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1.

Introduction ______________________________________________________ 3
2.1. Introduction ____________________________________________________________ 5 2.2. The Professional Profile ___________________________________________________ 5 2.3. The Educational Profile ___________________________________________________ 8

2. Professional Profile ___________________________________________________ 5

3. Programme Outline __________________________________________________ 13 4. Courses Year 1 ______________________________________________________ 15


4.1. Term 1 and 2 ___________________________________________________________ 15
4.1.1. Comparative Politics________________________________________________________ 4.1.2. Stakeholders in International Organizations: The Ascent of Present Day Global Society 4.1.3. IPM Project 1: Migration____________________________________________________ 4.1.4. Research Skills ____________________________________________________________ 4.1.5. English Skills ______________________________________________________________ 4.1.6. Study and Career Coaching (SCC) ____________________________________________ 4.2.1. 4.2.2. 4.2.3. 4.2.4. 4.2.5. 4.2.6. Policy Making Processes__________________________________________________ Introduction to International Law _________________________________________ Human Rights Law ______________________________________________________ IPM Project 2: HIV/AIDS in Africa ________________________________________ Dealing with Data 1______________________________________________________ Teamwork _____________________________________________________________ 15 17 18 22 24 25 27 28 30 33 36 36

4.2. Term 3 and 4 ___________________________________________________________ 27

5. Courses Year 2 ______________________________________________________ 38


5.1. Term 1 and 2 ___________________________________________________________ 38
5.1.1. 5.1.2. 5.1.3. 5.1.4. 5.1.5. 5.1.6. 5.1.7. 5.1.8. Global Sociology ________________________________________________________ Governmental Accounting ________________________________________________ Economics for IPM 1. Microeconomics: Government and Market _______________ IPM Project 3: Global Economics and Global Environment ____________________ Dealing with Data 2______________________________________________________ European Institutions ____________________________________________________ English Skills ___________________________________________________________ Study and Career Coaching (SCC) _________________________________________ 38 41 42 43 44 46 47 49

5.2.

Term 3 and 4 _________________________________________________________ 51


Economics for IPM 2. Macroeconomics: National Economic Policy ______________ 51 International Trade _____________________________________________________ 52 Organizational Management ______________________________________________ 53 Human Resources Management ___________________________________________ 54 IPM Project 4: Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights at the Workplace55 Intercultural Communication _____________________________________________ 58

5.2.1. 5.2.2. 5.2.3. 5.2.4. 5.2.5. 5.2.6.

6. Courses Year 3 ______________________________________________________ 59


6.1. Terms 1 and 2 __________________________________________________________ 59
6.1.1. Minor European Public Management__________________________________________ 59 6.1.2. SCC/ Mediation and conflict solving skills ______________________________________ 61

6.2.

Term 3 and 4 _________________________________________________________ 64

6.2.1. Minor on Globalization, Governments and Governance (G3): Global-local links in Public Policy. ___________________________________________________________________ 64 6.2.2. Organizational Management ______________________________________________ 67

6.2.3. 6.2.4. 6.2.5. 6.2.6. 6.2.7.

Financial Management ___________________________________________________ Human Resources Management ___________________________________________ E-Governance __________________________________________________________ IPM Project 5 __________________________________________________________ SCC/ Management and Negotiation Skills ___________________________________

67 67 68 70 71

7.

Examination Regulations __________________________________________ 72

1.Introduction
The IPM Programme The Bachelor of International Public Management (IPM) is a four year, full-time programme. Its a very practical, hands-on course, where youll learn by doing. The programme prepares you for a career as either a policy maker or manager in an organisation that deals with complex, international public issues like global warming, trade, peace and security, or human rights. In the first two years, youll learn the fundamentals, developing the skills and knowledge youll actually need in your career. Can you see yourself working in government, or international organisations, running a department or managing projects? It takes an analytical brain and self-discipline, balanced by strong social skills such as engaging with people or motivating your team. This is why in this programme youll spend quite a lot of your time actually working on team projects, solving problems drawn from real life scenarios. In the final two years of the programme, youll have to apply everything youve learned and practiced on a work placement, or job, for a real organisation. So youll graduate with two years of experience already behind you. You choose your minors, your work placement and your thesis subject, so you can customize your final two years to your own ambitions and career goals. Knowledge We believe that knowledge is something to be shared not just with our own students, but with the outside world. Were always looking for new opportunities to exchange knowledge with people from other places, and we teach our students to do the same. Talent Having knowledge isnt enough. You have to know how to use it, how to adapt and apply it to real situations. Our students learn not just how to think for themselves, but how to do it for themselves. Practical experience and independent thinking are a big part of The Hague University experience. Diversity To discover new ways of thinking, you have to explore other peoples perspectives. We believe that diversity is absolutely essential to progress. We welcome different viewpoints here, through cross-cultural debate and collaboration. Learning strategy

We want you to interact as much as possible during your Bachelors course. Well engage you in a mix of classroom tuition, lectures, group activities and project work. But to get your degree, you will have to do more than sit in lectures taking notes youll need to be an active learner. Hands-on assignments will gear you up to work with real companies.

2. Professional Profile
2.1. Introduction
The study of Public Administration & Management trains students for professions that have the public interest as their primary goal. The public interest is at issue in all kinds of processes that have in common that they bring and maintain order and structure to the society, and that a wide assessment of interests takes place during the management of these processes. A wide assessment of interests means that this assessment goes beyond private interests. The issues and processes concerned may be characterised as carrying an atmosphere of conflict, but that does not have to be the case. It is more essential that the parties concerned often differ in a number of important aspects: in values and standards (ethics and principles), culture, purposes, interests, and power. Those involved also differ in their perception of the problem. This causes a great number of variables within such a problem, and those involved differ over the direction of the solution and the strategy of the solution. Those who are working for the public interest are called Public Managers. Public managers have always been oriented towards solving social issues. Public administration is a matter of policy (trying to find solutions that work) and of management (the application of solutions). Public managers do not determine their agendas. Others do that for them: the public, politicians, and the press. Public administrators fix their attention on the questions of what good solutions could be, and how these solutions could best be put into practice, always being fully aware of the great possibilities and the preconditions the social order of constitutional state, democracy and market economy offer. In the dynamic and interdependent community of the twenty-first century, the public manager is an indispensable partner in governance.

2.2. The Professional Profile


Formerly, a public administrator was in the employ of a local, regional or national government almost automatically. Nowadays, seeing that authorities and politicians no longer hold the monopoly on tackling social issues, a public manager finds employment in all industry sectors, national as well as international. Companies, institutions and social organisations have started playing a role in the whole, not infrequently even the leading role. Sometimes networks of public or private organisations have been able to

stand up to social issues by combining their means and knowledge. Often the most appropriate level that is able to solve social issues has risen to a cross-border and supranational area. The task of a public manager has become complex and multifaceted. Not the one who pays their wages makes them public administrators; but what they do, makes them what they are. Public Managers work according to a professional profile. The profile our programme prepares for has been developed in cooperation with experts from the work field. In the various cycles of policy, public managers could play the role of adviser, lawyer, architect and contractor. In their role as policy adviser, they guide their employer or client in the processes in which they (often with others) search for answers to social issues or put them into operation. In their role of policy lawyer, public administrators act independently on behalf of their employers in processes and/or networks. Public managers also manage processes and/or networks that aim at solving social issues. When they play this role they act as policy architects; when they direct the implementation of the solutions they act as policy contractors. Public managers must have the skills and qualifications to perform each of their roles professionally. They must know how to assess a social problem quickly and successfully. The speciality of public managers is that they are able to retrieve, mobilise and co-ordinate information and participants which are necessary to be able to come to grips with a social problem with a prospect of success. Developments in the Professional Practice The public manager carries out his duties from the perspective of serving the common good. This is not an abstract objective, but an actual perspective that is being dominated by four developments: 1. The dichotomy between the public and the private field The fundamental difference between the public and the private field keeps continuing. Public refers to the general good, going beyond the private field. Private refers to private interests. Public does not refer to the government just like that; there are after all also private sector organisations with public objectives. Many organisations operate in the area between the public and the private, but that does not diminish the validity and depth of the distinction. It is true, people are speaking a lot about hybrid organisations, but it is debatable whether organisations really are turning into hybrids. However, it is unmistakably true that in many organisations hybrid corporate cultures have been coming into being. 2. Relationship management The interest attached to relationship management is not a passing thing, but will continue to grow. There is more to it than just people management. The public manager is also expected to: bring together well-trained people on the basis of their expertise;

have emotional intelligence at their disposal to understand human possibilities and conditions of their cooperation; view the necessity and effectiveness of cooperation from the perspective of the public interest; build bridges between the social parties and cope with conflicts between them; operate in networking, teams, and projects; reflect on their own role in processes, in the organisation, and in society. 3. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) The influence of ICT is growing more and more, not only in a general and social sense, but also in the activities of the professional. Internally, the applicability of ICT leads to changes in the construction and culture of the organisation. Externally, the applicability of ICT leads to a greater accessibility and disclosure of government information. All this is beneficial to the interaction between the civilian and the government, which may lead to shifts in the hierarchic relations and positions of power. 4. The European dimension The importance of the European dimension is often undervalued. Europe has become national: this applies not only to the field of legislation, rules and regulations, but also, to the tuning and coordination of numerous activities of the government, taking place on a European level. The field of expertise of the public manager can no longer remain limited to the Dutch domain. It cannot be that we in The Netherlands are being confronted with the European rules and regulations. The public manager is expected to anticipate on these matters. Furthermore, it has become more and more important to have an understanding of cultural diversity as well as being able to manage cultural differences between the various European countries, especially where it comes to understanding the culture of decision-making.

Fields of Activity and Jobs for the Public Manager The public manager is not only employed in government service, but is also employed in other fields of activity: o Organisations in the field of traffic between the government and the business world; o Companies and organisations with a public task, such as organisations in the field of safety and public order, transport companies, housing associations, interest groups, environmental authorities, benefit authorities (and management consultancies on behalf of these companies and organisations). Labour market research and research among graduates show that the public manager is employed in a wide spectrum of posts and branches. Based on this data the labour market distinguishes three types of posts:

1. The guardian and administrator of management processes. Designing management processes is in general a career function. Names of positions: Management Consultant, Management Supporter, Controller; 2. The policy adviser on a preparatory, executive, and evaluative level. The duties may be more internally oriented or more externally oriented. Names of positions: Policy Officer, Policy-Making Official, Consultant, Policy Decision-Making Official 3. The director of policy processes. In general, this is a career function, but on a local level, it is also a starting position. Names of positions: Project Manager, Coordinating Team Manager, Research Manager. The first type of the three types of positions, the guardian and administrator of management processes, may also be filled by graduates from related training colleges, such as MER (Management, Economics, and Law), P&A (Personnel and Employment), and other management and business colleges. The discerning element of this position is the affinity with the public interest. The second and third post demand competences that are fundamentally different from the first one (see below). This is why the profile distinguishes itself clearly from other vocational universities (Dutch: HBO = University of Applied Sciences & Arts). The aforementioned positions have in common that the public manager operates from an integral perspective. They are spiders in the web of the socio-political sphere of influence and they are able to: o supervise a decision-making process (from the conditions up to and including the consequences); o review the political sphere of influence, in which decisions may or may not be established; o think strategically; o contribute to each phase of a decision-making process (including financialeconomic and judicial aspects); o master quickly and adequately the required and relevant knowledge of the content of a decision-making process.

2.3. The Educational Profile


In accordance with the general trend in vocational universities, the professional profile has been translated from a competence-oriented approach into an educational profile. A competence is the skill to apply the acquired knowledge, insights, abilities, and attitude in such a way that the positions that have been distinguished in the professional profile can be filled adequately. The specific knowledge and skills of each competence have not been laid down in the educational profile itself, but in the next phase: the translation of the educational profile into end terms and learning objectives. The competences have a wide scope: they are not only about policy competences, but also about administrative-judicial, financial-economic and managerial competencies. Together they do not form a closed entity, but rather an open network. Combined with

the required learning abilities, the graduates will continue to develop these competences, in depth as well as in scope.

Competence-based approach Competences are action-oriented. However, they leave open the question to what extent the action should be performed. Specifications have not been given for each competence separately, but instead have been put in a general matrix that indicates to what level a graduate of the training Public Administration & Management has mastered the required competences. This matrix has been devised according to the key definitions: integral perspective and relationship management from the professional profile and consists of the five levels on which a competence may be mastered: 1. in concordance with other competences; 2. as a team; 3. in close collaboration with workers from other organisation units; 4. in close collaboration with actors outside the organisation; 5. in close collaboration with actors in problem areas that are new to the organisation unit. The competences in the educational profile are starting competences, i.e. the competences of someone who is at the beginning of their professional career. In general, the level of a School for Higher Vocational Education corresponds with performance level four. Command of level five takes place during the course of ones career. However, in view of the wide scope competences have, it is not realistic to expect a beginning professional to perform all of them on level four. These exceptions are called the development competences, marked in the text by the words contributes to. The Competences of the Public Manager1 The professional profile serves as a guideline for the identification and distinction of the competences a graduate should have in their capacity as public manager. The developments in the professional practice and the positions or offices the graduate holds therein are all reasons to subdivide the competences of the public manager into three sections: 1. Reflection on the Public Duties; 2. The Public Manager Set to Work; 3. Relational Management.

1 At a conference in 1999, key figures from the professional field framed a set of professional competences under the authority of the Landelijk Overleg Bestuurskunde/Overheidsmanagement, LOBO (Have your Heart in Public Interest). During the discussions, advisory bodies for the field of work and boards of graduates of the associated schools concluded that there is a need for supplementation and actualisation. Under the supervision and the responsibility of the management of the associated schools, a new set of professional competences has therefore been formulated, which the advisory bodies for the field of work have ratified. The set presented here replaces the competences stipulated in 1999.

The competences in the first section are required for all those situations in which the public manager is being called to give account of his involvement. The competences in the second section are a result of the integral perspective and strategic thinking. In the third section are found the competences the graduate should perform in order to be able to participate in one of the most important developments in the professional practice: relationship management.

I. Reflections on the Public Duty: 1. the student operates from a knowledge of the foundations, polity and functioning of the Netherlands (constitutional state, democracy, market economy, European co-operation); 2. operates from public service orientation; regards citizens as clients, stakeholders and partners; 3. allows for the political, ideological and cultural differences between people; 4. allows for interests, factors of power and influence (formal and informal, actual and potential) 5. is able to handle freedom of policy and discretionary competences in an ethical and wellconsidered way; 6. is able to withstand complex, only partially pre-structured policy issues and uncertain policy results; 7. is able to think outside the scope of their working place (where relevant: internationally); 8. has knowledge of relevant best practices; 9. has knowledge of up-to-date scientific literature in the English language; 10. surpasses executive work and is able to reflect thereupon 11. discusses their view on their role and effectiveness, looked at from different angles and interests; 12. is able to give account for their actions when asked, and is able to learn from personal experiences; II. The Public Manager at Work
Points on the Agenda

13. calls symptoms and phenomena problems of policy; 14. is able to influence participants effectively; 15. Is able to mobilise all parties involved on common interests;
Preparation

16. conducts research of a policy or social nature; 17. analyses the diversity of variables in the problem areas (economic, legal, political); 18. evaluates the contents of existing policies and their development stages; 19. calculates in the impact of European rules and regulations on the policies pursued; 20. is able to discriminate between politically sensitive issues; 21. is able to prepare an administration assignment within a financial-economic, legal and

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decision-making frame;
Project

22. translates political issues into lines of policies and indicates alternatives and priorities with the aid of a scheme of action; 23. deduces main lines of policies from a multitude of policy documents (dossier management); 24. uses formerly and elsewhere applied solutions, determining at the same time the comparability with former cases; 25. is able to handle scenarios; 26. is able to make an analysis of participants and a sphere of influence; 27. is able to establish favourable ways and strategies of finding solutions; 28. verifies intended policies on practicability, controllability, suitability, legitimacy, and communicability;
Determination and the Decision-making Processes

29. is able to discriminate between minor and major matters of a technical or executive nature that are relevant to administration; 30. is able to formulate compromises; 31. makes and presents a policy document in such a way that it leads to decision-making; 32. is able to account for cost estimating and make cost decisions;
Introduction

33. is able to convert decisions to executive organisations and primary executives;


Implementation

34. is able to implement stipulated policies; 35. is able to direct administrative-legal procedures; 36. operates professionally with a keen eye for the suitability of processes and possibilities of ICT; 37. keeps the costs within an agreed budget; 38. monitors the execution;
Supervision and Upholding

39. is able to gather information relevant for supervision and upholding 40. is able to correct processes effectively if they need correcting
Evaluation and Reflection

41. analyses and evaluates policy processes and policy effects; III. Relational Management 42. picks up signals from society; 43. is public service oriented 44. is a team worker 45. is focused on co-operation, and if there are differences of opinion, knows how to get a discussion going with all those involved; 46. is able to communicate clearly and correctly (in writing and vocally) with every target group, regardless of their social background and level of education; 47. is communicatively clear and decisive; knows how to deal with areas of tension, and conflict situations; 48. is unbiased and honest, has a clear sense of standards, and ensures fair play;

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49. has the sensitivity to put themselves in other peoples position; 50. acts as a negotiator in contract ; 51. manages projects, makes use of policy networks, and structuralises debates; 52. knows how to create a basis for decisions and win-win situations; 53. is able to keep a process going, avoiding trenches, traps, and deadlocks.

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3. Programme Outline
Year 1
programme line IPM credits per term 3

term 1
Comparative politics 1 Stakeholders 1

term 2
Comparative politics 2 Stakeholders 2

term 3
International law Policy making processes 1 Project 2.1 English 2.1 Dealing with data 1 SCC 2.1

term 4
Human rights law

Policy making processes 2 Project 2.2 English 2.2 Teamwork SCC 2.4

Projects

3 2 2

Project 1.1 English 1.1 Research skills 1 SCC 1.1

Project 1.2 English 1.2 Research skills 2 SCC 1.2

SCC

Year 2
programme line IPM credits per term 3

term 1
Public finance

term 2
Economics for IPM 1 Globalisation and Social Change Project 3.2 English 3.2 European Institutions SCC 3.2

term 3
Organizational Management Economics for IPM 2 Project 4.1 English 4.1 Intercultural Communication 1 SCC 4.1

term 4
Human Resources Management International trade

Introduction to sociology Project 3.1 English 3.1 Dealing with data 2

Projects

3 2 2

Project 4.2 English 4.2 Intercultural Communication 2 SCC 4.2

SCC

SCC 3.1

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Year 3
programme line Minor credits per term 7,5 7,5

term 1
Minor EPM Minor free of choice

term 2
Minor EPM Minor free of choice

term 3
Minor G3

term 4
Minor G3

IPM

Organizational Management Financial Management Project 5

Human Resources Management

2 Project 1,5

E-Governance Project 5

Skills/ SCC

Mediation and Conflict-solving skills/ SCC

Mediation and Conflict-solving skills/ SCC

Management and Negotiation Skills/ SCC

Management and Negotiation Skills/ SCC

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4. Courses Year 1
4.1. Term 1 and 2
4.1.1. Comparative Politics Instructors: Ins de Sousa (term 1) and Ron Crijns (term 2) Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Course Description Comparisons are useful to uncover relationships of cause and affect in any area of study. In the field of International Public Management, comparisons are especially important to understand and explain differences and similarities between countries and regions, and the national and international contexts within which political actors and institutions operate. The knowledge about differences and similarities among political actors and systems throughout the world allows us to critically reflect on the existing classifications of countries, government institutions and forms of political organization. For example, democracy vs. authoritarian rule, liberal vs. illiberal democracy or developed vs. developing economies. The comparative perspective, or approach, encompasses the strategies and techniques used to highlight both the differences and similarities among the units we wish to compare. In the political and social sciences, more general comparisons usually deal with differences in societies and states, while more specific comparisons deal with institutional and organizational differences, either within the same country or between countries. The comparative approach can have a spatial dimension comparisons between countries, regions, cities and/ or a time dimension comparisons between historical periods. For the public manager at work, the use of comparisons broadens his/ her understanding of the political world and has the potential for predicting and controlling political events and processes. Course Objectives.

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The aim of this course is to make students of International Public Management familiar with key concepts of political science and international relations and familiar with methods in comparing political systems and political processes. By the end of the course, the students are expected to have a basic knowledge of the main classifications used in comparative politics, and to be able to apply a comparative approach in the written assignment. Competencies 1. Knowledge about the foundations, polity and functioning of different types of government systems; (reflections on the public duty) 2. Ability to think about political issues outside the scope of their country of origin (reflections on the public duty). 3. Ability to discriminate among politically sensitive issues (the public manager at work). Teaching and Working Method The course consists of plenary lectures. The lectures will be mainly based on the literature prescribed for this course (see below). Other books, texts and audiovisual material used in the lectures dont count as exam material, but the lectures themselves do. Assessment and Evaluation The Comparative Politics course has two parts. Part 1 will be given in the first term and Part 2 in the second term. In each term, students will be evaluated through one written exam and one written assignment. The final grade of the course will be calculated as follows: Comparative Politics 1 (term 1): - 60 % exam - 40 % assignment. Comparative Politics 2 (term 2): - 70% exam - 30% assignment. Literature o Hague, Rod and Harrop, Martin, Comparative Government and Politics: An Introduction, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

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4.1.2. Stakeholders in International Organizations: The Ascent of Present Day Global Society Instructor: Willem Minderhout Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 6 (3 and 3) Course Description This course focuses on the ascent of the present day global society. In term 1 we will study the main themes of the post war history of world politics which give a historical and generic explanation of world we live in. Themes that will be studied are: the Cold War, the conflict in the Middle East, the unification of Europe, the disintegration of former Yugoslavia and West Africa. The main theories of world politics will be discussed as well. The term will be closed with an open book exam. In the second term, the focus will shift to international cooperation issues peace and security, trade relations, development, human rights - in both Governmental and Non Governmental forms. The present day nationalist backlash will be discussed as well. The term will be closed with an open book exam Literature for both term 1 and 2: 1. Peter Calvocoressi (9th edition 2009), World Politics since 1945, Pearson Longman. 2. John Baylis, Steve Smith, Patricia Owens (4th edition, 2008), The Globalization of World Politics, Oxford University Press

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4.1.3. IPM Project 1: Migration Course Design and Coordination: IJsbrand Hoetjes and Ins de Sousa Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Theme: Migration Population movements in response to war, demographic growth or climate change have always been part of human history. Warfare, conquest, formation of nations, development of production and trade have all led to migration, voluntary or forced. Contemporary migratory movements and policies are still influenced by historical precedents. For example, labor migration has gone hand-in-hand with limitation of individual liberty and denial of equality but it still was a major shaping factor in the emergence of modern capitalist economies and markets. Examples of this were the slave economies of the Americas, colonial labor in Asia and Africa, guest workers in post-1945 Europe or the contemporary illegal workers, who are often denied the protection of law in host countries. On the other hand, we have political and/ or religious migration, caused by persecution and war. Refugee settlement played a major role in the development of countries such as South Africa, the USA or Australia. Today, the skyrocketing numbers of asylum seekers requests in Western Europe and North America are a clear indication that war and persecution remain strong push factors in migration movements. In the last 50 years, immigration has developed into one of the most central and complicated issues for policy-makers, mostly in Europe, North America and Australia. There are three basic types of factors to take into account when studying and dealing with migration 1. Push factors, or reasons why people emigrate; 2. Pull factors, or reasons why they immigrate 3. Barriers/ control mechanisms, like restrictions, surveillance and registration of migrants. Migratory movements nearly always have political and/ or economic root causes, but it is vital to be aware that no migrant is the same. As such, policy-makers rely heavily on (statistical) data and information giving a more detailed account of the characteristics of each migrant, or of aggregate migration flows. With respect to the specific policy area(s) concerned with the theme of migration, the aim of this project is to make students aware of the impact of migration on society and government. The focus here will be on migration-related policies, specifically the role played by public institutions in the creation and implementation of these policies.

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The objectives of the first project are: o To make the student aware of the value of multidisciplinary research for policy making and policy evaluation, and to allow students to practice the skills required in an international policy context. To provide students with insights into the theory and issues connected to international migration For students to learn how to get acquainted with a complex policy field in a relatively short period. To enable students to properly present (formulate, explain, refer, publish) their findings in an open online environment. To give student the opportunity to develop a cooperative and constructively critical attitude towards the (policy-related) use of available information sources. Students are expected to actively and effectively join in informed discussions and small group collaboration. Students will become aware of the need of making a good selection of information (sources) based on the relevance to the policy context at hand.

o o o o o o

With respect to the specific policy area(s) concerned with the theme of migration, the aim of this project is to make students aware of the impact of migration on society and government. The focus here will be on migration-related policies, specifically the role played by public institutions in the creation and implementation of these policies. By the end of this course, students should have a basic knowledge of: o Changes in public management practice (mostly in Europe) regarding immigration. o Inclusion of human rights considerations in the definition and implementation of immigration policies. The online environment for the assignments: H/WIKI For more than three academic years already, online wiki-software has been used and developed by students and staff of the Dutch and English streams of Public Management. This has resulted in the creation and growth of several open, shared knowledge bases, fragmented and unfinished by nature, yet thereby always allowing student contributions to be of added value. Making use of the TRIAS wiki2, an English-language education-directed wiki environment developed originally for e-Government education, knowledge sharing will be a key activity right from the start of the first project. The semi-open nature of this wiki allows students to actually publish work online, adding the ingredient of 'public' scrutiny to the wiki workshops, IPM tutor coaching and cooperation with peers.

Visit the TRIAS wiki at http://wiki.triastelematica.org/index.php/TRIAS_Telematica_Wiki or take a look at the Dutch Bestuurskunde wiki at http://bkwiki2.medialab-hhs.nl/index.php?title=Main_Page.

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The individual research assignments will involve the creation of online content within this wiki, the peer-assessment of content added by fellow students, and combining efforts to deliver a set of wikipages meeting the standards of the wiki. The next stage of wikiwork in the first project involves the creation and maintenance of a portal within the wiki environment, primarily directed at disclosure of its existing content. Details about the individual and group assignments for this project, including a timetable, will be specified at the beginning of the course. Examination The two project 'halves' 1.1 (term 1) and 1.2 (term 2) are assessed separately. No grades or (attendance) records from one 'half' can compensate or determine the grades or (attendance) records of the other. In other words: Although these two projects share the same context, theme and working environment, they are formally two separate modules where exam regulations are concerned. Nevertheless, a good performance in project 1.1 is most definitely an excellent preparation for doing well in project 1.2. Attendance requirements Minimal attendance requirements are set for the wiki workshops and -consultations in term 1 as well as for group meetings in term 2. Your presence may also be required at some specific (guest) lectures to be announced for the one or more of the reserved time slots. In both projects, a sufficient attendance record is a necessary condition for receiving your grade (and the resulting study credits)! Literature and perspectives By definition and by multidisciplinary nature, the application-oriented IPMprojects primarily rely on the books and materials treated during the non-project courses in the current and previous (!) terms. In order to facilitate students in getting acquainted with a project's Theme and Context, additional book chapters, articles and of course policy documents will be supplied in a reader format and/or on Blackboard, or will be available in the HHS library after the beginning of each term. A good starting point is the publication detailed below, as it provides a solid overview of European migration developments, and was written for policy-makers. y Ederveen, S., e.a., Destination Europe; Immigration and integration in the European Union, European outlook 2, CPB/SCP (Dutch Central Planning Bureau/Dutch Social and Cultural Planning Office) 2004. ISBN9037701981 (available for free in digital pdf format online, at www.cpb.nl, www.scp.nl and on the HHS Blackboard course accompanying this project) When analyzing or explaining concepts connected to migration (policy), keep in mind that a number of approaches and disciplines are especially relevant. So, when working on the wiki assignments in this project, make sure you always include books, articles

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and websites providing the following perspectives (listed alphabetically) in your search for insights: o The economic perspective o The historical perspective o The international relations perspective o The legal/international law perspective o The political perspective o The sociological perspective

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4.1.4. Research Skills Instructors: Courtney Vegelin and Ins de Sousa Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 4 (2+2) Course Description Research is involved in many activities of the public manager, directly or indirectly. A policy plan, for example, cannot be developed without knowing and understanding the results of a research report first. Public managers are knowledge workers with a specialization. They look at societal phenomena and seek to discover what is of public interest in it. Identifying the public interest means looking through different lenses which are often shaped by the supporting disciplines of public management: law, economy, sociology, and political science. Public managers must be also able to identify core problems that work against the public interest for which they have to put solutions forward. They engage in activities that lead to a particular result: a professional product. Course Objectives The first term of this course will focus very closely on the early stages of learning how to do research and write a paper about the research you have done. It will cover the basics, beginning with how to discover an interesting and relevant topic, moving to how to develop an argument, and concluding with how to present your argument and research results in a clear manner. The objective is to provide a solid foundation to meet the expectations and requirements for producing papers at institutes of higher education and for agencies and organizations in the field of public management. The second term of the course will focus on how to develop a research proposal. The ultimate goal of this course is to make future public managers competent researchers. By the end of the course, including both terms, students should be able to: o Know how to find interesting and pertinent topics for research o Develop a plan for asking and answering questions about the topic o Write up a clear research project/ proposal o Understand the relevance of concepts, methodologies and theories to their research o Analyze research reports, policy and implementation plans Competencies The competencies you can expect to obtain from this course include: 1. 2. 3. 4. Ability to pick up signals from society; Ability to analyze the diversity of variables in problem areas; Ability to analyze and evaluate policy processes and policy effects; Ability to conduct research of a political, economic, or social nature.

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Teaching and Working Method Each meeting will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and in-class student activities. Blackboard Students should quickly become familiar with how to use Blackboard. All course information, the course readings, and the assignments will be posted there. Additionally, any relevant announcements will also be posted to the Blackboard so students should make a habit of checking it regularly. Attendance Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class. Students are not allowed to miss more than two classes, but it is highly recommended that you always attend. If you need to miss more than two classes, you need to inform the instructor via e-mail as soon as possible. Failure to attend the required number of classes can be reflected in your participation grade. Evaluation and Assessment The grade for the first term will be based on three parts, and your grade will be weighted as follows: Four short written assignments: 40% In-class participation: 20% Developed outline: 20% The grade for the second term will be based on three parts: In-class participation 20% Presentations 30% Research proposal 50% Literature Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, The Craft of Research. 3rd ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2003. y Students are NOT required to purchase this book. The required chapters are available via the course Blackboard. Remarks In the first term, this course will be used in close conjunction with your Comparative Politics Course. It will provide you with information, tools, and support for writing the paper in that course while also giving you the experience you need to write papers in your future courses. Eight weeks is a short period of time to become familiar with a topic and write a paper about it. By working on your own paper topic from Comparative Politics within the framework of this course, you can dig deeper into your topic of interest and spend more time focusing on it. This is a very valuable opportunity so please use it well!

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4.1.5. English Skills Instructor: Barbara van Toorenburg Terms 1, 2, 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 8 (2+2+2+2) Course Objectives: A university graduate at Bachelor Level is expected to have a command of the English Language at a B2 (upper intermediate) or C1 (advanced) level. The English Language Program of the first year teaches the skills Speaking & Listening, Reading & Writing at the required levels, progressing from upper intermediate to advanced level. The method used in this language program is Total English as it is related to the Common European Framework levels and the University of Cambridge ESOL main suite examinations. Competencies: The ability to understand (reading and listening skills) and communicate (written and oral skills) in the English language at level B2 and C1. B2: 1. Can follow or give a talk on a familiar topic or keep up a conversation on a fairly wide range of topics within the field of Public Management. 2. Can scan texts for relevant information and understand detailed instructions or advice. 3. Can make notes while someone is talking or write a letter including non standard requests. C1: 1. Can contribute effectively to meetings and seminars within the field of Public Management or keep up with a casual conversation with a good degree of fluency, coping with abstract expressions. 2. Can read quickly enough to cope with an academic course, to read the media for information or to understand non-standard correspondence. 3. Can prepare/draft professional correspondence, take reasonably accurate notes in meetings or write an essay which shows an ability to communicate. Program: Group A:Total English Upper Intermediate (B2) Group B: Total English Advanced (B2-C1) Assessment: The program starts with a placement test (= basis for group division) and is concluded by a progress test. Each term has one final written Test. Textbook: H. Huntley, Essential Academic Vocabulary. Thomson Heinle

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4.1.6. Study and Career Coaching (SCC) Instructor: Barbara van Toorenburg Terms 1, 2, 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 8 (2+2+2+2) Course Description and Objectives Student, Career, Coach and Coaching are an integral part of the IPM program, from year one to four. The objectives of the SCC program within the program International Public Management are: 1. To coach the student, (year 1-4) 2. To monitor the students academic progress, (year 1-4) 3. To monitor the students orientation towards his/her future career, (year 2-4) The objectives are realized by means of an intensive coaching program in which careful attention is given to the development of the LOBO competencies (level 2 to 5) with reference to the Dublin Descriptors of the First Cycle (International Bachelor Qualification). As several skills taught and trained in SCC like interviewing, presenting, report writing, writing formal letters are also part of the English Language Courses, SCC is considered to be an integral part of the English Language Program. The emphasis in year one is to acquaint the student with the academic life, and with his field of study. The central issues in this first (orientation) year are: 1. is International Public Management the right study for the student and if 2. does the program of IPM fulfill her/his expectations. Special attention is given to: 1. Competencies and how to work with them 2. Presentations 3. Personal Development Plan (PDP) 4. Portfolio 5. Learning Styles 6. The application of the instrument SWOT 7. Individual Progress (Coaching academic progress) The products that the students are requested to hand in are: - PDP (term 1-4). - Personal Action Plan (term 1-4). - Portfolio (term 1-4). - Presentations (term 3). - Letter of application 1 and 2 for the personal interviews. (term 1,3)

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Assessment: The assessment is based on: 1. Personal Development Plan (PDP) 2. Personal Action Plan (PAP) 3. Presentations (related to field of work) 4. Participation (contribution to discussions of the textbook) 5. Portfolio (including the assignments, which will be assigned weekly) Grading system Active participation counts for 20% of the grade. Term 1: Assignments: 40%, PDP 40% Term 2: PDP and PAP: 80 % Term 3: Presentations: 80% Term 4: Portfolio:80% Attendance: 1. You are allowed to miss no more than one session of the course per term. If you miss two you will have to do a special assignment as compensation. 2. If you miss more than two classes per term you will have to retake the course. Literature: o Thuss. Presentations. Archipelago. ISBN 978 90 01 70644 9 o Grit,Guit,Sijde. Managing your competencies. Noordhoff. ISBN 978 90 01 76363 3

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4.2. Term 3 and 4


4.2.1. Policy Making Processes Instructors: Courtney Vegelin Terms 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Course Description The aim of the course is to make future public managers familiar with all aspects of public policy-making, from a theoretical as well as empirical perspective. The main focus lies on the public policy process itself, including the emergence of policies on the agenda, policy formulation and policy implementation. Various aspects of the public policy process are explored, ranging from policy theories, the role of policy actors, the uses for policy instruments to the different styles used in the practice of each policy cycle stage. Developments and characteristics in American policy fields will be discussed, in order to illustrate theoretical insights. The course consists of a combination of plenary lectures and workshops. The lectures are based on prescribed literature. The workshops activate the students to apply knowledge obtained from the literature and lectures. During the working sessions, students will work on their assignments. Students will develop their ability to analyse problem fields and to search for sources. These are important competencies for professional managers in the public or semi-public sector. Literature: o Thomas R. Dye, Understanding Public Policy, New Jersey: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2007. Assessment The final grade of the course will be based on the grades of the exam and the assignment. The attendance during lectures and workshops must be sufficient. Term 3: Attendance: Exam: Assignment: Term 4: Attendance: Exam: Assignment:

20% 50% 30%

20% 50% 30%

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4.2.2. Introduction to International Law Instructor: Joris Sprakel Term 3 Total ECTS: 3 Course Description This is an introductory course in public international law. It starts with a question why we need to study international law. It is intended to provide students with an understanding of the structure of international legal system and basic principles underlying legal relations between states, international organisations and other actors in the international arena. The course will focus on fundamental pillar of any field of study of international law - interaction between international relations and law, sources of law, law of state responsibility and settlement of disputes. The course will focus on the role of states as they are (still) the principle actors in international system. Sub-topics dealing with their roles will be discussed briefly. Basic issues of state responsibility will be dealt with. Peaceful resolution of international disputes is another main pillar of the course; here the focus will be on judicial, quasi-judicial and non-judicial methods. As its nature suggests, the course can not and will not spend much time on the specialised fields of international law, such as, human rights, humanitarian law, trade law, law of sea, investment and so on. Course Objectives The goals of this course are: 1. to provide students with an understanding of the basic principles of international law and an analytical framework so that they will be able to analyse issues of international law; 2. to provide students with an adequate basic grounding in international law so that they will be prepared for a specialised course in the field of international law (for example, human rights, trade law, humanitarian law, law of sea, etc.); 3. to familiarise students with the main conventions and multilateral agreements in contemporary important areas of international law. Competences With reference to the Course Book/The Hague LL.B. Manual, the chapter on the Legal Competences, this course focuses on legal knowledge. Through the assignments this course contributes to the competence of application of knowledge and judgment.

Course activities 1. Lectures: In this course the faculty will offer a weekly lecture. Reference is made to the Course Book/The Hague LL.B. Manual for tips and suggestions how to make lectures and the like effective.

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2. Workshop lectures: In this course the faculty will offer a weekly workshop lecture. The purpose of these workshop lectures is to discuss, evaluate and deepen the understanding of the subjects of the lecture, to answer questions and, where necessary, repeat elements of the lecture.

Attendance In this course attendance of the lectures and workshop lectures, if any, is mandatory. Attendance Lists will circulate during the sessions. Failure to attend a minimum of 80% will lead to exclusion of the written exam, and/or deduction of the grade with one (1) point, and/or alternative tasks, at the sole discretion of the lecturers or program management. Examination and Assignments The exam of this course consists of a written exam with open and/or multiple choice questions, as well as the two assignments. Both elements have to be successfully completed. Literature To be announced

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4.2.3. Human Rights Law Instructor: Joris Sprakel Term 4 Total ECTS: 3 Course Description This is an introductory course in the law of human rights or fundamental rights. In the course Public International Law the individual is discussed as subject of international law. As such a human being has rights and obligations under international law. When the obligations are violated lawyers classify that within the subject of international criminal law and/or humanitarian law. Turning to the rights of individuals, those that play a role in international law are of a fundamental character, concerning life, liberty and welfare. Other rights of individuals are only relevant in the national context. Article 55 UN Charter stipulates that the universal respect for and observance of human rights is an objective of the United Nations and all its members. That objective is realized via the so called International Bill of Human Rights (the 1948 Universal Declaration and the 1966 International Covenants taken together), and all regional efforts like the European Convention of Human Rights and the European Social Charter. The backgrounds of this development in international law were the atrocities of the World Wars. The fundamental character is both articulated in the kind of rights like life, freedom from torture or freedom of thought and speech and articulated in the universality of the international human rights. The international role of human rights law was preceded by national developments. Traditionally founding fathers of international law (Grotius) and early national constitutions are cited as having regard to human rights as they are called now. But since up to the early 20th century half of the world population (women) were more or less exclude from these rights, modern legal scholars start the history of human rights law in 1945. Having said that, it is nevertheless the prime responsibility of the states to take care of the observance of human rights within their territory. The course Human Rights Law therefore also zooms in on regional and national systems of human rights law. Whether on the international, regional or national level, human rights law addresses: 1. the sources of the human rights and their content, 2. the mechanism on how these rights are implemented or effectuated, whether via reporting systems, state claims, individual claims or active control methods. As said, on the international plane the novelty lies in the phenomenon that an individual can files suit against it state. On the national level the novelty lies in the phenomenon that traditionally the treatment of not only aliens is object of scrutiny by their home countries, but that also the treatment of own nationals (and especially minorities and/or indigenous people) is on the agenda of other countries. As such human rights play a role in international relations, via the

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United Nations or between states, further strengthened by the activities of nongovernmental organizations (Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch) and legal scholars. Scrutiny by other countries does not please states, that is to say governments, that are not able or willing to meet the observance of human rights. As a reaction human rights law is set aside as an ideology and the universal claim is disputed. We only have to read our daily newspaper to see what results from that. Nobel laureate and political dissident Andrey Sakharov once wrote from his internal exile in the Soviet Union: The ideology of human rights is probably the one which can be combined with such diverse ideologies as communism, social democracy, religion, technocracy and those ideologies which may be described as national and indigenous. It can also serve as foothold for those () who have tired of the abundance of ideologies, none of which have brought () simple human happiness. The defense of human rights is a clear path toward the unification of people in our turbulent world, and a path toward the relief of suffering. The course Human Rights Law primarily focuses on the positive rules and procedures (especially from the Strasbourg Court on Human Rights), but also strives to implement a sense of urgency to take the special responsibility of lawyers vis--vis human rights seriously. Course Objectives The goals of this course are: 1. to provide students with an understanding of the basic principles of human rights law and an analytical framework so that they will be able to analyze issues of human rights law; 2. to provide students with an adequate basic grounding in human rights law so that they will be prepared for a specialized course in the field of human rights law (for example discrimination, minorities, child rights etc.); 3. to familiarize students with the main conventions and multilateral agreements in contemporary human rights law. Competences With reference to the Course Book/The Hague LL.B. Manual, the chapter on the Legal Competences, this course focuses on legal knowledge.Through the assignments this course contributes to the competence of application of knowledge and judgment. Preliminary requirements The introductory course Public International Law is a prerequisite to attend this course. The lecturers may grant special permission for those students not meeting this requirement and/or from other programs. Course activities 1. Lectures: In this course the faculty will offer a weekly lecture. Reference is made to the Course Book/The Hague LL.B. Manual for tips and suggestions how to

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make lectures and the like effective. Students are required to be prepared for the lecture. 2. Workshop Lectures: In this course the faculty will offer a weekly workshop lecture. The purpose of these workshop lectures is to discuss, evaluate and deepen the understanding of the subjects of the lecture, to answer questions and, where necessary, repeat elements of the lecture. Examination and Assignments The exam of this course consists of a written exam with open and/or multiple choice questions, as well as the two assignments. Both elements have to be successfully completed. Attendance In this course attendance of the lectures and workshop lectures, if any, is mandatory. Attendance Lists will circulate during the sessions. Failure to attend a minimum of 80% will lead to exclusion of the written exam, and/or deduction of the grade, and/or alternative tasks, at the sole discretion of the lecturers or program management. Literature To be announced

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4.2.4. IPM Project 2: HIV/AIDS in Africa Course Design and Coordination: IJsbrand Hoetjes and Ins de Sousa Term 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Theme: HIV/AIDS in Africa HIV/ AIDS constitutes a global, multifaceted problem. Whereas in Western Europe and North America prevention programs and access to treatment and medication have produced relatively satisfactory results, in poorer countries and regions this has not been the case. In sub-Saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached alarming proportions: the number of people living with this disease is still increasing, life expectancy has dropped from around 60 years to below 50 years, and in some cases is now barely above 35 years of age (Barnett 2006: 305). HIV/AIDS has serious long-term implications, which threaten to destroy the social, economic and political fabric of subSaharan countries. The impact of HIV/AIDS in Africa thus poses a huge policy challenge, for international and local policy-makers alike. What are the lessons to be learned from the African case and what can be done policy-wise to improve this situation? In this project two main approaches to this problem will be distinguished:
1. The Global Approach to HIV/AIDS as a relevant international policy field is

characterized by the focus on international institutions and organizations, and by the emphasis given to universal blueprints such as human, social and economic rights. This approach usually includes the analysis of regulatory frameworks and guidelines for states and other relevant international actors, such as NonGovernmental Organizations (NGOs) and Multinational Companies (MNCs) concerning research, prevention, control and treatment of the disease. 2. The Local Approach to HIV/AIDS is characterized by the focus on social, cultural and environmental factors that explain differences in policy responses among different continents, regions and countries. In the case of Africa, poor health systems and political and economic instability have turned HIV/AIDS in a multifaceted problem for local policy-makers and on-the-field organizations, such as international or local NGOs, religious and charity groups. Course Objectives The aim of this project is to make students think about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa as a concrete international policy field. By the end of this project, students should be able to: 1. Become familiar with different aspects of HIV/AIDS social, political and economic causes and effects from an international public policy perspective;

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2. Identify the main stakeholders involved in the policy-making process dealing with

this disease;
3. Apply and reflect upon the following phases of the policy cycle: agenda-setting,

discussion and policy evaluation. Teaching and Working Method In this project, there will be a combination of plenary meetings with group meetings. The plenary meetings (including guest lectures by experts on HIV/AIDS policies) serve the purpose of making students acquainted with the field of HIV/AIDS in Africa. The group meetings serve the purpose of preparing and guiding students in their group assignments, in preparation for a role-play exercise to be conducted at the end of Term 3; and in their individual assignments (reflecting upon and improving the outcome of the role-play exercise). Evaluation and Assignments Students will be graded according to their performance with regard to group and individual assignments throughout this 16 weeks project. In the first 8 weeks of the project (term 3) students should make themselves acquainted with the requirements of each assignment and with the necessary skills to be able to perform satisfactorily both in the group assignment and in the role-play exercise. In term 4, students are required to work in depth on the outcome of the role-play exercise Term 3: Preparation for the Role-play exercise (group assignment): The group assignment revolves around a role-playing setup, which will be conducted at the end of term 3. This assignment should result in a strategic document drawn up by each role-playing team, and it is a condition for entering into the role-play itself! Role-play exercise (individual assignment): The goal of the role-play exercise is to produce a document, containing the results of the negotiation sessions. This document is the result of the groups effort to reach an eventual policy decision, or at least a conclusion on the outcome of the negotiations. Though the result (document) will be the groups responsibility, students will be assessed on their individual performance during the role-play sessions Term 4: Improving the Outcome (group assignment): After the role-play, the students will form teams to improve the content of the document. Each team is expected to conduct relevant and necessary research in order to improve a number of items contained in the final document.

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Reflection on the Role-play (individual assignment): After concluding the final draft of the role-play document, each student is required to write an individual report about the negotiations. This should include:
1. a short summary of the negotiation proceedings; 2. a reflection on how their initial strategy has influenced the final outcome of the

negotiation. The final grade of the project will be calculated as follows:


o o o o

Strategic Document: 25 % Role-play Performance: 25 % Improving the Role-play Document: 25% Report on Role-play sessions: 25 %

Literature For this course a selection of texts from the list below will be made available via Blackboard or in reader format.

o
o o

Fisher, Roger, William Ury and Bruce Patton; Getting to Yes; Negotiating an agreement without giving in (2nd or later edition), Random House, 1999 Barnett, Tony and Whiteside, Alan; AIDS in the Twenty-First Century. Disease and Globalization (2nd edition), Palgrave MacMillan, 2006 Seckinelgin, Hakan, Who can help people with HIV/AIDS in Africa? Governance of HIV/AIDS and Civil Society, International Journal of Voluntary and Non-Profit Organizations, vol. 15, no.3, 2004, pp.287-303 UNAIDS Report on the Global AIDS epidemic 2006, available online:
http://www.unaids.org/en/HIV_data/2006GlobalReport/default.asp

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4.2.5. Dealing with Data 1 Instructor: Ron Crijns Term 3 Total ECTS: 2 Course Description Way, way back, as soon as humans realized that counting was a good idea, collecting information also became a useful skill. If counting counted, then one would know how many times the sun would rise in one season, how much food was needed to last the winter, and what amount of resources belonged to whom. That was just the beginning. Once numbers became part of language, it seemed like the next step was to attach these numbers to outcomes. The past 100 years have seen great strides in the invention of new ways to use old ideas. The simplest test for examining the differences between the averages of two groups was first advanced during the early 20th century. Techniques that build on this idea were offered decades later and have been greatly refined. And the introduction of personal computers and such programs as the SPSS products has opened up the use of sophisticated techniques to anyone who wants to explore these topics. In the most general sense, statistics comprises of a set of tools and techniques that is used for describing, organizing, and interpreting information or data. Those data might be the scores on a test taken by students participating in a special math curriculum, the number of patient complaints when using one type of drug rather than another, or the average price of a dinner in an upscale restaurant in Sante Fe. In all of these examples, and the million more we could think of, data are collected, organized, summarized, and then interpreted. In this course, youll learn about collecting, organizing, and summarizing data as part of descriptive statistics. And then youll learn about interpreting data when you learn about the usefulness of inferential statistics. Literature: Statistics for people who (think they) hate statistics. Neil J. Salkind, 3rd edition, Sage, ISBN: 978-1-4129-5150-0. (not the excel edition) Examination: individual, written closed book exam.

4.2.6. Teamwork Instructor: Sylvia Meijers

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Term 4 Total ECTS: 2 Course Description This course offers a broad overview on all aspects of teamwork and team leadership. Teamwork and team leadership are vital subjects for public managers: for most of their working career they will either be team members, team leaders or both. They will function in businesses or in the government which are all organisations that require teamwork and leadership in the way they operate and in the way through which they reach decisions. Understanding team work and leadership is essential for anybody who wants to work effectively as a public manager in either of those organisations. Students will be actively involved in this course: y In session 1, all students will be assigned a topic from the book, on which they have to prepare a presentation. y In sessions 3-7 there will be two presentations in each session, followed by a group discussion based on those presentations. y The last session is a general review of the course. Grading In order to pass this course, you have to meet the following requirements. 1. Attendance: You are allowed to miss no more than one session of the course. If you miss more, you will have to do a a special assignment in order to still qualify for a grade. 2. Presentation: You have to give one presentation in class, which will count 50 % of your final grade.. The subjects for your presentations will be assigned in class. Your presentation will be graded according to these criteria: - is it well prepared? - does it address the required topic? - has the presenter mastered his subject? - did the presenter manage to get the information across to the audience? - did the presentation stay within the time-guidelines? - was the presenter able to answer questions by the students? 3. Exam. You will have to sit a written exam at the end of the course. The exam will count towards 50% of your final grade.

Literature Mastering Team Leadership by Robert L Cartwright, Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN-10: 0333992989; ISBN-13: 978-0333992982

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5. Courses Year 2
5.1. Term 1 and 2
5.1.1. Global Sociology Instructors: Ins de Sousa and Courtney Vegelin Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Course Description In the last two decades, we have witnessed a number of events of truly global significance. The process of global transformation is still underway, mainly in the form of a time-space compression, or the shrinking of distance by better, faster, and cheaper forms of travel and communication. This has lead to an enhanced interconnectedness of economic and social processes and to an increase in the pace of human life. There are many way of explaining changes at a global level, but in doing so, we need to re-think old concepts and develop new perspectives to advance our understanding on globalization. The aim of this course is to examine a wide variety of contemporary social issues from a global perspective. This perspective includes examinations of: y The main interpretations used to explain an increasingly globalized world (sociology, history and modernization, global economy, state formation and nationhood). y New inequalities and divisions created by global processes (uneven development, class, gender and race, identity and citizenship).

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y y

New experiences such as consumerism, hyper-urbanization, the role of the media and the role of religion. The challenges of globalization in regard to the environment, sustainable development, and universal rights, and questions about global participation and a global society.

Course Objectives Globalization is a complex phenomenon, with multiple causes and a variety of facets. The aim of this course is to tackle some of these complexities and to make IPM students familiar with the effects and challenges posed by globalization. By the end of the two courses (Global Sociology I and II) students should be able to: o Understand and distinguish causes and effects of global processes from a politico-sociological perspective. o Understand and apply concepts and definitions related to social and cultural globalization. o Analyze contemporary themes from a global sociology perspective. Competencies The competencies students of this course can expect to obtain include: o Awareness and understanding of political, ideological and cultural differences among people (reflection on the public duty). o Ability to discuss the role and effectiveness of public policy, looked at from different angles and perspectives (reflection on the public duty) o Ability to conduct research of a social and political nature (the public manager at work) Teaching and Working Method The course will be a combination of lectures, discussions, student presentations, short debates, short homework assignments, and other in-class activities. Some of these activities are designed to guide the students in their assignments, exam preparation and final paper. The details of each assignment will be provided in class. Blackboard All course information found in this outline as well as any additional reading assignments will be available on the course Blackboard. Additionally, this course will make use of the Blackboard for submitting discussion questions, short written assignments, and discussion. Attendance Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class. Students are not allowed to miss more than two classes, but it is highly recommended that you always attend. If you need to miss more than two classes, you need to inform the instructor via e-mail as soon as possible. Failure to attend the required number of classes can be reflected in your participation grade. Evaluation and Assessment

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The grade for this term will be based on three parts: participation, presentations, and the final written exam. Participation includes not only being well prepared to discuss the topics in class, but submitting your discussion questions to the blackboard on time, and preparing the short written assignments (no more than one page each) to facilitate discussion in class. Presentations include preparing one well-structured presentation with a small group (of two or three students), and a 3-5 page written summary of the presentation. Both the presentation and written summary should be put on the blackboard the day of your presentation. The final written exam will take place during the exam period after the first term. Details of the exam will be provided toward the end of the course. Your grade for the first term will be weighted as follows: Participation: 25% Presentations: 30% Final written exam: 45%

The grade for the second term will also be based on three parts: participation, a research paper of 10-15 pages, and a written final exam. Your grade for the second term will be weighted as follows: Participation: 25% Research paper: 35% Final written exam: 40%

Literature o Cohen, Robin and Paul Kennedy, Global Sociology. 2nd ed., New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. o Any additional reading will be provided on the course blackboard.

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5.1.2. Governmental Accounting Instructor: Ron Crijns Term 1 Total ECTS: 3 Course Description Who would be interested in a book on governmental accounting who is not an accountant? The quick answers were obvious; investors, elected officials, financial and other managers working in government, and labour unions. On second thought, anyone who is impacted by a state or local government might have an interest in understanding what at times seems like the overly complex and confusing world of governmental accounting. Being able to more intelligently read and to understand the financial statements prepared by governments and understanding some of the key accounting concepts that underlie those financial statements can help non-accountants better understand the financial affairs of governments. In this course we will deal with the following topics: o What is meant by governmental accounting and to what types of entities it applies? o Some basic accounting concepts underlying all governmental accounting and financial reporting. o The principles of fund accounting. o The basic financial statements prepared by governments. o Specific accounting issues such as accounting for revenues, capital assets, and pensions.

Literature: Governmental accounting made easy, Warren Ruppel, John Wiley $ Sons, ISBN: 0-47164868-X. Examination: individual, written closed book exam.

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5.1.3. Economics for IPM 1. Microeconomics: Government and Market Instructor: IJsbrand Hoetjes Term 2 Total ECTS: 3 Course Description Before a public manager can fully see the role and impact of Government in the economic aspect of society, he/she first needs to understand the functioning and malfunctioning of the market mechanism. Starting from the economics of supply, demand, and market equilibrium, an examination of the conditions necessary for markets to deliver efficient and equitable/desired outcomes will reveal the different parts Government plays in economics. Government enables markets, yet also unavoidably burdens them, and economically sound policy-making should always encompass both angles. Objectives To provide the students with the understanding of basic micro-economic concepts relevant to policy-making, and to improve their rudimentary skills in utilizing an economists toolkit in analyzing market functioning and policy implications. Teaching method and Examination In this course, there will be 8 lectures, complemented by biweekly classes dealing with exercises and exam preparation. The final grade will be calculated as follows: Attendance: 20% Written exam: 80% Literature th (!)  Case, Karl E. and Ray C. Fair, Principles of Economics, 7 edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004 (ISBN: 013-144172-8) c Part I c Part II c Part III  Some additional texts may be supplied in reader or online format.

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5.1.4. IPM Project 3: Global Economics and Global Environment Course Design and Coordination: IJsbrand Hoetjes and Ins de Sousa Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Theme: Economics and the environment from a global perspective The last century, international relations have more strongly than ever been shaped by economic forces, as transportation and communication possibilities became manifold and ever cheaper. This increased interconnectedness does not, however, imply increasing global homogeneity, equality or even equity from an economic perspective or other relevant points of view. Nevertheless, the disappearance of barriers to the functioning of world markets, can be argued to (continue to) bring many benefits, though unevenly distributed. Increased economic activity and not in the least increased transportation of goods and people does have environmental drawbacks. The ecological perspective has been gaining attention in the public domain, although many questions still remain as to the extent and causes of the damage done. This project requires students to see both sides of the global equation, because any policy solutions to global problems need to acknowledge global economics (and politics) as a playing field. Project Objectives The aims of this project are: y Self-directed research: Students will gain insights (from several relevant theoretical disciplines) in the global developments and causalities underlying economic production, growth and distribution, and environmental change and its effects on society. y Application of theory: Students will, at the end of this project, be expected to have turned acquired knowledge and insights about the project theme into a concrete set of meaningful activities for a peer audience. y To make students realize the ins and outs of an audience-oriented approach to the presentation of content and conclusions directed at policy design. y To enhance skills required for the organization of a thematic event, involving (among others): o Researching o Formulating o Planning o Organizing o Teamwork o Presentation o Improvisation

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Assignments Term 1 Context: Research and Planning In the first half of this project, students will be expected to come up with a sound and detailed plan for the conference, working in small groups. The best plan will be selected for actual implementation in the second part of this project. Selection will be based on feasibility, effectiveness, originality, among other criteria. The aim of the plan should be: To organize a conference/symposium aimed at making people aware of the links between different developments on a global scale, and to encourage the search for cooperative solutions to international problems. Term 2 Context: Organization and Presentation In the second half of this project, student will form a project team with the mission to organize a conference aimed at increasing awareness of the economic and ecological developments underlying the perceived threat to the environment we live in. Important (long term) solutions should of course not be ignored. The conference should first of all present, to an audience of peers, IPM students' own content-based activities, showing an in-depth understanding of global economics and environment. It must also offer a line-up of authoritative speakers specialists, policy-makers, politicians etc. Examination Term 1: Small group and individual assignments (written), presentations. Products: Project Planning proposals, Conference Plan pitch presentation Term 2: Project group assignments; preparation and organization of a conference and related activities and (written) products and presentations, individual contributions and participation. Attendance A minimal attendance requirement will be set for tutored and presentation sessions, and may apply to some lectures and other group meetings. Participation in the final conference is of course obligatory. Literature By definition and by multidisciplinary nature, the application-oriented IPMprojects primarily rely on the books and materials treated during the non-project courses in the current and previous (!) terms. In order to facilitate students in getting acquainted with a project's Theme and Context, additional book chapters, articles and of course policy documents will be supplied in a reader format and/or on Blackboard, or will be available in the HHS library after the beginning of each term.

5.1.5. Dealing with Data 2

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Instructor: Ron Crijns Term 1 Total ECTS: 2 Course Description Way, way back, as soon as humans realized that counting was a good idea, collecting information also became a useful skill. If counting counted, then one would know how many times the sun would rise in one season, how much food was needed to last the winter, and what amount of resources belonged to whom. That was just the beginning. Once numbers became part of language, it seemed like the next step was to attach these numbers to outcomes. The past 100 years have seen great strides in the invention of new ways to use old ideas. The simplest test for examining the differences between the averages of two groups was first advanced during the early 20th century. Techniques that build on this idea were offered decades later and have been greatly refined. And the introduction of personal computers and such programs as the SPSS products has opened up the use of sophisticated techniques to anyone who wants to explore these topics. In the most general sense, statistics comprises of a set of tools and techniques that is used for describing, organizing, and interpreting information or data. Those data might be the scores on a test taken by students participating in a special math curriculum, the number of patient complaints when using one type of drug rather than another, or the average price of a dinner in an upscale restaurant in Sante Fe. In all of these examples, and the million more we could think of, data are collected, organized, summarized, and then interpreted. In this course, youll learn about collecting, organizing, and summarizing data as part of descriptive statistics. And then youll learn about interpreting data when you learn about the usefulness of inferential statistics. Literature: Statistics for people who (think they) hate statistics. Neil J. Salkind, 3rd edition, Sage, ISBN: 978-1-4129-5150-0. (not the excel edition) Examination: individual, written closed book exam.

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5.1.6. European Institutions Instructor: Kees Aldewereld Term 2 Total ECTS: 2 Course description: The European Union can be described as the most developed form of regionalism in international relations. Started after World War II the process of European integration has gone through different stages of deepening and broadening, leading to a common market with a single currency and cooperation between 27 member states. The objective of this course is to inform the student about the historic development of the EU and its institutional design. The course offers the student an accessible introduction to some of the main public management problems in the European context too. Insight in and knowledge of the European Union from a political, economic and historical perspective is obtained through lectures and interactive workshops as well as through discussions and presentations. The assessment consists of: o Written exam. The student will develop the following competencies: o Takes into account political, ideological and cultural differences. o Does research in matters of policy and society. o Is able to analyze political developments in the European Union. o Is able to determine relevant European issues. o Is able to analyze and formulate the area of tension between national policy and supranational directives and law making. Syllabus: Lecture 1: What is the European Union: an International Organization or a Superstate? Lecture 2: Identity and Evolution of the EU. Lecture 3: The European Institutions. Lecture 4: The EU Policy Process. Lecture 5: The EU and Its Citizens. Lecture 6: The Economic Policy. Lecture 7: The Quality of Life and Foreign Relations. Literature: o John McCormick, Understanding the European Union. A Concise Introduction, London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2008.

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5.1.7. English Skills Instructor: Kees Aldewereld Terms 1,2,3 and 4 Total ECTS: 8 (2+2+2+2) Objective: A university graduate at Bachelor Level is expected to have a command of the English Language at a B2 (upper intermediate) or C1 (advanced) level. The English Language Program of the first year teaches the skills Speaking & Listening, Reading & Writing at the required levels, progressing from upper intermediate to advanced level. The method used in this language program is Total English as it is related to the Common European Framework levels and the University of Cambridge ESOL main suite examinations. Competencies: The ability to understand (reading and listening skills) and to communicate (written and oral skills) in the English language at level B2, C1 and C2. B2: 1. Can follow or give a talk on a familiar topic or keep up a conversation on a fairly wide range of topics within the field of Public Management. 2. Can scan texts for relevant information and understand detailed instructions or advice. 3. Can make notes while someone is talking or write a letter including non standard requests. C1: 1. Can contribute effectively to meetings and seminars within the field of Public Management or keep up with a casual conversation with a good degree of fluency, coping with abstract expressions. 2. Can read quickly enough to cope with an academic course, to read the media for information or to understand non-standard correspondence. 3. Can prepare/draft professional correspondence, take reasonably accurate notes in meetings or write an essay which shows an ability to communicate. C2: 1. Can advise on or talk about complex or sensitive issues within the field of Public Management 2. Can understand documents, correspondence and reports. 3. Can write letters on any subject and full notes of meetings or seminars with accuracy. Program: Group A: Upper Intermediate B2 Group B: Total English Advanced (C1)

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Assessment: Each term has one final written Test (A,B,C,D) Textbooks: o Richard Ackham, Arminta Grace. Upper Intemediate Students Book. Pearson Longman o Jack Newbrook, Judith Wilson. Proficiency Gold Coursebook. Pearson Longman. o Helen Huntley. Essential Academic Vocabulary. Thomson Heinle

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5.1.8. Study and Career Coaching (SCC) Instructor: Kees Aldewereld Terms 1,2,3 and 4 Total ECTS: 8 (2+2+2+2) Description and Objectives The student has made his/her choice for the IPM program. The SCC program guides the student towards his/her career goal which is defined in the second year. Therefore, SCC in year 2 focuses on: o Career development; o o the development of the relational skills (LOBO competencies 42-53) on levels 2 individual student coaching.

In term 1 and 2 we focus on the writing of professional letters, especially on Letters of Application and CVs. The students are requested to write letters to organizations (profit or non-profit) in which they would like to take a traineeship asking for an interview. The purpose of the interview is to gather information on future career expectations as well as information on the organization itself. The interviews are to take place in term 3. The results of the interviews are presented in a Report, including information about the organization itself. In term 4 we concentrate on the future field of work and the students give a presentation based on the Report (term 3) as well as their choice of Minor in year 3. Term 1: o o o Term 2: o o o Term 3: o o o Reports and Interviews (Future Career Oriented) Individual interviews (2) PDP (smart/swot)

Correspondence Individual Interviews (2) PDP/PAP Correspondence Individual Interviews (2) PAP

Term 4: Future Field of Work/Presentations


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o o

Future field of work of the International Public Manager and the selection of minor programs. (orientation towards field of work of Int. Public Manager through guest lecturers) Individual Interviews (2) Portfolio/reflection

The products that the students are requested to hand in, are: 1. PDP (term 1-4) 2. PAP (term 1-4) 3. Diverse letters 4. Assignments 5. Report of the interviews conducted. (Career oriented) 6. Report on the organization where the interview took place. 7. Presentation of the Report. 8. A Plan for personal future career with well defined motivation for the choice of profession, as well as an overview of the competencies needed within the chosen professional context and minors related to this career objective. (SWOT and SMART) 9. Portfolio (Assignments, PDP,PAP, Report of Interviews, Presentation outline, Reflection) Assessment: The grades are based on the products, mentioned above. Attendance: You are allowed to miss no more than one session of the course per term. If you miss two you will have to do a special assignment as compensation. If you miss more than two classes per term you will have to retake the course.

Literature: C. Stuij. Reports. Archipelago series. A. Thuss. Presentations. Archipelago series. T. Ringeling, Correspondence, Archipelago series

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5.2. Term 3 and 4


5.2.1. Economics for IPM 2. Macroeconomics: National Economic Policy Instructor: IJsbrand Hoetjes Term 3 Total ECTS: 3 Course Description National economic policy affects the sum of all markets. In order to understand the aggregate mechanism of a national economy, some degree of model-wise thinking is necessary. The focus in dealing with macro models will be on graphical economics analysis, and in some instances also on the relation of these models to (time series of) economic indicators. Students of public management are required to grasp the macrolevel interrelations between the markets for products, investment and input factors, and to understand the effects of different choices in fiscal and monetary policy-making. This course will start out from a closed-economy perspective for the sake of simplicity, but will gradually add the international counterparts of the markets mentioned above. Objectives The aim of this course is to provide the students with the understanding of basic macroeconomic concepts relevant to policy-making, and to improve their basic skills in utilizing an economists toolkit in analyzing economic policy within a macroeconomic model. Teaching Method and Examination In this course, there will be 8 lectures, complemented by biweekly classes dealing with exercises and exam preparation. The final grade is calculated as follows: Attendance: 20% Written exam: 80% Literature th (!)  Case, Karl E. and Ray C. Fair, Principles of Economics, 7 edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004 (ISBN: 013-144172-8) c Part IV c Part V c Part VI  Some additional texts may be supplied in reader or online format.

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5.2.2. International Trade Instructor(s): IJsbrand Hoetjes and Ins de Sousa Term 4 Total ECTS: 3 Course Description Both the phenomenon of globalization and its impact are undeniably interlinked with economic forces. Nevertheless, a world economy is in many aspects still far away from international economic interactions as we know them. Insight in the meaning of (national and regional) borders and barriers to economic behaviour is crucial in the understanding (and management) of the international public realm. Starting out with a recap of open macroeconomics and an introduction to economic theories of international trade, this course will confront students with several important issues in international relations which have a strong economic component. Adding a historical, political or even an ethical context to the economic analysis will result in future policy directions reaching beyond the gains from trade. Objectives The aim of this course is to add to students economic insights into the analysis of international economic relations, and to see the value and limitations of the monodisciplinary conclusions of an economist when dealing with issues in a broader policy context. Once again, the student will acquire some useful economic tools to deal with the economic aspects of international relations, revolving around the interaction of national markets and policies concerning trade, factor movements, growth and development etc. Teaching Method and Examination In this course, there will be 7 lectures, complemented by biweekly classes used for discussions, exercises and exam preparation. The final grade is calculated as follows: Attendance: 20% Written Exam: 80% Literature th  Case, Karl E. and Ray C. Fair, Principles of Economics, 7 Prentice Hall, 2004 (ISBN: 013-144172-8) c Part VII  Additional texts will be supplied in reader or online format

(!)

edition, Pearson

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5.2.3. Organizational Management Instructor: Term 3 Total ECTS: 3

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5.2.4. Human Resources Management Instructor: Sylvia Meijers Term 4 Total ECTS: 3 Course description This course deals with essential topics in management and organizational behavior from the perspective of public and nonprofit management. Major topics include the behavior of individuals in organizations (self-knowledge, dealing with stress, making decisions etcetera), leadership, organizational politics and organizational change. Objectives: o The students understand the basic issues that affect behavior in public and nonprofit organizations o The students are able to analyze management problems from the standpoint of the individual o Students develop an understanding of interaction between individual behaviour and organizational behaviour / function Assessment: Students are requested to read and study a selection of chapters of the below mentioned book. At the end of the course students have to take a written exam and have to hand in a paper. Each will count 50 % of the final grade. Literature Managing Human Behaviour in Public and Non-profit Organizations by Denhardt, Denhardt and Aristigueta Publisher: Sage publications 2009-07-15 Language: English ISBN 9781412956673

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5.2.5. IPM Project 4: Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights at the Workplace Course Design and Coordination: IJsbrand Hoetjes and Ins de Sousa Term 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 6 (3+3) Theme: CSR and Human Rights at the Workplace (Labor Rights) During the past decades, the environment for regulation of corporate activity has gone through many changes. Attempts to regulate global processes of production and distribution have been increasingly coupled with the need to protect the global environment and to safeguard human rights. A whole range of actors intergovernmental organizations (IOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), trade unions, international solidarity groups and some corporations themselves is seeking to achieve a more active role in universal standards and codes of conduct for Multinational Corporations (MNCs) in order to deal with theses issues. The assumption of greater social responsibility by MNCs is particularly important in the light of the economic disruptions and social abuses that accompany the globalization process. It has become clear that globalization has facilitated the expansion of MNCs and a wider choice in the methods they use to operate in several different locations. As the decision about where to locate production facilities becomes crucial for economic development, so becomes the decision on where to invest and from where to trade. MNCs are strong advocates of international commitments regulating the obligations of national governments towards foreign investors. However, they share an aversion to international commitments that bind them to address the social consequences of their economic operations. This project thus focuses on one of the most important dimensions of corporate social responsibility: labor standards or the fundamental conditions that should apply across all workplaces. Globalization has produced marginalization and exclusion of large sections of the workforce, especially in developing countries where low value-added and lowwage employment prevails. In the developing world, issues such as forced labor, child labor, wage discrimination or no freedom of association not only illustrate the failure of national governments to address these problems but also the negligence that has accompanied the globalization of corporate activity in regard to the protection of human rights in the workplace. Project Objectives The objective of this project is to make students familiar with labor standards and corporate social responsibility as an international policy field. By the end of this project, students should be able to:

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o o

o o

Identify the relevant stakeholders involved in attempts of international regulation of corporate activity with regard to labor standards; Analyze and critically reflect on the pros and contras of international regulation of corporate activity concerning human rights at the workplace. Conduct research going into the field, rather than using only secondary sources (term 3). Planning and organizational skills (term 4).

Competencies o Knowledge of relevant best practices; o Ability to discuss the role and effectiveness of policies, looked at from different angles and interests; o Ability to evaluate the content of existing policies and their development stages; o Ability to translate political issues into lines of policies, as well as to indicate alternatives and priorities with the help of an action plan; o Ability to use formerly and elsewhere applied solutions. Assignments Term 3 Individual Assignment (50% of final grade): Each student selects and writes 2 case studies within the theme CSR and human rights at the workplace Each case (2000 words per case) should contain: o Introduction to the problem o Background of the problem o Legal dimension of the problem o Short description of the parties involved in the problem. For example: companies, governments, IOs, NGOs, the workers themselves o Conclusion. Attention: challenge the reader to think and discuss the problem through additional questions, mapping of possible solutions and suggestions Group Assignment (50% of final grade): Each group writes a comparative analysis of all the cases pertaining to the group (more or less 8 cases per group, 10 pages max, excluding annexes). Annexes should be the cases from the individual assignment and other relevant documents (legal texts, for example). Each analysis should contain: o Introduction o Commonalities among cases o Differences among cases o Conclusion: how to proceed in order to provide a solution to the main problem or question, which can be deduced from the 8 cases.

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Term 4 Group Assignment: Proposal for an organization, advocating corporate social responsibility and/ or the protection of human rights at the workplace. The proposal must contain: o Name of the organization, o Who the organizers are and what are their goals, o Membership and networks, o Legal framework (under which set(s) of laws does the organization operate and regulations on how it can exercise advocacy) o Financing and available budget o Distinction among short, medium and long term activities and planning: o Marketing and knowledge diffusion. Examination The projects final grade (for 6 ECTS) is calculated as follows: 25%- Individual Assignment 25%- Group Assignment term 3 50%- Group Assignment term 4 Attendance This project will consist of plenary and group meetings. Plenary meetings may include guest lectures so that students can familiarize themselves with the theme and the related topics. Group meetings will serve the purpose of guiding the students in their assignments. Attendance is required in plenary sessions. Literature By definition and by multidisciplinary nature, the application-oriented IPMprojects primarily rely on the books and materials treated during the non-project courses in the current and previous (!) terms. In order to facilitate students in getting acquainted with a project's Theme and Context, additional book chapters, articles and of course policy documents will be supplied in a reader format and/or on Blackboard, or will be available in the HHS library after the beginning of each term.

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5.2.6. Intercultural Communication Instructor: Kees Aldewereld Term 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 4 (2+2) Course description: In this course we explore the concept of culture and its impact on society and organizations. Students will be encouraged to identify their own cultural heritage and will be made aware of the importance of adopting a non-judgmental approach to cultural differences. Functioning as a Public Manager in a multicultural society (a society made up of groups of different ethnic backgrounds) and in a European or global context requires an understanding and knowledge of the different cultures the (public) manager is confronted with in his field of work. This course is designed to create awareness on the students part of the modes of behaviour, norms and values of the public or private organisations he/she will encounter in his/her future field of work and foster the ability to function successfully in an intercultural setting. The course consists of two parts. In the first part of the course (term 3) we discuss the theory of Hofstede and Hofstede. In the second part of this course (term 4) we apply the theory of Hofstede and Hofstede to Intercultural Communication and to case studies in International Management Competencies: o To understand and explain the concept of culture. o To explain the way in which national cultures influence behavior in the work setting (context of public management). o To assess the transferability of managerial concepts across cultures. o Demonstrate awareness of and a non-judgmental approach towards cultural difference. o Ability to express oneself in the above mentioned context in adequate English. o Ability to communicate across cultural borders. o To apply an awareness of cultural differences to a variety of organizational situations. Teaching Method: Interactive workshops Assessment: Intercultural Communication 1: Written Exam = 100% Intercultural Communication 2: Presentations = 60% Case study = 40% Literature: Reader: Intercultural Resource/Case Studies in International Management

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6. Courses Year 3

6.1. Terms 1 and 2


6.1.1. Minor European Public Management Coordinator: Kees Aldewereld Instructors: Kees Aldewereld, Ron Crijns, IJsbrand Hoetjes Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 15

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Description of the Minor EPM: This minor offers students of International Public Management insight in the functioning of the European Union, its affairs and procedures and its policy making processes. Knowledge of and familiarity with these topics facilitates the professional life of a future International Public Manager. The EU is an ever increasing political and economic power with an impact stretching far beyond its territory. This minor has the objective of acquainting the international student with European Politics, European Economics, European History and European Law as the impact of the policies of the EU will also influence his/her future field of work. The transfer of knowledge about the EU is obtained is through lectures and workshops as well as through discussions and presentations. There are three modules in this minor: o The Government and Politics of the EU: 9 ECTS o European Economic Integration: 3 ECTS o European Law : 3 ECTS Competencies: y Bases decision on knowledge of precepts and function of Dutch political system (democracy, judiciary, European cooperation). y Takes into account political, ideological and cultural differences. y Is able to place issues in a European context. y Has knowledge of professional, international literature the subject matter. y Does research in matters of policy, society and economics. y Is able to determine relevant European directives. y Is able to analyze and formulate the problematic aspects of national policy and supranational directives and law making. Assessment: The assessment consists of: y Oral presentations of the different themes. y Written exam. The final grade of the EPM course is based upon: y Exams (100%). There will be a written exam at the end of term 1 and at the end of term 2. y In addition drs. Crijns and drs. Hoetjes will provide a joint legal/economic perspective individual (written) assignment. Program: Term 1: EPM 8 lectures on Friday afternoon from 13.00-14.30 hours Term 2: EPM 8 lectures on Friday afternoon from 13.00-14.30 hours Assessment: final exam (33% of the total grade) Lecturers and themes: The program is co-coordinated by dr. Aldewereld

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The parts of the program are: 1. EPM: the lectures (24) focusing on the History of the EU, and on the Government and Politics of the EU. Lecturer; dr Aldewereld. These lectures cq workshops are scheduled for Friday afternoons in term 1 and 2. 2. European Economic Integrations. The lectures focus on the role of Economics in facilitating and to further the integration of the EU. Lecturer: drs. Hoetjes. Assessment: written exam (33% of the total grade) 3. European Law. The lectures focus on the importance of law in the process of European integration. Lecturer: drs. R. Crijns Assessment: written exam (33%) of the total grade) Literature: y Nugent, N. The Government and Politics of the European Union. Palgrave Macmillan. (ISBN 978 0 230 00002 5.) y Pelkmans, J. European Integration; Methods and Economic Analysis, Third ed., Prentice Hall, 2006 (ISBN: 0273694499( y Mc, Donald, Frank and Stephen Dearden (eds.), European Economics Integration, 4th ed., PearsonEd, 2005. (ISB: 0273679082)

6.1.2. SCC/ Mediation and conflict solving skills Instructors: Courtney Vegelin and Ines de Sousa Term 1 and 2 Total ECTS: 2 (1+1) Course Description Conflict between individuals at home, at school or in the workplace is not only unpleasant for those experiencing it, but can inhibit communication, block productivity, and escalate into a hostile environment. Most of the time, conflicts start small and can be resolved before such effects emerge by learning to promptly recognize them and confront them. While most people involved in a conflict, or those observing a conflict taking place, would like to bring them to an end as quickly as possible, they find it is very hard to do so. Often, the seeds of conflict are not apparent but are buried in subtle forms of miscommunication or passive conduct. Getting to the seeds of conflict in order to eliminate them requires an understanding of what to look for and knowledge of the first steps to take to re-establish open communication. As a public manager, the ability to recognize and resolve conflicts is paramount. The types of conflicts a public manager may encounter can range anywhere from personal disagreements in the office, to clashes with and between teams, to open hostility between organizations. Those involved in the conflicts will look to the experience of managers for guidance and assistance in resolving them. It is this knowledge and experience that will be offered in the course. Course Objectives

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This course will provide students with tools for recognizing, mediating and resolving conflict. Through readings, role plays and discussions, students will obtain basic training in approaching conflict, properly assessing the situation, and making decisions about the best forms of mediation. By the end of the course, including both terms, students should be able to: 1. Recognize the early stages of conflict 2. Recognize the role that emotions play in conflict 3. Understand how different personality types interact 4. Build bridges between different personality types 5. Carry out different stages or levels of mediation and resolution 6. Find ways to prevent future conflict

Competencies The competencies you can expect to obtain from this course include: 1. Allowing for the political, ideological and cultural differences between people (Reflections on the Public Duty) 2. Picking up signals from society (Relational Management) 3. Working in a team (Relational Management) 4. Focusing on co-operation, and if there are differences of opinion, knowing how to get a discussion going with all those involved (Relational Management) 5. Being able to communicate clearly and correctly (in writing and vocally) with every target group, regardless of their social background and level of education. (Relational Management) 6. Communicating clearly and decisively, and knowing how to deal with areas of tension and conflict (Relational Management) 7. Having the sensitivity to put themselves in other peoples positions. (Relational Management) Teaching and Working Method Each meeting will be a combination of student presentations, role play, and discussion.

Blackboard All course information, the course readings, the assignments, and any discussions taking place outside of class time will be posted on the Blackboard. Additionally, any relevant announcements will also be posted to the Blackboard so students should make a habit of checking it regularly. Attendance Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class. Students are not allowed to miss more than two classes, but it is highly recommended that you always attend. If you need to miss more than two classes, you need to inform the instructor via e-mail as soon

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as possible. Failure to attend the required number of classes can be reflected in your participation grade. Evaluation and Assessment The different components of the course are all closely integrated and will thus be weighted equally. Each student will be asked to provide a short presentation (no more than 10 minutes) of the reading for the week. Students will also be required to participate in role play. This means that a scenario will be described in which conflict takes place and the students will be required to work it out in their assigned role. After each role play, a discussion will follow to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the approaches used. At the end of the first and second term, each student will be asked to submit a 3-5 page written thought piece. The specific question will be provided at the end of each term. Presentations: Role Play: Discussions: One written paper: 25% 25% 25% 25%

SCC Component The SCC program of year three focuses on the study progress (minors) as well as on the trainee ship in year four. There will be one individual meeting per term with each student to monitor their progress Attention is paid to: o Training for job interviews o Monitoring study progress o Selecting an organization for a traineeship o Applying for a traineeship. At the end of term 2, students are required to hand in the following products: o Several application letters o Updated CV o PDP o Portfolio Literature y McConnon, Shay and Margaret, Conflict Management in the Workplace. 3rd ed. Oxford: How To Books, 2008. y T. Ringeling. Correspondence. Archipelago series. Noordhoff Wolters.

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6.2. Term 3 and 4


6.2.1. Minor on Globalization, Governments and Governance (G3): Globallocal links in Public Policy. Instructors: Kees Aldewereld, Ines de Sousa, Willem Minderhout, Ron Crijns Term 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 15 Brief Description This minor offers a multidisciplinary approach to public policy. It combines a focus on the four major domains of public management (law, sociology, political science and economics) with case-study analysis of specific geographic areas. Courses offered include: Multiculturalism in Global Cities, Governments and the Governance of East Asia, Microfinance and Ethical and Moral Issues of Public Management. The main goal of this minor is to make students aware of the links between global and local processes in researching, designing and implementing public policy. Governance and the Governments of East Asia: Multiculturalism in Global Cities: Ethical and Moral Issues of Public Administration: Micro-finance 4 ECTS 4 ECTS 3 ECTS 4 ECTS

Competences: This minor highlights 3 competencies: 1) Awareness of political, ideological and cultural differences between peoples and capacity to discuss policy effectiveness looked at from different angles and interests. 2) Ability to conduct research, analyse diverse variables in problem areas and to evaluate the content of existing policies and their development stages. 3) Ability to communicate clearly and correctly, to get a discussion going involving all differences of opinion, and to co-operate and function effectively in a group.

Governance and the Governments of East Asia Lecturer: Ins de Sousa Term 3 Total ECTS: 4 Course description: East Asia (including Southeast Asia) is an expanding field of study in the social sciences. East Asian countries and economies are an integral part of the global economy and what goes on this region affects and is affected by what is going on in

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Europe or in America. Most East and Southeast Asian countries are regarded as success stories of economic development in the current globalization era, but they are politically, socially and economically very diverse. The success of East Asias overall development trajectory is not only linked to the regions direct participation in global economic and trade processes, but also embedded in very different political, social and cultural settings. This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of these success stories, with a particular focus on the role that governments play in development processes (public policies, legal order and relationship with the private sector); the political characteristics of these governments and the quality of their governance. Teaching and Working Method: In this course, there will be a combination of lectures and discussion workshops. The workshops are led by the students themselves: each student or group of students will make a short presentation based on the literature and put forward questions for debate. Assessment: The students will be graded on their presentations and on one research paper. Literature: o M. Beeson, Regionalism and Globalization in East Asia, 2006, Palgrave Macmillan o A selection of texts will be made available through Blackboard or in a reader format.

Global Cities Lecturer: Willem Minderhout Term 3 Total ECTS: 4 Brief Course Description In 1800 only 2.5 % of the people lived in cities. Around 1900 the number of city dwellers had increased to 10%. Around 2000 approximately half of the world population lived in an urban environment and this percentage is still increasing rapidly. In this minor we will study the origins and the effects of this urban revolution and the position, function and dynamics of cities in the contemporary world system (global cities). Further details will follow.

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Literature: o Brenner, Neil and Roger Keil (ed.), The Global Cities Reader, London, New York: Routledge, 2006. o Cohen, Robin and Paul Kennedy, Global Sociology. 2nd ed., New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

Ethical and Moral Issues of Public Administration Lecturer: Dr. C. A. Aldewereld Term 4 Total ECTS: 3 Description: The topic of this course is an issue every international public manager is confronted with: it is the relationship between ethics and public administration relation to the concept of competing ethical obligations. Leading thinkers in public administration recognized that the critical issues of government ultimately involve moral choices. The definitive policy decisions made by public officials often have at their base conflicting ethical issues. The ambivalent position in which public officials often find themselves has led some administrative theorists to say that the chief qualifications of an executive is to resolve these ethical codes. This course consists of 6 case studies dealing with ethical and moral issues, and several readings related to the issues discussed in the case studies. Competencies: 03. Allows for the political, ideological and cultural differences between people. 04. Allows for interests, factors of power and influence. 48. Is unbiased and hones, has a clear sense of standards and ensures fair play. Literature: Reader based on Public Administration, Concepts and Cases by R.J. Stilman. Assessment: 1. participation: 20% 2. presentation of case studies; 80%

Micro Finance Instructor: Ron Crijns Term 4 Total ECTS: 4

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6.2.2. Organizational Management Instructor: Term 3 Total ECTS: 2 6.2.3. Financial Management Instructor: Ron Crijns Term 3 Total ECTS: 2 Course Description The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of financial management. We will cover four topics: businesses and their role in the economy, finance, management accounting and financial accounting. Businesses and their role in the economy discuss the characteristics of businesses, their activities and their legal forms. Finance is concerned with determining the quantity of capital required by a business and the means of providing the capital. Financial planning consists of capital budgeting, working capital management and capital structure. On top of that we will elaborate on financial statement analysis. Management accounting focuses on the process of providing mainly financial information for a variety of decision-making purposes. We will discuss cost allocation, budgets and variance analysis. Financial accounting highlights the provision of financial information to external parties by means of the annual report. We will address the legal framework of financial accounting. In addition the requirements governing the classification of the items shown on the balance sheet and profit and loss account will be dealt with. Literature: o Basics of Financial Management, An introductory course in finance, management accounting and financial accounting, P. de Boer, R. Brouwers, W. Koetzier, 2007, first edition, Wolters-Noordhoff, Groningen/Houten, The Netherlands, ISBN: 9789001701314.

6.2.4. Human Resources Management

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Instructor: Sylvia Meijers Term 4 Total ECTS: 2 Course description This course deals with essential topics in management and organizational behavior from the perspective of public and nonprofit management. Major topics include the behavior of individuals in organizations (self-knowledge, dealing with stress, making decisions etcetera), leadership, organizational politics and organizational change. Objectives: o The students understand the basic issues that affect behavior in public and nonprofit organizations o The students are able to analyze management problems from the standpoint of the individual o Students develop an understanding of interaction between individual behaviour and organizational behaviour / function Assessment: Students are requested to read and study a selection of chapters of the below mentioned book. At the end of the course students have to take a written exam and have to hand in a paper. Each will count 50 % of the final grade. Literature Managing Human Behavior in Public and Non-profit Organizations by Denhardt, Denhardt and Aristigueta Publisher: Sage publications 2009-07-15 Language: English ISBN 9781412956673

6.2.5. E-Governance Instructor: IJsbrand Hoetjes Term 4 Total ECTS: 2 Course objectives This course intends to y Make students aware of the views on the (new?) role of government in a widely and rapidly innovating society y Provide students with knowledge of tools and theories to answer the question How to best deal with public issues and perform public tasks by optimally using (ICT) innovations?

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Provide insight into the meaning of innovation for o different regions of the world o different levels of government o different public tasks

The following four themes will be explored; (1) ICT, the technological toolbox, (2) privacy, trust and security, (3) Web 2.0 and (4) networks and the future Introduction From an international perspective, e-government issues display a strikingly paradoxical meaning of national differences. On the one hand, the most recent ICT innovations are all about social and economic interaction taking place with little regard for borders and jurisdictions. On the other, policy approaches to enhancing government services by using such innovations are primarily developed at local or national levels. Comparisons across countries often reveal parallel cases of 'reinventing the wheel', yet initiatives to share experiences between public actors internationally remain very hard to bring to fruition. In many ways, society is becoming more and more networked, especially when considering relations on a global scale, making awareness of the network perspective on government, governance and the distinctions between private and public an invaluable tool for the internationally oriented public manager. At the same time, new ways of dealing with information and knowledge need to be found, as technology shifts the challenges from timing, availability and quantity, to accessibility, reusability and reliability (quality) as conventional information flows move from one-way traffic to multi directional dynamics. The changes technological innovations induce in 21st century society call for a government response, or do they? What is the public task, the responsibility of our governmental institutions when human interactions in the virtual realm have real-life repercussions? Or when citizens come to expect real-time information and increased transparency of government action? Or when millions spent on governmental innovation fail to show tangible results? Cases and Literature In this course, students will explore the most important issues in e-governance by examining the challenges, solutions and principles involved in five thematic cases. each case will be accompanied by a selection of sources (made available through blackboard or in reader format) from amongst others:  Goldsmith, Stephen, and William D. Eggers, Governing by Network; The New Shape of the Public Sector, Brookings Institution Press, 2004  Prins, J.E.J. (ed.), Designing e-governnment, second edition, Kluwer Law International, 2007  Relevant news items from conventional and new media sources  Autoritative online sources (Best practices and Gov 2.0) Examination 25% Participation in the joint case analysis sessions 25% Formulation and documentation of the case analysis and self-study results 50% Written exam

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6.2.6. IPM Project 5 Instructors: IJsbrand Hoetjes and Ron Crijns Term 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 3 (1,5+1,5) Theme: Managing Public Issues, Managing Public Organizations In line with the first and second year IPM Projects, this fifth project aims to ensure students are able to take an effective integrated, multidisciplinary approach to international issues in public management. Besides knowing how to apply their existing knowledge and being able to acquire additional insights relevant for the job, general professional competences w.r.t. work attitude, planning, team play and quality management weigh heavily in this final project. Without excluding any preceding courses, application of elements of the following courses running in parallel to this project will most certainly be required to successfully conclude Project Five:  Financial Management  Organizational Management  e-Governance  Human Resource Management Starting out by analyzing one or more selected cases from the public management context, students will be required to formulate their own problem definitions, and by themselves determine the most appropriate, effective and efficient research strategy, leading to a convincing problem analysis and presentation of solutions and advice. Students will be allowed a degree of choice regarding the case/context they will be working on within limits set by the project assignment(s). This implies that students are also expected to determine the best way to communicate their messages, and will have to do so in an early stage of the project, committing themselves to a partially selfdetermined 'final product'. Although different criteria details may apply to different product formats, such as presentations, reports, debates, press releases etc., the overall content level and effectiveness of the project outcome and project work process will be assessed according to a set of criteria specified in/with the assignment description(s). NB: The appropriateness of the format chosen for the final product (and of course the quality of the implementation) will also be weighed in the grading! Project Objectives The aim of this project is to challenge students to prove their all-round competence in running a professional project from start to finish, in an environment characterized by uncertainty, complex and multidisciplinary subject matter, and an explicit need for selfreliance, initiative and cooperative ability. Examination In the course of the third term the first half of this project students are required to present a project proposal, including essential information such as planning, task division, product details etc. (see exhaustive list in the assignment description on BB). This proposal must be accepted by the appointed IPM staff members before the start of term 4, in order for students to be allowed to participate in the second half of the project.

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The projects final grade will be calculated as follows: 25%- Project proposal (term 3) 25%- Individual professional performance in project team (term 3 and 4) 50%- Final Project result (term 4) NB: awarding of final grade is conditional on an approved (=sufficient) project proposal in term 3 Literature By definition and by multidisciplinary nature, the application-oriented IPMprojects primarily rely on the books and materials treated during the non-project courses in the current and previous (!) terms. In order to facilitate students in getting acquainted with a project's Theme and Context, additional book chapters, articles and of course policy documents may be supplied in a reader format and/or on Blackboard, or will be available in the HHS library after the beginning of each term.

6.2.7. SCC/ Management and Negotiation Skills Instructor: Term 3 and 4 Total ECTS: 2 (1+1)

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7.

Examination Regulations

Programme Examination Regulations 2009-2010


This document together presents the hogeschool university and study parts of the programme examination regulations. Per article the regulations at university level are shown in italics, followed by regulations and particulars at study level. Article 1 Definitions University part The regulations employ the following definitions: Academic year Associated Degree (AD) Associate Degree Programme (AD programme) Academy council Assessment The term starting at 1 September and terminating at 31 August of the following year. The legal degree awarded to students who successfully complete the Associate Degree (AD) programme. A programme within a study with a study load of at least 120 credits that leads to obtaining the Associate Degree (AD). Representative advisory body at academy and service level referred to in the sub-council of the WHW (article 10.25). Integral research that should lead to assessment of and feedback on the level reached for at least one competence, established by assessors on the basis of previously determined assessment criteria, based on observable behaviour and in accordance with a situation that presents itself in a realistic professional practice or in the professional practice itself. The assessor is the person who evaluates learning processes on the basis of an assessment. Through specific training he accurately and reliably interprets students test results and determines the extent to which a student has gained the tested (part) competences. The certificate is presented to the examinee who has passed the first year or final examination of the study or the Ad programme as referred to in article 7.11 paragraph 1 of the WHW. An integrated whole of knowledge, skills, insight and attitude, required to realise professional products in a professional context that meet prevailing quality requirements. The set of competences which a starting employee must have in a certain professional field to be able to act appropriately in a professional situation. The competence profile is related to the national competence profile. The study load referred to in article 7.4 of the WHW. According to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) one credit equals 28 hours of study. The official who manages a faculty or an academy covering at least one study subject. A study in which following a course (study part) during at least one

Assessor

Certificate

Competence

Competence profile

Credit

Academy director Dual study

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Educational (career) supervisor

Educational programme

Elective unit of study

Examination Appeals Board Examinations

Examination date

Examiner Examining Board

Executive Board External student

Final examination First year

First year exam Force majeure

Free selection

period is alternated with professional practice (practical part) related to that study (art. 7.7 paragraph 2 of the WHW). Professional practice is gained on the basis of an agreement signed by the faculty, the student and the employer (art. 7.7 paragraph 5 of the WHW). The educational (career) supervisor supports the process in which the student learns to guide or steer his own studies and career ambitions. The objectives of educational (career) supervision are the study process, professional process and career (choice) process, self-regulation and development of talent. The total units of study (including work placements and the units of study to be chosen by the student in the free selection) and related tests in the first-year, post-first year or the AD programme. A unit of study offered by the faculty, according to the students choice, or activities inside or outside the university to fill up the minor. The study load is no more than 6 credits. The Examination Appeals Board of the Hague University/TH Rijswijk as referred to in article 7.60 of the WHW (see also chapter VII of the Students Charter, part 1). The examination is taken if the tests of the units of study that are part of a study or the first-year programme of a study have been passed, insofar the Examining Board has not determined that the examination includes a study to be conducted by itself into the knowledge, insight and skills of the examinee (article 7.10 paragraph 2 of the WHW). The examination date is the date on which the Examining Board determines that the first year or the final examination has been passed. This date is stated on the certificate. The person responsible for evaluating tests (article 7.12 of the WHW). The board responsible for holding examinations, organising and coordinating tests and authorised to award certificates and diplomas (article 7.12 of the WHW). The board of the university as referred to in article 10.2 of the WHW and in article 1.1, subsection j of the WHW. The person registered at the university as external student who, according to article 7.36 of the WHW, has the exclusive right to take the tests of the study units and the examinations that are part of the study, including the AD programme, and who basically has the right to access the facilities and collections of the university (e.g. the library). The examination that concludes a bachelor study or an AD programme. The first period of the study or the AD programme of a study, prior to the post-first year phase, in which students gain insight into the study content and the future profession. Selection and reference is possible at the end of this period (article 7.8 of the WHW). The examination that concludes the first year of the study and the first-year phase of an AD programme. Force majeure is the event that a shortcoming cannot be directly ascribed to the person, because he or she cannot be held accountable for it by virtue of the law, legal act or prevailing notions. Free selection of which the scope is determined by the faculty or

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Fulltime study Handicap

Hogeschool ( The Hague University of Applied Sciences)

Learning process supervisor

Major

Minor Minor space Part-time study

Period Portfolio

Post-first year programme Professional practice Programme committee Programme examination regulations

study (at least 9 and no more than 60 credits) selected by the student and sanctioned by the Examining Board. A study whereby the practical aspect (e.g. work placement) is part of the education. A visible or invisible function restriction due to a handicap or chronic illness as referred to in article 1 of the WGBH/CZ (Dutch Act governing Equal Treatment of Disabled and Chronically Ill People). This might involve several physical restrictions, chronic diseases, psychological illnesses and dyslexia. The Hague University / TH Rijswijk, maintained by the Stichting Hoger Beroepsonderwijs Haaglanden & Rijnstreek (Haaglanden & Rijn area Foundation for Higher professional education), established in The Hague (TH Rijswijk is part of the Hague University of Applied Sciences). The person supervising the students learning process. Supervision here focuses primarily on learning (coaching competences), cooperation and project work. Supervision in case of project work focuses on the process rather than the specific project objective. The part of study also allowing the student to acquire the competence profile. The major, together with the free selection, prepares the student for obtaining the final examination certificate. A unit of study worth 15 credits to fill up the minor. The part of the study with a scope to be determined by the faculty to be filled up by the student, sanctioned by the Examining Board. A study taking into account the fact that the student also has other (educational) responsibilities. In the study part of the programme examination regulations these responsibilities can be regarded as units of study. A period covering 10 to 20 weeks. The written or electronic collection of evidence, on the basis of which the student shapes his study programme and which reveals the unique progress and/or the development achievements of a student. The part of the study following the first year. The part of the dual study which consists of practical application of professional work which is part of the study programme. The advisory committee called in for each study as referred to in article 10.3c of the WHW). The regulations which lay down the rights and obligations of students and the university as regards education, examinations and tests of a study (article 7.13 of the WHW). The regulations consist of a university part and a study part. The person wanting to sign up as a student at the university. The person registered at the university for a fulltime, part-time or dual study or the AD programme of a study, and who also has the right to participate in the universitys educational programme. The independent official who advises students and helps them solve personal problems of material or immaterial character, and who also mediates wherever necessary. The Students Charter consists of two parts (article 7.59 of the WHW): the university-related part (part 1) and the study-related part

Prospective student Student

Student counsellor

Students Charter

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Study

Study advice

Study part

Test

Unit of study

University University part

WHW

Working day

(part 2). The first part is a general description of the study structure, supporting facilities that are offered to the student, the rights and obligations of both the student and the university and a list of regulations that aim at protecting the students rights. The second part is the programme of examination regulations (OER) and a list of students facilities. A study is a coherent whole of units of study, aimed to gain competences or objectives in terms of knowledge, insight, attitudes and skills which the graduate should possess (article 7.3 of the WHW). Studies have fulltime, part-time and dual study variants. The term study used in this Programme of Examination Regulations is taken to mean a bachelor study. Advice to the student regarding study continuation within or outside the bachelor study or the AD programme of a study submitted at the end of the first year of registration for the first-year or as long as the student has not yet passed the first-year examination (article 7.8b of the WHW). The part of the Programme Examination Regulations (OER) presenting the result of the university part and which applies only to the (fulltime, part-time or dual variant of the) study concerned including the AD programme. The term test is the same as the term examination referred to in the WHW (article 7.10 of the WHW). A test is intended to research the examinees competences or knowledge, insight and skills, and to evaluate the outcome of that research. The term refers to all test forms (including written examinations, assessments, assignments and so on). A test may exist of several part tests. A coherent part of the study concluded with a test (article 7.3 of the WHW). A unit of study may also be referred to as course or module. The Hague University of Applied Sciences. The part of the Programme Examination Regulations (OER) that applies to the study, the tests and the examinations of all fulltime, part-time and dual studies including the universitys AD programmes. The Wet op het Hoger onderwijs en Wetenschappelijk onderzoek = The Dutch Act governing Higher Education and Research. (Bulletin of Acts, Orders and Decrees 1992, 593). All days of the year with the exception of Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays and days off, officially established by the university.

Article 2 Scope University part The university part and the study part make up the programme examination regulations (article 7.13 of the WHW). The university part (appendices included) applies to the studies, the tests and the examinations of all fulltime, part-time and dual bachelor studies of the university in the academic year 2009-2010. No rights shall be derived from the Programme Examination Regulations that prevailed in the previous years unless stated otherwise in the study part. The study part supplements the university part and applies only to one study concerned or a group of studies concerned.

Study part

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The study part applies to the fulltime programme of the International Public Management programme of The Hague University. Article 3 Study language (article 7.2 of the WHW) University part: 1. The study programme will be offered in Dutch, unless the study part states that the study programme or parts of the study programme will be given in a different language, including the reasons. 2. If the study programme is offered in a language other than the Dutch language, the foreign language code of conduct shall apply. This code of conduct can be found in part 1 of the Students Charter. Study part The International Public Management Programme is only offered in English

Article 4 Admission requirements University part 1. The admission procedure for those wanting to join the university as (external) student is largely outlined in part 1 of the Students Charter, chapter 2 and appendix 1. The study part specifies the following, if applicable The pre-university education requirements (article 7.24 of the WHW); The further pre-university education requirements (article 7.25 of the WHW); Supplementary requirements (article 7.26 of the WHW); Requirements set to carrying out activities and the working environment of part-time and dual students, providing these activities are considered to be units of study (articles 7.7 and 7.27 of the WHW) 2. In the event that a diploma has been granted abroad, the prospective student who wishes to sign up for a Dutch study, will need to demonstrate sufficient command of the Dutch language to successfully pass the study. The Enrolment and Deregistration Regulations (appendix 1, part 1 of the Students Charter) describe the language requirements prospective students are expected to meet. 3. If the diploma was issued abroad, the prospective student, who does not hold a diploma for an English study (a diploma issued in a non-EEA country) or who has not taken an English test (a diploma issued in an EEA country) prior to registration for an English study, must prove that he has sufficient command of the English language to successfully follow the study intended. The Enrolment and Deregistration Regulations describe the language requirements prospective students are expected to meet. 4. If a prospective student holding a diploma that was issued in the Netherlands, wishes to register for an English language study, his command of the English language could be put to the test if the study for which he wishes to register is offered in both the Dutch and the English language. Requirements have been further specified in the study part. 5. Prospective students who become 21 or older on the first day of the month in which they wish to register, and who fail to meet the pre-university education requirements must take an admission test to prove their suitability for the relevant study and to also prove sufficient command of the Dutch language to successfully follow the study. The study part describes the test content, prevailing assessment criteria and whom the prospective student should contact for further information (see below under 21+ test). The Enrolment and Deregistration Regulations (appendix 1, part 1 of the Students Charter) cover the language requirements prospective students are expected to meet. 6. Prospective students who do not meet further pre-university education requirements can still be admitted provided they take a test to prove that they have sufficient knowledge and skills. The study part describes the test content, prevailing assessment criteria and whom prospective students should contact for further information

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Study part a. Pre-university education requirements In order to join the International Public Management Programme, the prospective student must possess one of the following diplomas: 1. HAVO (upper general secondary education) or VWO (pre-university education) new style; 2. A diploma for a middle management degree course or specialists study (as referred to in article 7.2.2 of the Dutch Act governing Adult and Vocational Education) or a diploma for a professional training indicated by Ministerial Order; 3. The certificate of the first year or final examination at HBO higher professional education or WO university education level; 4. Another diploma or certificate considered equivalent by the Minister of Education, Science and Cultural Affairs, or considered to be proof of sufficient preparation for the prospective study; 5. Another diploma or certificate considered equivalent by the Executive Board, or considered proof of sufficient preparation for the prospective study. By order of 1 February 2005 the Executive Board has decided that this applies to the HAVO and VWO diploma old style. 6. A prospective student with a Dutch MBO-4 diploma who wants to register for the Public Management bachelor programme (English stream) is admissible after having successfully completed an English & HBO/university study skills test. b. Further pre-university education requirements Incoming students in possession of a HAVO or VWO diploma new style must have followed the culture and social studies profile or the economics and social studies profile to be allowed to follow the Public Management bachelor programme. Those possessing the HAVO or VWO diploma old style must have taken examinations in EC1, in order to obtain pre-mentioned diploma. c. Supplementary requirements The prospective student has to have a demonstrable command of the English language to such an extend that they can finish the study successfully. In the first week of the first term all prospective students are required to take the English language test of the IPM department. The prospective students must pass the test with a minimum score of 5,5. d. 21+ test The examination tests candidates knowledge and skills in terms of Dutch language, reading proficiency in English, and also involves a study-specific assignment. A description of the exact content and the test form as well as the assessment criteria are available at the XXX study. e. Shortcomings Students who do not meet the further pre-university education requirements can still be admitted provided they take a test to show that they possess the necessary knowledge and skills. The test consists of a study-specific assignment in the fields of Finance, Economics, Mathematics and Statistics and a corresponding examination. Article 5 Exemptions University part 1. Upon written request, the Examining Board may grant a student exemption to the interim examinations related to the units of study which involve a study load of no more than 60 credits, provided the student has an MBO (upper secondary vocational education) diploma

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2.

3.

4. 5.

which the hogeschool considers to be relevant. The study part lays down which MBO studies are considered to be related and describes exemption scope and content. Upon written request, the Examining Board might grant a student exemption to one or several examinations that are related to the units of study on the basis of submitted documents according to which the participant has already complied with the requirements (content and level) of the examination concerned. Examples of documents include: qualification, diploma, certificate. Upon written request, the Examining Board, provided it has developed specific policy and a specific procedure to this purpose, might grant a student exemption to one or several tests that are related to units of study on the basis of competences, knowledge and skills gained outside the domain of higher education provided the student can prove in a way to be determined by the study that he has indeed already complied with requirements of the test concerned. The study part sets down how a request for exemption should be submitted. Having received the request, the Examining Board will inform the student concerned in writing within a reasonable amount of time about the scope and type of exemption granted. The Boards letter will state the following: a) the date on which exemption is granted; b) the tests concerned related to the units of study for which exemption is granted; c) the validity of the exemption (equals the validity of the test results).

Study part a. Exemptions based on documents Students who, on the basis of diplomas, certificates, etcetera, believe they qualify for exemption to tests which are related to units of study may submit a written request to the Examining Board. See paragraph b. Exemptions based on competences, knowledge and skills previously acquired through working experience Students who, on the basis of competences previously acquired through working experience, believe they qualify for exemption to tests which are related to units of study will discuss with the Examining Board the possibilities as well as the portfolio assessment they should demonstrate to prove having gained the required competences previously. A portfolio assessment may exist of: curriculum vitae, self-evaluation or motivation, portfolio, 360 assignment, workplace scan (current competence level and learning effectiveness in the workplace), general test, paper, simulation as presentation. c. Procedure to apply for exemptions Students who believe they qualify for exemption to tests related to units of study, on the basis of one of above grounds, may submit a written request to the Examining Board. The Examining Board must receive the request at least XXX working days prior to the commencement of the unit of study. The request must include supporting evidence. Article 6 Study programme University part 1. The total study load of one study amounts to 240 credits (article 7.4b of the WHW). 2. If a study includes an AD programme, the total study load of this programme amounts to at least 120 credits.

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3. The study curriculum of one study and the AD programme within a study have been divided into a first year and a post-first year programme. The study load of the first-year programme amounts to 60 credits. 4. As for fulltime and dual studies the first year and the post-first year programme are divided into semesters. The courses during the semester period can be given in one period covering 20 weeks or two periods of 10 weeks each. The study load has been so allocated over the years and semesters to ensure students can make good progress (WHW 7.8b paragraph 3). 5. The exact arrangement for part-time studies and the AD programmes of fulltime, part-time and dual studies in the first year and the post-first year programme has been laid down in the study part. 6. The units of study and related credits are described in the study part (article 7.13 of the WHW). One unit of study involves at least 3 credits. Notwithstanding the above, smaller units of study can be defined for three credits in the first-year programme and for another three credits in the post-first year programme. 7. A study includes a major and a minor. The major focuses on gaining the competence profile. The minor space focuses on increasing or further developing the competences a student acquires in the major space. 8. The study load of a full-time studys major amounts no less than 180 credits and no more than 195 credits. The minor space in the post-year programme of a full-time study has a study load of 45 credits. The student can fill this minor space with 3 minors or 2 minors and elective units of study. The first-year programme may contain a minor of 15 credits. The study part states whether the first-year programme has a minor. 9. The study load of the major of a part-time or dual study amounts to no less than 180 credits and no more than 240 credits .The minor space in the post-year programme of a part-time and dual study amounts to no more than 45 credits. The exact scope has been included in the study part. The student can fill this minor space with no more than 15 credits for elective units of study. The first-year programme may contain a minor of 15 credits. The study part states whether the first-year programme has a minor. 10. To fill in the minor the student may select minors and elective units of study from the study and the university offer. A list of the possibilities is available on the university students network. One minor at the most can be completed with elective units of study. 11. To fill in the minor, the student may also choose units of study that have been provided by Dutch institutions for Higher Education or a foreign institution for Higher Education that has been acknowledged by the minister. 12. The student must submit his decision on how he intends to fill up the minor to the Examining Board. The study part describes the procedures to be followed by students to receive the Examining Boards approval as to selected minor and elective units of study. 13. Student participation in a programme committee for one year is considered equal to following an elective unit of study worth 3 credits, unless the study part lays down another study load.

Study part a. Professional and competence profile The professional and competence profile has been laid down in the national competence profile description Partner in Governance issued by LOBO (Landelijk Overleg Bestuurskunde en Overheidsmanagement). b. Study programme The study programme consists of a first year which, obligatory by law, has an introductory function, a selective function and a referring function, followed by the post-first year programme. - The first year involves 60 credits; post-first year programme 180 credits.

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- The fulltime and dual variants of the study have been divided into semesters; one semester covers 20 / or twice 10 lesson weeks. c. First year The first year covers the units of study mentioned below with the number of credits. Information about the content and interpretation of all units of study has been laid down in the IPM study guide and in the course descriptions.

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List of the units of study per period/year of the fulltime variant: Year 1 Credits per term 3 3 3 2 2 2

Term 1 Comparative politics 1 Stakeholders 1 Project 1.1 English 1.1 Research skills 1 SCC 1.1

Term 2 Comparative politics 2 Stakeholders 2 Project 1.2 English 1.2 Research skills 2 SCC 1.2

Term 3 International law Policy making processes 1 Project 2.1 English 2.1 Dealing with data 1 SCC 2.1

Term 4 Human rights law Policy making processes 2 Project 2.2 English 2.2 Teamwork SCC 2.2

Each 3 credit course counts as a single unit. Further units: English 1, consisting of English 1.1 and English 1.2 English 2, consisting of English 2.1 and English 2.2 SCC 1, consisting of SCC 1.1 and SCC 1.2 SCC 2, consisting of SCC 2.1 and SCC 2.2 Research skills, consisting of Research skills 1 and 2 Dealing with data/teamwork, consisting of Dealing with data 1 and Teamwork d. Post-first year programme Year 2. Credits per term 3 3

Term 1 Governmental accounting Global sociology 1 Project 3.1 English 3.1 Dealing with data 2 SCC 3.1

Term 2 Economics for IPM 1 Global sociology 2 Project 3.2 English 3.2 European Institutions SCC 3.2

Term 3 Economics for IPM 2 Organizational management Project 4.1 English 4.1 Intercultural communication 1 SCC 4.1

3 2 2 2

Term 4 International Trade Human resources management Project 4.2 English 4.2 Intercultural communication 2 SCC 4.2

Each 3 credit course counts as a single unit. Further units: English 3, consisting of English 3.1 and English 3.2 English 4, consisting of English 4.1 and English 4.2 SCC 3, consisting of SCC 3.1 and SCC 3.2 SCC 4, consisting of SCC 4.1 and SCC 4.2 Dealing with data/European institutions, consisting of Dealing with data 2 and European Institutions Intercultural communication, consisting of Intercultural communication 1 and 2. Year 3. Credits per term

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

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7,5

Minor European Public Management Minor free of choice

Minor European Public Management Minor free of choice

Minor Globalization, Governance and Governments

Minor Globalization, Governance and Governments

7,5 2

Organizational management Financial Management Project 5.1 Mediation skills/SCC

2 1,5 1

Human resources management E-Governance Project 5.2 Conflict-solving skills/SCC

Management skills/SCC

Negotiation skills/SCC

Each 15 credit minor counts as a single unit. Further units: Organizational management/Human resources management, consisting of Organizational management and Human resources management. Financial management/E-governance, consisting of Financial management and E-governance Project 5, consisting of project 5.1 and project 5.2 Skills/SCC, consisting of Management skills/SCC and Negotiation skills/SCC and Mediation skills/SCC and Conflict-solving skills/SCC. Since IPM is still under development, there is no full description of the programme for year 4. The programme for this year will be developed according to the following outline. Year 4. Credits per term 15

Term 1 Internship/work placement

Term 2 Internship/work placement

Term 3

Term 4

Several IPM courses SCC

Thesis Final assessment

e. Out-of-school curricular part of the training The out-of-school part of the training for fulltime/part-time study involves 30 credits of work placement/work placements. Only students who obtained 60 credits in year 2 and at least 40 credits in year 3 are allowed to apply for a workplacement/internship. Further stipulations, conditions and information are referred to in the work placement manual. f. Transition measure in case of new parts in the educational programme.

Courses that were taught in the year 2008-2009 and are not being taught again can be reexamined in the year 2009-2010. Article 7 University part Financial contributions article 7.46 of the WHW

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1. Registration shall not follow from a financial contribution other than the tuition fees. 2. A study may require a student to purchase teaching aids, if these are necessary in the study programme. 3. The study part shows which teaching aids the faculty requires students to have in order to follow the study and the costs of purchasing these teaching aids. 4. If costs are related to activities that have been included as a unit of study in the educational programme, the student shall be offered an equivalent alternative if he cannot or will not bear these costs. The student shall submit a request to the Examining Board. The Examining Board shall decide on the matter in consultation with the teacher. Study part a. Teaching aids In addition to a personal computer or a laptop the teaching aids listed in the study guide or the course descriptions are considered necessary to successfully follow the IPM-programme. b. The educational programme includes excursions and working visits. Costs involved can amount to 500 euro per academic year. Article 8 Awarding of credits University part 1. The study load of each unit of study is worth at least 3 whole credits. 2. The credits related to a unit of study will be granted to the student provided he has at least complied with the following requirements: a. The test for the unit of study or the (part) tests for the unit of study must be taken; b. The final result achieved for a unit of study must be at least 5.5 on a ten-point scale or sufficient on a sufficient/insufficient scale. Results of part tests can be related to terms in the study part (article 11, paragraph 8 of these regulations). 3. No credits shall be awarded for passing a part test. 4. Final results achieved for units of study are not compensated. Article 9 Examining Board University part

General rules on the Examining Board are stated in part 1, chapter IV.
1. The academy director establishes one Examining Board for each study that is related to his faculty. The academy director appoints the chairman and the other members of the Examining Board for the period of one year. Reappointment is possible unlimitedly. Guideline for the number of members of the Examining Board is at least three and a maximum of six members. 2. The members of the Examining Board are appointed from the staff responsible for providing the education in that study or group of studies (article 7.12 of the WHW). The team leader cannot be a member of the Examining Board. 3. The Examining Board is responsible for holding exams, establishing the result, organising and coordinating the examinations. The Examining Board is authorised to issue certificates and declarations (article 7.12 of the WHW). 4. The Examining Board will set up regulations for its activities and at the end of an academic year report its activities to the academy director. 5. The Examining Board will appoint examiners to hold tests. Only members of staff who are responsible for providing education in the study or studies, and experts from outside the university may be appointed examiner. The Examining Board can issue the examiners

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guidelines and directions with regard to the assessment and establishment of the result of an examination (article 7.12 of the WHW). 6. The academy director, in consultation with the Examining Boards, will determine the periods which are basically reserved for tests and examinations and will determine the periods in a year calendar. The year calendar also states the weeks basically reserved for education and the weeks in which the Examining Board will meet. The year calendar will be announced through the students network. 7. On the recommendation of the Examining Board, the academy director appoints (external) advisors who, based on their specific expertise with regard to the study, can be added as advisor to the Examining Board for a period of one year each time. They shall not make (co)decisions with regard to any part of the examination. The advisors tasks can include: attending examination sittings; inspecting examination papers and the corresponding assessment standards; inspecting students examinations; judging the quality of the examination papers and how this relates to the curriculum; reporting the conclusions to the Examining Board and the academy director. 8. The Examining Board will promptly provide the academy director, both on request and of its own accord, with all relevant information needed in the performance of his job.

Study part a. Regulations of the Examining Board The regulations on the basis of which the Examining Board operates, are available for perusal at the department for educational support of the Academy for Public Management, Safety and Law. b. Permission of the Examining Board is required if a student wants to follow a minor programme outside the Academy for Public Management, Safety and Law. Article 10 Examinations University part 1. A study consists of a first year and a post-first year programme. Both phases include an examination. If the tests or units of study corresponding with the first year or the post-first year programme have been successfully completed, then the examination in question will be completed unless the study part determines that the examination shall also consist of an investigation by the Examining Board (article 7.10 of the WHW). 2. If the Examining Board decides that the examination will include a research study to be carried out by the board itself, the contents of that research will be determined and laid down annually in the study part by the Examining Board in consultation with the academy director prior to the commencement of the academic year. 3. A student who has successfully completed an examination will be awarded a certificate (article 7.11 of the WHW). The examination date referred to on the certificate is the date on which the Examining Board determines the examination results. Study part a. Contents of the first-year/post-first year examination b. The examination of the first-year/post-first year programme of the fulltime study consists of an assessment of the units of study referred to in article 6.

Article 11 Tests University part Tests and part tests

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1. A unit of study is completed with a test. A test consists of several part tests. Reasonable conditions of an organisational and educational nature can be attached to participating in (part) tests in the study part. 2. The description of the units of study (article 6) in the study part includes how the (part) tests are taken (orally, in writing or otherwise). 3. The Examining Board is responsible for announcing the learning objectives and/or competences to be tested prior to the test concerned. 4. The Examining Board may decide that a student, before taking a test, must participate in certain practical exercises. The Examining Board may exempt the student from this obligation and may or may not set alternative demands. The study part states the practical exercises students must join, including the procedure to be followed to be exempted from this obligation (article 7.13 of the WHW paragraph 1 under t). Grading 5. The Examining Board is responsible for announcing the standards of the different test parts prior to the test concerned. If these standards are not mentioned, the same standards shall apply to all study parts. On the basis of the qualitative analysis of the test the standard can be adjusted subsequently. 6. A (part) test is graded with one of the following qualifications: a. Inadequate or fail to be indicated as F, whereby inadequate or fail is understood to mean a mark lower than 5.5; b. Adequate or pass to be indicated as P, whereby adequate or pass is understood to mean a mark higher than or equal to 5.5; 7. If a part/test is graded with a mark, then the mark will be graded with an accuracy of 0.1 (a tenth) on the scale from 1.0 up to and including 10.0. Rounding off test marks to whole numbers is possible. If the training staff decide to round off numbers, this is laid down in the study part. If marks are rounded off, the study or faculty will do so to whole figures. If the first figure behind the comma is less than 5 the test mark will be rounded down (example: 6.48 becomes 6). If the first figure behind the comma is equal to or higher than 5 the test mark will be rounded up (example: 6.51 becomes 7). Marks which are the results of a weighted or calculated average and marks given to several decimal places should first be reduced to 1 decimal place. Here marks shall not be rounded off (for example: 6.49 becomes 6.4). 8. When a unit of study is completed with part tests to which marks are given, the final result of that unit of study will be the arithmetic average of all part tests. If the part marks are based on a weighted average, this will be stated in the study part. 9. The study or faculty may lay down in the study part the demand that results of certain part tests be adequate (5.5 or, if rounding off, 6, or P), 10. No grades shall be awarded to (part) tests that are related to units of study from which the student has been exempted. Announcing results and objection and appeal 11. The student will be notified of the result of a (part) test within 15 working days after the test in OSIRIS. This is the official announcement. Students may derive rights from the results stated in OSIRIS two months subsequent to the date at which the test had taken place. 12. If a student disagrees with an examiners assessment, he may lodge a written objection with the Examining Board within 20 working days of the official publication of results. 13. The Examining Board shall have the right to rectify evident mistakes in OSIRIS within 2 months subsequent to the test. The student shall have the right to submit an objection to the Examining Board within 20 working days subsequent to rectification in OSIRIS. 14. If a student has submitted an objection,if necessary the Examining Board will convene a meeting in which both the student and the examiner can be heard. The student will be notified of the decision in writing within 15 working days from the date on which the

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Examining Board has received the objection. The period commences on the day after which the students written objection has been received. 15. Students may lodge an appeal against decisions taken by Examining Boards and examiners with the Hague University Examination Appeals Board (article 7.61 of the WHW). (See Students Charter part 1, appendix 8.) Evaluation/feedback 16. The student will be given the opportunity to inspect the graded work at a time to be determined by study management, however in any case within 15 working days after the official announcement. The period will commence on the day following the day on which the result was officially announced. The graded work can also be inspected by appointment with the lecturer (article 7.13 of the WHW). Retake 17. In principle the Examining Board will offer students at least one retake for each (part) test during the same academic year. Tests that cannot be repeated during the same academic year, because retake cannot reasonably be scheduled in the study programme due to the specific character of the unit of study, are stated in the study part. After retake the highest result shall be counted. Study part a. Test material The test material and the criteria which form the basis for assessing the examinations are stated in the course descriptions. b. Assessment of tests If a unit of study is completed with several part tests then the module description shall show which weighting factors apply for establishing the final mark of the unit of study concerned. c. Resits/retakes (Part) tests are taken in the last week of the block in which the unit of study is given, unless stated otherwise in the module description (see also the year calendar in article 8 of these regulations). The possibility to resit is in the test week of the next block, with the exception of the (part) tests ...; the next possibility to resit these tests is in the following academic year. d. Minimal results to be obtained for part tests For all part test students should obtain at least a 5,5. e. The examinations of the fulltime study include an assessment at the end of the fourth year in addition to the units of study referred to in article 6. An assessment manual describes the content of this research, the assessment criteria and other supplementary information.

Article 12 Regulations concerning the taking of the tests University part 1. The study part includes further provisions with regard to the taking of part/ tests. This concerns rules with regard to registration, attendance, the way in which assignments are submitted, identification, prohibited acts and so forth. 2. If a student takes a test at another study or faculty than the one for which he has registered, the rules that prevail for that study shall be applicable. 3. Oral tests and examinations are not public, unless the Examining Board determines otherwise in special cases (article 7.13 of the WHW).

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4. The study shall always have the right to request students to identify themselves (twice) on participating in (part) tests showing their student card and valid ID (passport, ID card, driving license or an IND card).If double identification is not required, the student shall identify himself with his student card at all times. Study part a. Provisions with regard to the taking of (part) tests The manner in which the (part) tests are to be taken (oral, written or otherwise) is laid down in the course descriptions.

Article 13 Period of validity of (part) test results and granted exemptions University part 1. In principle the results of examinations and exemptions shall remain valid for 10 years, unless the study part lays down a different period of validity for part tests. This paragraph shall be applied for the first time to the results of the part tests and exemptions received and granted in the academic year 2007/2008. Results achieved before 1 September 2007 have a restricted period of validity, unless the study part of the Programme Examination Regulations that prevailed before 1 September 2007 states otherwise. 2. For examinations with a limited period of validity, in special cases and at the students written request, the Examining Board can decide to extend the period of validity or require that an additional or substitute examination (article 7.13 of the WHW) be taken. This decision will be made in writing. This regulation will be laid down in the study part. 3. The faculty must save the tests for at least six months, counting from the official announcement of the result. If the student objects to the result of a test, the test concerned shall be saved until an irrevocable decision has been taken about the test. Article 14 Special facilities for students with a handicap University part 1. Students with a handicap are entitled to proper adaptations (which means: suitable and necessary), according to the extent of their handicap, this as a result of the Dutch Act governing Equal Treatment of Disabled and Chronically Ill People (WGBH/CZ) and the WHW (article 7.13), unless they cause a disproportionate burden to the university. 2. Adaptations are aimed at removing restrictions or limiting them, and improving the students independence and full participation as much as possible. They may concern accessibility to buildings, the educational programme (including work placements), the study schedule, teaching methods, and testing and teaching aids. Students with a handicap who want to claim special adjustments, should submit a reasoned request for an adaptation to the Examining Board (see also part 1, appendix 11 of the Students Charter). Students with a handicap who want to claim special facilities, should submit a reasoned request for an adaptation to the Examining Board. The request must include advice by the student counsellor, based on a medical certificate submitted to the student counsellor, containing the students personal information and medical diagnosis. In the event of dyslexia, a dyslexia statement based on an inspection by a certified psychologist or remedial educationalist will suffice. The Examining Board may study the medical certificate if it deems this necessary on behalf of its decision, under the obligation of privacy. Article 15 Adjustments in case of a foreign diploma University part

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1. Upon written request and during the first year of registration, students holding a foreign secondary education diploma could be given 30% extra time during Dutch tests and may use a dictionary if they wish. 2. The request should be addressed to the Examining Board. 3. The Examining Board may expand these adjustments. The study part sets down how a request for (expansion of) an exemption should be submitted. Study part Requesting adjustments Students who believe to be entitled to longer test time and/or use of dictionaries during tests will need to submit a written request stating grounds to the Examining Board. The Examining Board must receive this request no later than six weeks prior to commencement of the unit of study. . Article 16 Force majeure University part If a student is unable to take a test as a result of force majeure the Examining Board, upon the students written and reasoned request (if possible prior to the test), may decide to allow the student to take the test concerned at a different time. Article 17 Irregularities University part 1. If a student is guilty of an irregularity with regard to any part of the first year or the post-first year programme, then the Examining Board can refuse him/or from participating in specific tests or examinations for a further to be determined period of no more than one year (12 months) (article 7.12 of the WHW). See also the Fraud Regulations appended to part 1 of the Students Charter. 2. If a student is guilty of an irregularity during a test, then the students name is stated on the record or the work made. The student concerned will be notified of this. In the event of an irregularity no evaluation will be given for the test in question. A copy of the record will be put in the students file. 3. If the irregularity is discovered after the test or examination, the Examining Board can withhold from issuing the student concerned the certificate or qualification. It may also determine that the student concerned will only be issued the certificate or qualification after a new examination of parts of the test or examination to be determined by the Examining Board, as well as the manner in which this will be taken (article 7.12 of the WHW). 4. Before a decision is taken in accordance with paragraph 1 or 2, the (chairman of the) Examining Board will hear the student. The(chairman) of the Examining Board will announce the Examining Boards decision as soon as possible, orally if possible and in any case in writing. 5. The Examining Board will make a report of this decision and the facts on which this rests which is sent to the academy director 6. Students can lodge an appeal against decisions by the Examining Board with The Hague University Examination Appeals Board / TH Rijswijk (article 7.61 of the WHW). (See Students Charter part 1, appendix 8.) Article 18 Study progress, study counselling and study advice University part 1. The study progress of all students is included in the study progress system called OSIRIS. Students may read the information registered in OSIRIS any time. First-year programme students will receive an e-mail reminder of this possibility at least once every six months.

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2. The study part states which forms of individual study counselling the study offers (article 7.13 of the WHW). 3. Under the responsibility of the academy director the Examining Board will give students written advice on how the study is progressing. This advice is given towards the end of the first year of registration for the first-year programme (for studies commencing on 1 September) or the second year of registration for the first-year programme (for studies 3 commencing in February) (For the full regulations of the binding study advice, see the study advice regulations, appendix 1 of this regulation). 4. Under the responsibility of the academy director the Examining Board will give a student of the first-year period a negative binding study advice if the student, taking into account his/her personal circumstances, is not considered suitable for the study because study results do not meet the qualitative and quantitative requirements (article 7.8b of the WHW). The requirements and the times at which these must be observed are laid down in the study part. 5. Before giving the student negative binding study advice, the Examining Board shall warn the student in writing. This warning shall be given at such time, offering the student the possibility to improve his study results (article 7.8b of the WHW). The study part refers to the month in which the Examining Board is to give the warning. 6. Before the negative study advice is given, the student will have the opportunity to be heard. 7. Under the responsibility of the academy director the Examining Board can deviate from applying the negative binding study advice if the students personal circumstances give cause for this. That which is understood to mean personal circumstances is laid down in the study advice regulations (appendix 1 of this regulation) (article 7.8b of the WHW). 8. If the student has private circumstances which he would like to be taken into consideration, the student shall inform the counsellor about these private circumstances .The student will also request the Examining Board in writing and before 1 July (study programme started on 1 September) or 1 January (study programme started on 1 February) to take these private circumstances into consideration. The Examining Board might towards the end of the first year (study programme started on 1 September) or the second year (study programme started on 1 February) of registration for the first-year programme, grant a postponement or an exemption; towards the end of the second year (study programme started on 1 September) or the third year (study programme started on 1 September) of registration for the first-year programme it may only grant a postponement. 9. Students who have not yet passed the first-year examination, but who did receive positive study advice or non-binding negative study advice, may take tests that are part of the postfirst year programme. The Examining Board shall have the right to stipulate conditions. 10. If the study consists of more than one specialisation after the first year, the Examining Board, under the responsibility of the academy director, can decide that the student is only entitled to one or more specialisations. It is only possible to make use of this authority if: a. it has been laid down in the programme examination regulations that a binding reference can be made with regard to the post-first year; b. the nature and the contents of the different specialisations of the study differ in such a way that applying this authority is justified. If the binding reference in the post-first year is applied, then the student will firstly be given the opportunity to be heard taking into account the personal circumstances of the student concerned. The student will subsequently receive written notification of the reference, whereby the decision is motivated on the basis of the students study results, taking into account his/her personal circumstances, and/or the study programme followed by the student (article 7.9 of the WHW). If the study uses the post-first year advice, then the programme
A registration year commences on 1 September and terminates on 31 August. The first year of registration for a student who registers for the first time on 1 February of a calendar year, terminates on 31 August of that same calendar year. On 1 September of that calendar year begins the second year of registration. On 1 September of the following calendar year begins the third year of registration.
3

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examination regulations will further explain the differences in specialisations, study results and how the units of study link to the different specialisations. Study part a. Educational career supervision: see appendix number 1 b. Period in which a warning and study advice are given The warning is given in april. The study advice is given in july c. The standard of the study advice First year of registration for the first-year period: A student will receive negative binding study advice if, no later than on 31 August (study programme started on 1 September) or no later than on 28 February (study programme started on 1 February) of the first year of registration for the first-year period, the student gains less than 40 credits (excluding credits from exemptions) from the first-year programme and fails to reach the following units of study: XXX. Students who have been exempted from at least one part of the first-year programme, will receive negative advice if, on 31 August or 28 February, they have failed to gain 2/3 of the credits yet to be gained (excluding exemptions). Second year of registration for the first-year period: Students will receive negative binding study advice if, no later than on 31 August (study programme started on 1 September) or 28 February (study programme started on 1 February) of the second year of registration, they have not yet passed the first-year programme. d. Supplementary procedure in case of personal circumstances If a student wishes the Examining Board to take into account certain personal circumstances, the student shall inform both the student dean and the student counsellor. Also, he shall submit a written request to the Examining Board.

Article 19 Supply of information University part 1. Information on the educational organisation shall be offered to students on time through the students network. 2. The schedule for an educational period will be announced at least 10 working days prior to the commencing date; the schedule applies to the entire period. 3. No alterations shall be made to schedules that have already been offered to students, unless unforeseen circumstances present themselves. In such case alterations shall be announced at least 24 hours in advance. If notifying students 24 hours in advance proves impossible, the study or faculty shall inform students by means of an individual e-mail. 4. The same rules apply to test schedules; regarding the provision under paragraph 1, the test schedules are to be offered to students at least 10 working days prior to the test week. Article 20 Passing University part 1. The study part includes regulations with regard to graduating, the assessment in the graduation phase and the determination of the results of the final examination.

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2. The Examining Board will determine whether a student has passed with distinction (met lof) or with great distinction (met de hoogste lof) for the first year or final examination. The descriptive with distinction or with great distinction shall be stated on the certificate. The student passes with distinction if the weighted average of the results for all units of study in the first-year or the post-first year programme amounts to at least 8,0 or higher and for all units of study at least a 7,0 has been achieved or has been graded with an adequate or pass. The student will have passed with great distinction if the weighted average or results achieved for all units of study in the first-year or post-first year programme are least 9,0 or higher and for all units of study at least a 8,0 has been achieved or has been graded with an adequate or pass. Results gained for units of study which are assessed on the basis of a sufficient-insufficient scale shall not be included on calculating the weighted average. Units of study to which exemption has been granted are also not included. Calculating the weighted average the study load of the units of study, expressed in credits, will be the weighting factor. 3. Students who have been exempted for at least three-quarters of the educational programme, do not fall under the provision referred to in paragraph 2; these students cannot pass for the first year or final examination with distinction (met lof) or with the highest distinction (met de hoogste lof). For the first time this subclause shall apply to students who register for academic year 2007/2008. Students who had already registered for 2007-2008cannot pass the first-year of the final examination with (highest) distinction if they have received exemption for at least three-quarters of the educational programme. Study part Regulations: The following regulations with regard to graduating, assessment in the final examination phase and assessment of the result of the final examination are referred to in the graduation manual. Article 21 Certificate University part 1. To prove that the first year or final examination has been successfully completed, the student concerned is awarded the certificate, the assessment list and in the case of a final examination also the International Diploma Supplement, at a time to be determined by the Examining Board. 2. The examinee who prematurely discontinues his studies and who is not awarded the certificate, will, on request, receive a declaration by the Examining Board which states how far the student has progressed with the study and which tests of the first year and final examination were successfully completed. 3. The academy shall store the minutes and the list of marks/results that present the basis for the certificates for 30 years after the students deregistration. 4. The academy shall store copies of certificates for 30 years. Article 22 Final clause University part 1. In all cases these regulations do not cover, the academy director shall decide upon the advice of the Examining Board. 2. In some cases and upon the advice of the Examining Board, the academy director may decide not to apply these regulations should application of the regulations lead to unfairness of significant nature. In this context, the interest that these regulations intend to protect shall be taken into consideration.

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3. In case of alterations to the university part and/or the study part of the Programme Examination Regulations (OER) that involve consequences for the registered students, the study or faculty shall lay down a transitional arrangement in the study part.

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