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The Silverware Napkin Roll

1. Lay the napkin face-down in front of you. 2. Fold the napkin in half diagonally. 3. Orient the napkin so the longest side is toward you, and then place the silverware on the inner-edge of the long side. 4. Fold both sides in and over the silverware. Do not crease. 5. Tightly roll the silverware into the napkin. 6. There you are, easy peazy mac and cheezy!

The Basic Silverware Pouch


1. Lay the napkin face-down in front of you. 2. Fold the napkin in half and orient the open end toward you. 3. Fold the napkin into quarters. 4. Orient the napkin so the open corner is facing away and to the Left. 5. Fold the top-most layer of napkin in half diagonally and press it down. 6. Turn the napkin over so that the open corner is now facing away and to the right. 7. Fold the right-side back about 1/3 of the way and press it down. 8. Fold the left-side back also about 1/3 of the way and press. 9. Flip it over, straighten it up and insert those shiny eating instruments. Perfecto!

The Fancy Silverware Pouch


Lay the napkin face-down in front of you. Fold the napkin in half and orient the open end toward you. Fold the napkin into quarters. Orient the napkin so the open corner is facing away and to the right. 5. Roll the top-most layer of napkin diagonally down to the center and press it flat. 6. Roll the next layer down until it meets the first and press that one as well. 7. Repeat the last step once more. 8. Turn the napkin over. 9. Fold the right side back about 1/3 of the way and press it down. 10.Fold the left side back also about 1/2 of the way and press. 11.Flip it over and insert the food poker, slicer, and scooper. So what's for dinner? 1. 2. 3. 4.

The French Napkin Fold

1. Lay the napkin face-down in front of you. 2. Fold the napkin in half diagonally. 3. Orient the napkin so the long side is on the left. 4. Fold the far corner of the napkin diagonally towards you and to the right so that the crease falls an inch or two short of the right-most corner and the newly formed point at the bottom is a few inches to the right of the left one. 5. Fold the right-most point towards you, pivoting at the same place the last fold pivoted. Use the finished napkin to drape the dinner place. Very classy and uncomplicated.

The Diamond Napkin Fold


1. Lay the napkin face-down in front of you. 2. Fold the napkin in half and orient the open end toward you. 3. Fold the napkin into quarters. 4. Fold the top-most layer of the napkin in half diagonally - up and to the left. 5. Fold the next layer of napkin diagonally up and to the left, stopping slightly before the last fold to create an even, staggered effect. 6. Repeat by folding up the next layer of napkin to a point just before the last one. 7. And one last time with one last layer. Keep them as uniform as you can. 8. Now fold both sides of the napkin under and in to create an even, staggered diamond effect on the napkin. Press it down as flat as possible and you're ready for guests within 60 seconds!

George Frideric Handel


(German: Georg Friedrich Hndel; pronounced [ h nd l]) (23 February 1685 14 April 1759) was a German-British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Handel was born in 1685, in a family indifferent to music. He received critical musical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712) and becoming a naturalised British subject in 1727.[1] By then he was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middleGerman polyphonic choral tradition. Within fifteen years, Handel, a dramatic genius, started three commercial opera companies to supply the English nobility with Italian opera, but the public came to hear the vocal bravura of the soloists rather than the music. In 1737 he had a physical breakdown, changed direction creatively and addressed the middle class. As Alexander's Feast (1736) was well received, Handel made a transition to English choral works. After his success with Messiah(1742) he never performed an Italian opera again. Handel was only partly successful with his performances of English Oratorio on mythical or biblical themes, but when he arranged a performance of Messiah to benefit theFoundling Hospital (1750) the critique ended. The pathos of Handel's oratorio is an ethical one, they are hallowed not by liturgical dignity but by the moral ideals of humanity.[2] Almost blind, and having lived in England for almost fifty years, he died a respected and rich man.

Royal Academy of Music (171934)


In May 1719 Lord Chamberlain Thomas Holles, the Duke of Newcastle ordered Handel to look for new singers.[27] Handel travelled to Dresden to attend the newly-built opera. He saw Teofane by Antonio Lotti, and engaged the cast for the Royal Academy of Music, founded by a group of aristocrats to assure themselves a constant supply of baroque opera oropera seria. Handel may have invited John Smith, his fellow student in Halle, and his son Johann Christoph Schmidt, to become his secretary and amanuensis.[28] By 1723 he had moved into a Georgian house at 25 Brook Street, which he rented for the rest of his life.[29] This house, where he rehearsed, copied music and sold tickets, is now the Handel House Museum.[30] During twelve months between 1724 and 1725, Handel wrote three outstanding and successful operas, Giulio Cesare, Tamerlano and Rodelinda. Handel's operas are filled with da capo

arias, such as Svegliatevi nel core. After composing Silete venti, he concentrated on opera and stopped writing cantatas. Scipio, from which the regimental slow march of the British Grenadier Guards is derived,[31] was performed as a stopgap, waiting for the arrival of Faustina Bordoni.

Works
Handel's compositions include 42 operas, 29 oratorios, more than 120 cantatas, trios and duets, numerous arias, chamber music, a large number of ecumenical pieces, odes and serenatas, and 16 organ concerti. His most famous work, the oratorio Messiah with its "Hallelujah" chorus, is among the most popular works in choral music and has become the centrepiece of the Christmas season. Among the works with opus numbers published and popularised in his lifetime are the Organ Concertos Op.4 and Op.7, together with the Opus 3 and Opus 6 concerti grossi; the latter incorporate an earlier organ concerto The Cuckoo and the Nightingale in which birdsong is imitated in the upper registers of the organ. Also notable are his sixteen keyboard suites, especially The Harmonious Blacksmith. Handel introduced previously uncommon musical instruments in his works: the viola d'amore and violetta marina (Orlando), the lute(Ode for St. Cecilia's Day), three trombones (Saul), clarinets or small high cornetts (Tamerlano), theorbo, horn (Water Music),lyrichord, double bassoon, viola da gamba, bell chimes, positive organ, and harp (Giulio Cesare, Alexander's Feast).[65] Handel's works have been catalogued in the Hndel-WerkeVerzeichnis and are commonly referred to by an HWV number. For example, Messiah is catalogued as HWV 56.

Musician's musician
Handel has generally been accorded high esteem by fellow composers, both in his own time and since.[66] Bach attempted, unsuccessfully, to meet with Handel while he was visiting Halle.[67] Mozart is reputed to have said of him, "Handel understands affect better than any of us. When he chooses, he strikes like a thunder bolt."[68] To Beethoven he was "the master of us all... the greatest composer that ever lived. I would uncover my head and kneel before his tomb".[68] Beethoven emphasised above all the simplicity and popular appeal of Handel's music when he said, "Go to him to learn how to achieve great effects, by such simple means".

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina


'Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (3 February 1525 or 2 February 1526 2 February 1594)[1] was an Italian Renaissancecomposer of sacred music and the best-known 16th-century representative of the Roman School of musical composition.[2]He had a lasting influence on the development of church music, and his work has often been seen as the culmination of Renaissance polyphony.[2]

Music and reputation


Palestrina left hundreds of compositions, including 105 masses, 68 offertories, at least 140 madrigals and more than 300 motets. In addition, there are at least 72hymns, 35 magnificats, 11 litanies, and four or five sets of lamentations.[2] His attitude toward madrigals was somewhat enigmatic: whereas in the preface to his collection of Canticum canticorum (Song of Songs) motets (1584) he renounced the setting of profane texts, only two years later he was back in print with Book II of his secular madrigals (some of these being among the finest compositions in the medium).[2] He published just two collections of madrigals with profane texts, one in 1555 and another in 1586.[2] The other two collections were spiritual madrigals, a genre beloved by the proponents of the CounterReformation.[2] Palestrina's masses show how his compositional style developed over time.[2] His Missa sine nomine seems to have been particularly attractive to Johann Sebastian Bach, who studied and performed it while writing the Mass in B minor.[5] Most of Palestrina's masses appeared in thirteen volumes printed between 1554 and 1601, the last seven published after his death.[2][6] One of his most enduring works is the Missa Papae Marcelli (Pope Marcellus Mass), which according to legend was composed in order to persuade the Council of Trent that a draconian ban on the polyphonic treatment of text in sacred music (as opposed, that is, to a more directly intelligible homophonic treatment) was unnecessary.[7] However, more recent scholarship shows that this mass was in fact composed before the cardinals convened to discuss the ban (possibly as much as ten years before).[7] It is probable, however, that Palestrina was quite conscious of the need for intelligible text, in conformity with the doctrine of the Counter-Reformation,[7] and he certainly wrote in this manner from the 1560s until the end of his life. Palestrina's seemingly

dispassionate approach to expressive or emotive texts could have resulted from his having to produce many to order, or from a deliberate decision that any intensity of expression was unbecoming in church music.[2]

Biography
Palestrina was born in the town of Palestrina, which is near Rome, then part of the Papal States. Documents suggest that he first visited Rome in 1537, when he is listed as a chorister at the Sta Maria Maggiore basilica. He studied with Robin Mallapert and Firmin Lebel. He spent most of his career in the city. Palestrina came of age as a musician under the influence of the northern European style of polyphony, which owed its dominance in Italy primarily to two influential Franco-Flemish composers, Guillaume Dufay and Josquin des Prez, who had spent significant portions of their careers there. Italy itself had yet to produce anyone of comparable fame or skill in polyphony.[2] From 1544 to 1551, Palestrina was organist of the principal church (St. Agapito) of his native city, and in 1551 he became maestro di cappella at the Cappella Giulia, the papal choir at St Peter's. His first published compositions, a book of Masses, had made so favorable an impression with Pope Julius III (previously theBishop of Palestrina) that he appointed Palestrina musical director of the Julian Chapel. This was the first book of Masses by a native composer: in the Italian states of his day, most composers of sacred music were from the Low Countries, France, Portugal,[3] or Spain. In fact the book was modeled on one by Cristbal de Morales: the woodcut in the front is almost an exact copy of the one from the book by the Spanish composer.

Intro: G-Em-C-D G Em C D Minsan madarama mo kay bigat ng problema G Em C Minsan nahihirapan ka at masasabing D "di ko na kaya" Am Bm Tumingin ka lang sa langit C D Baka sakaling may masumpungan Am Bm Di kaya ako'y tawagin C D Malalaman mong kahit kailan Chorus: G Hawak-kamay Em C9 Di kita iiwan sa paglakbay D Dito sa mundong walang katiyakan G Hawak-kamay Em C9

Di kita iiwan sa paglalakbay D Sa mundo ng kawalan (same chords lang kanina) Minsan madarama mo Ang mundo'y gumuho sa ilalim ng iyong mga paa At ang agos ng problema'y tinatangay ka Tumingin ka lang sa langit Baka sakaling may masumpangan Di kaya ako'y tawagin Malalaman mong kahit kailan (Repeat Chorus) Bridge: Wag mong sabihin nagiisa ka Laging isipin meron kang kasama Narito ako oh,Narito ako... (Rpeat Chorus) Sa mundo ng kawalan Hawak-kamay,hawak-kamay Sa mundo ng kawalan

( verse 1) E B comparasons are easily done C#m A once you've had a taste of perfection E B like an apple handing from a tree C#m A i pick the ripest on i still got the seed (pre-chorus) B C#m A you said move on where do i go B C#m A F#m i guess second best is all i will know (chorus) E B C#m cause when im with him i am thinking of you, thinking of you A B what you would do if E B you were the one who was spending the night C#m A F#m oh i wish that i was looking into your eye (verse 2- same chords as verse 1) you're like an indian summer in the middle of winter like a hard candy with a surprise center how do i get better once ive had the best you said there's tons of fish in the waters

so the waters i will test (pre-chorus- same as first prechorus) he kissed my lips i taste your mouth he pulled me in, i was discussed with myself (chorus- same as first chorus) cause when im with him i am thinking of you, thinking of you what you would do if you were the one who was spending the night oh i wish that i was looking into your.... (bridge) C#m B A the best and oh i do regret B C#m B A B how could i let myself let you go C#m B A and now, now the lessons learned B A i touched and i was burned B A B oh i think you should know (chorus- same as other chorus) cause when im with him i am thinking of you, thinking of you what you would do if you were the one who was spending the night oh i wish that i was looking into your eye, your eyes, your eye wont you walk through and bust down the door and take me away no more mistakes cause in your eyes i'd like to stay

B F#m Ohh, ohhh B F#m Ohh, ohhh

E E

Intro: B F#m Ohh, ohh

So jet-lagged. Verse 1: B E What time is it where you are? I miss you more than anything B E Back at home you feel so far Waiting for the phone to ring Pre-chorus: Abm It's getting lonely living upside down E I don't even wanna be in this town Abm F#m Trying to figure out the time zones making me crazy Chorus: B You say good morning E When it's midnight Abm Going out of my head F#m Alone in this bed B E I wake up to your sunset Abm It's driving me mad F#m I miss you so bad B B E And my heart heart, heart is so jet lagged Abm Abm F#m Heart heart, heart is so jet lagged B B E Abm F#m Heart heart, heart is so jet lagged So jet lagged

Verse 2: B E What time is it where you are? 5 more days and I'll be home B E I keep your picture in my car I hate the thought of you alone Pre-chorus: Abm I've been keeping busy all the time E Just to try to keep you off my mind Abm F#m Trying to figure out the time zones making me crazy Chorus: B You say good morning E When it's midnight Abm Going out of my head F#m Alone in this bed B E I wake up to your sunset Abm And it's driving me mad F#m I miss you so bad B B E And my heart heart, heart is so jet lagged Abm Abm F#m Heart heart, heart is so jet lagged B B E Abm Abm F#m Heart heart, heart is so jet lagged So jet lagged B Ohh, ohhh E Ohh, ohhh Bridge:

B I miss you so bad (I miss you so bad) E I miss you so bad (I miss you so bad) B I miss you so bad (I wanna share your horizon) E I miss you so bad (And see the same sun rising) B E I miss you so bad (And turn the hour hand back to when you were holding me) Chorus: You say good morning When it's midnight Abm Going out of my head F#m Alone in this bed B E I wake up to your sunset Abm And it's driving me mad, F#m I miss when B You say good morning E But it's midnight Abm Going out of my head F#m Alone in this bed B E I wake up to your sunset Abm And it's driving me mad F#m I miss you so bad B B E And my heart heart, heart is so jet lagged Abm Abm F#m Heart heart, heart is so jet lagged B B E Abm Abm F#m Heart heart, heart is so jet lagged So jet lagged B F#m E Ohh, ohhh (so jet lagged)