano, 2008. Photo Hiroyasu Sakaguchi A to Z

Atelier Bow Wow, Tower Machiya, faade from street, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 2010. Courtesy The Artist

Atelier Bow-Wow, Pony Garden, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 2008. Photo Hiroyasu Sakaguchi A to Z

House & Atelier Bow-Wow, interior, Tokyo, 2008. Photo Hiroyasu Sakaguchi A to Z Atelier Bow-Wow, Gae House, interior, Setagaya, 2003. Photo Hiroyasu Sakaguchi A to Z

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Atelier Bow-Wow House Behaviorology

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Atelier Bow-Wow House Behaviorology

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Berger&Berger a va, a prefabricated movie theater

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Berger&Berger a va, a prefabricated movie theater

Exhibition

a va, a prefabricated movie theater is the creation of a unique space dedicated to the meeting of films and their audience. originally proposed in the framework of a play by Philippe Minyana and directed by robert Cantarella at the Dijon Theater, this public alcove is an envelope placed within another. A temporary movie theater then resulted from protocols that determine an audiences behavior and can lead to a viewer experience that goes beyond the basic, core uses of a constructed object. our project focuses on dissolving an architectural object into a fictional system.
An unprecedented environment is formed by selecting the minimum necessary volume for an audience of eighty. The morphology of this inhabitable set obeys the rules and physical deformations of acoustic compositions. The pre-established rule for the design arrangement is to avoid putting two partitions parallel to each other. Fabricated from Alucobond sheets (aluminum sandwich trapping a polymer core, here manipulated with careful craftsmanship), the plates are grooved for folding, then bolted together. With characteristics similar to a primitive cave, this movie theater has frontal tiers with a small stage and fixed projection screen. By putting into action this conceptual apparatus, our display attempts to simultaneously question architectural models of representation: the movie and theater auditorium, and the museum gallery. The space sketches out an ulterior behavioral and participatory relationship to the public. Today, the prefabricated theater resembles a selected array of piecesfilms, videos, sound installationscreated by artists invited by Berger&Berger. The selection of works does not necessarily focus on a theme, but instead offers moments. Pieces question the notion of space, fictional narrative, architecture, and time. With this project we assert the autonomy of the objects own architecture as being more than just a link or an interface between the spectator and the projected works. rather, it imposes itself as the pure presence of a visual and acoustic environment. It is a solid piece of architecture and creates a new interior environment formed through the transformation of existing acoustic effects in basic theater design. The piece is an architectural structure that operates through the definition of an interior space as it modifies the exterior. An installation that asserts the vivid resonance of the container or the theater just as much as the contents or the visual and sound elements.
Conception: Berger&Berger (Laurent P. Berger / Cyrille Berger) Construction Team: Pyrrhus Conception Technical Manager: Franois Gaultier-Lafaye With the additional support of: Caterina Tognon Arte Contemporanea - Venice, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, ThyssenKrupp Elevator, CULTUrESFrAnCE, Ministry of Culture and Communication, Service Culturel de lAmbassade de France rome, Alain resnais and Cin Mag Bodard, Lux, DCTP Info & Archiv our warmest thanks to all the artists presenting their films in our movie theater Thanks to: robert Cantarella, Caterina Tognon, Gabriele Pimpini, Francesca Von Habsburg, Daniela Zyman, Marion Tharaud, Alain Bessaudou, Thtre Dijon Bourgogne, Monitor, Galerie Chantal Crousel, Le Troisime Ple, Steven Hearn, Chlo Colp, Brent Klinkum, Alexandra Baudelot, Christiane Gaultier-Lafaye, Massimo Saidel, JeanMarc Sr-Charlet, Sandrine Mini, Stefano Coletto, Enrico Fontanari, Eric Troussicot, Grard-Julien Salvy, Franis rambert, Emmanuel Lefrant, Federica Zama Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella. Image Guillaume Ziccarelli

Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella

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Berger&Berger a va, a prefabricated movie theater

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Berger&Berger a va, a prefabricated movie theater

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Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella. Image Guillaume Ziccarelli

Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella. Image Guillaume Ziccarelli

Berger&Berger, a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Courtesy robert Cantarella. Image Guillaume Ziccarelli

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Berger&Berger a va, a prefabricated movie theater

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Berger&Berger a va, a prefabricated movie theater

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Berger&Berger, Dr Jekyll & Mr Mouse , 2008. Steel, electric cables, plexiglas, white fluorescent tubes, 540 540 250 cm. Courtesy CEnT QUATrE. Image Guillaume Ziccarelli

Berger&Berger + Thomas raynaud Architecte, Centre Pompidou Mobile , mobile art museum, 2009. Courtesy the Artists. Image Berger&Berger + BuildingBuilding

Berger&Berger + BuildingBuilding, notus Loci , Artists residence and extension of the international art and landscape center, le de Vassivire, Beaumont du Lac, France, 2011 (year of project 2008). Courtesy the Artists. Image Berger&Berger + BuildingBuilding

Berger&Berger + BuildingBuilding, Centre Pompidou Mobile , mobile art museum, 2009. Courtesy the Artists. Image Berger&Berger + BuildingBuilding

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Lina Bo Bardi

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Lina Bo Bardi

Exhibition

Lina Bo Bardi brings to the People meet in Architecture exhibition some of her most successful projects in creating places for everyday life. These works stand out by combining a strong urban presence and a warm welcome to people in their daily life. The drawings gathered here show that this feature is not accidental, but the result of design strategies. In them we see the great forms heavily populated by children playing, people talking among animals, native plants, artworks, and furniture. Situations taking place under the old factory converted into a leisure center, the huge slab of the span of the Museum or in the restored historic houses in Bahia. These are not mere illustrations showing the project, as is usual in architecture. They appear right in the moment of conception, as if they were checking whether the projected forms may contribute to peoples lives. In these drawings, Lina Bo Bardi makes use of her experience with the Italian architect Gio Ponti. As in this architects projects, the drawings are accompanied by plenty of writings that make the architecture a narrative of life that will unfold there. They are reminders to herself of how certain aspects of the project should be developed throughout the design and construction. The apparently simple and deliberately unadorned line is opposed to the virtuoso drawing that, according to her, stifles the image and overlaps the idea. She prefers to follow the design of Le Corbusier, with the clean line she calls intellectual drawing. However, those are drawings that have something childish, not in the sense of a childs naivety, but its spontaneity. There is something of the decorative arts in her furniture design, visual communication, objects, construction details, and even vegetation. They function as classical ornamentation, which brought the geometry of great forms to a human scale. However, she acknowledges that this approach is not a problem of scale but of culture. She pays tribute to Yves Klein and Mayakovski in designing forests of tallow-wood, wooden masts present in festivals in Brazil, breaking with separation between erudite and popular culture. She exhibits the artworks at MASP in transparent supports and walls to bring them closer to the visitors and incorporate the artworks into city life. Lina reproduces African constructions and decorations in Benin House (a center for highlighting the culture of the main ethnic group of former slaves in Bahia) exactly where they were tortured up to the end of slavery. Attitudes laden with political density that are rare in contemporary cultural practice. renato Anelli
organization: Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi Courtesy: Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, Coleao nelson Kon, Marcia Benevento

Lina Bo Bardi, SESC Pompia - Mostra Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique . Hydrographics and pastels on paper, 21.4 15.4. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi Collection

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Lina Bo Bardi

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Lina Bo Bardi

Exhibition

Lina Bo Bardi, SESC - Fbrica da Pompia , Perspective of the restaurant, 1981. Watercolor, rollerball pen and Indian ink on paper, 38.9 57.2. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi Collection

Lina Bo Bardi, MASP - Museu de Arte de So Paulo , study of faade on the Avenida Paulista, 1965. Collage, graphite and Indian ink on paper, 56.8 99.7 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi Collection

Lina Bo Bardi, SESC Pompia - Mostra Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique . Watercolor, hydrographics and graphite on paper, 32.7 58.4 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi Collection

Lina Bo Bardi, Casa do Benin na Bahia , sketches of details of the staircase and column in reinforced concrete, 1987. Watercolor, rollerball pen and hydrographics on paper, 19.1 27.9 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi Collection

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Lina Bo Bardi

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Lina Bo Bardi

Exhibition

Museo de Arte de So Paulo-MASP, 1957-1968. Concert at Belvedere, 1992. Photo Divulgation Itamar Miranda, Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil

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Lina Bo Bardi

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Lina Bo Bardi

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Photo Dean Kaufman

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Studio Andrea Branzi Per una nuova Carta di Atene

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Studio Andrea Branzi Per una nuova Carta di Atene

Exhibition

In recent years my work has been mainly concentrated on the search for new weak models of urbanization, theoretical models that try to interpret the social and functional conditions of the Twenty-first century. These conditions are profoundly different from those of the previous century, but have not yet been properly and globally interpreted. It is not my intention to produce a unitary model of the modern goods civilization city, but rather to make a contribution to its different interpretation, still too bound to the centrality of architecture. Le Corbusiers Map of Athens of 1933 was never implemented, but was a useful mental model for interpreting the industrial citya city consisting of specialized zoning (residential, leisure, production, traffic, old city centers) serving a single specialized function, separated like the teeth of a gear, though each maintaining its own autonomy. The Twentieth-century city always assumed the presence of a perimeter, a boundary, a threshold that separated it from a politically different world, from the agricultural world, or from pre-industrial culture. These limits have now gone and, as the philosophers say, we live in a world that no longer has an exterior; a globalized world where states are ever weaker and society has become a multitude; a world where architecture and agriculture merge, where capitalism and socialism co-exist, where technology and the sacred are a single thing. So it is a world where the category of the infinite (as Erwin Panofsky wrote) is the only possible symbolic form. An opaque, ambiguous form, free of any external image; an infinite that must exist in our mind, in our psyche, before existing in reality: mind and psyche are the only possible territories for a refounding of architecture. So the aim of a new Map of Athens is not the city of the Future, but rather the city of the Present, with all its limits and contradictions. A city that must be constantly rethought, readapted, and replanned, in search of temporary balances. A city that corresponds to our reformist society, free of any unitary reference model, that must every day produce new laws, new statutes, and new rules to positively manage its own permanent state of crisis.

time.

Seventh recommendation: Consider the city as being microconditioned all-full; interpret the city as a place where architecture is not a visual presence, but a sensorial, experiential, immaterial reality; a place of computer relations and virtual economies; an anthropological area in constant renewal, movement, replacement. Eighth recommendation: Consider the big transformations as the result of micro operations; interpret urban quality as the result of the semiosphere made up of domestic objects, tools, services, goods, people; like Mohamed Yunuss microcredit, you have to go into the domestic economies and interstices of everyday life. ninth recommendation: Consider the city as a genetic laboratory; interpret the city as a factory of life; place of genome exchanges, sexual experiences, development of ones own gene; cities of humans, bodies, flows of sperm, births, and deaths. Tenth recommendation: Consider the city as living plankton; interpret the city as a bio-technological system, in constant transformation, that produces economy and culture as a spontaneous effect of its own expansive energy.
Collaborators: Stefano Marzano, Dante Donegani, Giovanni Lauda, Antonio Petrillo, Claudia raimondo, Tamar Ben David, Afterpixel, Bartolini-Fiamminghi Architetti, Attu Studio, Giovanni De Francesco, Ernesto Bartolini, Lapo Lani, Daniele Macchi, Dario Valenti, Giacomo Miola, Alberto Tradati, Haruhiko Endo, Bianca Vezzi, Anna Serena Vitale, Jimmy Gelli Collection: Centre Pompidou (Paris) Muse national dArt Moderne/ Centre de Cration Industielle, FrAC Centre (orlans), Galerie Italienne (Paris), Friedman Benda (new York), Metea With the additional support of: omnidecor s.p.a.; Metalvetro s.r.l. Milano; Vetreria Dal Bo

First recommendation: Consider the city as a high-tech favelas; avoid rigid and definitive solutions and favor reversible, incomplete, imperfect systems that allow the urban space to be constantly adapted to new unexpected and unplanned activities. Second recommendation: Consider the city as a personal computer every twenty square meters; avoid the identification of form and function, specialist types, rigid systems, armored perimeters; create areas similar to functionoids that can host every activity in every place, changing function in real time. Third recommendation: Consider the city as a place of cosmic hospitality; encourage planetary coexistence between man and animals, technology and divinities, living and dead, as in the Indian metropoli; cities that are less anthropocentric and more open to biodiversity, the sacred, and human beauty. Fourth recommendation: Consider new models of weak urbanization; imagine permeable districts between city and country, hybrid semi-urban and semi-agricultural places; productive and hospitable areas that follow the changing of the seasons and climate, creating conditions of widespread and reversible livability. Fifth recommendation: Consider blurred and accessible confines and foundations; create organisms with an uncertain perimeter, within an urban fabric where the difference between interior and exterior, public and private disappears, creating an integrated district without functional specializations. Sixth recommendation: Design light, temporary, reversible infrastructure; build roads, bridges, connections with non rigid, non definitive, removable logistical systems that leave no trace on the ground and adapt to the change of local needs over
Studio Andrea Branzi, Agronica , 1995. Centre Pompidou Collection (Paris)

TxT oVEr IMAGE BoTH EnG AnD ITA

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Studio Andrea Branzi Per una nuova Carta di Atene

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Studio Andrea Branzi Per una nuova Carta di Atene

Exhibition

Studio Andrea Branzi, Architecture-Agricolture , 2005. FrAC Centre Collection (orlans)

Studio Andrea Branzi, Forest of Architecture , 2007. Friedman Benda Collection (new York)

Studio Andrea Branzi, Agronica , 1995. Centre Pompidou Collection (Paris)

Studio Andrea Branzi, residential agriculture , 2008. Friedman Benda Collection (new York)

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Janet Cardiff The Forty Part Motet

Biennale Architettura 2010

105

Janet Cardiff The Forty Part Motet

Exhibition

Janet Cardiff presents an audio work, The Forty-Part Motet based on the renaissance choral music Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis (1514-1585). Forty separately recorded voices are played back through forty speakers strategically placed throughout the space. While listening to a concert you are normally seated in front of the choir, in traditional audience position. With this piece, I want the audience to be able to experience a piece of music from the viewpoint of the singers. Every performer hears a unique mix of the piece of music. Enabling the audience to move throughout the space allows them to be intimately connected with the voices. It also reveals the piece of music as a changing construct. I am also interested in how sound may physically construct a space in a sculptural way and how a viewer may choose a path through this physical yet virtual space. Thomas Tallis was the most influential English composer of his generation and is one of the most popular renaissance composers of today. He served as an organist to four English monarchsHenry VIII, Edward VI, Mary, and Elizabethas a gentleman of the Chapel royal. one of his greatest works was this composition for forty partseight choirs of five voices. It is suggested that this was written on the occasion of the fortieth birthday of Queen Elizabeth I in 1573 to emphasize humility in the context of her suppression of the Catholic faith. I placed the speakers around the room in an oval so that the listener would be able to really feel the sculptural construction of the piece by Tallis. You can hear the sound move from one choir to another, jumping back and forth, echoing each other and then experience the overwhelming feeling as the sound waves hit you when all of the singers are singing.
A re-working of Spem in Alium nunquam habui (Thomas Tallis, 1573) Performed by: Salisbury Cathedral Choir recording and Postproduction: SoundMoves Editing: George Bures Miller Production: Field Art Projects The Forty Part Motet by Janet Cardiff was originally produced by Field Art Projects with: Arts Council of England, Canada House, the Salisbury Festival and Salisbury Cathedral Choir, BALTIC Gateshead, The new Art Gallery Walsall, noW Festival nottingham Cardiff Miller Studio, The Forty Part Motet , choir recording, 2001. Photo Hugo Gledinning

TxT oVEr IMAGE BoTH EnG AnD ITA

Cardiff Miller Studio, Telephone / Time , installation view, 2004. Photo Jens Ziehe

Cardiff Miller Studio, The Forty Part Motet , 2001. Courtesy the Fondation dentreprise Herms, 2009. Photo Atsushi nakamichi / nacsa & Partners Inc.

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Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand nagelhaus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand nagelhaus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich

Exhibition

Some houses stay, some houses go, some pop-up somewhere else While houses get torn down day in and day out in China, none are as famous as the house that disappeared in the Chinese city of Chongqing in April 2007. Wu Ping and Yang Wu, the owners of the building, which was home to a minute restaurant on the ground floor, fought for three years against the joined forces of the construction company, investors, and Party functionaries. They battled the plan that envisaged erecting a shopping mall where the house stood, even though, by then, all the other buildings in the immediate vicinity had already been torn down. only their house was left standing, because they so stubbornly refused to move. During this time, thousands of people, be they simply passers-by, demonstrators or journalists, stared down into the huge hole that had been torn into the heart of the Chinese metropolis of Chongqing and out of which rose, like a single tooth, the house owned by Mrs. Wu and Mr. Yanga sight that was spectacular simply because it was still there. Wu and Yang refused to budge an inch, though they were put under pressure, as is usual in China. The earth around them was excavated to precipitous depths and it soon became impossible to keep their restaurant open. But Mrs. Wu would not yield, and instead informed the international press and gave interviews, while Mr. Yang, a former boxer, also remained in his house although the bulldozers dug ever deeper around him. Then, much to the applause of the crowds, he took to the roof of his property, which now resembled an island more than a house, and waved the Chinese flag in anger, as if he had just conquered an important piece of land in the battle with the armies of the Shopping King. The local censors were unable to maintain their prohibition of coverage of the so-called nail House; the Internet carried countless videos and reports, and Wu and Yang became stars of civil disobedience, with many people assembling to demonstrate against the demolition. When it appeared in newspaper caricatures, it was clear that the house had become an icon. For three years the house stood, degraded by the construction planning department to the status of a barren tower, in the midst of the huge holea somber metaphor of new China gaping in the middle of the city. Then, in April 2007, Wu and Yang finally gave in and their house was torn down.

Here the story could have come to an end. Instead it now continues in Switzerland, in Escher Wyss Platz, a corner of Zurich West that is not exactly the epitome of casual Alpine comfort. The architect Caruso St. John and the artist Thomas Demand won the competition to redesign the square in 2008. They seek to reconstruct the demolished Chinese house beneath a road bridge, where it will be home to a 24hour restaurant that the creators believe will bring life to a square otherwise lacking in vibrancy.

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, nagelhaus, project for EscherWyss-Platz, Zrich. Martin Mrck, Denmark 2010. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

With this project, Demand has taken his reconstruction strategy and transposed it from the world of art into the domain of architecture. His photographs of life-size paper models function like the cool storage rooms of memory built around an aesthetics of retroaction and record, yet they preserve shapesand this is exactly what the resurrected house from China will do. normally, it is old houses that get covered by new interstate flyovers; the reconstructed edifice, grafted onto the urban space under the bridge, up-ends the temporal layers, the citys sedimentary strata, and their spatio-temporal narration. The house that disappeared juts out of the ground and into the present like the materializing memories in the film Solaris . In Africa, structures built under existing flyovers are more commonas in Lagos, for instance, where, under the concrete columns that support the ring-road flyovers, traders and cookshops have since found a niche for themselves where they supply provisions to drivers stuck in an endless gridlock. In this way, an overhead road construction, which essentially cuts right through city life, spawns a new form of microurbanity.

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, nagelhaus, project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zrich. Martin Mrck, Denmark 2010. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, nagelhaus, project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zrich. Martin Mrck, Denmark 2010. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

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Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand nagelhaus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich

Biennale Architettura 2010

109

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand nagelhaus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich

Exhibition

The rebirth of the demolished Chinese house also takes up a classical European tradition dating from the Enlightenment, namely that of the Chinese Pavilion. Since the mid-Eighteenth century, such structures started popping up in parks, such as those at Broughton House, Kew Gardens, Wrlitzer Park, and in Sanssouci in Potsdam, where Frederick the Great had a Chinese house built. The act was also a political statement: European travelers had painted a picture of China as a peaceful society that nurtured a lighter and more playful lifestyle; in military-agricultural Prussia, the Chinese Pavilion bore the promise of a more cosmopolitan and liberal society. The architecture was decorated by chinoiserie and, in the castle gardens, sealed away from the surroundings, it offered a window onto a different world. Even in Switzerland, some of the more philanthropically-minded citizens had Chinese pavilions erected as a sign of their ties to such a culture and their knowledge of the world; among them was shoe manufacturer Carl Franz Bally, who built a Chinese Pavilion in Bally Park in Schnenwerd. Caruso St. John and Demands nail House falls into this tradition, too, though instead of courtly Chinese architecture it takes as its role model a type of building that stands for a combative understanding of democracy. Caruso St. John and Demands reconstructed house will stand not only as a monument to bourgeois obduracy, but will also be a social experiment that tries to see how migrating forms can bring new life into an urban setting. The Chinese House immigrates to Switzerland and turns the dead square into a place where you can eat round the clock, something that is fairly rare in Zurich. The City Council has approved the project which can be read as a staunch politicoaesthetic statement in a country that, if one considers the prohibition on minarets, is currently ill at ease with its immigrant population. The nail House is also an image for the enervating influence of forms and rituals that have likewise entered the country from the outside. But Switzerland would not be Switzerland if the project were to proceed smoothly. Popular referendums on art are not generally held in other countries, and for good reason. If either the construction of the Eiffel Tower or the design of the republican pavilion depended on approval by plebiscite, then Paris would lack a landmark and Picasso would not have painted Guernica the way he did. In Switzerland, with its zest for grassroots democracy, there have been fewer concerns in this regard, which is why the fortune of the nail House project now hangs on the outcome of a plebiscite. The right-wing populist SVP, boosted by the recene referendum forbidding minarets, has found its next cause clbre. The construction costs, it argues, are three to four times higher than those for a normal kiosk, and it claims the project is a fiasco in urban design, artistic, and financial terms. The party has obtained the requisite number of signatures to force e referendum and the matter will be put ttevoters in September. one of the ironic twists to this story is that the house has triggered fundamentally different demonstrations in two very different corners of the world. In the authoritarian big-brother state of China, the demonstrators protested against its demolition, whind in Switzerland, with its tradition of grassroots democracy, they protest against its reconstruction. Text by niklas Maak Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Georg Ackermann GmbH, Wiesenbronn, Germany City of Zurich, Switzerland Lichtblick Bhnentechnik GmbH, Hohen neuendorf, Germany oberflchenwelt, Berlin, Germany Illustrations by Martin Mrck, Denmark

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, nagelhaus, project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich. Martin Mrck, Denmark 2010. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

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Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand nagelhaus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich

Biennale Architettura 2010

111

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand nagelhaus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zurich

Exhibition

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, Fondation Cartier pour lart contemporain, Paris 2000. Andr Morin. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, neue nationalgalerie, Berlin, 2009-2010. nic Tenwiggenhorn. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

Caruso St. John + Thomas Demand, Fondation Cartier pour lart contemporain, Paris 2000. Andr Morin. Thomas Demand, by SIAE 2010

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Aldo Cibic Biennale Architettura 2010 rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

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Aldo Cibic Exhibition rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

nEW CoMMUnITIES, nEW PoLArITIES How a small center becomes a big center An international company moves its headquarters to the industrial area of a town at the foot of the Alps. About one thousand people work there, a good number of whom are young creatives from all over the world. A new district is created in the center, where this foreign community finds space to integrate and become a resource for the district. A CAMPUS AMonG THE FIELDS Venice agri-techno valley The Venice lagoon offers incredible landscapes and biodiversity. A young group working on innovative new technology start-ups occupying a large area of farmland surrounded by water to allow about 250 young people to live and work there. This leads to the possibility of developing a new model of campus, self-sufficient in terms of energy and food. SUPErBAZAAr A place in which to live, meet, buy, sell, trade on the outskirts of Milan, near the northern bypass, a new underground station that crosses the rail link is being built. This is an opportunity to invent a new public space to host activities relating to life in the area. A complex of small, low cost homes and work spaces develops above the porticoes. They are intended for students and non-E.U. nationals. rUrAL UrBAnISM The city goes to the country, the country goes to the city An hour from Shanghai, a large rural area is squeezed in between an expanding industrial area and a new city. The idea is to create a rural park inhabited with low density housing, retaining the agriculture. A group of buildings raised above the streets creates a perpendicular mesh that floats over the countryside.
Collaborators: Chuck Felton, Tommaso Cor, Luigi Fumagalli, Susana Chae, Dario Freguia, Silvia Conz, Andrea Argentieri, Carolina Chini, Caterina rosa, Daniela Ventura, Franca Bosia Models made by: 1a100 (Luca Stalla, Francesca Fezzi, roberta Bacco, Mattia Bianchi, Martin Bickler, Alice Cillara, Isabella Falchi, Paolo Ceresato, riccardo rossi) With the collaboration of: Maya Brittain, Mariano Zanon, Valeria Adani, Francesco Donghia, Martina Facci, Ilenia Fossati, Alessandro Frigerio, Federica Gramegna, Melisa Indra, Michele novello, Lucia Pongolini, Antonio Prinzo, Silvia redaelli, Diana rizzoli, Anna Maria Stefani, Giovanni Cor, Lavinia xausa Graphics: Elena xausa Sketches: Chuck Felton Photos: Matteo Cibic and Dario Freguia Energy Concept: Cremonesi Consulenze (renato Cremonesi, Andrea Fornari, Stefano Zerbato, Stefano Chilese, Laura Cremonesi, Andrea Finezzo, Carlo Cremonesi) With the additional support of: Buderus spa, Corradi spa, Dainese, De Carlo Infissi spa, Gemmo spa, Gruppo Autogrill, Gruppo rubner, Marazzi Group, Unicredit

Aldo Cibic, Sport and show, 2010. Drawing

Aldo Cibic, new communities, new polarities , general view, 2010

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Aldo Cibic Biennale Architettura 2010 rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

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Aldo Cibic Exhibition rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

Aldo Cibic, A campus among the fields , the public square, 2010

Aldo Cibic, The market square in the suburbs , 2010

Aldo Cibic, Public gardens , 2010

Aldo Cibic, rural urbanism , general view, 2010

Chuck Felton, Magic Square , 2010

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Aldo Cibic Biennale Architettura 2010 rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

117

Aldo Cibic Exhibition rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Aldo Cibic Biennale Architettura 2010 rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

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Aldo Cibic Exhibition rethinking Happiness: new realities for changing lifestyles

Aldo Cibic, rural urbanism , elements of the design, 2010 Aldo Cibic, rethinking Happiness, nuove comunit nuove polarit , 2010

Aldo Cibic, rethinking Happiness, Un campus tra i Campi , 2010

Aldo Cibic, rethinking Happiness, Un campus tra i Campi , 2010 Aldo Cibic, rethinking Happiness, Un campus tra i Campi , 2010

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dePaor architects 4am

Biennale Architettura 2010

121

dePaor architects 4am

Exhibition

Title: 4am (figure 1) From this point on I came to regard architecture as the instrument which permits the unfolding of a thing. (figure 2) (A. rossi, A Scientific Autobiography) The square footprint casts the shadow of Adams house in Paradise. (figure 3) A square plan is an economical speculation beyond the vernacular, which is difficult to extend. (figure 4) The approach is either oblique or flat and dictates the site. A cut pyramid roof denies the gable and the small politics of front and back. (figure 5) reduced continuity between inside and outside multiplies the encounter between here and there. (figure 6) The tactic and strategy of servant and served plot the room plan. At the half landing, nothing happens. (figure 7) (figure 8) A 1,846-square-foot house is cornered between a two-storey semidetached garden city plan and a ring road at the foot of the Dublin mountains. It is detached with villa aspects. The thresholds of front, back, and sides implicate cupboard and doorway to cross-ventilate between the cast concave corners. (figure 9) Transformed and displaced images, impressions, occurrences that have moved me deeply (often without my knowing it), forms that I sense are closely associated with me, even though I am incapable of identifying them, which makes them all the more troubling to me. (figure 10) (A. Giacometti, The Palace at 4 am) The section of the house at Pine Valley Park projects a softwood servant carcass insinuated within the colonnade of the Corderia, the found brick columns as giant terracotta rainwater goods. (figure 11)
figure 1

figure 3

4am is staged between hylo and hedra, a shade and a stone after Drers Melancholia I of 1514. (figure 12)
(figure 13) At 4am the air duct fouls the upholstered dogleg staircase, which ascends to descend at the fire escape of the Palace. (figure 14) The planed and lavendered 2 4 softwood cribbage is glued and screwed at 400-milimeter centers. Beneath the transoms, the pleated 600-thread-count linen closets the lambs wool treads of the house at 4am. (figure 15) The wardrobe is filled with linen There are even moonbeams which I can unfold. (figure 16) (A. Breton, revolver aux cheveux blancs)
Collaborators: Anna Hofheinz, ray Cullen, Simon Walker, Jason Ellis, Judith Devlin, Jimi Shields, Maria Vlahos, Peter Maybury Berengo Studio, Fragrances of Ireland, Kvadrat With the additional support of: Culture Ireland Thanks to: nathalie Weadick, Annette nugent, Paul Bradley, John Casey figure 2

figure 4

figure 5

figure 6

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dePaor architects 4am

Biennale Architettura 2010

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dePaor architects 4am

Exhibition

figure 7

figure 8 figure 13 figure 14

figure 10

figure 9

figure 15

figure 16

figure 11

figure 12

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dePaor architects 4pm

Biennale Architettura 2010

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dePaor architects 4pm

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Biennale Architettura 2010

127

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Exhibition

In our first communication, Kazuyo Sejima pointed to our proposal for the ordos 100 projecta project initiated by Herzog and deMeuron and led by Ai Weiwei in 2008in Inner Mongolia, China. It seems that it was this specific project that made the curators decide to invite us to this biennale. It seems that this project merged with the theme People meet in Architecture. The interest was not only in the design, but also the drawingsthe drawings, together with the models. And, specifically, the technical or construction drawings. We appreciate this point of view, and we took it as the starting pointthe point for presenting our work or attitude at the Biennale. The original ordos 100 plot # 001 id 096 was developed by jan de vylder architectenJan De Vylder and Inge Vinck. The actual project 7 houses for 1 house is presented by architecten de vylder vinck taillieuJan De Vylder, Inge Vinck, and Jo Taillieu. The title 7 houses for 1 house says in one sentence what the concept is about: at that time we rescaled the issue of a 1000-square-meter dwelling towards a more feasible scaleat least for usof seven times a house of about 150 square meters. We started from the concept of the house. A scale we can feel. The revisited concept points to several ideas. First, the idea that this project has become a reference in our practice today. The development became real ongoing research and debate on how we wanted to develop projects as such, but also specific to drawing and deciding on every last detail. It points to an attitude. Still today it is a daily manual in the office. To look at. To be inspired by. or to oppose. The second revisited points to what people do: meet in architecture by revisiting places, houses, spaces, buildings. The act of revisiting as the act of meeting. As the act of architecture. Meeting seen as making a place. Defining a space. A house. ordos. our house.
architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, ordos 100

The last or perhaps first revisited points specifically towards the aspect of drawing. The drawing is the medium where architecture starts; the drawing is also the ultimate place where you can meet the project, a space, a place, a house. By paper and by the drawing people meet architecture. People meet in architecture. People meet in the drawing. revisiting as the ultimate meeting. revisiting as the ultimate meeting. People meet again, and again and again. Architecture makes people meet. Makes people revisit each other. revisiting space. A place. A house. A drawing. A dream. Seven different media will guarantee the complete perception of the project.
Team: Jan De Vylder, Inge Vinck, Jo Taillieu, Gosia olchowska, Hui Ping Foo, Dawid Strebicki, olivier Goethals, Lauren Dierickx, Indra Janda, Karolien Verstraeten, Jessica Langerock Frank Ternier With the additional support of: deSingel internationale Kunstcampus / international arts campus Antewerp Belgium, VAi Vlaams Architectuurinstituut / Flemish Architectural Institute, roose&Ternier meubeatelier / forniture atelier, ABET LAMInATI, DExIA, CAnon, Jeroen Musch (nL) Thanks to: Jerry Aerts, Stefan Delombaerde, Tony Fretton, Moritz Kung, Johnny Maris, Luca Molinari, Frank Ternier, Katrien Vandermarliere, Jeroen Musch (nL), all the collaborators of architecten de vylder vinck taillieu and especially Gosia olchowska

TESTo EnG TroPPo LUnGo DI 1 rIGA

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, ordos 100

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architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Biennale Architettura 2010

129

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Exhibition

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, ordos 100

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, ordos 100

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, ordos 100

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architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Biennale Architettura 2010

131

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Biennale Architettura 2010

133

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Exhibition

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, leeuw saint-pierre

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, kongo

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, leeuw saint-pierre

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, leeuw saint-pierre

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, iota

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architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Biennale Architettura 2010

135

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096

Exhibition

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, HeL . Filip Dujardin, by SIAE 2010

architecten de vylder vinck taillieu, HeL . Filip Dujardin, by SIAE 2010

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Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim) Blueprint

Biennale Architettura 2010

137

Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim) Blueprint

Exhibition

Blueprint is a dialogue between an artists home, twice-removed, and its past, present, and future silhouette. This dialogue began with two brothers, Do ho and Eulho Suh (Suh Architects), exploring their notions of home. Beginning with artist Do ho Suhs current new York address, the collaboration with Suh Architects re-envisions the hanok in which they grew up together as it arrives in Venice, Italy.
Do ho Suhs work is a full-scale (1:1 scale) 12.7 meter tall, hand-stitched, translucent fabric faade of the new York townhouse where he presently resides. As part of a series of works recreating the buildings in which he has lived, the artist continues to explore the notion of home in a nomadic, global society. If suspended vertically, the viewer is invited to enter this dream-like drapery building through an entry on the ground floor. Beyond the entry, the viewer then finds himself standing on what appears to be the buildings shadow. If suspended horizontally, the townhouse hovers above the viewer, an ephemeral blueprint floating in from new York. From this cobalt blue ceiling, a front stair extends down to the floor where Suh Architects reflection begins. This full-scale floor installation is comprised of CnC routed High Pressure Laminate panels upon which viewers are able to walk. The image is a compilation of a section of the artists original Korean home, his present new York homes faade, and a typical Venetian villa faade. These three building faades do not merely overlap; they adopt characteristics of one another to emerge as a new composite shadow that reflects three different homes at once. Thus, by creating a hard, physical imagined shadow that is a reflection of a soft, ephemeral architectural faade, this collaboration questions the boundary between real and reflection, between art and architecture, between where one once was, now is, and soon will be.
Do ho Suh Fabric Installation Collaborators: Arthur Henoch, Direct Dimensions Inc. USA, ArT (Seoul, Korea) Suh Architects (Eulho Suh + KyungEn Kim) - Floor Installation Collaborators: Shani Cho, Jihyeun Byeon, Yoojin Han, Seokji Jean Whail System (Gyeonggi-do, Korea); Sunyoung Co. (Gyeonggi-do, Korea) With the additional support of: Lehmann Maupin Gallery, new York Do ho Suh, 348 West 22nd Street, Apt. A, new York, nY10011, USA , 2010. the Artist

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Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim) Blueprint

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim) Blueprint

Exhibition

Do ho Suh, Staircase-V, 2008. the Artist

Do ho Suh, 348 West 22nd Street, Apt. A, new York, nY10011, USA , 2010. the Artist

Suh Architects (Eulho Suh + KyungEn Kim), Blueprint , 2010.. the Artist

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Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh e KyungEn Kim) Blueprint

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh e KyungEn Kim) Blueprint

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Peter Ebner and friends enjoy the view

Biennale Architettura 2010

143

Peter Ebner and friends enjoy the view

Exhibition

The Gothic turned the building into decoration. Moveable ribbed vaults, vegetal and then once again geometrical, extend luxuriantly over late Gothic ceilings. These fantastic structures symbolizing the heavenly vault have never supported any weight. In the Baroque period the plasticity was endlessly multiplied: enormous painted ceilings opened up onto a heavenly scene populated by ranks of saints or gods, according to whether the building was sacred or profane. The structures contained in them were extremely elaborate, with wooden trusses and sophisticated hanging constructions that acted as a ground for this perfect illusionism. Construction engineering wiped out this connection between the here and now and the beyond. From that time on the building itself was exalted; perfect beauty then became the result of pure logic, due to the mechanics of forces, and beauty was no longer only the good but much more: it was truth. In the end the discourse still wavers between these two, even if it seems that we have long left them both behind. Translucent Concrete The translucent concrete element in the new garden designed by Piet oudolf at the Arsenale seems like a simple piece of urban furnishing. The front end of the eightmeter-long piece extends over the stone bank without supports or parapets, inviting you to gaze at the sea, the passing ferries, the motorboats that ply the waters of the lagoon, or the cruise ship towed menacingly towards the city. Without drawing our attention, almost as if a stone ready to trip us up, the oblong shaft rests on two small plinths that keep it suspended above the ground. If you dont genuinely trip up, you will pass by without even noticing them. Indeed, what is really astonishing is the material with which it is made: a transparent material, similar to Plexiglas, opaque but hard as concrete, because in fact it is concrete. This is not a new material, but a completely new interpretation of an already known material. Translucent concrete represents a revolution that is only now beginning to be put to the test in architecture. The first building ever made with translucent concrete is the ICA headquarters of our offices in Mexico city. The piece of translucent concrete displayed in the Venice lagoon is intended to show that there are aspects that are always new that can be radically modified by architecture.
Peter Ebner and friends, enjoy the view, 2010

Being translucent concrete, the first question to ask concerns the best way to represent the interior of a structure in reinforced concrete. For the first time, as in an x-ray in which the limbs become transparent, we see the skeleton of steel reinforcing, which in the case of the concrete shaft is intended as a decorative motif, related to the configuration of the forces of traction. Translucent concrete with steel reinforcing makes the lines of strength in the structure directly visible. The visualization of the interior life of a building in reinforced concrete invalidates traditional logic and the load bearing structure is at the same time also decoration. Enjoy this view!
Michael Eichner, Javier Sanchez, Michael Schwarz, Franziska Ullmann, Gianluca Andreoletti, Claudio Valentino Design team: Javier Snchez Mariana Paz, rodrigo Langarica, Gerardo Fonseca, Virginie Vernis de Velasco Engineering: Fernando Valdivia, Sergio Barrios Production: Concretos Translcidos S.A.P.I. de C.V., roberto Snchez Cortina, Luis D. Sistach, Fermn Beltrn robles Tranacer S.A. de C.V. With the support of: Hewlett Packard

Peter Ebner and friends, enjoy the view, 2010

144

olafur Eliasson Your split second house

Biennale Architettura 2010

145

olafur Eliasson Your split second house

Exhibition

A split second is the space between two seconds, the gap between past and future; not just now, but the part of now that is a void. This void seems static, frozen in time. In it, nothing changes. What might change is the way we relate to it. Habitual coordinates such as subject and object, inside and outside, gravity and antigravity with which we normally navigate are freed up. This feeling of reconstituting our way of experiencing the world can happen suddenly, in a jolt, as if it doesnt occupy a graspable period of time. We do not feel the split second, but only realize afterwards that we have lived through one. To quote my friend otto rssler: How long does it take an astronaut to get out of a black hole? About a day. But for people who are not in the hole, the astronaut takes forever. only very few people know this.
With the additional support of: Kvadrat

olafur Eliasson, Tests for Your split second house , 2010. Water, hoses, pump, strobe light, dimensions variable. 2010 olafur Eliasson

olafur Eliasson, Tests for Your split second house , 2010. Water, hoses, pump, strobe light, dimensions variable. 2010 olafur Eliasson

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olafur Eliasson Your split second house

Biennale Architettura 2010

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olafur Eliasson Your split second house

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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olafur Eliasson Your split second house

Biennale Architettura 2010

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olafur Eliasson Your split second house

Exhibition

olafur Eliasson, Mikroskop , 2010. Courtesy the Artist, neugerriemschneider (Berlin) and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery (new York). Photo Maria del Pilar Garcia Ayensa

olafur Eliasson, Your blind movement, 2010. Courtesy the Artist, neugerriemschneider (Berlin) and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery (new York). Photo Studio olafur Eliasson. 2010 the Artist

olafur Eliasson, room for one color, 1997. Courtesy the Artist, neugerriemschneider (Berlin) and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery (new York). Photo Keizo Kioku

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Biennale Architettura 2010 Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France
The building is composed of slabs layered at 350-mm intervals. These slabs can be used as chairs, desks, floors, roofs, shelves, stairs, lightings, openings, gardens, and structure. 350mm is based on the size of human activities. For example, 350mm is the height of chairs, 700mm (350*2) is the height of desks, 175mm (350/2) is the height of the steps of stairs. This succession of such different levels creates a variety of places. As they seek out functions for these places by instinct, the inhabitants manage to dwell in this topography called a house. This idea was not to create a functional machine but rather a more fundamental place for living. Within this context, the word place may also be replaced by prompt or key. This is a primitive place like a cloud, a nest, or a cave. We believe that this project envisages a new prototypical mode of living. This house can be said to be inconvenient. However, in this project, inconvenience does not have any negative connotations; such as impractical, uncomfortable, or ill-equipped. We think that inconveniences can prompt multiple human activities, similar to the relationship between nature and man. now, is it possible to design such inconvenience, indefiniteness, and unexpected surprise? For this purpose, we tried a relationship between Parts method. By using this method, we design architecture from local order, not overall order, and from the relationship between parts. Then we can make ambiguity, imperfectness, and order live together in one building. The most complicated and ambiguous thing is the simplest, which is new simplicity. Here, 350mm (the intervals of the slabs) serves as the local order. 350mm is the new module of architecture. It is about 1/10 of the conventional story height. The new relationship between architecture and the human body is born there.
With the support of: Patrick McKillen, Tim Power Architects, Jun Sato Structural Engineers, Stylplex S.n.C.

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Exhibition Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

TxT oVEr IMAGE BoTH EnG AnD ITA

Sou Fujimoto Architects, Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France , 2010. the Artists

Sou Fujimoto Architects, Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence , France, 2010. the Artists

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Biennale Architettura 2010 Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Exhibition Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Biennale Architettura 2010 Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Exhibition Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

Sou Fujimoto Architects, Tokyo Apartment, Tokyo, 2010. the Artists

Sou Fujimoto Architects, Final Wooden House, 2008. the Artists

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Biennale Architettura 2010 Sou Fujimoto Architects Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

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Sou Fujimoto Architects Exhibition Primitive Future House Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix Provence, France

Sou Fujimoto Architects, House n, oita, Japan, 2008. Photo Iwan Baan

Sou Fujimoto Architects, Childrens Center for Psychiatric rehabilitation, Hokkaido, Japan. the Artists

Sou Fujimoto Architects, House n, oita, Japan, 2008. Photo Iwan Baan

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Exhibition

Balancing Act is a play of balance. Two structural lines in the longitudinal space of the Arsenale buildings, which operate as a reagent to modify the original space. on the clear structure of the building, the interference caused by generating a diagonal incision cuts on the bias the previous line marked by the old structure. The harmony between the two now contiguous structures forms a space from the two systems that meet, face and compare each other. This is where gravity, which transmits its load in the building, combines and reacts with the new structure. And the primary space now plays with the actions we have caused. The structural columns supporting the weight of the building provide the tempo of the visit. The new forces incorporated into this space play with this rhythm creating a new order, breaking its scale. This architectural structure is the basis for the Balancing Act installation, a composition in which several voices sound at the same time, where the diverse technique is the way of achieving the polyphonic object. Contrapuntal structures, predominantly horizontal, face the harmony of the Arsenale space, affecting its verticality, and the intervals displayed in the space by the sequence of columns receive the insertion of new elements, like notes to a new tonal chord in perfect balance. This tense and unstable dissonance generates intense friction, which results in a new and disturbing reading of the Arsenale space. This is how we play with balance, with the forces of the space, using the gravitational actions that the structures generate. And the aerial balancing act that invokes spatial conditions which were absent in the previous space thus accentuates the consonance, order, and harmony of the itinerary that, from our perspective, continues through the linearity of the building to receive other voices. We have understood the whole Arsenale as a theme of multiple counterpoint, where, after the appearance of the original space, different voices occur around that theme, developed and carried in intervals, creating a complex compositional sequence, an architectural fugue, in which different spaces follow one another, and in which the dissonant balance of the Balancing Act is just one chord.
Video of Hemeroscopium House: Ensamble Studio Video of The Truffle: Esteban Iglesias Francheteau Video of Linkcity: Esteban Iglesias Francheteau, Artemio Fochs navarro Video of Tower of Music: Ensamble Studio Models: Ensamble Studio Collaborators: Javier Cuesta, Dbora Mesa, ricardo Sanz, Alba Cortes, Juan ruiz, Tomaso Boano, Federico Letizia With the additional support of: Positive City Foundation, State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad (SEACEx)

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, Hemeroscopium House, Las rozas, Madrid, Spain, 2008 (year of project 2005). Photo roland Halbe

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Exhibition

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, The Truffle, Costa da Morte, Spain, 2010 (year of project 2006). Photo roland Halbe

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, The Truffle, Costa da Morte, Spain, 2010 (year of project 2006). Photo roland Halbe

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio Balancing Act

Exhibition

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, Wo-Ho, 2010. Photo Ensamble Studio

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, Wo-Ho, 2010. Photo Ensamble Studio

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, The Truffle , Costa da Morte, Spain, 2010 (year of project 2006). Photo Ensamble Studio Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, Wo-Ho, 2010. Photo Ensamble Studio

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, The Truffle , Costa da Morte, Spain, 2010 (year of project 2006). Photo Ensamble Studio

Anton Garca-Abril & Ensamble Studio, Wo-Ho, 2010. Photo Ensamble Studio

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junya.ishigami+associates Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste

Biennale Architettura 2010

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junya.ishigami+associates Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste

Exhibition

Architectures ability to produce transparency may be limited by the same massive, solid structures that give a building its very shape. The object here is to move beyond the unrefined opacity of structures in pursuit of a new architectural transparency. The key, I believe, lies in eliminating the boundaries between space and structure. Space is light and empty; a structure has substance and density. The aim here is to arrive at a new type of transparency that goes beyond concepts such as lightness and weight by infinitely weakening and diluting these boundaries that give buildings their form. This will require thinking of architecture as airall around us, endlessly spreading, filling space as it goes. But what, in actual fact, is air, in all its transparency? An aggregate of unique structures, molecules such as oxygen and nitrogen and vapor, atoms and subatomic particlesin turn, all collections of minute structures themselves, invisible to the naked eye. Far smaller than anything on an everyday scale, they in fact deviate entirely from that scale. As a result we are unable to actually sense that anything is there, instead perceiving the massive agglomeration of tiny structures itself as a transparent space, a void. But what if, for instance, we were to think of a building as an aggregate of minute partslike air? This is a full-scale study for a building planned for somewhere in Europe. Approximately fourteen meters in depth, four meters across, and four meters high, the structure is of a scale enabling it to be viewed as a model, or an actual construction. The components would be superfine beams and columns and bracing, designed specifically for the purpose and fabricated to a scale so small as to make them almost impossible to perceive at first glance. These supremely delicate elements, failing to manifest as a visual image, would dissolve into transparent space to form blurred, indeterminate contours rather than structures supporting the building in defiance of gravity. Thus a structure of architectural scale emerges as an aggregate of things so small in scale as to deviate enormously from the usual scale of architecture. Within it is revealed something transparent, possessed of a mysterious atmosphere. The aim is to identify just what that something is. This study would attempt to bring a new transparency to architecture. This construction, infinitely see-through, infinitely full, may succeed in creating a new world unlike anything we have ever seen before.
Collaborator: Jun Sato Structural Engineer With the support of: Patrick McKillen; ErCo Lightning Company

junya.ishigami+associates, Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste , perspective drawing. Mixed media. Courtesy the Artists

junya.ishigami+associates, Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste , view from far to closer. Mixed media. Courtesy the Artists

junya.ishigami+associates, Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste , model photo. Mixed media. Courtesy the Artists

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junya.ishigami+associates Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste

Biennale Architettura 2010

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junya.ishigami+associates Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste

Exhibition

junya.ishigami+associates, balloon , 2007. Photo the Artists

junya.ishigami+associates, balloon , 2007. Photo the Artists

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junya.ishigami+associates Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste

Biennale Architettura 2010

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junya.ishigami+associates Architecture as air: study for chteau la coste

Exhibition

junya.ishigami+associates, Kanagawa Institute of Technology KAIT Workshop, Kanagawa, Japan, 2008. Photo the Artists

junya.ishigami+associates, ralph Sobel Architect, Yohji Yamamoto Gansevoort Street store, new York. 2008. Photo junya. ishigami+associates junya.ishigami+associates, ralph Sobel Architect, Yohji Yamamoto Gansevoort Street store, new York, 2008. Photo junya. ishigami+associates

junya.ishigami+associates, ralph Sobel Architect, Yohji Yamamoto Gansevoort Street store, new York, 2008. Photo junya. ishigami+associates junya.ishigami+associates, Venice Biennale: architecture exhibition 2008 japanese pavilion, Venice, Italy, 2008. Courtesy Gallery Koyanagi. Photo the Artists

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Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Taichung Metropolitan opera House

Biennale Architettura 2010

173

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Taichung Metropolitan opera House

Exhibition

Design Process of the Taichung Metropolitan opera House At the 12th International Architecture Exhibition, we are delighted to present the design process of our Taichung Metropolitan opera House project in Taiwan. This complex, including theaters and commercial facilities, will be an international hub of performing arts. our proposal won first prize at the international competition in 2005, and this project is under construction towards its realization. The project site is located within the redevelopment district that is to become the core of Taichung City. The project consists of a 2,013-seat Grand Theater suitable for full-scale performances, an 800-seat Playhouse and a 200-seat Black Box along with shops, restaurants, and a public park surrounding the building. The concept of the emerging grid is a structural system that constitutes the projects entirety. It is a horizontally and vertically continuous network of tubes, originally proposed for a concert hall competition held in Ghent, Belgium, in 2004. We presented this system once again at the competition for this opera house, and we were able to develop and lead it towards realization. The emerging grid is not only a structural network but also enables flexible plans that correspond to various conditions related to the programs. The system creates a rich interior space resembling a continuum of caves. Extending this network pattern further unto the park outside, a unified harmony is obtained between the opera house and the surrounding environment such as walkways, water, and green network. We hereby present our process of struggle during the realization of the project.
Collaborators: Da-Ju Architects & Associates Arup Evergreen Consulting Engineering Inc., Kankyo Engineering Inc., Takenaka Corporation, I.S. Lin & Associates Consulting Engineers, Harder Engineering & Construction Inc., nagata Acoustics Inc., national Taiwan University of Sience and Technology, Shozo Motosugi, Bears Engineering Co. Ltd., Lighting Company Akarigumi, Izumi okayasu Lighting Design, Lead Dao Technology and Engineering Ltd., old Former Landscape Architecture Co., Fujie Kazuko Atelier The Taichung Metropolitan opera House is built by the Taichung City Government, republic of China (Taiwan) With the additional support of: Akamura Corporation

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, Black Box and Landscape, 2010. kuramochi+oguma

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Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Taichung Metropolitan opera House

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Taichung Metropolitan opera House

Exhibition

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, south faade, 2010. kuramochi+oguma

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, first floor plan, 2010

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, seneration of a complex surface from simple crude mesh, using a smoothing algorithm, 2010

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Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Taichung Metropolitan opera House

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Taichung Metropolitan opera House

Exhibition

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, event space lounge on the fifth floor, 2010

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, roof garden, 2010. kuramochi+oguma

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, longitudinal section, 2010

Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Taichung Metropolitan opera House, caf and restaurant on the first floor, 201

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Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Fray Foam Home

Biennale Architettura 2010

179

Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Fray Foam Home

Exhibition

Even the most intimate and personal action happens in shared multiple locations. Washing our skin activates shared contracts with water and infrastructures. Lotions to prevent its aging make our skin inhabit labs where they are tested on mice. We are bubbled-foam-homes dwellers. There are no agorae any more, but an atmosphere of collective controversies in which we can take decisions. We no longer go out to emerge as citizens. There is no outside and inside. By committing ourselves with efficient energy or unsustainable expenditure we install ourselves both individually and as collectives as members of the public. We live in Parliament Homes ruled by confrontation, but we remain mainly blind to it.

Fray Foam Home comes from the detailed study of the dependencies and polemics that take place in a specific flat in Madrids Calle del Pez. A flat shared by five people with personal daily options. The installation is an approach to the restitution of the distant contextual fragments and public polemics in which their daily lives are installed. What becomes visible, critical, and accountable. What are the politics of design that emerge from opening the black box of expanded multilocated homes? That is the question architecture can build up. A local interior design for global occupancies, which could be detailed in three questions:
1. What if consumption and productive locations could be experienced simultaneously? Could we produce a notion of relational beauty, closer to parliaments than to white boxes? 2. What if we try to build with resilience and redundancy rather than with zoning and spatial specialization? Could a sensitivity to forecasting and optimizing be replaced by one of risk management and adaptability? 3. What if conflict could be politically managed? Could the management of difference and controversies be taken to daily life? Could we transform the material architectural devices that mediate in our social installation move from a territorial antagonism to a foam-like agonism? Architecture is often the device to promote territorial distribution in order to ensure realms of Sweet Local Calm. But it can also be a time for the architecture of daily realities to become compulsory pass points for the polemics in which it is constructed.
Coordinators: Alejandro Sajgalik, Walter Cuccuru Graphic Design: Mara Jaque Development team: Patricia Acosta Morales, ngela Bailn Lpez, Diana Calvache Martnez, Mehrdad nazemi, Carolina Silvana Vaca Manjarres, Sizhou Yang, Adeline ruiz, Silvia rodrguez With the additional support of: State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad (SEACEx); UEM, Universidad Europea de Madrid; MATADEro-Madrid; MUSAC, Museo de Arte Contemporneo de Castilla Len; Ministry of Housing, Spain; Fundacin Mies van der rohe; Imagen Subliminal

Andrs Jaque Arquitectos, Fray Foam Home , 2010. Courtesy and the Artists

Andrs Jaque Arquitectos, Democratic Sponge , Madrid, 2005. Photo Miguel de Guzmn

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Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Fray Foam Home

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Fray Foam Home

Exhibition

Andrs Jaque Arquitectos, House in never never Land , San Jos, Ibiza, 2009. Photo Miguel de Guzmn

Andrs Jaque Arquitectos, Mouse City, Stavanger, 2003. Photo Miguel de Guzmn

Andrs Jaque Arquitectos, restitution of the Spread-in-the-World rooms from a Specific Home (Fray Foam Home), 2010. Courtesy and the Artists

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Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Fray Foam Home

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Andrs Jaque Arquitectos Fray Foam Home

Exhibition

photo Kaufmann

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Christian Kerez Some Structural Models and Pictures

Biennale Architettura 2010

185

Christian Kerez Some Structural Models and Pictures

Exhibition

We are not interested in architectures submitting itself to or expressing daily use, but in strict, self-sufficient architecture, which holds its own against any unforeseen or unplanned everyday use. The rigor and clarity of the building structure combine a variety of uses and demands into an indissoluble conceptual unity. Every room, every detail is a fragment of a greater whole. The structural models shown in this exhibition are the very same ones shown by the films. Without the filmic, interior perspective, these structural models turn into abstract sculptures. However, they received their actual shape and compelling nature only through a confrontation with everyday demands. The architectural space we are interested in, or rather its characteristics, only become manifest when in motion. That is why a filmic rendering from the fleeting perspective of a user or visitor immediately suggests itself. The cinematic image is made up of hundreds or thousands of images, which all equally reflect the same space. The individual images themselves may be casual, fuzzy, imprecise, and often even accidental, but the very diversity of all these pictures combined reflects the essential qualities of an architectural space. The transient nature of these films allows people to meet in architecture, architecture that keeps fading into the background.
Team: Christian Kerez, Catherine Dumont dAyot, Raphael Jans, Petter Krag, Michael Haller, Takaaki Kikumoto, Bernardo Menezes, Marc Leschelier Thanks to: Arno Ritter Technical exhibition preparation: Magenbitter, Innsbruck With the additional support of: Bundesamt fr Kultur BAK; Holcim (Schweiz) AG

Christian Kerez, Schoolhouse Leutschenbach, Zrich, 2002-2009. 1:10 steel model. Photo Walter Mair

Christian Kerez, Schoolhouse Leutschenbach, Zrich, 2002-2009. Movie stills

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Christian Kerez Some Structural Models and Pictures

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Christian Kerez Some Structural Models and Pictures

Exhibition

Christian Kerez, Swiss Re Headquarters, 2008. 1:33 model. Photo the Artist

Christian Kerez, Holcim Competence Center, 2008. 1:33 model. Photo the Artist

Christian Kerez, Swiss Re Headquarters, 2008. Movie stills. Video the Artist

Christian Kerez, Holcim Competence Centre, 2008. Movie stills. Video the Artist

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Christian Kerez Some Structural Models and Pictures

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Christian Kerez Some Structural Models and Pictures

Exhibition

Christian Kerez, Museum of Modern Arts, Warsaw, 2007-2014. 1:33 model. Photo the Artist

Christian Kerez, Museum of Modern Arts, Warsaw, 2007-2014. Movie stills. Video the Artist

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Luisa Lambri

Biennale Architettura 2010

191

Luisa Lambri

Exhibition

I photographed Menil House in Houston during a storm. The changes of light and weather became as important to the images as any other aspect of the architecture and shaped my perception of the house. I then continued to explore natural conditions while working in the Casa das Canoas in Rio de Janeiro, focusing on the relationship between architecture and its surroundings. I looked for or found such conditions again in other houses and places. The photographs evoke all the photographs I have taken in the past, and all the other places in which I have been. So the work is not about a specific house or a photograph of it. It is about being there.
Thanks to: Thomas Dane Gallery, London; Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam; Gallery Koyanagi, Tokyo With the additional support of: Hiroshi Sugimoto and Atsuko Koyanagi

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (Menil House, #01) , 2002. Laserchrome print, Ed. 5 + 1 AP, 104 130 cm. Produced by the Menil Collection (Houston). Courtesy Galerie Paul Andriesse (Amsterdam), Luhring Augustine (New York), Thomas Dane (London), Marc Foxx (Los Angeles), Studio Guenzani (Milan), Gallery Koyanagi (Tokyo), Galeria Luisa Strina (Sao Paulo)

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Luisa Lambri

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Luisa Lambri

Exhibition

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (Casa das Canoas, #01) , 2003. Laserchrome print, Ed. 5 + 1 AP, 99 115 cm. Courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London. Image 1 of 2

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (Casa das Canoas, #02) , 2003. Laserchrome print, Ed. 5 + 1 AP, 99 115 cm. Courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London. Image 2 of 2

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Luisa Lambri

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Luisa Lambri

Exhibition

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (Casa das Canoas, #13) , 2003. Laserchrome print, Ed. 5 + 1 AP, 99 115 cm. Courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London. Image 2 of 2

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (Casa de Vidro, #02) , 2003. Laserchrome print, Ed. 5 + 1 AP, 42 48 cm. Courtesy of Luhring Augustine (New York), Thomas Dane (London), Marc Foxx (Los Angeles), Studio Guenzani (Milan), Gallery Koyanagi (Tokyo), Galeria Luisa Strina (Sao Paulo)

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Luisa Lambri

Biennale Architettura 2010

197

Luisa Lambri

Exhibition

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, #03) , 2004. Laserchrome print, Ed. 5 + 1 AP, 63.7 74 cm. Courtesy Hiroshi Sugimoto, Atsuko Koyanagi

Luisa Lambri, Untitled (Sheats-Goldstein House, # 06) , 2007. Laserchrome print, Ed 5 + 1 AP, 98 79.5 cm. Courtesy of Luhring Augustine (New York), Thomas Dane (London), Marc Foxx (Los Angeles), Studio Guenzani (Milan), Gallery Koyanagi (Tokyo), Galeria Luisa Strina (Sao Paulo)

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Exhibition

Establishing a dialogue between the Iranian urban landscape, which arose after the Islamic revolution of 1979 and is largely influenced by Western architecture, and the historic sites and cultural places of ancient Persia is the central interest of my work. Is there any chance of finding connections between past and present in the current debate on culture and architecture in Iranian society? From this point of view it seems essential to also make reference to the ambiguity of the emerging urban landscapes, or the impact of Eastern and Western cultural conceptions (intentions and consequences) and the imposition of the latter with a gradual relative abandoning of the local cultural and architectural tradition and history. The question is also raised as to how it can come about that, despite the changes incurred following the historic events and influences of different cultural periods, a country was able to develop different architectural languages and consider them a cultural asset, but this richness is no longer easily drawn on in the contemporary cultural debate. In this relationship between the history of its own culture, Islamic doctrine and Western influences, which at a political level are considered unwelcome, the Western image predominates, particularly in the periphery of the urban landscapes. The work alternates between the fine appearance of a so-called reality and the reality of the image; it is aimed at revealing the media representation and fostering and clarifying perception, also taking into account the collective dimension. It makes reference to social processes, showing unstable systems in open and enclosed spaces and thus referring to social and political situations.
With the support of: Autonome Provinz Bozen / Sdtirol, Abteilung deutsche Kultur Thanks to: Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin / Stockholm; Galleria Suzy Shammah, Milan

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Exhibition

Walter Niedermayr, Shiraz, Iran 124/2006 . Quadriptych, digitial print, acryl on canvas, 253 845 4 cm. Courtesy Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin / Stockholm and Galleria Suzy Shammah, Milan

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Exhibition

Walter Niedermayr, Isfahan, Iran 176/2008 . Diptych, digitial print, acryl on canvas, 160 421 4 cm. Courtesy Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin / Stockholm and Galleria Suzy Shammah, Milan

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Walter Niedermayr Recollection 2005-2008

Exhibition

Walter Niedermayr, Isfahan, Iran 107/2006 . Diptych, digitial print, acryl on canvas, 160 421 4 cm. Courtesy Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin / Stockholm and Galleria Suzy Shammah, Milan

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Noero Wolff Architects Strangeness and familiarity

Biennale Architettura 2010

207

Noero Wolff Architects Strangeness and familiarity

Exhibition

Three schools in Cape Town, South Africa, that Noero Wolff Architects have worked on over the past decade are presented here. In spite of their contrasting socioeconomic circumstances, these projects share common architectural concerns. With the dawn of democracy in South Africa in 1994, urgent questions have had to be asked about the role of architecture in a free society. Since political freedom does not automatically lead to the removal of the deprivations of the past, architecture must play a role in facilitating and expressing freedom. By their nature, educational facilities aim to empower the individual to have greater participation in economic, cultural, and political processes. The proposed architectural corollary of this empowerment objective has been architecture that participates in local spatial, representational, and building practices whilst representing optimism for a better future. A new architecture is generated out of an engagement with the familiar world. The Usasazo Secondary School (2003), built by the provincial government, has a central space that mimics the spatial undulation of the informal settlements around it. The area around the school is so densely populated that the streets become the living rooms of the houses. The school is pushed against the street edge to continue the tight urban world and to invite interaction through a series of trading hatches and benches. The school protects its users from the strong directional wind with a series of L-shaped blocks. The Inkwenkwezi Secondary School (2007) was also built by the provincial government. In this residential area, with no other formal public buildings, houses are converted into shops and are differentiated from residential buildings by colorful painted signage. This local device signifying public use was adopted as the basis of signage (Inkwenkwezi means the morning star) and surface articulation for the school. Saint Cyprians School (2009) is a private school close to the center of Cape Town. A series of small interventions takes spaces that have lost their potency or purpose and adds specialized classrooms (IT classroom and library) that will advance the schools ability to deliver first class education. These interventions add vitality to the existing fabric of the school. Each of these schools contains key spaces designed to enhance human interaction by accommodating divergent activities in the same place. The possible uses of these spaces are influenced by the time of day, the season, the age and activity level of the children, as well as income generating activities and events in adjacent spaces.
Jo Noero and Heinrich Wolff Film: Dave Southwood with Noero Wolff Architects Usasazo Secondary School: Client (Department of Transport and Public Works of the Provincial Government of the Western Cape); Architects (Noero Wolff Architects); Project architect (Heinrich Wolff); Team (Jo Noero, Sushma Patel, Robert McGiven) Inkwenkwezi Secondary School: Client (Department of Transport and Public Works of the Provincial Government of the Western Cape); Architects (Noero Wolff Architects in association with Sonja Spamer Architects); Project architect (Heinrich Wolff); Team (Sonja Spamer, Jo Noero, Joel Ketsekile, Nadia Tromp, Robert McGiven) Saint Cyprians School: Client (Saint Cyprians School); Architects (Noero Wolff Architects); Project architect (Jo Noero); Team (Heinrich Wolff, Kylie Richards, Mias de Vries, Korine Stegman, Robert McGiven)

Noero Wolff Architects with Sonja Spamer Architects, Inkwenkwezi Secondary School, Du Noon, Cape Town, 2007. Photo Iwan Baan

Noero Wolff Architects with Sonja Spamer Architects, Inkwenkwezi Secondary School, Du Noon, Cape Town, 2007. Photo Iwan Baan

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Noero Wolff Architects Strangeness and familiarity

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Noero Wolff Architects Strangeness and familiarity

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Noero Wolff Architects with Sonja Spamer Architects, Inkwenkwezi Secondary School, Du Noon, Cape Town, 2007. Photo Dave Southwood

Noero Wolff Architects with Sonja Spamer Architects, Inkwenkwezi Secondary School, Du Noon, Cape Town, 2007. Drawing Heinrich Wolff

Noero Wolff Architects, Usasazo Secondary School, central space, Khayelitsha, Cape Town, 2003. Photo Iwan Baan

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Hans Ulrich Obrist NOW INTERVIEWS, Wall of Names, 2006 Serpentine 24-Hour Interview Marathon

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Hans Ulrich Obrist NOW INTERVIEWS, Wall of Names, 2006 Serpentine 24-Hour Interview Marathon

Exhibition

Twenty or so years ago, when I first met Hans Ulrich Obrist (I always think of him as HUO) in Zurich, he reminded me of Rimbaud. Not only because he was roughly the teenage poets age when he and I met, but because I felt he was embarking on making a new form of poetry, of art. In time, I came to see how true my feeling was. I was amazed that this then very young man, without funding and without institutional support or commissions from art magazines or journals, had set out on his own to record that which he feared would one day vanish or get lost, forgotten in the greater, more seemingly relevant cultural dialogue of the moment. His interviews were and remain his divine passion: he has done nearly 2,000 hours of them since he began. Little has changedexcept that he now also devotes himself and interweaves this passion with his full time curatorial workin HUOs mission and in his way of getting to the core and heart of the person being interviewed. As Douglas Coupland wrote in his Introduction to Interviews Volume 2: We could have done one interview together and Id never have to do another interview again. Id simply send people a photocopy of our interview and declare, It doesnt get any better than this. Learn from the master. As I say little has changed, except that in earlier days HUO sped from city to city in Europe on trains and dwelled in their stations, where now the circumference of his interviews has widened globally and planes and their airports are his hosts. How many actual hours is he ever on terra firma? Rimbaud transformed his genre, radicalizing the conventional idea of its meter and rhyme; HUO has reconfigured the genre of the Interview, distilling the mass of prose information with its disparate themes and motifsand with the usual, who, how, where, and whentransforming it into artifact, a poem of idea and emotion. His interviews, like poems, focus and synthesize thought into its greatest point of energy and beauty. In itself, the making of an individual interview into a poem would be an interesting achievement. A book of such interviews would be like an anthology of poems by various poets with varying degrees of interest. But the aggregate, the sheer volume and the international scope of the interviews HUO has done over the past two decades, gather up the individual voicesthe individual poems, to form a MasterPoem, not only one with its cultural roots in the heritage of one nation, like Orlando Furioso or El Cid or La Chanson de Roland , but a vital global epic: a unified and culturally unifying poem, with its life and memory of the past, which is our present inheritance, and our cultural legacy for the future. Perhaps all his rush to travel and his urgency to do more and more interviews in recent years is explained by HUOs desire to preserve traces of intelligence from past decades or testimonies of those living in the century past, those whose words have not yet been recorded and who might fall away into undeserved oblivion. The fruit of this enlightened desire to preserve is evident in HUOs many hours of interviews with the visionary architect Cedric Price and the many visits with Rem Koolhaas to Japan to document the aging Metabolism architects, whose voices would have otherwise been lost or fade away and have important things to say to us today. People die, voices fade, but so, too, the fabric, the very materialthe tapeson which those voices have found sanctuary. Tapes, such as the ones HUO used in his earlier interviews years ago and still sometimes uses, are perishable and disintegrate. And soon they will be as mute and dead as many of the people whose voices they have long held in their very fragile keep. These voices are not just autobiographical, historical documents but have embedded within themas HUO has said lost projects, poetic utopian dream constructs, partially realized projects, censored projects, etca host of proposals for yet unrealized projects. Do not these hopes and dreams form a matrix of art and architectural history? Are not these dreams and hopes part of our inheritance in the future? These conversations bear seeds wait-

ing for the opportunity to one day flower. HUO, himself, has a yet unrealized dream to one day curate a large scale exhibition of unrealized projects. Preservation of these interviews on tapes is a hedge against an amnesiac future. HUOs tapes are a strained, delicate net holding up for nowand who knows for how longthe value of an otherwise lost past, which is to say, our future. I hope this exhibition, the first project organized by the Institute of the 21st Century, will open the way to recognize the importance of HUOs work in assuring us of that future. Thus, I hope it will be apparent that the NOW INTERVIEWS are not just an exciting event at the 12th International Architecture Exhibition in the present but a gateway to understanding and supporting HUOs amazing and vital project. To paraphrase T. S. Eliot, these interviews may well be the fragments we have shorn against our ruin. Karen Marta
NOW INTERVIEWS Interviews by Hans Ulrich Obrist with the participants of the 12th International Architecture Exhibition Wall of Names The over 850 names listed on the wall are a brief selection of those interviewed by Hans Ulrich Obrist over the past twenty years
Exhibition curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Karen Marta Project Director: Bettina Korek, Institute of the 21st Century; Producer: Karen Constine; Project Manager: Justin Conner; Production Coordinator: Maggie Kayne; Research Coordinator: Yun Jie Chung; Research Assistant: Alexandra Weeks Organized by: Institute of the 21st Century With the additional support of: HyundaiCard, LG, nextmaruni, The Kayne Foundation, Brenda R. Potter, ForYourArt, Pasadena Arts Council

TESTO ENG TROPPO LUNGO DI 2 RIGHE

2006 Serpentine 24-Hour Interview Marathon To explore the topology of the city from the inside Rem Koolhaas and Hans Ulrich Obrist interviewed leading figures in contemporary culture continuously over 24 hours in the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion designed by Koolhaas. The 24-Hour Marathon in 2006 launched the annual Serpentine Marathon series. The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion commission was conceived by Serpentine Gallery Director, Julia Peyton-Jones, in 2000.
Thanks to: the Serpentine Gallery Interviews with: Abake, Sir Kenneth Adam, David Adjaye, Tariq Ali, Ron Arad, Shumon Basar, Michael Baxandall, Anat Ben David, Eleanor Bron, Caruso St. John, Hussein Chalayan, Michael Clark, Peter Cook, Mark Cousins, Giles Deacon, Marcus du Sautoy, Paul Elliman, Tony Elliott, Brian Eno, Pedro Ferreira, Sophie Fiennes, Ryan Gander, Ant Genn, Gilbert & George, Jonathan Glancey, Zaha Hadid, Richard Hamilton, Russell Haswell, Susan Hiller, Roger Hiorns, Damien Hirst, Eric Hobsbawm, Charles Jencks, Isaac Julien, Patrick Keiller, Jude Kelly, Hanif Kureishi, Scott Lash, Doris Lessing, Ken Loach, Gautam Malkani, Doreen Massey, Tom McCarthy, Gustav Metzger, Mary Midgley, Markus Miessen, Michael Moorcock, Chantal Mouffe, Tim Newburn, Tim OToole, Julia Peyton-Jones, Olivia Plender, Milan Rai, Tayeb Saleh, Peter Saville, Dame Marjorie Scardino, Denise Scott Brown, Yinka Shonibare, Iain Sinclair, Squarepusher, Marina Warner, Eyal Weizman, Richard Wentworth, Jane & Louise Wilson, Cerith Wyn Evans With the additional support of: HyundaiCard, LG, nextmaruni, Thanks to: Sara Adelman, Alessio Ascari, Roman Berka, Stuart Comer, Bice Curiger, Katrin Dod, Coris Evans, Fabrizio Gallanti, Miranda Giardino di Lollo, Joseph Grima, Vit Havranek, Hu Fang, Sarah Herda, Enrique Juncosa, Nicola Lees, Matthias Lilienthal, Heather Lindsey, Janis Minton, Isabela Mora, Dan Nadel, Adrian Notz, Kayoko Ota, Ou Ning, Annapaola Passarini, Julia Peyton-Jones, Christian Posthofen, Gianluigi Ricuperati, Georg Schoellhammer, Felicity D. Scott, Kevin Conroy Scott, William Sherak, Sally Tallant, Phil Tinari, Frederic Tuten, Lorraine Two, Manuella Vaney, Joseph Varet, Miriam Waltz and Sarah Williams

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Hans Ulrich Obrist NOW INTERVIEWS, Wall of Names, 2006 Serpentine 24-Hour Interview Marathon

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Hans Ulrich Obrist NOW INTERVIEWS, Wall of Names, 2006 Serpentine 24-Hour Interview Marathon

Exhibition

Gilbert & George , from Serpentine Gallery Post-Marathon , London, 13-14 October 2006. Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2006, designed by Rem Koolhaas and Cecil Balmond with Arup. Photo Declan ONeill

NOW INTERVIEWS project, installation design by SANAA, 2010

Hans Ulrich Obrist . Marco Anelli 2009

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

Biennale Architettura 2010

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

Exhibition

At the beginning of the Twenty-first century, everybody knows that images do not represent the truth, but they do constitute our contemporary reality. Nevertheless, some images are more real than others. Referring to the title of this project, they could be called perspectives. The photographs taken by Bas Princen show existing forms of anonymous space and architecture; the images made by OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen are fictitious views of their architecture designs. In this sense, they seem to move in opposite directions: the perspectives of Princen long for authorship and particularity; the perspectives of OFFICE want to shed their artifice as a layer of skin. This division, however, is false, as both sorts of perspectives simply want to show places where people can exist by being confronted with their own existence. The means with which these perspectives and these forms of architecture are made show a striking resemblance. What is important here is that nature and culture, or chaos and architecture, are not considered enemies. Rather, the opposite is true. Massive walls, high columns, plane roofs, large squares, and perpendicular openings draw lines and impose borders. Trees, debris, water surfaces, rubble, clouds, and the skybut also human beings, cars, books, artifacts, and furnitureimpose themselves as messengers and signs of the endless warehouse of our globalized world. They need each other in order to exist, and they can only be real and meaningful if they are granted to be what they are. The perspectives by OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen and Bas Princen reintroduce architecture as what it has been since the advent of mankind: a brave and necessary attempt to impose order, structure, and legibility to the world in general and to one place in particular. At the same time, these constructions include their own fantastic failure. And that is exactly the essence of architecture. It has to fail, in a grandiose way, as an invitation to all kinds of people, things, and activities. A perspective is only real if it shows both the independent ambition of architecture and the autonomous reaction of all that is not architecture, and that might as well be called human life. Visiting this exhibition is like enacting this fundamental process. Here are twentyone images that are authored, constructed and clearthey can become perspectives only in confrontation to the mind and the body of the visitor. Christophe Van Gerrewey
Collaborators: OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Jan Lenaerts, Adeline de Vrij, Steven Bosmans, Bert Rogiers, Michael Langeder, Inga Karen Traustadottir), Christophe Van Gerrewey, Joris Kritis With the support of: The Obayashi Foundation, Groep Kordekor Belgium, Boss Paints, Bonar Technical Fabrics, eyes on media, Interior Foundation BE

OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen+Bas Princen, 7 rooms 21 Perspectives , 2010

OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen+Bas Princen, 7 rooms 21 Perspectives , 2010

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

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Bas Princen, Botanic garden (Xiamen) , 2009. Inkjet print on painted aluminium plate, 140 x 171 x 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague

OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen, A grammar for the city, South-Korea-Collage, view from the mountain , 2005. Inkjet print on painted aluminium plate, 85 x 116 x 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen, Border crossing, MEX-USA-Collage, view from the ground , 2005. Inkjet print on painted aluminium plate, 85 x 116 x 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists

Bas Princen, Ringroad (Houston) , 2005. Inkjet print on painted aluminium plate, 140 x 171 x 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague

Bas Princen, Reservoir (Concrete Rundown) , 2005. Inkjet print on painted aluminium plate, 140 x 171 x 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague

Bas Princen, Pavilion II (Venice, Office KGDVS) , 2008.

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

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OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen 7 rooms 21 Perspectives

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Valerio Olgiati Onement

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Valerio Olgiati Onement

Exhibition

The work presented at the 12th International Architecture Exhibition is part of a monographic exhibition on the work of Valerio Olgiati which was first shown approximately one year ago at the ETH in Zurich (Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich) and subsequently in Mendrisio, London, and Porto. The essence of the original exhibition is constituted by several white models, all shown at the same comparable scale of 1:33. The model of the Perm Museum XXI is presented at the Biennale, together with images of four other important buildings and projects. The model shows no context to the physical environment. The building simply seems to spring out of the ground, like uprooted trees. It is shown with visible foundations, totally isolated and without context. Valerio Olgiati is convinced that it is possible to make architecture that is not primarily contextual. Over the past twenty years or more, particularly in the German-speaking parts of Europe, the demand to contextualize has become inevitably compulsive, and principally in projects that are based on attitudes and positions of moral origin. Olgiati, however, thinks that architecture can be developed out of an idea, a concept, and that this idea or concept basically has nothing to do with context. Temples or churches can be taken as historical examples. Further examples are Swiss barns, which are wonderful buildings and almost all, without exception, noncontextual. These buildings are born from an idea that does not respond to contextual, economic, technical, or functional demands. Valerio Olgiati is convinced that it is possible, or even necessary, to design buildings based on ideas reflecting the cultural intelligence of modern times.
Perm Museum XXI
Architect: Valerio Olgiati Collaborators: Fabrizio Ballabio, David Bellasi, Aldo Duelli, Nathan Ghiringhelli, Tamara Olgiati

National Palace Museum


Architect: Valerio Olgiati Collaborators: Aldo Duelli, Pascal Flammer, Christoph Junk, Sven Richter, Michael Umbricht

The Yellow House


Architect: Valerio Olgiati Collaborators: Iris Dtwyler, Pascal Flammer, Karen Wassung, Raphael Zuber Client: Community of Flims

Valerio Olgiati, Perm Museum XXI, Perm, Russia, 2008

Atelier Bardill
Architect: Valerio Olgiati Collaborators: Nathan Ghiringhelli, Nikolai Mller, Mario Beeli Client: Linard Bardill

Perm Museum XXI, Perm, Russia, 2008. Floor plan (5th floor). Archive Olgiati

Perm Museum XXI, Perm, Russia, 2008. Section. Archive Olgiati

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Valerio Olgiati Onement

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Valerio Olgiati Onement

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Valerio Olgiati, Visitor Center Swiss National Parc, Zernez, Switzerland 2008

Valerio Olgiati, The Yellow House. Flims, Switzerland, 1995-1999

Valerio Olgiati, The Lake Cauma Project, Flims, Switzerland 1996

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OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture Preservation

Biennale Architettura 2010

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OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture Preservation

Exhibition

The exhibition occupies a suite of two rooms, each with a distinct character and function. The first room is a vestibule featuring a range of OMA projects engaging with preservation, often liberating what has been preserved from a frozen condition. Projects ranging from the Dutch Parliament to the China National Museum, the Libyan desert and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg will be displayed through photographs, historical documents, and even relicsincluding chairs and doorknobs from Munichs Haus der Kunst (an OMA preservation project in 2008). The second room is a manifesto in space featuring critical preservation stories of the Twentieth and Twenty-first centuries. These are organized in five thematic bands that form various trajectories through the room: the increasing territorial claims of preservation; the arbitrary morality of what is preserved and what is not; nostalgia vs. memory; the preservation of the future: the shift from retroactive to prescriptive preservation; and finally, the black hole of preservation. The black hole, occupying the central band and a screen on a wall, is the core of our argument. While our sense of duty towards history (and our nostalgia) grows exponentiallyincreasingly, everything must be preservedactual knowledge and the depth of our memory diminishes. As a result, many crucial but politically unpopular or impractical buildings of the second half of the Twentieth century remain subject to erasure or neglect. Our second key argument concerns the notion of thinning: as more and more territory falls under the protection of preservationabout 4% of the earths surface now cannot be touchedand the time lag between construction and preservation becomes ever smaller, the intensity of our use of land and our ability to inhabit architecture declines. In cities and in the countryside, thinning is one of the most urgent phenomena related to preservation. The final display, at the back of the second room, is a timeline of OMA projects, spanning the 35 years of its practice, which have given new definitions to the idea of preservation, sometimes even as a retroactive realization. Each project comes on a postcard that visitors can peel off the wall and take home. By the end of the Biennale, preservation and depletion will be evident in the exhibition itself. OMA
Team: Rem Koolhaas, Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli, Kayoko Ota, Miriam Roure, Amelia McPhee, Andrew Lin, Simon Pennec, Lawrence Siu, James Westcott Thanks to: Haus der Kunst, Munich With the additional support of: HyundaiCard The Netherlands Architecture Fund, Benetton

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Bijlmermeer, Amsterdam, 1986 [1960]

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Grande Axe La Defense, Paris, 1990 [1958]

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OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture Preservation

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OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture Preservation

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The Image of Europe , Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany, 2004

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Wahad Vision, Lybia, 2010

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Zollverein Kohlenwasche, Essen, Germany, 2006 [1932]

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , project on the city, Lagos, Nigeria, 1998 [rapid growth of the 60s and 70s]

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OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture Preservation

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OMA - Office for Metropolitan Architecture Preservation

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Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Riga Contemporary Art Museum, Riga, Latvia, 2006 [1904]

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Maison Bordeaux, Bordeaux, 1998

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Tate Modern, London, UK, 1994 [1947]

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Preservation , Airport, 2000 / Kloten Airport, Zrich, 1995 [1948]

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OpenSimSim OpenSimSim.net

Biennale Architettura 2010

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OpenSimSim OpenSimSim.net

Exhibition

Open source is changing many aspects of our everyday life. We use open source tools such as Wikipedia for researching information and gaining knowledge. We use open source software such as OpenOffice to write letters and make presentations. We are shifting from a corporation owned consumer world to a community driven participation system where people enjoy contributing their knowledge and time to the wider public free. Could architecture and urbanism also benefit from these ideas? Ninety-eight per cent of the worldwide house building market (residential) is not designed and built by architects. OpenSource will gain credibility as well as market shares for the architectural community. OPEN SOURCE ARCHITECTUREOPENSIMSIM.NET Open source architecture is a community driven platform that enhances the architectural design and building process. Open source architecture deals with widerange, innovative, and sustainable housing concepts. It provides user generated content including scripting tools and with it valuable knowledge. The design process and realization of architecture are defined in a contemporary way: an interested community such as architects, engineers, climate specialists, home owners, designers, and manufacturers are putting their input and feedback into the design. The key players in the process are: - prospective home owners - architects - manufacturers - engineers and scientists A work in progress version of the online platform OPENSIMSIM.NET will be presented to a broader audience as a physical installation. An augmented reality installation will demonstrate the ideas and possibilities of OpenSource for architecture and design. Fifteen open source designs by international design studios of what is called an intelligent living pod will be featured and visitors can interact with the sustainable design process and meet the design community.

Daniel Dendra, Peter Ruge, Rosbeh Ghobarkar Collaborators: ACCONCI STUDIO, New York; anOtherArchitect, Berlin + Moscow; AU STUDIO, London; BFR LAB, Cologne + Langenthal; Haptic Architects/StokkeAustad, London/Oslo; HHD_FUN, Beijing; JUMP STUDIOS, London; JUNE14, Berlin + New York; SCHOOL ARCHITECTURE, Kyoto; MONOCHROME, Ljubljiana; NAGA STUDIO ARCHITECTURE, Los Angeles + Cairo; TATIANA BILBAO S.C., Mexico Thanks to: AEDES NETWORK CAMPUS; CREATE BERLIN; DIA DESSAU; DRUPAL; IMAGINE ENVELOPE bv, Den Haag; IxDS, Berlin; LOOM, Berlin; NATALIA FENTISOVA; NOUS GALLERY, London; STRELKA INSTITUTE, Moscow; TRANSSOLAR, Stuttgart

anOtherArchitect, OpenSimSim.net , Open Source Design Process, 2010

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Piet Oudolf Il Giardino delle Vergini

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Piet Oudolf Il Giardino delle Vergini

Exhibition

Beautiful buildings hidden between shipyards and naval depots, some from the early Fourteenth century, surround the Giardino delle Vergini, where the garden will be situated. The space, partly a wilderness and covered by a canopy of large plane trees, will become a destination and a place to stay during the visit to the Biennale. Part of this wilderness will remain, but in the middle of this a new garden will be created with an atmosphere that reminds you of nature in its most ideal form (as in a dream). The emphasis is on late summer and autumnal abundance. The plants are chosen for their late flowering, structure, texture, or autumnal color. Most plants are attractive even in decay or as skeletons in winter. A path invites people to move through the garden. It is wide and therefore invites us to stop, sit, or simply hang out for a while. At the end, as an introduction to the following areas, there is a slightly wild, rough meadow under existing trees where you can enjoy the flower and plant borders from a little distance.
Landscape architects: Climmy Schneider, Kina Bergdahl With the additional support of: the Netherlands Architecture Fund

Piet Oudolf, Il Giardino delle Vergini , sketch, Venice, 2010

Piet Oudolf, Il Giardino delle Vergini , sketch, Venice, 2010

Piet Oudolf, Il Giardino delle Vergini , sketch, Venice, 2010

Piet Oudolf, Il Giardino delle Vergini , zoom, Venice, 2010

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Piet Oudolf Il Giardino delle Vergini

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Piet Oudolf Il Giardino delle Vergini

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Piet Oudolf Il Giardino delle Vergini

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Piet Oudolf Il Giardino delle Vergini

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Piet Oudolf, High Line, New York. Photo the Artist

Piet Oudolf, The Battery, New York. Photo the Artist

Piet Oudolf, Project for High Line, New York

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Pezo von Ellirichshausen Architects Detached

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Pezo von Ellirichshausen Architects Detached

Exhibition

In Architecture, there is an eternal tension between context and object. Since a building is inevitably placed in a particular and unrepeatable location, it establishes a limited set of specific relationships with it. Considering this physical inevitability, to willingly base the integrity of a building in those common places (such as orientation, views, access, or topography) is in itself a commonplace, or at least the minimum that an architect should aspire to do. To explain a building as an answer to a place is to explain the place, not the building. It is no more than a tautological exercise, instrumentally required for political or commercial purposes. However, a building, in its inner formal structure, could also be understood as an independent logical grammar. In its unitary conclusiveness, an architectural object could be separated from its location, from its anecdotal dramas. An isolated building is a singular entity. It is a piece, a device that resists, with more or less integrity, the problems (social, cultural, economic, or technical) of the context that supports it. Today, considering the widespread scarcity of resources, it appears problematic to trace a project as an autonomous figure. There is no possible canon, no fixed measure, when dealing with an unstable and informal environment. That context is anywhere. Therefore, a project is meant to be a flexible machine. Its efficiency is determined by its accidents. In this lack of autonomy, architectural practice is faced as a mere fitness activity, a continuous negotiation, an unpredictable contest to articulate a new program with an existing place. But that is half of the idea, half of the promises of an architectural statement. The other half is what could be called the antifitness property of a building. This is the objectual aura of the piece; the capacity of an object of replying, of declining the expected associations, up to the extent of producing a sort of uncomfortable situation in a given moment. It is an irony, as Borges said, to select as a personal option what is imposed as an inevitable condition.
Collaborators: Cristobal Palma, Dany Berzceller, Eleonora Bassi, Bernhard Maurer With the additional support of: SOTTAS SA - Steel & Metal Constructions

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Fosc House, interior view, Coliumo, Chile, 2005. Photo Cristbal Palma

MANCA

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MISSING CAPTION!

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Poli House, exterior view, Coliumo, Chile, 2005. Photo Cristbal Palma

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Poli House, exterior distant view, Coliumo, Chile, 2005. Photo Cristbal Palma

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Pezo von Ellirichshausen Architects Detached

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Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Poli House, drawing, 2005

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Poli House, drawing, 2005

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Poli House, interior view, Coliumo, Chile, 2005. Photo Cristbal Palma

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Poli House, drawing, 2005

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Pezo von Ellirichshausen Architects Detached

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Pezo von Ellirichshausen Architects Detached

Exhibition

MISSING CAPTION!

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, Fosc House, exterior view, San Pedro, Chile 2009. Photo Cristbal Palma

MISSING CAPTION!

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Renzo Piano Building Workshop Biennale Architettura 2010 People meet in Architecture - RPBW selected projects

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Renzo Piano Building Workshop Exhibition People meet in Architecture - RPBW selected projects

People meet in Architecture is a title that well describes the architects art. This is why Renzo Piano and the Building Workshop wanted to be present with an installation that would document the effort to design spaces for people.
Going beyond the institutional confines of the Biennale, RPBW takes some of its buildings among the Venetian calli and canals by affixing images of inhabited architecture. The focus of the photos, some by famous photographers, is not the places but the people that meet in architecture. The same pictures will be displayed on big panels in the Giardini and the Arsenale.
Renzo Piano with Stefania Canta, Marco Profumo, Chiara Casazza

Renzo Piano Building Workshop, The New York Times Building, New York, 2000-2007. In collaboration with FXFowle Architects, P.C. (New York). and Photo Michel Denanc

Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Renovation and expansion of the Morgan Library, New York, 2000-2006. In collaboration with Beyer Blinder Belle LLP (New York). and Photo Michel Denanc

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Renzo Piano Building Workshop Biennale Architettura 2010 People meet in Architecture - RPBW selected projects

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Renzo Piano Building Workshop Exhibition People meet in Architecture - RPBW selected projects

Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy, 1991-2004. RPBW. Enrico Cano, by SIAE 2010

Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Zentrum Paul Klee, Bern, 1999-2005. In collaboration with ARB, architects (Bern). and Photo Michel Denanc

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Exhibition

In a great chamber crowded by classical columns, crowned with a dark void suggesting the nocturnal sky and enclosed by 6.5-meter-high masonry walls, we have made a place whose character shifts from the urban to the domestic. The place and the objects within at once recall a small, monumental piazza, and a salone grande, redolent of Venetian palazzi . Different interpretations of where one is or what things areor how one might be (public, private)depend on ones point of arrival. From the main entrance, one happens upon a street scene, festooned with lights. A car, its interior an empty lounge awaiting guests, is parked in front of a loggia or monumental staircase. Caught in the cars headlights, a great pile stands in an opposite corner, a ghost of a building as though viewed from a distance. The place is at first very much like a piazza, though the presence of objects of inconsistent scale lends it an ambiguous character that is reinforced as one moves through it. The ghost reverts to being a rack of shelves, and the piazza briefly assumes the guise of a chapel, the loggia a baldacchino. A diminutive font is caught in a beam of light, its tiny pool casting rippling light high onto the walls, reminiscent of the play of the lagoon. Tall, empty stretchers stacked on top of each other in another corner sketch a succession of illusory interiors, a trompe loeil enfilade of unmade pictures. A pale object, again, like a stack of shelves, stands next to them: an abandoned piece of furniture, an overgrown dolls house that one can fill with ones dreams. An image of swaying tree branches at dusk shimmers upon the wall like a window onto another place, a world beyond. The space is now a room, a private interior. A desk sitting in a pool of its own light is an intimate refuge turned to the wall. A secretaire , or building, stands by. Next to the desk, another opening, another place and the image of another in the sylvan glow: ones reflection. One sees an interior receding behind ones own image. Then, one turns, naturally, outward, past the furniture, to see the city, waiting. One looks back through the loggia to all the figures one has seen, and returns to the piazza, the city, its lights, its movement, its fantasy.
With the additional support of: Derek Lam, Jan Schlottmann Thanks to: Pietro Valle

Mark Pimlott, La scala , Aberystwyth, 2003. Photo Hlne Binet

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Exhibition

Mark Pimlott, La scala , Aberystwyth, 2003. Photo the Artist

Tony Fretton Architects, Red House, London, 2001. Photo Hlne Binet

Mark Pimlott, Guinguette, Birmingham, 2000. Photo Mark Pimlott

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects Piazzasalone

Exhibition

Mark Pimlott and Tony Fretton. Piazzasalone , definitive project, 2010. Pencil on paper, 19 25 cm. Drawing courtesy of Mark Pimlott Mark Pimlott and Tony Fretton. Piazzasalone , definitive project, 2010. Pencil and permanent marker on paper, 19 25 cm. Drawing courtesy of Mark Pimlott

Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects. Piazzasalone , first project, 2010. Pencil and permanent marker on paper, 19 25 cm Drawing courtesy of Mark Pimlott.

Mark Pimlott and Tony Fretton. Piazzasalone , definitive project, 2010. Pencil on paper, 19 25 cm. Drawing courtesy of Mark Pimlott

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Cedric Price VENIC VENIC

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Cedric Price VENIC VENIC

Exhibition

A project curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Samantha Hardingham


Cedric Price (1934-2003) has been one of architectures most influential figures since the founding of his office in London in 1960. His major themes are those of time and movement. His work has had a great impact on young architects as well as on generations of artists, who continue to be inspired and influenced by his ideas. One of the central features of his thinking and his workas manifest in the kinetic Snowdon Aviary at the London Zoo (1964), which changes its form as the wind-load varies over timedemonstrates Prices opposition to permanence and his discussions on change. Prices projectsover 250 of them in allconsistently push against the traditional physical limits of architectural space. His focus on time-based urban interventions, rather than on finished buildings, has earned him heroic status with seminal works including the Fun Palace (1961-1974), an interdisciplinary multi-purpose complex for theater and for cultural projects; Potteries Thinkbelt (1964), a university on the move; and Magnet (1999), a series of short life structures, or urban triggers, to stimulate new patterns of urban movement in London. Francis Picabia claimed that our head is round so that thinking can change directionsthus, Prices conviction that buildings should be flexible enough to allow the occupier to adapt the building to serve the needs of the moment reflects his own belief that time, alongside breadth, length, and height, is the fourth dimension of design. Hans Ulrich Obrist
The project incorporates An online project conceived at the department for Exhibition Design and Curatorial Practice at the Hochschule fr Gestaltung Karlsruhe (HfG), supervised by Armin Linke, Markus Miessen, and Wilfried Khn Student researchers: Kilian Fabich, Stella-Sophie Seroglou, and Ulrich Steinberg huoarchive.hfg-karlsruhe.de With the additional support of: Institute of the 21st Century (Karen Marta; Justin Conner; Bettina Korek, Director); Pasadena Arts Council A special thanks to: Eleanor Bron; The Architectural Association Photo Library; The Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal; Peter Weibel, Hochschule fr Gestaltung Karlsruhe; Pidgeon Digital; Tom Cairnes; Agnes b.; Richard Hamilton; Rita Donagh

Philosopher, sir? An observer of human nature, sir, said Mr. Pickwick. Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers or The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836-1837).* Cedric Price was an architect, thinker, and above all an Englishman of extraordinary generosity towards his subject. He had an independence of mind the likes of which can only come from a fondness for humans and a fascination for human nature. He worked tirelessly to invest his architecture with the ambition ofin the words of his uncle, Jack Pricedignifying life generally. For Price, the moral and ethical principles implied in any design speculation are privileged over and above variations on the arte-factual by-product. In this respect, the role of the many rich collaborations over his lifetime, conversations and talks amongst audiences, engaging with the media as a means of initiating discussion, and the more personal dialogue presented in his sketchbooks were all critical in developing his design thinking on the themes of participation, anticipation, indeterminacy, and delight. The films and drawings that appear in the exhibition present Price doing what he did best over a period of forty yearsconstantly challenging our understanding of what architecture might be, in discussions with students, colleagues, strangers and himself. Samantha Hardingham
*a CP favoritehe held sixteen copies in his library at home, with one copy especially reserved for traveling.

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Cedric Price VENIC VENIC

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Cedric Price VENIC VENIC

Exhibition

This project is part of broader, ongoing research at Hochschule fr Gestaltung Karlsruhe (HfG), Germany, that attempts to turn Hans Ulrich Obrists archive into a productive tool generating a set of (spatial/content) structures that produce new works from the archived material. Fifteen hours of recorded conversations with Cedric Price were isolated in order to generate new content. The video-material is primarily of Obrist interviewing Cedric Price in his London office from 1998-2003. The situation generated a process that Cedric Price employed throughout his working life: a continuous self-critique of the modes of operation and production of a designer. The research group at the HfG has produced hundreds of individually edited video clips, tagged according to specific key words, which can be used to generate a live, albeit fictional, conversation with the architect. The website creates the possibility of a virtual conversation between Cedric Price and the user. Armin Linke and Markus Miessen

Cedric Price, Autumn Gets Me Badly (1989), 101, Screen shots taken from the video recording of a talk in five parts by Cedric Price, delivered at the Architectural Association on the 6th of November, 1989. Video transfer to DVD. Courtesy The Architectural Association, London

Cedric Price, Autumn Gets Me Badly (1989), 101, Screen shots taken from the video recording of a talk in five parts by Cedric Price, delivered at the Architectural Association on the 6th of November, 1989. Video transfer to DVD. Courtesy The Architectural Association, London

Cedric Price, Autumn Gets Me Badly (1989), 101, Screen shots taken from the video recording of a talk in five parts by Cedric Price, delivered at the Architectural Association on the 6th of November, 1989. Video transfer to DVD. Courtesy The Architectural Association, London

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Cedric Price VENIC VENIC

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Cedric Price VENIC VENIC

Exhibition

Cedric Price and Joan Littlewood, Fun Palace: Promotional brochure , 1964. Black and red ink reprographic copy on wove paper, 36,2 x 59,8 cm. DR1995:0188:001:016. Cedric Price fonds, Centre Canadien dArchitecture/Canadian Centre for Architecture Collection, Montral

Cedric Price, Pages from the sketchbooks of Cedric Price (27.10.70 - 28.06.74). Ink pen on paper - sketchbook, 7 x 11.5 cm. Courtesy The Cedric Price Estate, London Cedric Price, Pages from the sketchbooks of Cedric Price (1952). Ink pen on paper - sketchbook, 9 x 9 cm. Courtesy The Cedric Price Estate, London

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Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa The Boy Hidden in a Fish

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa The Boy Hidden in a Fish

Exhibition

After the earthquake of February 27, 2010, in Chile, we decided to rebuild a future that is protected, perfumed, and peaceful, reproducing the sense behind the dry lines of the David Hockney etching, The Boy Hidden in a Fish . The etching shows a scene from the Brothers Grimm tale, The Little Sea Hare, in which the boy hidden in a fish tries to avoid the searching eyes of the princess who observes everything through her towers twelve windows. This refuge is simply one example of a protected interior that could be used to sleep if we want, just as a homeless person would, by the visitors to the exhibition People meet in Architecture. It is built simply by hollowing out a granite boulder using industrial technology and then partially covering the interior with raw wood. The size of the boulder is 310 152 540 centimeters and the initial weight is nineteen tons. Once hollowed, its weight will decrease to eight tons. The wooden covering is made of cedar which we have chosen for its soft scent, an aroma that can be sensed by the public when inside.
Collaborators: Juan Araya, Marcelino Lopez, Gerardo Rojas, Juan Castillo With the additional support of: HORM (Italy), HITEK (Chile)

Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa, The Boy Hidden in a Fish , image of the project, 2010

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Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa The Boy Hidden in a Fish

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa The Boy Hidden in a Fish

Exhibition

Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa, The Boy Hidden in a Fish , image of the project, 2010

Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa, The Boy Hidden in a Fish , stone view completed, 2010

Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa, The Boy Hidden in a Fish , image of the project, 2010

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Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa The Boy Hidden in a Fish

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa The Boy Hidden in a Fish

Exhibition

Smiljan Radic, Room, 1997. Photo Erieta Attali

Smiljan Radic, Pite House, 2005. Photo Cristobal Palma

Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa, Fonola House, 2009. Photo Gonzalo Puga

Smiljan Radic, Room, 1997. Photo the Artist

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raumlaborberlin Kitchen Monument, The Generator

Biennale Architettura 2010

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raumlaborberlin Kitchen Monument, The Generator

Exhibition

Instant urbanism In many of their projects, raumlabor focuses on activation of the public realm. Public buildings, squares, or abandoned spaces, forgotten areas, or derelict buildings are their field of action. Through specific architectural and programmatic interventions, they detect unused potential and open new perspectives for new spheres of activity. One of raumlabors motivations is to engender alternative practices within the city, fostered through cooperation and self-empowerment. They explore what remains of collective ideals and ways to overcome todays harsh conditions of economic competition. Establishing temporary communities is one tool for creating a surrogate notion of a city divorced from the capitalist logic of use-value and profitability.

Kitchen Monument is one of many mobile structures developed by raumlabor in collaboration with Plastique Fantastique to create instant communities in different urban situations. This zinc-sheet-clad sculpture can be installed within public spaces, transforming each site into a collective space through an inflatable mantle. Kitchen Monument has traveled across many sites in Europe and has accommodated multiple purposes, including banquet hall, conference room, cinema, concert hall, ballroom, dormitory, boxing arena, and steam bath. The Generator is an experimental building laboratory for instant, participatory building practices in public space. Central issues of the research include construction principles, different assemblage points, new geometries for furniture, and lightweight construction buildings, as well as new use possibilities and multiple programs for people to meet and interact in public. The Generator consists of two components: hardware and software.
The hardware is a workstation designed for mobility. A set of several flight cases can be assembled as two workbenches. They contain all the necessary tools for eight people to work on site using simple wooden slats and plywood as building materials. The software is a set of construction plans and instructions for modules, which are developed for easy assembly. The construction methods will be constantly tested and improved. The modules can be assembled into chairs, tables, and shelves, as well as walls and shelters. The participants can transform the modules accidentally or intentionally. A process of learning by doing. The team will record and reuse all possible mutations of the system and incorporate them into a growing structure.

raumlaborberlin and Plastique Fantastique, Marco Canevacci, Kitchen Monument , Duisburg, 2006. Photo Marco Canevacci

The Venetian Chair is a remembrance of childhood, when building fortresses, hideouts, and our own world with pieces of furniture was our utmost pleasure. A chair is the archetype of furniture, an object that assists us as we work, relax, or gather for a meal or discussion. With The Generator it is endowed with a further function: the stacking chair becomes an assembly part to construct spaces.
Collaborators: Kitchen Monument (Plastique Fantastique-Marco Canevacci Manfred Eccli); The Generator (Frauke Gerstenberg, Lucia Pasquali, Andrew Plucinski, Lucas Fink, Armin Fucks, Annamaria Piccinini, Francesco Vedovato, Manuel Coletto, Roberta Aralla, Camilla Minini, Marella Diamantini, Paolo Ruoro, Anna Francesca Triboli) With the additional support of: Zumtobel, Domus, Graduate School of Design - Harvard University, nora systems GmbH raumlaborberlin and Plastique Fantastique, Marco Canevacci, Kitchen Monument , Duisburg, 2006. Photo Rainer Schlautmann

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raumlaborberlin Kitchen Monument, The Generator

Biennale Architettura 2010

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raumlaborberlin Kitchen Monument, The Generator

Exhibition

raumlaborberlin and Plastique Fantastique, Marco Canevacci, Kitchen Monument , Liverpool, 2008. Photo raumlabor

Markus Bader, Oliver Baurhenn, Jakub Szreder, Raluca Voinea, The Knot , 2010. Photo raumlaborberlin raumlaborberlin, Chaise Bordelaise , 2009. Photo the Artist

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raumlaborberlin Kitchen Monument, The Generator

Biennale Architettura 2010

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raumlaborberlin Kitchen Monument, The Generator

Exhibition

raumlaborberlin, Tempelhof Airport , since 2006

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R&Sie(n) Isobiotope / thebuildingwhichneverdies

Biennale Architettura 2010

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R&Sie(n) Isobiotope / thebuildingwhichneverdies

Exhibition

Meeting someone means facing the unknown, the strange, or even confronting your own repulsion at negotiating unfamiliar surroundings. Its neither comfortable nor pleasing. It means crossing a heterotopic space where the passage itself is the only way to define yourself in relation to whats already there. This involves consideration of risk and a determination of whether or not to go through with it. Meeting doesnt mean plunging into a masked carnival, or huddling in a dark room, as if in a ceremony meant exclusively for a sum of individualities. It means daring to risk the unknown together. I remember the inaccessible zone and the room where wishes are granted in the Tarkovsky movie Stalker ; a place you enter after crossing a territory where the gods clashed with humanitywe still dont know who won that battle. The truce is unstable. Nothing can be discerned but sweat and silence, like climbers roped together, seeking to transgress the forbidden. The fence simultaneously protects those who are still there, about whom we know nothing, and those who dare venture in without knowing how to make use of what they may find there. At the end of the journey, amid the humid dilapidation, looms this Room of Wishes, where architecture is precisely the meeting point R&Sie(n)s apparatus is something similar, touching something which could simultaneously intrigue, attract and repulse you. The meeting point is not pretending to be safety. But its also a fragment of the design of thebuildingwhichneverdies commissioned by the Zumtobel Group for its Thorn subsidiary. This building is a nocturnal observatory pivoting on itself. This research laboratory is intended to analyze human beings physiological and ocular adaptation to the dark, in order to be able to reduce urban light pollution. This lab is aimed at the moon when its above the horizon, to take advantage of the one-lux minimum moonlight and even amplify it. But at night this lab restores the light intensity of daytime by discharging UV sensor units located on all the exterior surfaces. Thus their phosphorescent components (Isobiotopic oxide pigment), populated on all its outdoor surfaces, report on solar activity, its degree of danger according to its variations of intensity and specific nature (UVA, B, C). The components afterglow is a detector, an architectural Marker of the mutation of our environment and occurs as a signal of UV human pathologies. The level of UV which has crossed the Ozone layer is only revealed with a gap of time, after people are plugged into the shadows of the day, in the death of the sunset, by the after glowing ghost, inter canem et lupum
Team: Franois Roche, Stephanie Lavaux, Kiuchi Toshikatsu Collaborators: Stephan Henrich, M/M, Benoit Lalloz, Gaetan Robillard, Sebastien Szczyrk, Gorka Arrizabalaga, Jean-Michel Castagn, Gabriel Blue Cira, Sandra Meireis, Ulrike Marie Steen, Hamish Rhodes, Alessandra Vassallo, Sina Momtaz, Liza Langard, Melissa Millot Production: Stephane Rivoal, CNC Prototyper Tecmolde, Assembling Ufacto With the additional support of: Zumtobel, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary / Vienna / Austria, Materialise / 3D print / Belgium, Tecmolde / CNC production / Spain www.new-territories.com/biennale010.htm

R&Sie(n), UV detector component draft version

R&Sie(n), UV detector component second version

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R&Sie(n) Isobiotope / thebuildingwhichneverdies

Biennale Architettura 2010

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R&Sie(n) Isobiotope / thebuildingwhichneverdies

Exhibition

R&Sie(n), Isobiotope

R&Sie(n), thethingwhichnecrose , 2009

R&Sie(n), Biennale apparatus

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Tom Sachs

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Tom Sachs

Exhibition

Tom Sachss exhibition focuses on Le Corbusier, whose legacy represents the successes and failures of modernismboth the potential for solving the worlds housing crisis with technology and the mismanagement of projects that incubated poverty. Le Corbusiers most influential late work and his first significant postwar structure, the Unit dHabitation in Marseilles, was completed in 1952. Sachs has included four related works, Care Taker and Unit Faade, B Side. Unit dHabitation , a massive, twelve-story apartment block for 1,600 people, is the late-modern counterpart of the mass housing schemes of the 1920s. It was built to alleviate a severe postwar housing shortage. Although built as a prototype for mass productionCorbusier envisioned 1,000 Unitsjust three other bastardized versions were completed: Nantes-Reze, Firminy, and Berlin. Only the Marseilles Unit stands uncompromised. Parading the successes and failures of modernism, Unit represents both the potential for solving the worlds housing crisis through technology, and economic mismanagement resulting in project failure and continued suffering and poverty. Driving through McBusier, one would experience the worlds most important drive-thru restaurant. Designed around the turning radius of the front-wheel-drive Citroen Traction Avant automobile, Le Corbusiers Villa Savoye is the first significant residential building to incorporate the automobile into its architecture. The McDonalds drive-thru, designed to provide burgers and fries to Americas increasingly mobile fast-food consumers, is the most ubiquitous automobile-influenced building. In comparing Ray Krock to Le Corbusier, who is the success and who is the failure? Who is the winner and who is the loser? Also, consider Minoru Yamasaki, perhaps Le Corbusiers most infamous disciple. His two most significant buildingsdestroyed for political reasonsare Pruitt-Igoe (1955-1972) and the World Trade Center (1973-2001). In the 1920s, Le Corbusier presented his radiant city towers as an armor-capped defense against the new German threat of aerial attack. The buildings raised feet also allow the new poison gas to dissipate. With Yamasakis compromised plan for Pruitt-Igoe based on radiant city, we trace an arc of aerial terror through modern history that links greed, imperialism, and retribution.
Collaborators: Gordon Millsaps, Oksana Todorova, Casey Neistat, Van Neistat, John Furgason, Kai Williams, Nick Doyle, Chris Beeston, Pat McCarthy, Erik Brandt, Iris Jaffe, Jason Kotara, Alex Chohlas-Wood, Sarah Vasil, Daniel Akselrad, Evan Murphy, Marley Lohr, Daniel Gatenio With the additional support of: Sperone Westwater, Baldwin Gallery, Deutsche Guggenheim, Bohen Foundation Thanks to: Vanhaerents Art Collection, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Tom Sachs, Untitled, Unit Faade, B Side , 2001

Tom Sachs, The Radiant City, 2010

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Tom Sachs

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Tom Sachs

Exhibition

Tom Sachs, The Radiant City, 2010

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Tom Sachs

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Tom Sachs

Exhibition

Tom Sachs, The Radiant City, 2010

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selgascano vacuum pack-ing (on room 25)

Biennale Architettura 2010

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selgascano vacuum pack-ing (on room 25)

Exhibition

vacuum pack-ing (sotto-vuoto) is a title that defines this project for the Biennale as well as describing the work produced in the studio so far.
Although we like to live with inconstancy and the unstable, constant themes can be found in our work. We try to work with vacuum and void, we use as little material as possible, and we are interested in working with the habitual, the ordinary, or, better yet, the vulgar. This is why we interpreted the proposition of SANAA of moving to the Biennale all the objects, models, and pieces from projects that we keep collecting and accumulating on the shelves of our studio as a mere packing-moving-exhibiting. And we are forcing ourselves to do it with as little material as possible. This implies working with the lightest and cheapest materialair. We started with small floating inflatable capsules. These capsules would exhibit the pieces out of the publics reach. But soon we realized they were unstable, the objects would end up moving and falling and, moreover, they occupied space, making its transportation unviable. Although the material seemed ideal for the projectthin plastic sheets that, well-folded, would fit in any suitcasewe had to use it in another way. At lunchtime we saw it clearly instead of adding we had to remove, as usual. We didnt have to add air, but on the contrary we had to remove it all, producing a common vacuum packing. This would ease the transportation and would fix the small objects to the desirable position. The project was reduced to the technical task of vacuum packing objects, some of which were delicate and some big. The project was enriched when we had to adapt and curve the vacuum forms to the small size of Room 25 (we subtitled this On room 25) and place them in the presence of a window and its reflections. We play with the little space, the window, and its transparency; the transparency and reflections of both the window and vacuum forms that together produce a dance of mirages over the room wrapped in 3M mirror paper. All this packaging work has triggered the investigation of new materials and effects, so this project ended up being the start of a future one. And finally comes the most interesting virtue of this montage for us: the tactile. This is a work made to be touched, for the blind, where a sign will read: please touch.
Collaborators: Jose Mara Lastra, Jeong Woo, Gilberto Ruiz Lopez With the additional support of: Lastra & Zorrilla, State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad (SEACEX), 3M, Polimertecnic

Photo Dean Kaufman

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selgascano vacuum pack-ing (on room 25)

Biennale Architettura 2010

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selgascano vacuum pack-ing (on room 25)

Exhibition

selgascano, Office in the Wood, Madrid, 2008. Photo Iwan Baan

selgascano, Silicon House, Madrid, 2006. Photo Iwan Baan

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selgascano vacuum pack-ing (on room 25)

Biennale Architettura 2010

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selgascano vacuum pack-ing (on room 25)

Exhibition

selgascano, Vacuum Pack-ing (On room 25) , detail of Congress Center in Badajoz, Spain

selgascano, Vacuum Pack-ing (On room 25) , detail of Auditorium and Congress Center, Plasencia, Spain

selgascano, Auditorium and Congress Center, Plasencia, Spain

selgascano, Congress Center, Badajoz, Spain

selgascano, Congress Center, Badajoz, Spain selgascano, Auditorium and Congress Center, Plasencia, Spain selgascano, Police Headquaters, Merida, Spain

selgascano, Auditorium, Cartagena, Spain

selgascano, Police Headquaters, Merida, Spain selgascano, Vacuum Pack-ing (On room 25) , detail of Cartagena Auditorium

selgascano, Vacuum Pack-ing (On room 25) , detail of Police Headquaters, Merida, Spain

294

Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Biennale Architettura 2010

295

Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Exhibition

Our immediate environment is a space that we subconsciously create and inhabit. We can make this space very familiar or we can expose ourselves to unfamiliar elements that provoke our response and reevaluation. There are many sources of inspiration: one only has to observe closely. It is possible to have set ideas of what architecture should be, but first we need to understand why things are a certain way. Work-Place is an environment created from an iterative process, where ideas are explored through the production of large scale mock-ups, models, material studies, sketches, and drawings. Here projects are developed through careful consideration of place and a practice that draws from traditional skills, local building techniques, materials, and an ingenuity arising from limited resources. Inspired by observation of real life conditions, these architectural studies are vital tools that enable us to look at the complexity of relationships within each project and to respond and adapt freely through the practice of making. They are ambiguous, existing as part and whole, between idea and reality. Our endeavor is to show the genuine possibility in creating buildings that emerge through a process of collective dialog, a face-to-face sharing of knowledge through imagination, intimacy, and modesty.
Team: Studio Bijoy Jain, Jeevaram Suthar, Samuel Barclay, Punamchand Suthar, Bhaskar Raut, Pandurang Gharat, Chanana Ram, Bhuraram, Bhanwar Lal, Kharta Ram, Bhaira Ram, Sawai Ram, Michael Anastassiades, Kate Dineen, Samir Raut Studio Mumbai Architects, Work-Place , framing model, Nagaon, Maharashtra, India, 2006. and Photo the Artists

Studio Mumbai Architects, Work-Place , shifting of stone, Leti, Uttaranchal, India, 2007. and Photo the Artists

Studio Mumbai Architects, Work-Place , Studio Workshop, Nagaon, Maharashtra, India, 2010. and Photo the Artists

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Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Exhibition

Studio Mumbai Architects, Tara House, well construction, Kashid, Maharashtra, India, 2005. and Photo the Artists

Studio Mumbai Architects, Work-Place , carpenter sketches, Nagaon, Maharashtra, India, 2009-10. and Photo the Artists

Studio Mumbai Architects, Tara House, well construction, Kashid, Maharashtra, India, 2005. and Photo the Artists

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Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Biennale Architettura 2010

301

Studio Mumbai Architects Work-Place

Exhibition

Photo Dean Kaufman

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Cloud Island I (Fiona Tan)

Biennale Architettura 2010

303

Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Cloud Island I (Fiona Tan)

Exhibition

Fiona Tan with Toshiyuki Abe, Kinue Inoue, Senji Nakayama, Kojiro Shibata, Michiko Shibata, Chieko Tsugita Written and Directed by: Fiona Tan Production Manager: Marty de Jong Director of Photography: Erik van Empel Sound Engineer: Mark Wessner Research: Renna Okubo Production Assistants: Renna Okubo, Mao Nagakura Helicopter Pilot: Toshihiko Sasae Catering: Sakae Ikeda Artists Assistant: Letizia Colella Edited by: Gys Zevenbergen Sound Design: Hugo Dijkstal Postproduction: Filmmore, Amsterdam; Shosho, Amsterdam; Lodewijk van Olffen Grading: Wouter Suyderhoud Produced by: Fiona Tan With thanks to: All the inhabitants of Inujima and Toshiyuki Abe, Yuko Hasegawa, Hiroshi Kagayama, Kazuo Miura, Ryue Nishizawa, Kazuyo Seijma, Takafumi Shimooka, Hiromitsu Tokumori (Ohmoto Group), Masakazu Uchida (Inujima Art Project), Kiyoshi Wako, Chikako Watanabe Filmed on location on Inujima and Teshima, Japan Courtesy the artist, Wako Works of Art, Tokyo and Frith Street Gallery, London Commissioned by: the Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum Foundation Funded by: Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum Foundation and Wako Works of Art, Tokyo Fiona Tan, 2010 With the additional support of: Mondriaan Foundation, Amsterdam

Fiona Tan, Cloud Island I , 2010

Fiona Tan, Cloud Island I , 2010

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Cloud Island I (Fiona Tan)

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Cloud Island I (Fiona Tan)

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Fiona Tan, Rise & Fall , 2009. Courtesy the Artist and Frith Street Gallery, London

Fiona Tan, Cloud Island I , 2010

Fiona Tan, Disorient , 2008. Courtesy the Artist and Frith Street Gallery, London

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Photo Dean Kaufman

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates Biennale Architettura 2010 + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Inujima Art house project (Kazuyo Sejima & Associates)
There is a tiny island called Inujima in the Seto Inland Sea, on which there is a village. It was once renowned for its granite production, then its soft hills and rich nature lay quiet. Our project creates a series of independent gallery spaces among the houses and trees. Visiting Inujima regularly we could trace the seasons and become accustomed to the distances, routes and visual sequences that the island offers. Each season revealed different views, changing colors and an ephemeral relationship between village, the trees and the flowers. We selected sites within valleys formed by the undulating hills, sites within the houses, sites high above with a view over the sea. By studying in many media and with models at varying scales, we could understand the characteristics specific to each location. It is from this process that shapes, sizes and materiality emerged for each gallery space, every one communicating with its immediate nature, the landscape as a whole and the life of the village as it flows through. In places where the traditional wood structures could be reutilized they were transformed, in others new light structures evolved. Walking through the village people can find a series of galleries: wood, aluminum, acrylic and granite appear and disappear with the changing levels of the terrain. As you approach and pass through each space the art displayed melts into its environment. Transparent surfaces dissolve and the landscape, sky and sea appear as art. Our desire is to create an environment where the village itself is a museum. Nature, existing houses and scattered galleries become the framework of the island and it is transformed into a new landscape: a landscape that visitors and local people are invited to inhabit together.
Project Team: Kazuyo Sejima, Yoshitaka Tanase, Takashi Suo, Naoko Kawachi, Takayuki Furuya Art Director: Yuko Hasegawa Structural engineers: Sasaki Structural Consultants, Atelier Shimamura Mechanical engineers: Scientific Air-Conditioning Institute Planting: Akaruiheya Inc. General Contractor: Ohmoto Gumi Co., LTD Client: Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum Foundation

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MAP SMALLER BUT DONT CROP IT

Kazuyo Sejima & Associates, Inujima Art House project, 2010

Kazuyo Sejima & Associates, Inujima Art House project, 2010. Photo Iwan Baan

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates Biennale Architettura 2010 + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Inujima Art house project (Kazuyo Sejima & Associates)

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates Exhibition + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Inujima Art house project (Kazuyo Sejima & Associates)

Kazuyo Sejima & Associates, Inujima Art House project, 2010. Photo Iwan Baan

Kazuyo Sejima & Associates, SANAA, Installation in the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion, 2008. Photo SANAA and Kazuyo Sejima & Associates

Kazuyo Sejima & Associates, Inujima Art House project, 2010. Photo Iwan Baan

Installation for Comme des Garons, 2009. Photo Kazuyo Sejima & Associates

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Teshima Art Museum (Office of Ryue Nishizawa)

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Teshima Art Museum (Office of Ryue Nishizawa)

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Upon completion the museum we are currently designing for Teshima (an island in the Seto Inland Sea) will provide a simple functional space for a collection of work on permanent display. The site is located on a low range of hills that looks out onto the ocean. This beautiful environment, in which rice paddies lie side by side amongst untouched nature, contains zero commercial buildings or private residences. What we envisioned for the site is an architectural form that resembles a drop of water. As the terrain is richly contoured we imagined that this form, with its gentle curves, would snugly blend into the surroundings whilst simultaneously forming an architectural space. The thin concrete shell extends upward some 60 meters at its highest point creating a large, organic, single room space. By significantly reducing the height of the ceiling compared with that of normal shell structures, the exterior is imbued with a presence of form that is similar to a landscape element such as a hill or slope. The interior is distinguished by an organic space that resembles a horizonstretching out like a drop of water on a sheet of paper. There are also a number of holes in the shell through which natural light and glimpses of natural scenery are introduced into the space. In this project rather than simply creating an art museum we set out to create a fusion between the environment and the building, between art and architecture, and to realize a single unit comprising all these elements.
Project team: Ryue Nishizawa, Yusuke Ohi Artist: Rei Naito Structural engineer: Sasaki Structural Consultants Mechanical engineer: Kajima Corporation General contractors: Kajima Corporation Client: Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum Foundation Expected completion October 2010 Office of Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Art Museum, 2010. Photo Office of Ryue Nishizawa / July 2010

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Art Museum, section, 2010

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Art Museum, plan 2010

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Art Museum, 2010. Photo Office of Ryue Nishizawa / July 2010

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Teshima Art Museum (Office of Ryue Nishizawa)

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Office of Ryue Nishizawa, House A, 2006. Photo Kenichi Suzuki

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, House A, 2006. Photo Kenichi Suzuki

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Art Museum, 2010. Photo Kenichi Suzuki / July 2010

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, House A, 2006. Photo Kenichi Suzuki

Office of Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Art Museum, 2010. Photo Office of Ryue Nishizawa / May 2010

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates Biennale Architettura 2010 + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Inujima Art house project (Kazuyo Sejima & Associates)

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Fiona Tan + Kazuyo Sejima & Associates + Office of Ryue Nishizawa Teshima Art Museum (Office of Ryue Nishizawa)

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Photo Dean Kaufman

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Transsolar & Tetsuo Kondo Architects Cloudscapes

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Transsolar & Tetsuo Kondo Architects Cloudscapes

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Clouds are important elements of our atmosphere, framing outdoor space and filtering sunlight. They are the visible part of the terrestrial water cycle, carrying water the source of lifefrom the oceans to the land. Clouds find balance within stable equilibria and naturally sustain themselves, embodying and releasing solar energy. The ability to touch, feel, and walk through the clouds is a notion drawn from many of our fantasies. Gazing out of airplane windows, high above the earth, we often daydream of what it might be like to live in this ethereal world of fluffy vapor. Transsolar and Tetsuo Kondo Architects create Cloudscapes where visitors can experience a real cloud from below, within, and above floating in the center of the Arsenale. Visitors find a path that is akin the normal experience of walking through a garden. The path winds through the Cloudscapes appearing and disappearing. Sometimes people only see the other people across the cloud while the path is obscured. The structure consists of a 4.3 meter high ramp that allows visitors to sit above the cloud. Simply, the structure leans on the existing Arsenale columns. The cloud is always changing so the experience of the path is also dynamic. The cloud is based on the physical phenomenon of saturated air, condensation droplets floating in the space and condensation seeds. The atmospheres above and below the cloud have different qualities of light, temperature, and humidity, separating the spaces by the light filter effect. The cloud can be touched, and it can be felt as different microclimatic conditions coincide. The scene is set underneath an artificial sky where the cloud can be touched and felt as different micro-climatic conditions coincide. The scene is set underneath an artificial sky, when people are changing the cloud e meeting each other.
Transsolar: Nadir Abdessemed, Thomas Auer, Eric Baczuk, Volkmar Bleicher, Stefan Holst, Timur Khanachet, Matthias Schuler, Anja Thierfelder anOtherArchitect: Daniel Dendra Tetsuo Kondo Architects: Tetsuo Kondo, Mitsuru Maekita Structural engineer: Sasaki and Partners: Mutsuro Sasaki, Yoshiyuki Hiraiwa SASP DIA Dessau With the additional support of: Extenzo France, Martin Professional Denmark, Roschmann Group Germany, Schiico Germany, My Book Service Inc., surutokoro

TXT OVER IMAGE BOTH ENG AD ITA

Transsolar KlimaEngineering & Tetsuo Kondo Architecs, Cloudscapes , 2010. Courtesy Sasaki and Partners

Photo Dean Kaufman

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Tetsuo Kondo Architecs, Mirror, 2001

Transsolar KlimaEngineering & Tetsuo Kondo Architecs, Cloudscapes , 2010. Foto Frank Ocker

Transsolar KlimaEngineering & Tetsuo Kondo Architecs, Cloudscapes , 2010. Photo Transsolar KlimaEngineering

Transsolar KlimaEngineering & Tetsuo Kondo Architecs, Cloudscapes , 2010. Courtesy Tetsuo Kondo Architecs

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Photo Dean Kaufman

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Transsolar & Tetsuo Kondo Architects Cloudscapes

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Photo Dean Kaufman

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Wim Wenders If Buildings Could Talk

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Wim Wenders If Buildings Could Talk

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If Buildings Could Talk... ... some of them would sound like Shakespeare. Others would speak like the Financial Times, yet others would praise God, or Allah. Some would just whisper, some would loudly sing their own praises, while others would modestly mumble a few words and really have nothing to say. Some are plain dead and dont speak anymore... Buildings are like people, in fact. Old and young, male and female, ugly and beautiful, fat and skinny, ambitious and lazy, rich and poor, clinging to the past or reaching out to the future. Dont get me wrong: this is not a metaphor. Buildings DO speak to us! They have messages. Of course. Some really WANT a constant dialogue with us. Some rather listen carefully first. And you have probably noticed: Some of them like us a lot, some less and some not at all. Buildings, like people, are subject to time and exist in a three-dimensional world. Thats why our film is in 3D. Its an invitation to wander around, to experience and to listen, for once. The building you will encounter is a particularly gentle and friendly one, made for learning, reading, and communicating. Its hills and valleys (yes, they exist in there) are eager to welcome you, to help, to be of service, and to be, in the best sense of the word, a meeting place.
a 3D video installation by Wim Wenders, duration: 12 min Director: Wim Wenders; Stereographer: Alain Derobe; Director of Photography: Jrg Widmer; Editor: Toni Froschhammer; Music: Thom Hanreich; Sound: Ansgar Frerich; Producer: Erwin M. Schmidt 1st Assistant Director: Heidi Frankl; Production Coordinators: Michael Mitchell, Francesca Hecht Stereographer Time Lapses and Second Unit: Josephine Derobe; First Assistant Camera / DIT: Thierry Pouffary; Stereographer Postproduction: Daniele Siragusano; Post-production Supervisor: Jan Frhlich; Key Grip: Jean Chesneau; Grip: Patrick Chizalet; Time Lapses Assistant: Murielle Gerber; Editing Assistant: Maxine Goedicke; Photography: Donata Wenders Shot on location at the Rolex Learning Center of the Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale Lausanne Produced by: Neue Road Movies, Berlin; Post-produced by: Cinepostproduction, Mnchen; With the support of: Rolex Neue Road Movies 2010

Rolex Learning Center / EPFL SANAA . Photo 2010 by Hisao Suzuki, scribbled by Wim Wenders

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Cerith Wyn Evans Joanna (Chapter One)

Biennale Architettura 2010

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Cerith Wyn Evans Joanna (Chapter One)

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The work is a text fabricated from white neon letters supported on a metal framework suspended from the ceiling a construction apparatus, if you like occasioning a scene. Redolent of cinematographys support to the interrealm of language through language, namely SUBTITLE (with all its associative compressions and frictions of syntax rubbing up against syntax), or surtitle, hermeneutic talisman spelling-out the scene. A text is being staged. The text is a quotation from The Changing Light at Sandover, a poem by James Merrill emerging from sessions at the Ouija board with his partner David Jackson and published in 1982. The excerpt cites an episode describing a scene from a lost novel in which the author prevaricates regarding a character protagonist Joanna is found lost in reverie Whilst smoking a cigarette on an airplane suspended,the intuition of spacethe words hang in the air.
Collaborators: Pascale Berthier; Sam Chermayeff; Jack Hogan; Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo Project development and realization: Dusty Sprengnagel, NEONline, Vienna With the additional support of: White Cube, London Cerith Wyn Evans, Rinsed with mecury , 2009. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz

Cerith Wyn Evans, The plexi-glass cover Courtesy Galerie Neu, 2008

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Cerith Wyn Evans Joanna (Chapter One)

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Photo Dean Kaufman

Biographies

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Aires Mateus e associados 48 The Aires Mateus e associados architecture studio was set up in 1988 in Lisbon by brothers Manuel Aires Mateus (Lisbon, 1963) and Francisco Aires Mateus (Lisbon, 1964). The architecture of Aires Mateus, only superficially related to international minimalism, is based on a study of space and material that, while recognizing its main raison dtre in mass, aims at eliminating gravity in order to assert lightness through its substantial dematerialization. This is done both by playing on the contrast between solids and spaces, and by making an expert choice and treatment of the materials, including stone and marble. The most significant works carried out by Aires Mateus e associados include numerous private homes, such as Casa ad Alenquer (2001), Casa en el litoral de Alentejo (2003), and Casa Brejos de Azeito (2003), as well as public works such as the Residencia de estudiantes de la Universidade de Coimbra (1999), the Rectorado de la Universidade Nova (2001), the Museo de Arquitectura (2006), the Edifcios de Escritrios (2008), the Centro Cultural de Sines (2000), the Museo del Faro in Cascais (2003), and the Almedina bookshops (20002002). www.airesmateus.com AMID.cero9 54 Cristina Daz Moreno (1971) and Efrn Garca Grinda (1966) were both born in Madrid, Spain, where they set up the AMID.cero9 architecture studio in 1997. Their buildings are often of composite, irregular volumes, and seem to derive from an assembly of geometrical forms; their distinguishing style is the frequent use of modular elements, placed together and at different angles. The studios design research is based on the chromatic and creative element. Daz Moreno and Garca Grinda have taught architecture at the ETSAMEscuela Superior de Arquitectura di Madrid since 1998 and in the masters course at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London. AMID.cero9 has won various Spanish and international prizes and completed numerous projects, including the Palacio del Cerezo en Flor in the Jerte Valley, Cceres, Spain (2010), the head offices of the Giner de los Rios Foundation in Madrid, the IntermediaePrado Art Center of Madrid (2006), and the Made-Endesa Offices in Medina del Campo (2002). The studio has also presented its designs at various monographic exhibitions, including the exhibition organized by the Spanish Ministry of Labor in 1999. www.cero9.com Aranda\Lasch 64 Aranda\Lasch is a design studio based in New York that focuses on experimental research applied to architecture and design. Set up in 2003 by Benjamin Aranda (1973) and

Chris Lasch (1972), the studio designs highly innovative buildings, objects, and installations after carefully studying the material using virtual technology. Aranda\Lasch designs are often inspired by molecular structure in their symmetrical and modular forms. In 2008, the studio worked with artist Matthew Ritchie and Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (T-BA21) of Vienna on the first anti-pavilion for the Venice Biennale, then exhibited at the Seville Biennale. The studio designed and built the temporary architecture for Design Miami 08 and 09 to house the works on show. In May 2010, once again following collaborative work with T-BA21 and Matthew Ritchie, along with the Arup Agu studio, Aranda\Lasch created The Morning Line in Istanbul, European capital of culture in 2010. This is a multifunctional installationstructure inspired by the interaction between art, architecture, music, mathematics, cosmology, and science. The studio also produces short films and video installations under the name terraswarm. www.arandalash.com ARU/Architecture Research Unit 70 Architecture Research Unit (ARU) is a research workshop based in the Department of Architecture and Spatial Design at London Metropolitan University and directed by Professor Florian Beigel. ARU was set up to study space and its endless potential. The relationship between the interior and exterior of a building and appreciation of the potential of the spaces are the starting points in the processes of upgrading buildings, landscapes, and urban areas. The most significant projects completed by ARU include the Half Moon Theatre in London (1979-1985); Bishopsfield Harlow in Essex (1994), a project for the regeneration and modernization of a public building complex of the 1960s; Lichterfelde Sud (1998), an upgrading plan for a former military area in Berlin; Paju Book City in Seoul (1999), a building complex for publishers, printers and writers; and some parts of the Heyri Art Valley (2004), a community of artists and creatives who work together in the Seoul area. In 2008, ARU was one of the groups chosen for the Saemangeum Island City project, an enormous city to be built on the southeast coast of South Korea in a vast area reclaimed from the sea. www.aru.londonmet.ac.uk

Apart from designing numerous buildings, Atelier Bow-Wow also takes part in large exhibitions and international biennales, having participated in the Liverpool Biennale in 2008, the International Architecture Exhibition in Venice in 2008, and the San Paolo Biennale in Brazil in 2007, as well as in collective exhibitions in galleries and museums such as the Hayward Gallery, the Walker Art Center, the Mori Art Museum, the Tokyo City Opera Gallery, and the New National Museum in Berlin. In 2009, Atelier Bow-Wow held its first solo exhibition in the USA at REDCATRoy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater in Los Angeleswhere it presented its research on the Case Study House, the contemporary interpretation of a postwar residential program based on the principles of reuse and energy saving. www.bow-wow.jp Berger&Berger 86 Cyrille Berger (1975) and Laurent P. Berger (1972), respectively architect and visual artist, are two French brothers who have worked together under the name Berger&Berger since 2005. They specialize in design and architectural design, frequently offering new composite proposals and ideas that take on new functions and meanings rather than meeting specified needs. From 2007 to 2009 they had a period of residence at one of the Centquatre studios in Paris, a multifunctional space divided into different areas for artistic creation and various other activities. In this period they worked on a design for single-family housing called A Paradise Island is a Man-made Show. The finished project involved the construction of a range of microhouses conceived as living spaces but with no set functions, intended rather to adapt to the use the inhabitants wish to put them to. In January 2008, Berger&Berger and Thomas Raynaud won the competition held to mark the tenth anniversary of the international architecture magazine 2G . The aim was to identify design ideas for turning the Venice lagoon into a park that the city could reappropriate as a landscape integrated into the surrounding district. In March 2008, Berger&Berger received the prestigious Nouveaux albums des jeunes architectes, a prize awarded by the French Ministry of Culture. www.berger-berger.com Lina Bo Bardi 92

Atelier Bow-Wow 78 The Atelier Bow-Wow architecture studio was set up in Tokyo in 1992 by Yoshiharu Tsukamoto (1965) and Momoyo Kaijima (1969). Atelier Bow-Wows research is based on the study of space and its uses and functions within urban environments. Bow-Wow coined the definition Pet Architecture, which refers to a type of architectural structure that is small but highly functional, built especially for restricted urban spaces.

In the course of her intense professional career, Lina Bo Bardi (Rome 1914San Paolo 1992) worked in architecture, design, set design, museography, cinema, publishing, and teaching. A competitive and restless designer, Bo Bardi was constantly inspired by an enthusiasm for experimentation in which political commitment and professional work were inseparable. After graduating in architecture in Rome in 1939, she became intensely involved in publishing in Milan, where she was

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one of the founders of the Movimento di Studi per lArchitettura. After the war, she and her husband Pietro Maria Bardi moved to Brazil, where they settled permanently. From that time on, she was involved mainly in designing public buildings, driven by the desire to foster the creation of an authentic Brazilian culture that would value its own roots. In 1951, she built her first work in San Paolo: the Casa de Vidro, her home. She set up and designed various museums, including the Museo dArte a So Vicente (1952) and MaspMuseo dArte di San Paolo (1957-1968). In the early 1970s, after a period of university teaching, Bo Bardi focused mainly on set designs for theater and cinema and the organization of large exhibitions. From 1977 to 1986, she devoted her time to a project to save the Pompia factory in San Paolo, which was turned into a social center. She then moved to Salvador de Bahia, where she completed various designs in her final years, including the Casa do Benin and the refurbishing of the Ladeira da Misericordia. Andrea Branzi 100 Born in Florence in 1938, the architect and designer Andrea Branzi has lived and worked in Milan since 1973. Branzis design practice is to constantly seek out connections with the different manifestations of culture: from figurative art to communication, post-modern philosophy, and political ideology. From 1964 to 1974, Branzi was part of Archizoom Associati, an internationally renowned visionary avant-garde group set up in Florence that at the end of the Twentieth century produced a rich range of designs for clothing, architecture, and urban visions at a district level, the source of inspiration for architects such as Isozaki, Koolhaas, and Tschumi. Branzi cofounded the Domus Academy in Milan (1983), the first international post-graduate design school, and has written several books on the history and theory of design. In the course of his professional career, he has curated many exhibitions in Italy and abroad, and in 1987 was awarded the Compasso dOro for career achievement. In the sphere of industrial design, he works with companies such as Acerbis, Alessi, Artemide, Cassina, Interflex, Lapis, Pioneer, Twergi by Alessi, Unitalia, Up & Up, and Zanotta. In 2008, he was awarded an honorary degree in Industrial Design by the Faculty of Architecture at La Sapienza University, Rome. He is full professor and dean of the degree course in the Faculty of Interiors and Design at Milan Polytechnic. www.andreabranzi.it Janet Cardiff 104 The Canadian artists Janet Cardiff (Brussels, Ontario, 1957) lives and works in Canada and Berlin usually in partnership with George Bures Miller (Vegreville, Alberta, 1960). Her projects are the result of an unconventional

combination of images, sound, and space, and often communicate complex and contradictory information that disturbs the observers perception, stimulating questions and reflections on how the world is conceived. The works are often devised for architectural spaces, completing them, enriching them, or drawing attention to the context in which they are presented. The relationship between art, architecture, and culture is best expressed in the video series Walk , available on her website. In 2001, Cardiff and Bures Miller represented Canada at the Venice Biennale directed by Harald Szeeman, Platea dellumanit , with a multimedia installation entitled Paradise Institute . The work was a hybrid of installation, video, audio, sculpture, and show built inside the Canadian pavilion and presented as a film house for eighteen people. Cardiff and Bures Miller have exhibited in numerous art galleries including the Art Gallery of Alberta (2010), the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh (2008), the Miami Art Museum (2007), the Vancouver Art Gallery (2005), Luhring Augustine, New York (2004), the Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati (2003), the Art Gallery of Ontario (2002), the National Gallery of Canada (2002), and Oakville Galleries, Oakville, Ontario (2000). www.cardiffmiller.com Caruso St. John 106 Adam Caruso (Canada, 1962) and Peter St. John (UK, 1959) set up a studio under their own names in London in 1990. After an initial period working mainly on museum and exhibition spaces, the studio added to its experience and design expertise by expanding into the public and private sphere. Caruso St. Johns main principle is to include among their built work a vast and heterogeneous range of designs, avoiding the ever increasing trend in contemporary architecture towards specialization in specific sectors. The first project that brought the studio to international attention was the New Art Gallery, built in Walsall in 2000, for which, along with the Brick House in London, built in 2006, Caruso St. John became a candidate for the prestigious Stirling Prize. The studios current clients include Tate Britain, the Victoria & Albert Museum, English Heritage, the Arts Council of England, SBB-Swiss National Railways and the Gagosian Gallery. Its recently built designs include the Chiswick House Cafe in London (2010), the New Center for Contemporary Art in Nottingham (2009), Downing College in Cambridge (2001-2009) and the Brick House in London (2001-2005). www.carusostjohn.com Aldo Cibic 112 The Cibic&Partners studio was set up in Milan in 1989. It is a composite organization that by choice and vocation works on different kinds of design including architecture, interiors, design, and multimedia. The studio is directed by four partnersAldo Cibic (Schio,

1955), Luigi Marchetti (Livorno, 1967), and Chuck Felton (New York, 1958) constitute the design nucleus that is flanked by specific work groups for various projects, while Antonella Spiezio (Torre Orsaia, 1966) runs the strategic center responsible for organizing and managing human and financial resources. The result is an environment of exchange that provides stimulus and energy and is aimed at producing solid, innovative designs. Cibic&Partners work develops in two directions: a design section focuses on architecture and large interiors, while CibicWorkshop works with schools on design and research into the development of new types of design. The studios most recent designs include More with Less (2009), which presents a new way of living in a serene balance between man and nature, the Citt degli Orti (2008), an innovative rural settlement proposal, the staging of the 10th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice (2006), and Microrealities (2004), a project on places and people. www.cibicpartners.com Thomas Demand 106 Born in Munich in 1964, the photographer Thomas Demand lives and works in Berlin. The main subjects portrayed in his photos are three-dimensional models of rooms and places that are famous because of their connection to news stories, politics, and history. Demands creative process does not include any computer enhancement, as is now normal in film production, but is based on the construction of genuine installations that precisely reproduce what has been reported by the television news or shown in vintage photos. However, on close observation of his works, small errors in structuring the image can be found, creating an ambiguity that makes the observer reflect on the simulation created by the artist. From 1987 to 1989, Demand attended the Fine Arts Academy in Munich and, until 1992, the Art Academy in Dsseldorf. In the same year, he had a period of residence at the Cit internationale des arts in Paris and subsequently, until 1994, attended Goldsmiths College at the University of London. In 2004, Demand represented Germany at the San Paolo Biennale and, in 2005, he held a large retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He has exhibited at numerous galleries and museums around the world, including the Serpentine Gallery in London (2006), Fondazione Prada in Milan (2007), and Fundacin Telefnica in Madrid (2008). In May 2010, he presented his latest personal exhibition at the Museo Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam, entitled Nationalgalerie . www.thomasdemand.de Tom dePaor 120 Born in London in 1967, Tom dePaor lives and works in Dublin, where he set up his studio under his own name in 1991. DePaor consid-

ers individuals and their emotions the hub of his design choices and, in a more absolute sense, of architecture. Starting from this conviction, he originally resolves aesthetic and practical spatial problems, creating buildings of great emotional and evocative power. In the course of his career he has often worked with other architects and artists, such as Eilis OConnell, Dominic Stevens, and Emma ONeill. With the latter, Tom dePaor designed the visitors center for the former Royal Gunpowder Mills in Ballincollig in the country of Cork in 1991. In 1996, the dePaor architects studio was commissioned by the Dagenham council, London, to draw up a strategic master plan for the A13 motorway. In 2000, he was commissioned by the Department of Foreign Affairs to design N3 , the Irish Pavilion for the 7th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice and, six years later, took part in the Irish collective exhibition, again at the Biennale. In 2003, Tom dePaor was awarded the YAYA (Young Architect of the Year Award). www.depaor.com architecten de vylder vinck taillieu 126 Jan De Vylder (1968) and Inge Vinck (1973) set up the Jan De Vylder Architecten studio in 2008 in Gand, Belgium. De Vylder studied architecture at Sint-Lucas University in Gand, opened a studio with Trice Hofkens in 2000, and then became project director in the Stphane Beel studio. He has been teaching at Sint-Lucas University and the School for Science and Art of Brussels since 2005, and is also guest lecturer at TU Delft (University of Technology) in Holland. The studio changed its name to architecten de vylden vinck taillieu with the arrival of Jo Tailleu (1971). Its most important work includes the extension of the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst and the cultural center in Ledeberg, both in Gand, the new offices for the Het Toneelhuis theatre company, and a residential and multifunctional complex in Antwerp. Jan De Vylder Architecten won the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture Mies Van der Rohe Award in 2009 and was appointed to curate Interieur 2010, the Belgian Design Biennale. www.jandevylderarchitecten.com Do ho Suh + Suh Architects (Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim) 136 Eulho Suh set up the Suh Architects studio in Seoul, Korea, in 2006. After gaining a research doctorate from the Harvard School of Design, Suh continued his studies at a theoretical and practical level working with Morphosis Architects and Pederson Fox in New York. He has won numerous prizes, recognitions, and appointments as visiting critic at various universities including the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Southern California, and Seoul National University. KyungEn Kim is manager of the design area at Suh Architects. During his training and professional career he worked

with sculpture, exhibiting in numerous galleries, and then approached architecture, studying and investigating the concept of space. Born in Seoul, Korea, in 1962, Do ho Suh lives and works in New York. After studying at Seoul National University and completing his military service in the South Korean army, he moved to the USA, where he continued his studies at the Rhode Island School of Design and Yale University. Do ho Suh has always sought to focus on the dialectical relationship between the individual and mass society and the interactions between people and space in his installations. Do ho Suh represented Korea at the 49th International Art Exhibition in Venice in 2001. His most important exhibitions have been at the Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Serpentine Gallery, London, and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City. Suh Architects designs combine function and aesthetics and range from buildings to graphic consultancy and genuine artistic works. Some examples are the interior designs for the Arumjigi Culture Keepers (2003) and the Shinsegae Centum City Culture (2008-2009) in Korea, along with renovation of the KIA Motors Sports Center (2006). www.suharchitects.com

Since 1993, he has lived and worked in Berlin where he set up Studio Olafur Eliasson, which carries out artistic experiments and works on architectural design. Eliassons fascinating poetics, inspired by natural elements such as water and light, is obtained by the play of light, reflections, and shadows resulting from the expert and closely studied use of colored filters, lights, and especially mirrors. In 2003, Eliasson represented Denmark at the 50th Venice Biennale, and in the same year installed one of his most well known works at the Tate Modern in London: the Weather Project , a spectacular artificial sun that attracted more than a million visitors. He has exhibited in the most prestigious museums, including the Hara Museum of Contemporary Art (Tokyo), the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen (Rotterdam), the Kunstmuseum in Wolfsburg, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in New York. Eliasson has taken part in numerous public art projects, including Green River, which toured various cities between 1998 and 2001, and the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in 2007, designed in London. In 2009, he set up the Institut fr Raumexperimente. www.olafureliasson.net Tony Fretton 252

Peter Ebner 142 Born in Austria in 1968, Peter Ebner lives and works in Vienna, Salzburg and Munich. He works with numerous international design partners that differ according to the commission received, which is never considered as a mere provision of services, but a process of articulate design. The work of Peter Ebner and friends is based on the conviction that individual needs and choices are of primary importance rather than the influence of fashions and trends. Ebner taught residential building at the Technische Universitt in Munich from 2003 to 2009, and since 2009 has taught at the UCLA. He also teaches at Roma Tre University, the International Summer Academy of Fine Arts in Salzburg and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard in Boston. He has held numerous workshops in Japan, the US, Colombia and European countries. The current members of the Peter Ebner and friends group are Michael Eichner (Germany, 1968), who lives and works in Munich and Moscow; Michael Schwarz (Germany, 1958), who lives and works in Dubai; Javier Sanchez (Mexico, 1969), who lives and works in Mexico City; Franziska Ullmann (Austria, 1950), who lives and works in Vienna and Stuttgart; Claudio Valentino (UK, 1967), who lives and works in Rome and Bologna; Gianluca Andreoletti (Italy, 1965), who lives and works in Rome. www.ebnerandfriends.com Olafur Eliasson 144 Olafur Eliasson was born in Copenhagen in 1967 and educated at the Danish Royal Academy of Arts.

Tony Fretton was born in London where he opened an architecture studio under his own name in 1982. He is one of the most significant exponents of contemporary architectural culture. One of the first designs produced by the studio was Lisson Gallery in London, completed in 1992, in which use of the space given over to art is quite exemplary. Other designs followed, always of spaces or buildings used for exhibitions, such as the ArtSway Centre for Visual Arts in Sway, Hampshire (1996), the Quay Arts Centre for Visual and Performing Arts in Newport, on the Isle of Wight (1998), and the Fuglsang Kunstmuseum in Denmark, one of the most significant buildings for art, opened in 2008 and awarded the prestigious Stirling Prize Building of the Year in 2009. Tony Fretton is professor and visiting professor at many international universities, director of Architectural Design & Interiors at the Technical University of Delft in Holland and, in 2010, at the ETH in Zurich. www.tonyfretton.com Sou Fujimoto 150 Sou Fujimoto was born in Hokkaido, Japan, in 1971. He studied architecture in the faculty of engineering at Tokyo University, and in 2000 set up the Sou Fujimoto Architects Studio and began specializing in the study and experimentation of detached and terrace houses. The simple forms he favors are arranged in numerous ramifications or recomposed in a meticulously orchestrated spatial order. One of his first residential designs, the N House (2001), is a surprising building with absolute permeability between interior and exterior. In

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2005, he won acclaim by winning the prestigious international ARArchitectural Review Award in the Young Architects category, which he won for three years running, along with the Top Prize in 2006. In 2008, he was invited to be a member of the jury for the same AR Awards. In that year, he won the JIA (Japan Institute of Architects) prize and the highest recognition at the World Architecture Festival, in the Private House section. In 2008, Fujimoto published Primitive Future , the architecture best-seller of the year. In 2009, the magazine Wallpaper awarded him the Design Award. Fujimoto has had many designs built, which have gained appreciation and recognition in Japan and elsewhere, including the T House, Guma (2005), 7/2 House, Hokkaido (2006), House O, Chiba (2007), and Final Wooden House, Kumamoto (2007). www.sou-fujimoto.com Anton Garca-Abril 158 Born in Madrid in 1969, Antn Garca Abril studied at the Madrid Architecture Polytechnic (ETSAM) and graduated in 1995. In 1996 he was awarded the Spanish Academy Research Prize in Rome and in 2000 set up the Ensamble studio, consisting of a team of associates who work mainly on studying possible architectural applications for new conceptual and structural research. The studios work ranges from studying the essence of the material to creating architectural spaces and compositions marked by their essential compositional nature. Its built works include the offices of the Society of Authors and Publishers in Santiago de Compostela (2004-2007), the Hemeroscopium House in Madrid (2008) and the Museum of America in Salamanca. Buildings currently in progress are the Readers House in Madrid, the Cervantes Theatre in Mexico City and the Tower of Music in Valencia. Ensamble studio has won numerous prizes and recognitions, including The Rice Design Alliance Prize for emerging architects in 2009, and the Architectural Record Design Vanguard Prize in 2005. In 2009 Garca Abril set up the Positive City Foundation, which investigates urban phenomena in search of possible solutions. www.ensamble.info Junya Ishigami 166 The Japanese architect Junya Ishigami was born in Kanagawa in 1974 and attended Tokyo University. After graduating in 2000, he initially worked with the SANAA studio, then in 2004 set up his own firm, junya. ishigami+associates. Ishigamis language is notably ephemeral and transparent, and his work and research redefine the confines between art and architecture. This is evident in his first building, the Kanagawa Institute of Technology (2008), a light, ethereal structure, designed almost to disappear. The surrounding space seems to merge into the faade of glass. In 2008, he designed the Japanese

pavilion for the 11th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice, and in the same year was awarded the Iakov Chernikhov Prize 2008 in Moscow. In April 2010, he presented two designs made for the Italian company Living Divani at Design Week in Milan. One of these is drop , a kind of lens-table, made entirely of shiny, transparent Perspex, designed to give the visual effect of a lens that distorts whatever is around it; the other is family chairs , a series of chairs in different sizes in an ironic and distorted review of an archetype. www.jnyi.jp Toyo Ito 172 Toyo Ito was born in Seoul in 1941 and graduated from the Department of Architecture at Tokyo University in 1965. He began his architectural career in 1971, setting up a studio he originally called Urban Robot (URBOT), but then changed to Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, in 1979. He initially became known for his conception of residential buildings before moving on to public projects, creating the basis for a new mobile concept of inhabiting urban spaces. His public commissions from 1986 on show that his designs are based on an original and innovative approach to architecture that combines the physical and virtual worlds. His main projects are the Wind Tower in Yokohama (1986), the Yatsuhiro Museum (1991), the T Hall in Taisha (1999), the O Dome in Odate (1997), and the Mediateca in Sendai (2001), which clearly demonstrate the implications of his formal research and introduce new naturalist elements. He has designed objects and furniture for Alessi Driade, Electrolux, Horm, Cleto Munari, Unifor, and Rotaliana. Toyo Ito teaches at various international universities (including Columbia University in New York and the University of North London), and in 2002 was awarded the Leone dOro for his career at the 8th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice. www.toyo-ito.co.jp Andrs Jaque 178 Andrs Jaque was born in Spain in 1971. He studied in Madrid and Hamburg, and set up the Andrs Jaque Arquitectos studio in Madrid in 2000. He concentrates mainly on the role played by architecture in creating and molding society, considering it a point of meeting and exchange between individuals and community. Apart from this studio, Jaque directs the Office for Innovation Policies and is visiting professor at various international universities. His studio has designed public and private buildings, mainly in Spain, including the Casa Sacerdotal Diocesana in Plasencia (2000-2004), an old abandoned seminary converted into a multi-functional building, which in 2005 won the Dionisio Hernandez Gil prize; the Ojala Awareness Club in Madrid (2005), Peace Foam City in Ceuta (2005), Teddy House in Vigo (2005-2006), which

was awarded the Grande Area prize in 2006; House in Never Never Land in Ibiza (20062007), Democratic Sponge in Madrid (2005), the Tupper Home housing prototype in Madrid (2006-2007), for which the studio was made a candidate for the European Award Mies van der Rohe and a finalist for the Bienal Espaola de Arquitectura y Urbanismo Prize . www.andresjaque.net Christian Kerez 184 The architect Christian Kerez, born in 1962 in Maracaibo, Venezuela, lives and works in Zurich. His work is distinguished by constant formal and structural research. Indeed, Kerez considers architecture the result of an ongoing study of space and a linked pathway that generates continuous alternatives and themes. His preferred tools are models: molding them and constantly questioning the results, Kerez incessantly explores numerous design possibilities. After his studies at the Federal Polytechnic in Zurich, Kerez worked with the architect Rudolf Fontana from 1991 to 1993, then devoted himself to architecture photography, which he continues to practice. In 1993, he opened his own studio in Zurich, where he has taught at the ETH since 2001. The designs that have garnered Kerez critical acclaim are the Vaduz Art Museum in the principality of Liechtenstein (2000), built with the Swiss couple Morger & Degelo, the apartments in Forsterstrasse (2003), and the Eschenbach (2003) and Leutschenbach (2009) school buildings in Zurich. In 2007, he won the international competition for the new Warsaw Museum of Modern Art, an avantgarde building still under way. In the course of his career Kerez has exhibited all over the world, from New York to Paris and Shanghai. www.kerez.ch Tetsuo Kondo 318 Tetsuo Kondo was born in the prefecture of Ehime, Japan, in 1975 and attended the Nagoya Institute of Technology. He then worked at Sejima & Associates, SANAA, from 1999 to 2006 and set up Tetsuo Kondo Architects in 2006. One of his most well known designs, House with Gardens in Kanagawa, Japan, dates from 2007. This minimalist wooden house has been designed so that the internal and external spaces merge completely: a series of gardens, some hanging, are accessed from every room, and the system of openings to the outside makes the sky and surrounding forest visible from several points. In 2008 he presented his Mirror project, a mirror that reflects only frontal images and seems blurred if looked at from the sides, made by applying a special film to the glass. He has received prestigious awards such as the TOKYO Society of Architects and Building Engineers Residential Architecture Award in 2008 and the Grand prix at the Chair design competition Landscape with Chair in 2009. www.tetsuokondo.jp

Luisa Lambri 190 The artist Luisa Lambri, born in Cant (Como) in 1969, lives and works in Milan. She studies the relationship between architecture and emotional states in her photographic work. The interiors she portrays interpret rather than document the spaces represented, simply recalling something minimal, abstract, and non-specific, steeped in a sense of memory and desire. The formal and experimental qualities that Lambri celebrates in contemporary architecture, the object of her most recent research, include reflection and dematerialization, opacity and transparency, intimacy and expansiveness. Her education and research has taken place in Finland, England, Japan, Italy, and the USA. Luisa Lambri began exhibiting regularly in 1995, then in 1999 she was awarded the Leone dOro at the 48th International Contemporary Art Exhibition in Venice for the best national participation in the Italian Pavilion, shared with Monica Bonvicini, Bruna Esposito, Paola Pivi, and Grazia Toderi. Many of her works appear in the public collections of major international institutions and foundations. The museums and galleries that have recently staged her solo exhibitions include the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Luisa Strina Gallery, San Paolo, Brazil, the Paul Andriesse Gallery, Amsterdam, the Thomas Dane Gallery, London, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, and Gallery Koyanagi, Tokyo. Walter Niedermayr 198 The photographer Walter Niedermayr was born in 1952 in Bolzano, where he lives and works. The main aim of his artistic research is to explore the microclimates of our frenetic contemporary culture and of the relationship between man and environment. He uses photography as a medium to create fractures, to dismantle reality and analyze it in depth. Niedermayrs research won international acclaim at the start of the 1990s when he devoted himself to photographs of Alpine landscapes on large panels. He then shifted his attention to places often ignored and sidelined, such as motorways, abandoned buildings, and, especially, psychiatric hospitals, prisons, and rest homes. The subjects portrayed are united by a sense of latent oppression and apprehension. In 2008, he took part in Manifesta7 in Trentino and also presented Bildraum , a body of photographs resulting from six years spent studying the work of the Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishiwaza (SANAA). Niedermayr has held solo exhibitions and participated in collective exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Schirn in Frankfurt (2008), the Galerie Nordenhake in Berlin (2007), the Robert Miller Gallery in New York (2006), the Galleria Suzy Shammah in Milan (2005), and the Museion in Bolzano (2004). www.walterniedermayr.com

Ryue Nishizawa 302 Ryue Nishizawa was born in the prefecture of Kanagawa, Japan, in 1966, and now lives and works in Tokyo. He graduated in architecture at Yokohama National University in 1990 before joining the Kazuyo Sejima & Associates studio. In 1995 he set up the SANAA studio with Kazuyo Sejima, and in 1997 opened The Office of Ryue Nishizawa. The buildings designed by Nishizawa are distinguished by their essential, linear, minimalist design. The Office of Ryue Nishizawa has designed the Naoshima Museum in Kagawa, Japan (2005), the Towada Museum in Aomori, Japan (2005), and numerous homes in Gunma, Tokyo, Kanagawa, and Ichikawa. Nishizawa has been associate professor at Yokohama University since 2001. From 2005 to 2006 he was Visiting Professor at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale of Lausanne, and from 2005 to 2008 was Visiting Professor at Princeton University. In 2010, together with Kazuyo Sejima, he was awarded the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize. Noero Wolff Architects 206 Noero Wolff Architects was founded in 1998 in Cape Town, South Africa, when Heinrich Wolff joined the studio set up by Jo Noero in 1985. Noeros direct experience, a former anti-Apartheid activist who has long worked in close contact with the black community of South Africa, has had a profound influence on the studios planning choices. The work of the Noero Wolff studio is based on the conviction that architecture can be a means of resisting oppression and a vehicle of social change, especially if linked to the land and the communities that inhabit it. Such a position is also behind their decision to involve the local inhabitants in the planning stages and to share their development with them. Noero Wolffs projects include individual houses, large museums, schools, and social and cultural centers. The most significant are Inkwenkwezi Secondary School (2007) and St Cyprians School (still under construction) in Cape Town and, especially, the works for the municipality of Nelson Mandela Bay, some completed, such as the Red Location Museum in New Brighton (2005) dedicated to the victims of Apartheid, and others under way such as the upgrading of North Beach and the Red Location cultural center. www.noerowolff.com Hans Ulrich Obrist 210 Hans Ulrich Obrist was born in Zurich in 1968 and lives and works in London. International curator of the Programme Migrateurs at the Muse dArt Moderne de la Ville in Paris, director of International Projects at the Serpentine Gallery, London, professor at the IUAV of Venice, and art director for Domus, Obrist has been active on the art scene since the early 1990s. Since 1991, he has curated or cocurated more than two hundred international exhibitions, including Do it, Take Me, Im

Yours (1995, Serpentine Gallery), Life/Live (1996, Paris), Manifesta 1 (1996) , Cities on the Move (1997-1998 Vienna and Bordeaux), Nuit Blanche (1999, Helsinki), Uncertain States of America (2005, Oslo) , 1st Moscow Biennale (2005), the Lyons Biennale (2007), and China Power Station (2008, Serpentine Gallery). In 2007, Obrist co-curated Il Tempo del Postino with Philippe Parreno for the Manchester International Festival. In the same year, the Van Alen Institute awarded him the New York Prize Senior Fellowship for 20072008. In 2008, he co-curated the Yokohama Triennale and Indian Highway at the Serpentine Gallery, and was curator for the Artpace residences in Texas. Another activity he has devoted himself to over the course of his career, since 1993, is interviewing. He has now conducted hundreds of interviews with artists, writers, curators, and composers in what is a kind of endless conversation that itself has become a form of art and is published in separate installations in The Conversation Series (2006-).
OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen 214 Architects Kersten Geers (Gand, Belgium, 1975) and David Van Severen (Gand, Belgium, 1978) set up Office Kersten Geers David Van Severen in 2002. Both studied architecture and town planning at Gand University and at the Esquela Tecnica Superior de Arquitectura in Madrid, Spain. Since 1995 Van Severen has designed numerous objects, installations and furnishing items. He has worked with various other studios since 2004, including Stphane Beel Architects in Gand and Xaveer De Geyter Architects in Brussels. Van Severen has taught at the Amsterdam Academy, at the Delft University of Technology, at the Arnhem Academy, at the Berlage Institute in Rotterdam and, currently, at Gand University. After his academic studies, Kersten Geers worked with the two Rotterdam studios Maxwan Architects and Urbanists and Neutelings Riedijk Architects. He currently teaches at Gand University and is a visiting professor at the Architecture Academy in Mendrisio. Recent designs produced by Office Kersten Geers David Van Severen include the Kortrijk Xpo exhibition complex in Kortrijk, Belgium (2008-2009), Hatlehol Church in lesund, Norway (2009), the Belgian pavilion After the Party at the 11th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice, and some parts of the Handelsbeurs Concert Hall in Gand, Belgium (2006). www.officekgdvs.com Valerio Olgiati 222 Valerio Olgiati was born in Switzerland in 1958 and lives and works in Flims. His architectural language, through which he gives his buildings an intentionally sculptural style, is both innovative and radical. After studying at the Federal Polytechnic in Zurich, Olgiati lived

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and worked for some years in Los Angeles. In 1996 he opened his own studio in Zurich and in 2008 in Flims (Switzerland). He has been full professor at the Architecture Academy in Mendrisio since 2002. He has held the chair previously held by Kenzo Tange at Harvard University in Cambridge, USA, since autumn 2009. His most important designs include Paspels school (Paspels, 1998), La Casa Gialla museum in Flims (1999), the Visitor Center in the Swiss National Park (Zernez, 2002), a residential building complex in Zugo (2007), the Atelier Bardill, a musicians home in Scharans (2007) and the Cantina Carnasciale in Mercantale, Italy (2007). Olgiati has won various prizes and recognitions, including the German Architecture Prize Appreciation Honor (1993); his designs have won the prize for the best Swiss architecture four times, awarded by the Hochparterre magazine and the television program 10 vor 10 . Olgiati has been an honorary member of the Royal Institute of British Architects in London since 2009. www.olgiati.net OMA Office for Metropolitan Architecture 226 Rem Koolhaas was born in 1944 in Rotterdam, where he lives and works. He has spent decades reflecting on the founding principles of contemporary design. His design methodology is marked by a total adhesion to the logic of constant renewal that typifies modernization. Koolhaas trained as a journalist and cinema scriptwriter in Holland, then studied architecture from the end of the 1960s in London and New York. In 1974, he set up the OMA studio (Office for Metropolitan Architecture) in London, with which he has worked on numerous projects, subsequently collected and published in S,M,L,XL (1994). In 1998, he was selected to design a new Campus Center at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, alongside buildings designed by Mies van der Rohe. In 1999, he was chosen to build the Board of Trustees Library in Seattle and, the following year, was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Between 2001 and 2002, he built the Prada stores in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. He won the 2003 Praemium Imperiale, awarded by the Japan Art Association, and received the Royal Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects in 2004. The key publication considered most representative of Koolhaass thinking is New York Delirium: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan (1978), which revolutionized the reading of contemporary cities. www.oma.eu OpenSimSim 232 OpenSimSim is a new open source design network that is developing architectural design with the help of the web 2.0 community. Fifteen international design studios started a collaborative design process focused on

a common topic in July 2010. The design was shared and commented on by all design teams. The web 2.0 community can actively participate in the design process through a commenting and sharing interface on the internet. OpenSimSim is supported and developed by anOtherArchitect: Daniel Dendra, Peter Ruge and Rosbeh Ghobarkar. Daniel Dendra lives and works in Moscow and Berlin, the two cities where he set up anOtherArchitect in 2007. This is a multidisciplinary platform for digital design that works mainly on studying sustainable strategies and connections between virtual networks and real town planning processes. Since 1993 Peter Ruge has been working with Justus Pysall, with whom he founded Pysall Ruge Architects. Today they are working on projects such as the Aviation Museum in Krakow, the master plan for a business park at the new Berlin international airport, the plan for a sustainable city in China and the LTD_1 office building in Hamburg. Rosbeh Ghobarkar is the creative director of LOOM, a full-service digital brand management agency founded in Berlin in 2001 that provides high-end internet applications. Piet Oudolf 234 Piet Oudolf was born in 1944 in Haarlem, Holland. He is a landscape architect who is internationally renowned for the design of gardens for private homes and offices in Holland, Germany, Sweden, the U.K. and the U.S.A. One of Oudolfs characteristics as a garden designer is his originality in the precise choice of plants, based on the shape of the leaves, the flowers, and the structure of the stems, enriching Dutch formalism with a more naturalist approach. Oudolf is the founder of the New Perennial or New Wave Planting movement to foster an appreciation of plants starting from their structural characteristics, and created his own nursery alongside his home in 1992 in order to study new varieties of perennials. His most recent projects include The High Line park in New York (2009), Agrdsfreningen park in Gteborg (Sweden, 2007), the Pensthorpe Waterfowl Trust park created in 2000 and updated in 2009 in Fakenham, Norfolk (UK), Pottersfield , a small park on the banks of the Thames, London (2007), Battery Park (New York, 2003), and the Millennium Garden (Chicago, 2003). Oudolf has been awarded various prizes and received much recognition, including the Dalecarlica Award from the Swedish Park Commissioners in 2009 for his contribution to the development and improvement of Swedish parks and, in 2010, recognition for his work as a landscape designer from the APLDthe Association of Professional Landscape Designers. www.oudolf.com Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects 240 Mauricio Pezo (Chile, 1973) and Sofia von

Ellrichshausen (Argentina, 1976) set up the Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects studio in 2001 in Buenos Aires and are currently working in Concepcin, Chile. The studio designs numerous houses and hotels in which the buildings are distinguished by a high level of functional and spatial organization. The houses in particular, often built in isolated places, are systems for meditation on the landscape and nature, the horizon and gravity, space and light, silence and intimacy. Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects has received considerable recognition in Chile and Europe and in 2008 curated the Chilean exhibition at the 11th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice. The studios designs include Solo House in Creats, Spain (2009-2010), Cien House in Concepcin, Chile (2008-2010), the R15 Building in Saragozza, Spain (2009), and the Indigo Hotel in Santiago, Chile (2008). Pezo and von Ellrichshausen both teach at Talca University and are visiting critics at the AAPCollege of Architecture, Art & Planning, Cornell University (Ithaca, NY). www.pezo.cl Renzo Piano 248 Born in Genoa in 1937, Renzo Piano lives and works in Genoa and Paris. He graduated from the Milan Polytechnic and began his design work in 1964 with a series of experimental studies on spatial structures. In 1971 he set up the Piano & Rogers studio in London with Richard Rogers, with whom he won the competition to build the Centre Pompidou in Paris. He also worked with the engineer Peter Rice from the 1970s to the 1990s, creating the Atelier Piano & Rice. This was followed by intensive design work focusing on the use of avant-garde materials and technology and supported by the Renzo Piano Building Workshop, which since 1981 has brought together his offices in Paris, Genoa and New York. Piano designs buildings and urban complexes all over the world: Osaka airport (1988), the Cit Internationale in Lyons (1991), the Museum of Science and Technology in Amsterdam (1992), the redesign of Postdamer Platz in Berlin (1992), the Parco della Musica in Rome (1994-2002), the Paul Klee Centre in Berne (1999-2005), Aurora Place in Sydney (1996), the Telecom Tower (1997) in Rotterdam and the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco (2000-2008). Piano has received numerous recognitions over the course of his career and several exhibitions have been dedicated to his work. www.rpbw.r.ui-pro.com Mark Pimlott 252 Born in Montreal, Canada, in 1958, Mark Pimlott lives and works in London and the Hague. He is an artist and designer who works mainly with photography and video. Pimlott concentrates his studies on places, architecture, and the relationship between the individual and the urban environment. He uses photography as a means of observa-

tion, analysis, and reflection of the subject portrayed. He has created public installations in Birmingham (2000), Aberystwyth (2003), and London (2002-2010). He designed the interiors for the Red House in London (from 1999) and the Puck restaurant in the Hague (2007), and has made numerous videos. www.markpimlott.com Cedric Price 260 Cedric Price (Stone, 1934-London, 2003) was one of the most visionary postwar English architects and theoreticians. He considered architecture not as a way of conditioning man, but as a means of improving his possibilities by studying the flexibility of spaces and mobility. After graduating in architecture, Price set up the Cedric Price Architects studio in London in 1960 and worked mainly on university buildings. His most famous designs are undoubtedly the Fun Palace (1961) and the Potteries Thinkbelt (1964). The former, never built, stemmed from the idea of creating a transdisciplinary structure, which has influenced many architects, including Richard Rogers, Renzo Piano and Rem Koolhaas. In the latter, Price proposed siting mobile architectural structures in decommissioned industrial areas. Both works are united by the structuring of potential organizational processes that can be altered by interaction with the user and wide use of the most advanced technology. In 1999, Price was one of the five finalists in the competition for the International Foundation of the Canadian Center of Architecture organized in New York on the new conception of the city. In 2002, he was awarded the third Austrian Frederick Kiesler Prize for Architecture and the Arts. Bas Princen 214 Bas Princen (1975, Netherlands) is an artist who lives and works in Rotterdam. He graduated with distinction from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 1999 and received a Master of Excellence in Architecture from the Berlage Institute, Rotterdam in 2002. His work has been exhibited at the Storefront for Art and Architecture, NY, in 2010, at the Rotterdam Architecture Biennale in 2009, and at the Venice Biennale in 2004 and 2006, among others. He has published four books on his work; the latest being Five Cities Portfolio published by SUN, Amsterdam (2009). A book and exhibition on his recent work will be presented in spring 2011 in association with De Singel, Antwerp, and Hatje Cantz. He has received several grants for his work from the Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture, Fonds BKVB. In 2004 he was awarded the prestigious Charlotte Khler Prize for young artists and architects in the Netherlands. In 2006 he was awarded the Prix de Rome for Architecture in the Netherlands Basis Prize for his work with Milica Topalovic. He joined the artist in residence programs at the MAK Centre, Los Angeles in 2005 and at the CEAC, Xiamen in

2007. Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa 266 The architect Smiljan Radic (Chile, 1965) and sculptor Marcela Correa (Chile, 1963) live and work in Santiago, Chile. They are distinguished by absolute discretion, which makes their work seem fragile and delicate. Their installations often represent spaces that invite reflection and meditation, suggesting a rethink of the relationship between man and society. After graduating in architecture in 1989 at the Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Radic continued his studies in Italy, attending the Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia and subsequently working in Athens, Greece. In 2001, he was nominated best Chilean architect under 35 by the Colegio de Arquitectos de Chile (Chiles architects association). Most of Radics designs are for buildings in Chile. They include the Mestizo Restaurant in Concepcin (2005-2007), designed with Marcela Correa, the civic district in Concepcin, designed with Eduardo Castillo and Ricardo Serpell (2000-2007), the Copper House 2 in Talca (2004-2005) and the Pite House in Papudo (2003-2005). Noteworthy among Marcela Correas most recent solo exhibitions are those in Santiago, Chile: Lleno de Aire (2007), Campana (2005), and Punta Seca (2003) at the Galera Animal. raumlaborberlin 272 Set up in Berlin in 1999, raumlaborberlin is a team of eight architectsFrancesco Apuzzo, Markus Bader, Benjamin Foerster-Baldenius, Andrea Hofmann, Jan Liesegang, Christof Mayer, Matthias Rick and Axel Timm. Starting from an analysis of the rapid and at times unrestricted development of the city after the fall of the Berlin wall, the group center their research on themes relating to contemporary architecture and town planning, exploring new strategies for city regeneration. Raumlaborberlins experimental designs also extend to research, public art, and performance, which often involve professionals from other sectors, such as engineers, sociologists, and local experts. Their designs include the conversion of urban spaces, such as the Eichbaum underground station (between Essen and Mlheim) turned into an opera theatre (2009), objects and installations defined as fetish relational objects such as the Chaise bordelaise (2009) and The Endless City, an installation commissioned by the city of Poznan in Poland (2009-2010), along with interactive works such as the balloonssoap bubbles used for Soap Opera , presented in Essen on the occasion of the Ruhr European Cultural Capital (2010), and the installation Futures Exchange , a kind of modular pavilion built for the transmediale.10 festival in Berlin (2010). www.raumlabor.net R&Sie(n) 278 The associates of R&Sie(n) are Franois

Roche (Paris, 1961) and Stphanie Lavaux (Saint-Denis, 1966), with a creative team made up of Toshikatsu Kiuchi, Benoit Durandin, and Stephan Henrich. Their research centers on the concept of genetic architecture and all the transverse readings it allows, turned back to a starting nucleus, to a central motive, which is that of the transformation and regeneration of our planets material. The work of R&Sie(n) is distinguished on the one hand by a strong visionary tension, arising out of a combination of the performance of sophisticated machines with generative formal procedures, and on the other by the immediate practical applications that, through the use of mechanical or natural processes, restore the sense of endless transformation. Their most significant designs include Ive Heard About (2006-2009), an exhibition in which they presented their urban research designs for a new biomorphic residential solution, Spidernetthewood , a holiday home in the Nmes countryside (2007), Olzweg , a device for the creation of new spaces presented at the 10th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice (2006), and Barakhouse , the unusual home of Amy and Judith Barak (Sommires, France, 2001). www.new-territories.com Tom Sachs 282 The artist Tom Sachs was born in New York in 1966, where he lives and works. Using various materials and drawing on numerous engineering principles, Sachs creates sculptures, that cite famous elements and historic buildings or reproduce the principle modern icons. His reproduction of Le Corbusiers Unit dHabitation, made by using only poliplat and glue, and his various versions of Apollo 11 and the bridge of the warship USS Enterprise are particularly significant. Sachs flanks this work with subjects drawn from popular culture and commercial brands such as Hello Kitty and McDonalds. A common element in all the artists works is his preference for leaving visible signs of his work on the materials, as if the creative process were not entirely finished. Sachs has had solo exhibitions at the Site Santa Fe (1999) in New Mexico, the Bohen Foundation in New York (2002), and the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin (2003). He has also taken part in the collective exhibitions Icons: Modern Design and the Haunting Quality of Everyday Objects at the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco (1997), My Reality: Contemporary Art and the Culture of Japanese Animation at the Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa, US (2001), Five by Five: Contemporary Artists on Contemporary Art at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York (2002), and Materials, Metaphors, Narratives: Work by Six Contemporary Artists at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York (2003). www.tomsachs.org Kazuyo Sejima 308

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Architects Index

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Architects Index

Exhibition

Kazuyo Sejima was born in the prefecture of Ibaraki, Japan, in 1956. Considered one of the most innovative of contemporary architects, she conceives architecture as being completely detached from tradition and her designs show a constant tension towards research, in line with the minimalist geometries of contemporary Japanese architecture. She graduated in architecture at the Japan Womans University in 1981 and began working in the studio of Toyo Ito. In 1987 she opened her own studio in Tokyo and in 1995 set up SANAA with Ryue Nishizawa. This Tokyo firm has designed some of the most innovative architecture built around the world in recent years: the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York (2007), the Serpentine Pavilion in London (2009), the Christian Dior Building in Omotesando (Tokyo 2004) and the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa (2004), which won the Leone dOro at the 9th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice in 2004. Other important designs are the Rolex Learning Center at the Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale in Lausanne (2010) and the new premises of the Louvre Museum in Lens, France, currently being built. In 2010 Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa were awarded the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize in New York . selgascano 288 The associates of the Madrid-based selgascano architects studio are Jos Selgas and Luca Cano. Born in Madrid in 1965, Selgas and Cano graduated in 1992 at the Escuela Tecnica Superior de Arquitectura in Madrid. Jos Selgas subsequently worked in Naples with Francesco Venezia, while Luca Cano specialized in the studio of her father, Julio Cano Lasso, one of the most sensitive leaders of Spanish modernism. The selgascano studios design research is based mainly on analyzing the environmental impact of the buildings. So their works embody many principles of sustainable architecture, such as exposure along the east-west axis, use of materials obtained from waste recycling, including polyester and fiberglass, and dialogue with the outdoor space and nature. The best example of their design thinking is undoubtedly their own studio, a structure in the form of a tunnel roofed by a transparent window in acrylic plastic, entirely immersed in the countryside near Madrid. In 2006, the studio designed the futuristic Manuel Rojas conference center in Badajoz, Spain, a changeable, transparent building made with contemporary materials that recall its site, inside a historic fortified bastion. The spaces and functions are entirely underground and the shell and framing are characterized by plastic materials. www.selgascano.com Studio Mumbai Architects 294 Bijoy Jain was born in 1965 in Mumbai, India, and graduated at Washington University in St. Louis, USA, in 1990. He worked in Los

Angeles with Richard Meier from 1989 to 1991, and in 1991 opened the Bijoy Jain + Associates studio in Mumbai. During his time in the USA, Jain became aware of how much Indian architecture was becoming more and more obviously similar to that of the West, forgetting its roots. His analysis does not focus on the quality of the buildings, but on the emulation of Western production. Starting from this idea, Jain set up Mumbai Studio in 2005, a collective that interprets the Indian landscape as a resource, using craftsmen, artists, and Indian tradesmen who work in close contact during all stages of the project, recovering local traditions and materials. The studios recently built designs in various parts of India include Belavali House (2008, Belavali, Maharashtra), House on Pali Hill (2008, Bandra, Maharashtra), Utsav House (2008, Satirje, Maharashtra), Trinity Guest House (2008, Kochin, Kerala), Palmyra House (2007, Nandgaon, Maharashtra), and Leti 360 Resort (2007, Leti, Uttaranchal). www.studiomumbai.com Fiona Tan 312 Born in 1966 in Pekan Baru, Indonesia, Fiona Tan lives and works in Amsterdam, Holland. She studied at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie and the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. An emblematic artist, her mainly photographic and video works reflect her complex personal history: nomadic, dense with significant factors, and influenced by different cultures, points of view, and ways of thinking. Her look is distinguished by a surprising expressive richness resulting from the idea of travel, moving, and mutation. The nucleus of her poetics lies in the profound elaboration of memory, a visually recorded immersion in memory (subjective and collective) that is then artistically recontextualised in a modern creative apparatus, thanks also to her skilful and elegant use of technology. She represented Holland at the 53rd International Art Exhibition in Venice in 2009 with her project Disorient . She has taken part in solo and collective exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the New Museum in New York, Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Universitys gallery, the Tate Modern in London, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, and at Biennali in Istanbul, Shanghai, Berlin, and Venice. www.fionatan.nl Transsolar 318 Transsolar is an environmental engineering firm based in Stuttgart, Munich, and New York, whose research is concentrated on the design of buildings with a high level of comfort and technology and a low environmental impact. All aspects and stages of design are carefully monitored so that every decision is assessed from a thermodynamic and physical point of view. By favoring elements like light and natural ventilation, acoustics, air quality, and temperature, but also the interaction of

the buildings with the urban fabric in which they are placed, Transsolar surpasses the limited idea of conserving energy and combines efficiency and ecology for the well being of the individual. On the basis of these principles and in association with other architectural offices, the firm works on regenerating spaces and the design of domestic, school, and public buildings and spaces. Transsolars designs include the upgrading of the Place de la Rpublique in Paris (2009), the Dolce Vita Tejo shopping center in Lisbon (2009), the central station in Strasburg, France (2007), the headquarters of the PSD Bank in Freiberg, Germany (20062007), and the Adidas Factory Outlet in Herzogenaurach, Germany (2003). www.transsolar.com Wang Shu 54 Wang Shu (1963) lives and works in Hangzhou, China. After completing his education, he founded the Amateur Architecture Studio with Lu Wenyu in 1997. His design philosophy is based on the desire to pursue a genuine, immediate, and natural approach to architecture, highlighting his preference for an entirely spontaneous order. The guidelines for Wang Shus design choices include the central place of the individual and humanity in architectural research and the appreciation of simple manual work instead of technology. The reflective approach to building is a fundamentally important element to him. Most of Wang Shus designs have been built in China, and include the campus of the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou (2002-2007), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Ningbo (2002-2005), and the Wenzheng College Library in Suzhou (1999-2000). Wang Shu is also involved in a range of research projects, including the campus at Hangzhou, the Wenzheng Library at Sozhou University, and the Harbor Hart Museum in Ningbo, which have been the object of numerous exhibitions. Wim Wenders 326 Ernst Wilheim Wenders was born in Dusseldorf, Germany, in 1945. After attending film courses in Munich and having worked as a critic on some cinema magazines, Wenders moved to directing in the 1970s, devising his own particular language that is a personal expressive combination of image and music. After some short films, Wenders directed Hammet in 1983 in the US, produced by Francis Ford Coppola and the following year Paris, Texas , which won the Palma dOro at the Festival of Cannes. In 1987 he made Wings of Desire , winning the prize for the best director at the Festival of Cannes, and in 1991 directed Until the End of the World , a complex, fragmentary film that was to have a sequel in Faraway, So Close! (1993). In 1995 Wenders directed Beyond the Clouds with Michelangelo Antonioni, which won the international critics prize at the Venice Film

Festival. After The End of Violence (1997) and Buena Vista Social Club (1998), Wenders directed the original mystery film The Million Dollar Hotel , which won the Silver Bear at the Festival of Berlin. In 2005 he returned to the US to film Dont Come Knocking and in 2007 made Palermo Shooting in Germany and Italy. www.wim-wenders.com Cerith Wyn Evans 328 Born in Llanelli, Wales, in 1958, Cerith Wyn Evans lives and works in London. After graduating from the Royal College of Art in London in 1984, he began working as a filmmaker and directors assistant to Derek Jarman. His artistic pathway changed direction in the early 1990s when he began exploring new themes related to language, perception, and communication, which remain central to all his work. Wyn Evans mixes different artistic languages and techniques to make his installations, such as Japanese gestural calligraphy, graffiti, and sculpture, and uses a vast range of supports, with a preference for lighting elements. He considers his works to be catalyzers, reserves of possible meanings that can reveal irrational thoughts. Wyn Evans has taken part in important exhibitions in museums and institutional spaces, such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (2004), the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris (2004), the Istanbul Biennale (2005), the Bawag Foundation in Vienna (2005), the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London (2006), the Yokohama Biennale (2008), the Venice Biennale (1995, 2003, and 2009), and the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo (2009).

Index

347

Exhibited Works

Exhibition

Aires Mateus Francisco and Manuel Aires Mateus - studio Aires Mateus, VOIDS , 2010. White lacquered wood fiber panels, 900 900 160 cm. Courtesy Aires Mateus Amateur Architecture Studio

Pompia, study for the solariums furnishings, watercolor, rollerball pen and China ink on paper, 26.8 40.6 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil

Decay of a Dome , 2010. Wooden structure. Courtesy Wang Shu


AMID.cero9 Palacio del Cerezo en Flor, Valle del Jerte (Spain), 2010. Pink glossy card board, mirror, 110 75 60 cm. Client Junta de Extremadura, Consejera de Cultura y Turismo Aranda\Lasch with Island Planning Corporation

SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, visual comunication, study for the placard, collage, guache, graphite and China ink on paper, 45 67 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, swimming pool of the sporting center, collage, watercolor, rollerball pen and hydrographic on paper, 70.3 50 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, study for the boundary wall, watercolor and graphite on paper, 29.7 19 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, perspective of the theater, watercolor, rollerball pen and hydrographics on paper, 57.3 37.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, lunch at the SESC Pompia Restaurant, rollerball pen on paper, 21.5 15.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, study of the waste-water rivers covering, watercolor, rollerball pen and hydrographics on paper, 21.6 33 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, visual communication, study of the signs for gyms, collage, watercolor, rollerball pen, hydrographics on paper, 69.5 49.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, study of the carts, watercolor, rollerball pen and hydrographics on paper, 70 50 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, perspective of the sporting centers stair, watercolor, rollerball pen, hydrographics and graphite on paper. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, landscape study of the sheds for recreational activities, watercolor, hydrographics and graphite on paper, 57.2 38.9 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, study of the pergola and dressing of outdoor areas walls, watercolor, rollerball pen, graphite and collage on paper, 31.6 x 21.6 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil

SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, study for the outdoor areas walls, rollerball pen, graphite and collage on paper, 31.4 21.6 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, visual communication for the restaurant and workshops, watercolor, rollerball pen and collage on paper, 49.4 35.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, study of the general plan, watercolor, rollerball pen, hydrographics, graphite and pastels on paper, 111 79.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, studio of the great wall and wastewaters river, watercolor on heliographic paper, 31.5 21.3 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, plan of the internal streets with plantings indications, rollerball pen, hydrographics, heliography, guache and graphite on paper, 165.5 97.3 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Exposio Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique, 1984 , SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Paua-pique exhibition, studies for the masters, hydrographics and pastels on paper, 15.4 21.4 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Exposio Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique, 1984 , SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Paua-pique exhibition, studies for the masters, hydrographics and pastels on paper. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Exposio Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique, 1984 , SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Paua-pique exhibition, studies for the masters, hydrographics, heliography and graphite on paper, 21.4 15.4. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Exposio Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique, 1984 , SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Paua-pique exhibition, studies for the masters, hydrographics, guache and graphite on paper. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Exposio Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique, 1984 , SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Paua-pique exhibition, studies for the masters, hydrographics, heliographic and graphite on paper, 31.5 21.4 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Exposio Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique, 1984 , SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Paua-pique , exhibition, watercolor, hydrographics and graphite on paper, 58.4 32.7 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil

Modern Primitives , 2010. Hard-coated EPS foam. Courtesy Aranda\Lasch, T-B A 21, Johnson Trading Gallery
ARU/Architecture Research Unit, Metropolitan University

Saemangeum Island City, Korea, 2008. Inkjet print on Korean rice hanji paper, laser cut card model on mdf substrate, inkjet prints
Atelier Bow-Wow House Behaviorology, 2010. 19 house models, scale 1:20 Berger&Berger / Laurent P. Berger + Cyrille Berger

a va, a prefabricated movie theater, 2006. Model for movie theater (audience 80 people) for the performance a va by Philippe Minyana, 1230 1070 445 cm. Courtesy Robert Cantarella
Lina Bo Bardi

Sesc Pompia . Hand-made paper model, scale 1:50 MASP 7 de Abril , Educational exhibition, sketch of the works stand, rollerball pen on paper, 20.8 31 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, study of the faade on Avenida Paulista, collage, graphite and China ink on paper, 99.7 56.8 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, perspective study, collage, watercolor, graphite and China ink on paper, 85.2 55 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, perspective of the restaurant, watercolor and rollerball pen on paper, 32.9 21.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC

348

Exhibited Works

Biennale Architettura 2010

349

Exhibited Works

Exhibition

Exposio Entreato para Crianas, 1985 , SESC Pompia, interior perspective of the exhibition, watercolor, hydrographics, rollerball pen, guache and graphite on paper, 35 25 cm. Courtesy Coleo Marcia Benevento Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, Casa do Benin, detail sketches of the reinforced concrete stair and column, watercolor, rollerball pen and hydrographics on paper, 27.9 19.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, studies of the whole complex, watercolor, hydrographics and graphit on paper, 56 37 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, Restaurant, study of the side faade, heliography and guache on paper, 48.8 32.7 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, window of the sporting center, color photograph, 40 27 cm. Courtesy Coleo Nelson Kon SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, projected reinforced concrete platforms, between the locker rooms and gyms, color photograph, 49.9 50.4 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, view of the deck and the sporting center, color photograph, 85.2 99.9 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, aerial view of the complex, color photograph, 38.8 26 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, view of the Rio San Francisco, at the end the pathway, color photograph, 20.2 25 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Library: open spaces vs closed spaces, color photograph, 25.4 18.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, the pavilion for activities and meeting point, b/w photograph, 24.4 18 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, the pavilion for activities and meeting point, b/w photograph, 24.1 18.2 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, saturday at the fbrica: collective gymnastics for children, color photograph, 19.2 24.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e

P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil

SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, saturday at the fbrica: popular characters for children, b/w photograph, 24 18 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, meeting-point area, color photograph, 73.5 42.4 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia , fishing in the Rio San Francisco, color photograph, 73.4 52 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Caipiras, Capiaus: Pau-a-pique exhibition, accordion player, b/w photograph, 23.9 17.8 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Design in Brasile exhibition, visitors, b/w photograph, 24 18.3 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Pinocchio exhibition, color photograph, 25.3 17.9 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Mille Giocattoli exhibition, b/w photograph, 24.1 18.2 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Mille Giocattoli exhibition, visitors, b/w photograph, 18.2 24.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Mille Giocattoli exhibition, general view, b/w photograph, 24 18.2 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977, SESC Pompia, Mille Giocattoli exhibition, color photograph, 25.4 18.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, view of the Avenida Paulista, b/w photograph, 18.9 12.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Nelson Leirner exhibition, b/w photograph, 33.1 25.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Circo Piolin, b/w photograph, 35.1 24 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Belvedere, b/w photograph, 45.5 34.8 cm. Photo pb

Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, aerial view of the Avenida 9 de Julho, color photograph, 35 35 cm. Coleo Nelson Kon Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, view of the open space, musical performance, color photograph, 48 34.7 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, stair/ramp, color photograph, 30.1 20.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Picture Gallery, paintings bearing in reinforced concrete and glass, b/w photograph, 31.1 42.2 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Picture Gallery, paintings bearing in reinforced concrete and glass, b/w photograph, 100.2 52.5 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, aerial view, b/w photograph, 40 37.7 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Bob Wolfenson exhibition, b/w photograph, 25 20 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 , MASP, Picture Gallery, paintings bearing in reinforced concrete and glass, b/w photograph, 17.9 23.60 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, restaurant and garden, color photograph, 30 x 24.1 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, view of the Cascata di Xang, color photograph, 25.3 23 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, Benin handcraft exhibition on the ground floor, color photograph, 25.1 20.2 cm. Courtesy Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi, So Paulo, Brasil
Nelson Kon, Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987, aerial view of the complex restored in 2002, color photograph, 40 28.3 cm. Nelson Kon Collection Documentary Lina Bo Bardi (Portuguese audio/Italian subtitles), video NTSC, 4953, DVD Documentary Fbrica da Pompia (French subtitles), video NTSC, DVD Documentary LAAT OP DE AVOND (Dutch audio), video NTSC, 45, DVD

1968 - Lina Bo Bardi - Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP - Corte BB , CAD - CADMASP01 Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 - Lina Bo Bardi - Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP - Plantas do nvel -9,50 e do nvel -4,50 , CAD - CADMASP02 Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 - Lina Bo Bardi - Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP - Plantas do nvel 0,00 e do nvel +8,40 , CAD - CADMASP03 Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 19571968 - Lina Bo Bardi - Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP - Planta do nvel +14,40 , CAD CADMASP04 SESC - Fbrica da Pompia, 1977 - Lina Bo Bardi - SESC Fbrica da Pompia - Planta do Complexo , CAD - CADSESC01 Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987 - Lina Bo Bardi - Casa do Benin - Plantas do primeiro pavimento,segundo pavimento e soto , CAD CADBENI01 Casa do Benin na Bahia, 1987 - Lina Bo Bardi - Casa do Benin - Planta do trreo , CAD CADBENI02, CAD - CADMASP02a
Andrea Branzi

Peter Ebner and friends

Enjoy the view, 2010. Prototype. Poured-in translucent concrete, 120 800 35 cm
Olafur Eliasson

laserchrome prints, 99 115 cm each. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London

Your split second house , 2010. Water, hoses, pump, strobe light, dimensions variable. Courtesy the Artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonkadar Gallery, Berlin
Sou Fujimoto Architects

Untitled (21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, #02) , 2004. Laserchrome print, 74 63.7 cm. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Courtesy Hiroshi Sugimoto, Atsuko Koyanagi Untitled (21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, #03) , 2004. Laserchrome print, 74 63.7 cm. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Courtesy Hiroshi Sugimoto, Atsuko Koyanagi Untitled (Casa de Balle, #01, #02, #03) , 2003. 3 laserchrome prints, 73.9 85 cm each. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London
Walter Niedermayr

Primitive Future House , 2010. Study for the pavilion for the works by W.S. at Chteau La Coste in Aix-en-Provence, France. Acrylic/ plexiglas model, scale 1:5, 300 300 273 cm
Antn Garcia-Abril & Ensamble Studio

Balancing Act . Various media (film, models); equilibrium structure (expanded polyestyrene model, 2 beams 1620 and 2100 100 240 cm)
junya.ishigami+associates

Shiraz, Iran 124/2006 . Quadriptych, digitial print, acryl on canvas, 253 845 4 cm. Courtesy Galerie Nordenhake Berlin / Stockholm + Galleria Suzy Shammah Milan Isfahan, Iran 107/2006 . Diptych, digitial print, acryl on canvas, 160 421 4 cm. Courtesy Galerie Nordenhake Berlin / Stockholm + Galleria Suzy Shammah Milan Isfahan, Iran 176/2008 . Diptych, digitial print, acryl on canvas, 160 421 4 cm. Courtesy Galerie Nordenhake Berlin / Stockholm + Galleria Suzy Shammah
Noero Wolff Architects

Architecture as air: study for chateau la coste . Mixed media, 400 380 cm. Courtesy the Artists
Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects Forum for Music, Dance and Visual Culture, Ghent, Belgium. Study models, presentation panels, video. Courtesy Toyo Ito Associates, Archtects + Andrea Branzi Architetto Taichung Metropolitan Opera House, Taichung, Taiwan. Structural models, study models, detailed models; presentation panels for process and for competition; video. Courtesy Toyo Ito Associates, Architects Andrs Jaque Arquitects

Per una Nuova Carta di Atene , 2010. Installation with models. Courtesy Centre Pompidou, Paris, Muse national dart moderne / Centre de cration industrielle, FRAC Centre Collection, Orlans, Galerie italienne, Paris, Friedman Benda Collection, New York, Metea srl
Janet Cardiff

Strangeness and familiarity. Various medias (film, model, drawings, digital printing). Courtesy the Artists
Hans Ulrich Obrist

The Forty Part Motet , 2001. A re-working of Spem in Alium Nunquam habui 1573 by Thomas Tallis, sung by Salisbury Cathedral Choir. 40 loud speakers mounted on stands, placed in an oval, amplifiers, playback computer. Duration: 14 min. loop with 11 min. of music and 3 min. of intermission
Aldo Cibic

NOW INTERVIEWS , 2010. Videos Wall of Names . Wall text The Serpentine Gallery 2006 24-Hour Interview Marathon . Videos. Courtesy The Institute of the 21st Century and The Serpentine Gallery
OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen

Fray Foam Home , 2010. Set of objects on hanging wire structure, 800 40 280 cm. Courtesy the Artist
Cristian Kerez

Rethinking Happiness , 2010. 4 models, photos, graphics and text on a wall


dePaor

Some Structural Models and Pictures . 4 models, videos


Luisa Lambri

Cit Refuge, Ceuta - Collage, view from the sea , 2007. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artits Cit Refuge, Ceuta - Collage, view from the mountain , 2007. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artits Villa Voka, Kortrijk - Collage, view from the south , 2009. Inkjet print on painted aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artits A grammar for the city, South-Korea - Collage, view to the city, 2005. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artits A grammar for the city, South-Korea - Collage, view from the mountain , 2005. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists

4am , 2010. 2 4 planed, lavendered softwood, linen, wool, limestone, glass, 455 405 510 cm. Courtesy dePaor architects
architecten de vylder vinck taillieu

7 houses for 1 house / the ordos 100 project revisited / ordos 100 # 001 id 096 . Diverse technics and media: drawing, painting, modelling / paper, cardboard, wood, plasticine, brick / originals, prints, dia
Do-ho Suh

Untitled (Menil House, #07, #10, #04) , 2002. 3 laserchrome prints, 104 130 cm each. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Produced by the Menil Collection, Houston. Courtesy Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam Untitled (Menil Collection, a) , 2002. Laserchrome print, 104 130 cm. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Produced by the Menil Collection, Houston. Courtesy Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam Untitled (Casa das Canoas, #01, #02) , 2003. 2 laserchrome prints, 99 115 cm each. Ed. 5 + 1 AP. Courtesy Thomas Dane Gallery, London Untitled (Casa das Canoas, #12, #13) , 2003. 2

Museu de Arte de So Paulo MASP, 1957-

Blueprint , 2010. Nylon fabric and CNC milled high pressure laminate panels. Courtesy the Artist

350

Exhibited Works

Biennale Architettura 2010

351

Exhibited Works

Exhibition

Border crossing, MEX-USA - Collage, view from the air, 2005. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists Border crossing, MEX-USA - Collage, view from the ground , 2005. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists University Library, Berin - Collage, view from the street , 2004. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists 25Rooms, Ordos - Collage, internal view room 0 , 2008. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116x 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists 25Rooms, Ordos - Collage, internal view room -1, 2008. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists 25Rooms, Ordos - Collage, internal view room -2 , 2008. Inkjet print on white coated aluminium plate, 85 116 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artists
OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen + Bas Princen Installation with pictures Valerio Olgiati Perm Museum XXI, Perm, Russia, 2008. White pvc, forex National Palace Museum, Taiwan, 2004. Screen presentation The Yellow House, Flims, Switzerland, 19951999. Screen presentation Atelier Bardill, Scharans, Switzerland, 20022007. Screen presentation OMA Office for Metropolitan Architecture

2000-2006, Renovation and expansion of the Morgan Library, New York, USA. Photo Michel Denanc. Michel Denanc 1991-2004, Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church , San Giovanni Rotondo (Foggia), Italy. Photo Michel Denanc. Michel Denanc 1999-2005, Zentrum Paul Klee , Bern, Switzerland. Photo Michel Denanc. Michel Denanc
Mark Pimlott + Tony Fretton Architects

raumlaborberlin

Kitchenmonument , 2010 The Generator, 2010


R&Sie(n)

Architecture Biennale 2010. 2 channel HD installation, filmed on location Inujima and Teshima, Japan. Courtesy the Artist, Wako Works of Art, Tokyo, and Frith Street Gallery, London. Commissioned by Naoshima Fukutake Art Museum Foundation Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa Inushima Art House project, 2010 Teshima Art Museum, 2010. Installation with models and drawings Transsolar KlimaEngineering + Tetsuo Kondo Architects

Isobiotope / The Building which never dies , 2010. Mixed media installation. Courtesy R&Sie(n) Architects / Paris
Tom Sachs

Piazzasalone , Venice, 2010. Mixed media installation, 2046 1393 650 cm overall
Cedric Price

Mc Busier, 2002. Steel, wood, hardware, foamcore, plexiglass, asphalt. Courtesy Vanhaerents Art Collection, Brussels Care Taker, 2002. Sculpture. Courtesy the Artist Untitled / Unite Faade , 2001. Sculpture. Courtesy the Artist Unite Drawing , 2003. Sharpie, painted sheet metal, plywood. Courtesy the Artist Modular Man , 2001. Synthetic polymer paint on wood panel. Courtesy the Artist La Ville Radieuse , 2010. Pyrography on reconstituted Ikea forniture. Courtesy the Artist The Radiant City, 2010. Synthetic polymer paint on plywood. Courtesy the Artist The Radiant City, 2010. Steel, synthetic polymer paint, plywood, hardware. Courtesy the Artist Deluxe Racing Kit , 2010. Mixed media. Courtesy the Artist Nutsys Learning Station , 2010. Synthetic polymer paint, plywood, hardware, chain, nutsys book. Courtesy the Artist La Guerre Aeriene , 2010. Paper, pen, coned barrier, museum glass, hardware. Courtesy the Artist The Open Hand , 2010. Wood, steel, resin. Courtesy the Artist Le Modulor, 2000. Ink on paper on hinged plywood. Cortesy Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris/Salzburg
selgascano

VENIC VENIC , 2010. An exhibition curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Samantha Hardingham. Installation with tagged interviews, sketches, video. Courtesy Eleanor Bron c/o Cedric Price Estate; The Architectural Association Photo Library, London; Pidgeon Digital, World Microfilms Publications Ltd., London; Hans Ulrich Obrist
huoarchive.hfg-karlsruhe.de. An on-line project conceived at the department for Exhibition Design and Curatorial Practice at the Hochschule fr Gestaltung Karlsruhe (HfG) Bas Princen

Cloudscapes , 2010. 800 m artificial cloud (produced live at the Arsenale) with ramp/ stairs to go into and through cloud
Wim Wenders

If Buildings Could Talk... , 3D video installation. Neue Road Movies 2010


Cerith Wyn Evans

Joanna (Chapter One) sat in the plan , 2010. Neon text on structure; 2 channel HD installation. Courtesy the Artist and White Cube, London

Ringroad (Findeq / Ceuta) , 2007. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague Superiour court , 2005. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague Botanic garden (Xiamen) , 2009. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague Pavilion (Office) , 2008. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artist Garden Pavilion (Office) , 2010. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy the Artist Ringroad (Houston) , 2005. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague Reservoir (Concrete Rundown) , 2005. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague Domino II (Xiamen) , 2009. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 171 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague Grid II , 2008. Inkjet on painted aluminium, 140 176 0.5 cm. Courtesy van Kranendonk Gallery, The Hague
Smiljan Radic + Marcela Correa

Preservation , 2010. Furniture and ornament from Haus der Kunst, Munich, material relics, photographic documentation, archived documents, publications and research
Opensimsim

Opensimsim.net , 2010. Interactive models with augmented reality installation


Piet Oudolf

vacuum pack-ing (on room 25) , 2010. Vacuum. 2 pieces 450 20 450 cm each, 40 kg each. Cortesy Lastra & Zorrilla
Caruso St. John / Thomas Demand Nagel Haus, Project for Escher-Wyss-Platz, Zrich. Video installation, mock up, milled wooden panels. Courtesy Caruso St. John / Thomas Demand Studio Mumbai Architects

Il Giardino delle Vergini , 2010. Design and planting plan site specific for the Giardino delle Vergini, Arsenale
Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects

Detached , 2010. 2 backlight photographs (600 10 300 cm) and 2 concrete scale models, 30 30 40 cm
Renzo Piano Building Workshop

Work-place , 2010. Mixed media installation. Courtesy Studio Mumbai Architects


Fiona Tan Cloud Island I, Project for the Venice

1971-1977, Centre Georges Pompidou , Paris, France. Photo Charles Martin. Charles Martin

The Boy Hidden in a Fish , 2010. Granite stone and cedro wood, 5.40 3.00 1.80 m approx; 8 tons approx

Photolithography Fotolito Veneta, San Martino Buonalbergo (Verona) Printed by Grafiche SIZ s.p.a., Campagnola di Zevio (Verona) for Marsilio Editori s.p.a., in Venice No part of this book my be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by the means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior consent of the publisher

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