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School of Design Te Kura Hoahoa Science of Spying: Field Operative Elf Auger Loizeau, 2007

School of Design Te Kura Hoahoa

School of Design Te Kura Hoahoa Science of Spying: Field Operative Elf Auger Loizeau, 2007 COURSE

Science of Spying: Field Operative Elf Auger Loizeau, 2007

COURSE OUTLINE

DSDN 283 – SPECIAL TOPIC: DESIGN ANTHROPOLOGY

TRIMESTER ONE 2010

GENERAL

Elective; Trimester One; 20 points

ASSESSMENT

100% internal by assignment

CLASS TIMES AND LOCATIONS

Lectures

Dr. Anne Galloway

Tuesday

16:40 – 18:30

Room: VS 221

Tutorials

Group A

Dr. Anne Galloway

Wednesday

12:40 – 14:30

Room: VS 221

Group B

Jerad Tinnin

Wednesday

12:40 – 14:30

Room: VS 308

COORDINATOR AND TUTOR

Coordinator Dr. Anne Galloway Room: VS 305C Phone: 04 463 6230 Office Hours: Mondays 14:00-15:30, or by appointment Email: anne.galloway@vuw.ac.nz Course website:

Tutor Jerad Tinnin Room: WIG 001 (Postgraduate Studio) Office Hours: To be confirmed with tutor Email: jeradtinnin.vic@gmail.com

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COURSE SYNOPSIS

Anthropology can be defined as the study of similarities and differences between peoples of the world, or all the ways we make sense of ourselves, each other and the places in which we live, work and play. People everywhere live by believing, saying, doing and making particular things, and anthropologists try to understand how and why some things are included and others excluded. As designers work for—and with—a wide range of people around the world, the knowledge and skills of anthropology can be seen as increasingly relevant to a situated and adaptable practice. DSDN 283 will explore how design both shapes, and is shaped by, people’s cultural values and social practices.

AIMS OF THE COURSE

Building on students’ previous studies of discursive, visual and material culture, DSDN 283 will introduce students to major themes from anthropology and their relevance to the practice of design. The primary aims of this course are enhanced awareness of, and appreciation for, the social and cultural contexts of design; increased proficiency in creative and critical design research; and improved capacity to communicate the processes and products of design.

COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Knowledge

By the end of the course, students will have learned to:

demonstrate understanding of the broader social and cultural contexts and implications of design;

successfully work with words, images and objects to explore and express original ideas and arguments;

• utilise a creative and critical methodology in the analysis and practice of design. Creative
• utilise a creative and critical methodology in the analysis and practice of design.
Creative & Critical Thinking

By the end of the course, students will have learned to:

assess primary and secondary research sources;

identify and constructively evaluate significant design projects;

develop research questions and identify relevant research methods and theories;

engage with key concepts and methodologies to develop original perspectives and arguments about design and culture today;

recognise the importance of research and critical thinking and writing to the future of design.

Communication

By the end of the course, students will have learned to:

Verbal communication

articulate critical perspectives on design and culture;

clearly present independent and original analysis and critique in a group setting;

confidently and thoughtfully contribute within a dynamic group discussion.

Written communication

clearly and constructively evaluate existing research;

contribute to a community of scholarship through proper citation practices;

proficiently articulate an original argument;

express design objectives and methodologies in precise written language.

Visual and material communication

creatively expose and share design processes and products through the use of original images;

create compelling objects to explore cultural contexts and actively engage research participants.

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Leadership

By the end of the course, students will have learned to:

take responsibility for individual thought and share this with a group of peers;

engage and respond thoughtfully to debate and discussion of their own work;

engage in thoughtful and respectful debate and discussion of other people’s ideas, arguments and work.

COURSE CONTENT

This course’s exploration of design and culture will be framed by a number of scales and contexts, including individuals, social groups and cultures from different locations and points in history. Particular emphasis will be placed on what people believe, say, do and make across space and time. Themes include language and material culture, beliefs and rituals, identities and bodies, and relations between us and others.

In addition to theoretical concepts and cross-cultural examples, students will be introduced to practical research

concerns and methods including the ethics of working with people, formulating research questions, doing fieldwork and collecting information, and making sense of observations and experiences. Students will also be exposed to the presentation of design research in the form of written and visual ethnographies, material and performance ethnographies, and ethnographic and design fictions.

A major project, submitted in three parts, will require that students understand and create “cultural probes”—a

core method in design research inspired by social and cultural studies. Originally developed by interaction designers at the Royal College of Art in the late 1990s, the methodology of cultural probes continues to be creatively and critically adapted and elaborated by a variety of art, design, social science, computer science and

engineering research practitioners.

COURSE DELIVERY
COURSE DELIVERY

DSDN 283 – Design Anthropology comprises two primary approaches to learning—lectures and tutorials. Weekly lectures take place on Tuesday, and will introduce students to the key topics and ideas of the course. Since lectures will often introduce new concepts, students are encouraged to interject with any questions or comments as they come up. Wednesday tutorials will involve more active learning, and students are expected to fully participate in all individual and group activities and discussions.

Weekly topics, instructions for tutorials, assignments briefs and other important resources and course updates will be posted on the DSDN 283 website, and it is expected that all students regularly check the course website as well as their preferred email for updates and detailed course instructions:

ASSIGNMENTS

Project 1 – Understanding Cultural Probes

Deliverables: 500 word critical review Submission format: PDF; double-spaced, 12 pt font, APA-style citations and bibliography** Assessment: 20% of the final grade Due: Tuesday 30 March 2010, saved to the R: drive DSDN283 folder by 4pm

In Project 1, you are required to read three articles on the design research methodology of cultural probes, and write a critical review. In your review, be sure to answer the following questions using specific examples from the texts:

1)

What are cultural probes? What are they used for?

2)

How are all cultural probes similar? What makes some probes different?

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3)

What are the strengths of probes? When and where can they be used? What are they good for?

4)

What are the limitations of probes? When and where might they be avoided? What can’t they do?

5)

How are probes interpreted? How can they inform design?

Boehner, K., Vertesi, J. Sengers, P and Dourish, P. 2007. “How HCI Interprets the Probes.” CHI '07:

Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: 1077–1086.

Gaver, B., Dunne, A. and Pacenti, E. 1999. “Design: Cultural Probes.” Interactions 6(1): 21-29.

Loi, D. 2007. “Reflective probes, primitive probes and playful triggers.” Proceedings of EPIC 2007: 233-

246.

Project 2 – Designing a Cultural Probe

Deliverables: 3 sketches of a probe design; 400 word written research statement Submission format: full-size images/models and descriptive captions; PDF of written statement should be double-spaced, 12 pt font, APA-style citations and bibliography** Assessment: 30% of the final grade Due: Tuesday 27 April 2010, hard-copies/objects in lecture, email by 4pm

In Project 2, you will be asked to identify a design research question, explain how cultural probes could help answer this question, and sketch what kind(s) of cultural probes could be used to do so. Your questions and designs should foster creative and critical explorations of an area of personal interest or concern. For example, students interested in consumerism and food politics could probe people’s practices of food shopping, cooking and eating. Alternatively, students interested in body image could probe people’s attitudes and values surrounding men’s and women’s bodies across different ages and cultural groups. Whatever area you choose to explore, the goal is to challenge your own assumptions and learn from the experiences of others. Further instructions and expectations for Project 2 will be distributed in class.

expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting
expe ctations for Project 2 will be distributed in class. Project 3 – Creating & Presenting

Project 3 – Creating & Presenting a Cultural Probe

Deliverables: cultural probe; 250 word written statement; brief visual presentation Submission format: probe objects and container/package; PDF of written statement, double-spaced, 12 pt font, APA-style citations and bibliography**; presentation as PDF, video files or website url Assessment: 40% of the final grade (10% in-progress presentation; 30% final presentation) In-Progress Presentation Due: Tuesday 25 May 2010, slides/url emailed by 4pm Final Presentation Due: Thursday 24 June 2010, no later than 9am

In Project 3, you will be expected to respond to feedback given in Project 2 in order to create an original cultural probe that could be used for design research. Your cultural probe will need to contain all the objects and instructions necessary for unknown research participants to create and collect the information you would need as a designer exploring a particular question. Your cultural probe should be accompanied by a written statement that outlines your design research question, what you hope to obtain from the cultural probe and how you might use the results in your design practice. You are required to present your work in progress, as well as give a final visual presentation that showcases your cultural probe and explains how it could be used. Further instructions and expectations for Project 3 will be distributed in class.

Tutorial attendance and participation

Deliverables: attendance and active participation in weekly discussion Assessment: 10% of final grade

The seminar tutorials are an essential component of this course, providing a vital opportunity to engage in critical discourse with fellow students and academic faculty. Participation in seminar discussion is mandatory and will contribute directly to the student’s final grade. Attendance will be noted.

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If extraordinary circumstances arise that require you to be absent from one or more class sessions, you should discuss the situation with the Course Coordinator as soon as possible.

**Please note that all written assignments must follow the APA citation style (6 th edition). Review APA guidelines at: http://aut.ac.nz.libguides.com/APA6th and be sure to download the APA Style Sheet provided on the course website.

ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS

DSDN 283 is internally assessed by course work in the form of three assignments and an individual assessment for attendance and participation. Each is assessed and graded A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, E, (where C is a PASS). Grades only are issued to students. The final grade for the course is based on the aggregation of the percentage marks for each of the projects, and a final grade of C or better is required to pass the course. The assessments for DSDN 283 collectively contribute towards the final course grade as follows:

Project 1

Tuesday 30 March

20%

Project 2

Tuesday 27 April

30%

Project 3a

Tuesday 25 May

10%

Project 3b

Thursday 24 June

30%

Attendance & Participation

Weekly

10%

Total

100%

Assessment Criteria specific to each assignment will be distributed in class or through the course website. Overall Assessment Criteria for this course are:

website. Overall Assessment Criteria for this course are: • ability to creatively and critically explore course

ability to creatively and critically explore course themes in class discussions and assignments;

explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions
explore course themes in cl ass discussions and assignments; • regular and active participation in discussions

regular and active participation in discussions demonstrating thoughtful and respectful analysis;

• regular and active participation in discussions demonstrating thoughtful and respectful analysis;

ability to articulate and support an original point of view regarding the social and cultural contexts of design;

development of individual analytical skills and their application to methodologies of critical design.

Your work will be reviewed on the basis of the degree to which it meets the assessment criteria. The assessment of the course is carried out by the Course Coordinator in consultation with the tutor.

The School has a long tradition of providing critical review of student work as it progresses especially in design projects. This is part of feed-back for learning purposes. Such reviews must not be misunderstood as indicators of standards and they are different from assessment. Students have a responsibility to attend critical reviews at the appointed time as part of the learning process. Review panels are often composed of internal and external members for the appointed times and cannot be re-composed to consider late submissions. Consequently late work will not receive a critical review, though it will be assessed subject to any penalties as set out below.

Critical Review: May take place during the development phases of a project as well as at the time of the final submission. Its purpose is to identify strengths and weaknesses in the work and to offer suggestions to generally encourage the student. An encouraging critical review does not necessarily mean a good assessment result.

Assessment: May take place at a stage in a project or on final submission (or both). Its purpose is to value the work in terms of the objectives stated in the handout and to express this as a grade. Moderation of all assessment in design is undertaken at the end of the Trimester after critical reviews, involving a wider group of staff than the immediate lecturers in the course. This process ensures fairness.

All grades posted during this course are only provisional results until confirmed by the School Examiners Committee which meets after the examination period.

Attendance and participation is an important aspect of the learning process, and you are required to attend all the class sessions—both lectures and tutorials. Participation in tutorial activities and discussion is mandatory and represents 10% of the student’s grade for the course. If extraordinary circumstances arise that require you to be absent from some class sessions, you should discuss the situation with the Course Coordinator as soon as possible.

COURSE EXPECTED WORKLOAD

You should expect to spend a total of around 200 hours on this course, including both scheduled class time and independent study. Typically this involves around 12-14 hours per week during the twelve teaching weeks, with the balance during the mid trimester break, study week and examination period. This means that in addition to scheduled class sessions you are expected to spend approximately 7-9 hours per week reading, writing and generally pursuing the independent research and study necessary for the course assignments. http://www.victoria.ac.nz/home/about_victoria/avcacademic/publications/assessment-handbook.pdf

READINGS AND REFERENCE MATERIAL

There is one required textbook for this course but there is no set reading schedule. Students are encouraged to read this short text as soon as possible and return to it as often as necessary:

Monaghan, J. and Just, P. 2000. Social and Cultural Anthropology: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Available from VicBooks + SOAD closed reserve)

However, you will need to do additional research and reading for your course assignments. Please refer to the course website for an up-to-date list of required and suggested readings. Also be sure to review the list of suggested readings at the end of this document.

the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students
the list of suggested readings at the end of this document. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED Students

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

Students will need to provide all materials and equipment as necessary for the completion of required work.

It is recommended that you purchase a laptop although computer facilities are available at the School. If you are purchasing a laptop and would like information on the minimum requirements please contact the Student Administration Office. While digital cameras are available at the school, it is also recommended that students consider purchasing a simple digital camera (3.2mpxl minimum). Note: The Student Loan, administered by StudyLink, allows students to claim up to $1000 for course related costs for each year of study.

RECORDING OF WORK AND PORTFOLIO

You are strongly encouraged to respect and care for your work, making and recording a visual summary of each project in this course. This may be in digital and/or hard copy. The principal purpose of this is to maintain a record of your work for incorporation into your own personal ‘Design Portfolio’. Recording a summary of your work also means it is available if needed for you or the School to exhibit or publish.

SUBMISSION OF WORK

Each student is responsible for ensuring their work is submitted in on time and in the location and format as set out in the assignment brief. Any assignment not submitted in the specified manner will be treated as a no-submission. Late submissions will be penalised as set out below, unless an extension is approved by the Course Coordinator.

EXTENSIONS

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In the event of illness or other extraordinary circumstances that prevent you from submitting a piece of work on time, or that you feel adversely affect the quality of the work you submit, it is important that you discuss your circumstances with the Course Coordinator as soon as possible so that appropriate arrangements may be made. You should complete an Application for Extension form (available from the Faculty Office) for the Course Coordinator to approve. You will also need to provide suitable evidence of your illness or other circumstances. In an emergency, or if you are unable to contact the Course Coordinator, you should advise the Faculty Office of your situation. Work submitted late must be submitted to the Course Coordinator.

PENALTIES

Students are required to personally present their work on time at all scheduled reviews and in the location and specified format as set out in assignment outlines. Failure to personally present work at any scheduled graded review will result in an automatic failing grade of E for the work being reviewed, unless an extension has been approved in writing in advance by the Course Coordinator.

Late submissions will not be penalised in the event of illness or other extraordinary circumstances provided students have requested an extension of time in writing in advance of the scheduled review, and the Course Coordinator has similarly approved this in writing (see the Student Administration Office for an Application for Extension form). Work submitted late without the prior agreement of the Course Coordinator will be penalised by one grade step by calendar day including weekends (i.e. an A will become A-) and may result in a failing grade of E.

Work submitted late must be submitted directly to the Course Coordinator. Any project work left on the project shelves or elsewhere will be entered on the grade sheet as a no-submission.

MANDATORY COURSE REQUIREMENTS In addition to achieving an average of at least ‘C’ across all
MANDATORY COURSE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to achieving an average of at least ‘C’ across all assessments, in order to pass the course you must
also satisfy the following mandatory course requirements:

Submit ALL assignments

Attend at least 80% of the tutorial sessions

Discuss your assignment progress with the Course Coordinator or Tutor at least weekly

Submit the final project on time and deliver the visual presentation as scheduled (NO extensions)

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES

The Faculty of Architecture and Design operates a system of Class Representatives in 100-level courses, and Year Representatives in each of the professional disciplines. Student Representatives are elected during a class session in the first week of teaching. All student representatives will be listed on the STUDiO notice board in the Atrium, and the relevant Representatives are also listed on studio notice boards. Student Representatives have a role in liaising between staff and students to represent the interests of students to the lecturers, and also in providing students with a communication channel to STUDiO and VUWSA.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND PLAGIARISM

Academic integrity means that University staff and students, in their teaching and learning are expected to treat others honestly, fairly and with respect at all times. It is not acceptable to mistreat academic, intellectual or creative work that has been done by other people by representing it as your own original work.

Academic integrity is important because it is the core value in which the University’’s learning, teaching and research activities are based. Victoria University’s reputation for academic integrity adds value to your qualification.

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The University defines plagiarism as presenting someone else’s work as if it were your own, whether you mean to or not. ‘Someone else’s work’ means anything that is not your own idea. Even if it is presented in your own style, you must acknowledge your sources fully and appropriately. This includes:

Material from books, journals or any other printed source

The work of other students or students or staff

Information from the internet

Software programs and other electronic material

Designs and ideas

The organisation or structuring of any such material

Please note that all written assignments for this course must follow the APA citation style (6 th edition). Review APA guidelines at: http://aut.ac.nz.libguides.com/APA6th and be sure to download the APA Style Sheet provided on the course website.

Find out more about plagiarism, how to avoid it and penalties, on the University’s website:

USE OF TURNITIN

Student work provided for assessment in this course may be checked for academic integrity by
Student work provided for assessment in this course may be checked for academic integrity by the electronic
search engine http://www.turnitin.com. Turnitin is an online plagiarism prevention tool which compares submitted
work with a very large database of existing material. At the discretion of the Head of School, handwritten work
may be copy-typed by the School and subject to checking by Turnitin. Turnitin will retain a copy of submitted
material on behalf of the University for detection of future plagiarism, but access to the full text of submissions is
not made available to any other party.
COMMUNICATION OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Any changes or additions to this Course Outline will be discussed with the class, and conveyed in writing to all students enrolled in the course through the course website and blog. In order to assure that you receive such course announcements, please be sure to advise the Course Coordinator of your current contact details and be certain to check the course website regularly.

GENERAL UNIVERSITY POLICIES & STATUTES

Students should familiarise themselves with the University’s policies and statutes, particularly the Assessment Statute, the Personal Courses of Study Statute, the Statute on Student Conduct and any statutes relating to the particular qualifications being studied; see the Victoria University Calendar or the University’s policy website http://www.victoria.ac.nz/home/about/policy

Student and staff conduct

The Statute on Student Conduct together with the Policy on Staff Conduct ensure that members of the University community are able to work, learn, study and participate in the academic and social aspects of the University’s life in an atmosphere of safety and respect. The Statute on Student Conduct contains information on what conduct is prohibited and what steps are to be taken if there is a complaint. For information about complaint procedures under the Statute on Student Conduct, contact the Facilitator and Disputes Advisor or refer to the statute on the Victoria policy website at: http://www.victoria.ac.nz/home/about/policy

The Policy on Staff Conduct can also be found at: http://www.victoria.ac.nz/home/about/policy Academic grievances

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If you have any academic problems with your course you should talk to the tutor or lecturer concerned; class

representatives may be able to help you in this. If you are not satisfied with the result of that meeting, see the Head of School or the relevant Associate Dean; The VUWSA Student Advocate is available to assist in this process. If, after trying the above channels, you are still unsatisfied, formal grievance procedures can be invoked. These are set out in the Academic Grievance Policy which is published on the Victoria website at:

There is also a leaflet explaining the grievance process available from the AVC (Academic) website at:

Students with Impairments

The University has a policy of reasonable accommodation of the needs of students with impairments. The policy aims to give students with disabilities the same opportunity as other students to demonstrate their abilities. If you have a disability, impairment or chronic medical condition (temporary, permanent or recurring) that may impact on your ability to participate, learn and/or achieve in lectures and tutorials or in meeting the course requirements, please contact the course coordinator as early in the course as possible. Alternatively, you may wish to approach

a Student Adviser from Disability Support Services (DSS) to discuss your individual needs and the available

options and support on a confidential basis. DSS are located on Level 1, Robert Stout Building: telephone 463-

6070 email: disability@vuw.ac.nz

Martin Hanley is the Disability Liaison Person for the Faculty of Architecture and Design: telephone 463 6280 email. martin.hanley@vuw.ac.nz

Student Support

463 6280 email. martin.hanley@vuw.ac.nz Student Support Staff at Victoria want students to have positive learning
463 6280 email. martin.hanley@vuw.ac.nz Student Support Staff at Victoria want students to have positive learning
463 6280 email. martin.hanley@vuw.ac.nz Student Support Staff at Victoria want students to have positive learning
463 6280 email. martin.hanley@vuw.ac.nz Student Support Staff at Victoria want students to have positive learning
463 6280 email. martin.hanley@vuw.ac.nz Student Support Staff at Victoria want students to have positive learning

Staff at Victoria want students to have positive learning experiences at the University. There are a number of support services available to help you directly if your academic progress is causing concern or if there are elements in your life that are affecting your ability to study. These include:

that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;
that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;
that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;
that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;
that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;
that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;
that are affecting your ability to study. These include: • Your course coordinator or programme director;

Your course coordinator or programme director;

Staff in your Faculty Student Administration Office Student Dedicated learning support through Student Learning Support Service; Kaiwawao Māori ;Maanaki Pihiphipinga; Disability Support Services and Victoria International;

Wider holistic support through the Health Service; Counselling Service; Financial Support and Advice; Accommodation Service and Career Development and Employment. Find out more at www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/ or email student-services@vuw.ac.nz;

VUWSA employs a Student Advocate who deals with academic problems and provides support, advice and advocacy services, as well as training and supporting class representatives and faculty delegates. The Education Office is located on the ground floor, Student Union Building. Email education@vuwsa.org.nz or tel. 463-6716 or 463-6984.

TE ARO CAMPUS BUILDING RULES AND FACILITIES

Students on the Te Aro Campus are required to comply with the Faculty Guidelines relating to the safe use, access and care of the Architecture and Design technical resources and building facilities. These are available on the School website, and in the following documents available from the student R drive: R:\Student Health and Safety Information

FAD Health & Safety Handbook – available to all students, covering:

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Workshop and campus safety

Safety training and safety precautions for the workshops

FAD Hazard Register

Te Aro Campus floor plans

FAD Technical Services and Facilities Handbook – issued to all staff and available to all students on the student R drive, covering various local practices, including information on:

Information for new staff and students

Access and booking of teaching / studio spaces, and technical resources

Studio etiquette and rules pertaining to exhibitions, critiques and storage of models/drawings

Housekeeping/cleaning within the studios and workshops

Information on Te Aro IT systems and support

Te Aro campus floor plans

General information on Faculty/School Technical Facilities including technical staff and their associated areas - http://www.vuw.ac.nz/architecture/facilities/index.aspx

WHERE TO GET HELP Vivian Street Wing – Faculty of Architecture and Design Student Administration Office The Faculty’s Student Administration Office is located on the first floor of the Vivian Street Wing. The first floor counter is the first point of contact for general enquiries and FAD forms. Student Administration Advisors are available to discuss course status and give further advice about FAD qualifications. To check for opening hours call the Faculty Student Administration Office on (04) 463 6200.

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Administration Office on (04) 463 6200. HEALTH AND SAFETY Students are reminded that they must comply
Administration Office on (04) 463 6200. HEALTH AND SAFETY Students are reminded that they must comply
Administration Office on (04) 463 6200. HEALTH AND SAFETY Students are reminded that they must comply
Administration Office on (04) 463 6200. HEALTH AND SAFETY Students are reminded that they must comply
Administration Office on (04) 463 6200. HEALTH AND SAFETY Students are reminded that they must comply

Students are reminded that they must comply with any health and safety instructions given by staff members in charge of work places and instructions and signs posted around the campus. All students should familiarise themselves with the FAD Health & Safety Manual and Notices around the Workshops and Laboratories. Students are advised to refer to the Student R drive for safety and other relevant information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information

information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can
information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can
information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can
information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can
information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can
information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can
information. R:\Student Health and Safety Information WITHDRAWAL DATES Information on withdrawals and refunds can

WITHDRAWAL DATES

Information on withdrawals and refunds can be found at:

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SCHEDULE OF SESSIONS & ASSESSMENTS

Students must be seated in class no later than 5 minutes prior to the start of lectures. Mobile phones must be turned off.

Week

           

month

day

date

item

location

time

comments

week 9

M

22

       

February

TU

23

       
 

W

24

     

Orientations week

 

TH

25

       
 

F

26

       

week 10

M

1

     

Trimester 1 Begins

March

TU

2

Introducing design

VS 221

16:40 – 18:30

 

anthropology

 

W

3

Tutorials

VS 221 + VS 308

12:40 – 14:30

 
 

TH

4

       
 

F

5

       

week 11

M

8

       

March

TU

9

Culture & society

VS 221

16:40 – 18:30

 
 

W

10

Tutorials

VS 221 + VS 308

12:40 – 14:30

 
 

TH

11

       
 

F

12

       

week 12

M

15

       

March

TU

16

Ourselves & others

VS 221

16:40 – 18:30

 
 

W

17

Tutorials

VS 221 + VS 308

12:40 – 14:30

 
 

TH

18

       
 

F

19

       

week 13

M

22

       

March

TU

23

Beliefs & rituals

VS 221

16:40 – 18:30

 
 

W

24

Tutorials

VS 221 + VS 308

12:40 – 14:30

 
 

TH

25

       
 

F

26

       

week 14

M

29

       

March

TU

30

Spaces & places

VS 221

16:40 – 18:30

Project 1 due

 

W

31

Tutorials

VS 221 + VS 308

12:40 – 14:30

 

April

TH

1

       
 

F

2

     

Good Friday – holiday

week 15

M

5

     

Easter Monday – holiday

April

TU

6

     

Easter Tues– VUW holiday

 

W

7

       
 

TH

8

       
 

F

9

     

Mid trimester break

week 16

M

12

       

April

TU

13

       
 

W

14

       
 

TH

15

       
 

F

16

       

week 17

M

19

     

Trimester 1 continues

April

TU

20

Pasts, presents & futures

VS 221

16:40 – 18:30

Project 1 returned

 

W

21

Tutorials

VS 221 + VS 308

12:40 – 14:30

 
 

TH

22

       
 

F

23

       

11

week 18

M

26

       

April

TU

27

Constructing identities

VS 221

 

16:40 – 18:30

 

Project 2 due

 

W

28

Tutorials

 

VS 221 + VS 308

 

12:40 – 14:30

   
 

TH

29

       
 

F

30

       

Week 19

M

3

       

May

TU

4

Regulating bodies

VS 221

 

16:40 – 18:30

   
 

W

5

Tutorials

 

VS 221 + VS 308

 

12:40 – 14:30

   
 

TH

6

       
 

F

7

       

week 20

M

10

       

May

TU

11

Managing relations

VS 221

 

16:40 – 18:30

 

Project 2 returned

 

W

12

Tutorials

 

VS 221 + VS 308

 

12:40 – 14:30

   
 

TH

13

       
 

F

14

       

week 21

M

17

       

May

TU

18

Saying things

VS 221

 

16:40 – 18:30

   
 

W

19

Tutorials

 

VS 221 + VS 308

 

12:40 – 14:30

   
 

TH

20

       
 

F

21

       

week 22

M

24

       

May

TU

25

Making things

VS 221

 

16:40 – 18:30

 

Project 3a due

 

W

26

Tutorials

 

VS 221 + VS 308

 

12:40 – 14:30

   
 

TH

27

       
 

F

28

       

week 23

M

31

       

June

TU

1

Final project studio

VS 221

 

16:40 – 18:30

   
 

W

2

Final project studio

VS 221 + VS 308

 

12:40 – 14:30

   
 
TH 3 F 4 M 7
TH
3
F
4
M
7
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
 
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
  TH 3 F 4 M 7    
 

week 24

         

Queen’s Birthday

June

TU

8

     

Mid-year study period

 

W

9

       
 

TH

10

       
 

F

11

   

NO EXAM

   

Exams begin

week 25

M

14

 

FOR DSDN 283

   

June

TU

15

 

ASSESSMENT

     
 

W

16

       
 

TH

17

       
 

F

18

       

week 26

M

21

       

June

TU

22

       
 

W

23

       
 

TH

24

Final presentations

 

T.B.A.

 

09:00 – 14:00

 

Project 3b due

 

F

25

       

week 27

M

28

       

June

TU

29

       
 

W

30

     

Exams end

July

TH

1

     

Mid- year break begins

 

F

2

       

week 28

M

5

       

July

TU

6

       
 

W

7

       
 

TH

8

       
 

F

9

       

12

READINGS AND REFERENCE MATERIAL

Please check the course website for an up-to-date list of required and suggested readings, including online journals and blogs, but here is a list of suggested readings to get you started.

Titles marked with an asterisk (*) are highly recommended.

Books

Abrahams, R.D. 2005. Everyday Life: A poetics of vernacular practices. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

*Astuti, R, Parry, J. and Stafford, C. (eds.) 2007. Questions of Anthropology. Oxford: Berg.

Atkinson, P., Delamont, S. and Housely, H. Contours of Culture: Complex ethnography and the ethnography of complexity. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.

Brewer, J. and Trentmann, F. (eds.) 2006. Consuming Cultures, Global Perspectives: Historical trajectories, transnational exchanges. Oxford: Berg.

Buchli, V. (ed.) 2002. The Material Culture Reader. Oxford: Berg.

*Crang, M. and Cook, I. 2007. Doing Ethnographies. London: Sage.

Delaney, C. 2004. Investigating Culture: An experiential introduction to anthropology. London: Blackwell.

Dunne, A. 2005. Hertzian Tales: Electronic products, aesthetic experience, and critical design. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

experience, and critical design . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. *Dunne, A. and Raby. F. 2001. Design

*Dunne, A. and Raby. F. 2001. Design Noir: The secret life of electronic objects. Basel: Birkhauser.

The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A
The secret life of electronic objects . Basel: Birkhauser. Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A

Ellis, C. 2004. The Ethnographic I: A methodological novel about autoethnography. Walnut Creek, CA:

AltaMira.

Eller, J.D. 2007. Introducing Anthropology of Religion: Culture to the ultimate. London: Routledge.

Fought, C. 2006. Language and Ethnicity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Frascara, J. (ed.) 2002. Design and the Social Sciences: Making connections. London: Routledge.

Gell, A. 1998. Art and Agency: An anthropological theory. Oxford; Oxford University Press.

Gell, A. 1999. The Art of Anthropology: Essays and diagrams. New York: Berg.

Hallam, E. and Ingold, T. (eds.) 2007. Creativity and Cultural Improvisation. New York: Berg.

Horst, H. and Miller, D. 2006. The Cell Phone: An anthropology of communication. New York: Berg.

Hymes. D.H. 1996. Ethnography, Linguistics, Narrative Inequality: Toward an understanding of voice. London:

Taylor & Francis.

*Jacobsen, M. H. (ed.) 2009. Encountering the Everyday: An introduction to the sociologies of the unnoticed. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Jenkins, H. 2008. Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.

Jimenez, A.C. 2008. Culture and Well-Being: Anthropological approaches to freedom and political ethics. London: Pluto.

Julier, G.2007. The Culture of Design. 2 nd Edition. London: Sage.

Hartley, J. (ed.) 2005. Creative Industries. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

13

Lassiter, L.E. 2005. The Chicago Guide to Collaborative Ethnography. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Laurel, B. (ed.) 2003. Design Research: Methods and perspectives. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Lubkemann, S.C. 2008. Culture in Chaos: An anthropology of the social condition in war. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Madison, D.S. 2005. Critical Ethnography: Methods, ethics and performance. London: Sage.

*Makagon, M. and Neumann, M. 2009. Recording Culture: Audio documentary and the ethnographic experience. London: Sage.

Metcalf, P. and Huntington, R. 1991. Celebrations of Death: The anthropology of mortuary ritual. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press.

*Miller, D. 2008. The Comfort of Things. Cambridge: Polity.

*Moggridge, B. (ed.) 2007. Designing Interactions. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Moran, E. 2008. Human Adaptability: An introduction to ecological anthropology. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Orr, D. 2004. The Nature of Design: Ecology, Culture, and Human Intention. New York: Oxford University Press.

Paterson, M. 2006. Consumption and Everyday Life. London: Routledge.

*Pink, S. 2007. Doing Visual Ethnography: Images, media, and representation in research. London: Sage.

media, and representation in research . London: Sage. *Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London:

*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography. London: Sage.

*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.
*Pink, S. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography . London: Sage. Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007.

Robbin, A.C.G.M. and Sluka, J.A. (eds.) 2007. Ethnographic Fieldwork: An anthropological reader. London:

Blackwell.

*Shove, E. 2007. The Design of Everyday Life. Oxford: Berg.

Wolcott, H. 2005. The Art of Fieldwork. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.

Wolcott, H. 2008. Ethnography: A way of seeing. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.

14

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