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8 An Advertising Special Section of The Times-Union, Jacksonville DECEMBER 3, 2011

Special to @home
Valencia Condomini-
ums sits near Jackson-
villes Beaches, acting as
an elegant coastal escape.
From the community's
calming environment
of lush, formal gardens,
charming courtyards,
European-style plazas and
verdant landscaping to the
upscale conveniences of
the decadently outfitted
clubhouse, amenities at
Valencia have been care-
fully planned to provide
residents with a relaxing
retreat for body and soul.
Valencia was designed
with elegantly appointed
two- and three-bedroom
homes ranging in size from
1,356 to 1,868 square feet.
Homes include 10-foot
ceilings, arched walkways,
spacious walk-in closets,
granite kitchen counter
tops, 42-inch upper cabi-
nets and a gourmet eat-in
kitchen with an island and
breakfast bar.
Within the gated com-
munity, residents enjoy
a resort-style clubhouse,
pool and lounge, covered
parking and a fitness
center with sauna. Theres
also a new community
park with a croquet lawn,
a fenced-in dog park and
gardening area just steps
from the Atlantic Ocean
and Intracoastal Water-
way.
While theres no top-
ping the features within
Valencia, theres plenty
to capture your attention
throughout the dynamic
coastal lifestyle of South
Jacksonville Beach, one
of Northeast Floridas
most vibrant neighbor-
hoods thats known for its
many popular shopping
and dining destinations
and beautiful white sand
beaches. The communitys
prime location makes it
an attractive purchase
for individuals desiring
residential proximity to
invigorating ocean breezes
and the diverse culture
Jacksonville offers.
Valencia was created for
comfort but is priced for
peace of mind. It has never
been easier to live in North
Floridas prime coastal
setting with unbeatable
prices starting as low as
$189,000. Now is a great
time to purchase a home in
Valencia Condominiums,
as it offers an unbelievable
Building II closeout spe-
cial. New homeowners can
receive up to $16,000 in
extra incentives including
paid homeowners associa-
tion fees for one full year,
2 percent closing costs,
charming plantation shut-
ters and designer tumbled
tile kitchen backsplash.
To experience the lifestyle
Valencia has to offer, visit the
community at 4300 South
Beach Pkwy., Jacksonville
Beach. Office hours are
Monday through Friday from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and
Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.
To learn more, call (904)
285-1132 or visit www.
ValenciaCondos.com.
Valencia: Built for comfort,
priced for peace of mind
Photos special to @home
Valencias residents enjoy a resort-style clubhouse, pool and lounge, covered parking, a fitness center with sauna, a
new community park with a croquet lawn, a fenced-in dog park and a gardening area.
With designs ranging in size from 1,356 to 1,868 square
feet, Valencias homes include 10-foot ceilings, arched
walkways, spacious walk-in closets, granite kitchen
counter tops, 42-inch upper cabinets and a gourmet
eat-in kitchen with an island and breakfast bar.
Special to @home
CornerStone Homes wants area homebuyers to enjoy
the comfort and luxury of a new home oasis. For a
limited time, the Jacksonville-area homebuilder is of-
fering a choice of three oasis incentives in its Northeast
Florida communities.
Todays homeowners want a retreat from hectic,
fast-paced lifestyles, said CornerStone Homes Man-
aging Partner Mark Downing. With three incentive
choices, we tailor to the needs of each client.
Our backyard oasis offers outdoor features to create
an incredible sanctuary. Modern conveniences as eye-
catching as they are functional are free in our kitchen
oasis package. And another great option is our closing
cost promotion, where CornerStone Homes pays up to
$10,000 in closing costs.
See OASIS Page 14
CORNERSTONE HOMES
Choice of incentives
offered through Dec. 31
Special
Through Dec. 31, CornerStone Homes is offering its
Claim Your Oasis incentive, valued at $10,000, in its
Northeast Florida communities.
.
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Valencia Condominiums sits just footsteps from the
Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway in a
vibrant community. And, with only eight homes left in
Building II, Valencia is ready to award new homeowners
with an unbeatable closeout special.
Buyers can receive up to $10,000 in extra incentives
including paid Homeowners Association fees for one full
year, 2-percent closing costs, charming plantation shut-
ters and designer tumbled tile kitchen backsplash.
In addition to pricing from $180,000, Valencia is one
of only a few new-construction condominium com-
munities in the Jacksonville Beach area eligible for FHA
mortgages, which means only 8. percent down. Valencia
is also approved for conventional Fannie Mae financing.
This offers qualified buyers a low down payment and
fixed-rate mortgages at competitive rates.
Our success at Valencia is attributed to the amazing
value that this community offers," said Michelle Graves,
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There are many who
believe that luxurious homes
are lovely but inherently
impractical. Nothing could be
further from the truth. There
is no reason why a home with
style and sophistication can't
also be useful and livable.
There's no point having a beauti-
ful room you can't use," said interior
designer Francine Gardner, owner of the
New York home store Interieurs. Every
room should be alive, and every object
should be selected with care and love.
Often, combining function and form
is best. What I also like to do is add a
simple luxury when needed," Gardner
said.

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Technology presents a particular
challenge to designing a beautiful home:
Everybody likes the idea of the latest cut-
ting-edge electronics, but nobody wants
their living room to look like the inside
of a retail showroom.
That's where clever disguises can be
useful.
Some electronics companies like
Samsung, for instance, offer LED mirror
televisions that look like a normal mirror
(available in a wide range of customiz-
able frames) when not in use. With a
touch of a remote button, the mirror
becomes a flat-screen television. Sizes
range from 22 inches to 0 inches, in-
cluding the latest 8-D models. The larger
ones allow users to also access apps like
Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Netflix and
Pandora.
If you don't want your TV on the wall,
Samsung also makes one you can hide
in a chrome table with a built-in mir-
ror tabletop. Again, hit your remote and
the mirror converts to a -inch LED
television. That will set you back about
$10,000.
And, of course, there are a host of
audio manufacturers who masquerade
weatherproof stereo speakers as every-
thing from landscape rocks to planters.
That way you can enjoy music the next
time you're grilling or going for a swim
without sacrificing the feel of an outdoor
environment.

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Bringing the outdoors in, and vice
versa, has been a hot trend in home
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Ah AdverIisihg Special SecIioh o! 1he 1imes-Uhioh, 1acksohville, SaIurday, November 12, 2011
.
PR00NTIA| NTw0RK RA|TY
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The holiday season may be one of the best times of the
year to buy or sell a home. Not only do homes look beau-
tiful when they are decorated for the holidays, but buyers
and sellers are often motivated by the tax advantages and
year-end financial savings available to those who buy or
sell a home by Dec. 81.
There are many motivating factors at the end of
the year for buyers and sellers alike," said Prudential
Network Realty Founder, President and CEO Linda H.
Sherrer. For buyers, one of the biggest advantages is the
tax benefits. You can buy a home in December and get a
full year of value on your income tax return. For sellers,
buyers that are in the market during the holiday season
are often more motivated than at other times of the year."
If you are thinking about buying or selling a home
before the end of the year, here is what you need to know.
what tax sav|aqs are ava||ab|e!
Closing on a new home by Dec. 81 means you can
deduct mortgage interest, property taxes and points on
your loan on your income tax return. You can also deduct
the interest cost associated with a home equity loan.
These deductions are significant, especially in the early
years of a loan when you are paying mostly interest and
very little principal. As a result, many homeowners are
motivated to sell before the end of the year so they can
enjoy the tax savings on the next home they purchase.
what ether tax sav|aqs are ava||ab|e
te se||ers!
The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1007 allows married
couples who sell their primary home to keep up to
$00,000 in profits tax-free and lets single-filers keep up
to $20,000, often making it possible for sellers to avoid
capital gains tax.
what |s a hemestea4 exempt|ea!
There are a number of state and local laws providing
exemptions that can result in lower taxable value on
certain properties. The homestead exemption is the most
common and can provide up to $0,000 off the assessed
value of a property used as the owner's primary resi-
dence.
dew 4ees the hemestea4 exempt|ea beaeI|t
bayers whe c|ese ea a heme ea er beIere
0ec. JI!
A benefit of the homestead exemption is the assessed
value of the homesteaded property cannot increase more
than 8 percent each year unless there are changes made
to the property or the homestead exemption is removed.
0ea't m|ss eat|
Is this the right time for you to put a key under the
tree Ask the connected agents at Prudential Network
Realty. In today's complex real estate market, you are
more likely to find the home of your dreams and achieve
your financial goals if you work with an experienced
agent who has the market knowledge, skills and exper-
tise to help you take advantage of the best opportunities
in the market.
Make this a holiday your family will never forget
by taking advantage of one of the great buys still avail-
able," said Christy Budnick, executive vice president of
residential real estate, Prudential Network Realty. Our
connected agents are well-versed in all areas of the real
estate transaction with the knowledge to help guide buy-
ers and sellers to the best decisions in today's real estate
market."
Connect with the best by visiting www.Prudential
NetworkRealty.com.
Pra4eat|a| Netwerk Rea|ty
(04) 2o-o400
www.prudenlialnelworkreally.com
/.)9L:B<P<C8E<N<JK#JK%AF?EJ1 This Iabulous pool home wilh a spa, in Julinglon Creek Planlalion, oIIers
2,2?? square Ieel and Iealures Iour bedrooms including a spacious masler bedroom and a home oIIice localed near
lhe Ironl door. Luxurious upgrades include wood Iloors, granile counlerlops, crown moulding and archways. The
home is priced al $25,000. To learn more, conlacl Palli Namey oI Prudenlial Nelwork Really's Mandarin oIIice al
(04) 2o0-4?00.
:_i`jkp9l[e`Zb
Execulive Vice Presidenl oI
Residenlial Real Eslale
Prudenlial Nelwork Really
C`e[X?%J_\ii\i
Founder, Presidenl and CE0
Prudenlial Nelwork Really
Valencia's lwo- and lhree-bedroom homes are accenled
wilh I0-Iool ceilings, spacious walk-in closels, granile
kilchen counlerlops, 42-inch upper cabinels and a
gourmel eal-in kilchen wilh an island and breakIasl bar.
director of sales with The
Marketing Directors. Our
proximity to the beach,
convenience to nearby
shopping and dining, high
quality of construction,
and affordable pricing
have all made Valencia
one of the most popular
Jacksonville Beach com-
munities."
Other features that have
drawn homeowners to
Valencia are the large stor-
age closets and covered
parking - benefits not
available in many other
condominiums.
While many of our
homeowners also consid-
ered purchasing a single
family home, they ulti-
mately fell in love with the
low maintenance lifestyle
of Valencia," said Graves.
The idea of being able to
pick up and go without
having to worry about
home or yard maintenance
is very appealing."
All amenities at Va-
lencia have been care-
fully selected to provide
residents with a relaxing
retreat for body and soul.
The community's luxuri-
ous lifestyle allows resi-
dents to enjoy the calm-
ing environment of lush,
formal gardens, charming
courtyards, European-
style plazas and verdant
landscaping.
Within the gated com-
munity, residents enjoy
a resort-style clubhouse,
pool and lounge, covered
parking and fitness center
with sauna. Valencia also
has a new community
park with a croquet lawn,
a fenced dog park and a
gardening area.
Valencia is designed
with elegantly appointed
two- and three-bedroom
homes ranging in size
from 1,80 square feet to
1,808 square feet. These
homes are accented with
10-foot ceilings, spacious
walk-in closets, granite
kitchen countertops, 42-
inch upper cabinets and
a gourmet eat-in kitchen
with an island and break-
fast bar. These thought-
fully designed homes were
created to exhibit Jack-
sonville's coastal carefree
lifestyle.
Valencia is a short drive
from downtown Jackson-
ville, the St. Johns Town
Center and the world's best
golf and tennis locales in
Ponte Vedra Beach. The
community's prime loca-
tion makes it an attractive
purchase for individuals
desiring residential prox-
imity to invigorating ocean
breezes and the diverse
culture Jacksonville offers.
Extraordinary opportu-
nities like this don't come
along often. If you've ever
dreamed of settling into a
relaxed, low-maintenance
condominium lifestyle in
a prime coastal setting like
South Jacksonville Beach,
then you don't want to let
this chance slip away.
To experience the
lifestyle Valencia has to
offer, visit the community
at 4800 South Beach Pkwy.,
Jacksonville Beach. Office
hours are Monday through
Friday from 10 a.m. to 0
p.m., Saturday from 10
a.m. to p.m., and Sunday
from noon to p.m. To
learn more, call (004) 28-
1182 or visit www.Valencia
Condos.com.
Va|eac|a
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11/3/11 Valencia sails into 4th quarter | jacksonville.com
1/2 jacksonville.com/homes/2011-09-24/story/valencia-sails-4th-quarter
Valencia sails into 4th quarter
Posted: September 24, 2011 - 12:00am | Updated: September 26, 2011 - 9:11am
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Special
Valencia offers the ultimate coastal condominium resort lifestyle with homes for sale priced from $189,900. The community is located in South Jacksonville Beach between the Atlantic Ocean and
the stunning marshlands of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Valencia, a condominium community in South Jacksonville Beach, gears up for fall as a few drops of summer still linger in the air. The crisp air can be
felt approaching as Valencia is propelled into its fourth quarter with strong summer sales. During the momentum of third quarter, buyers signed 18
contracts and the community's sales team is seeing no signs of slowing down.
"Location, lifestyle and great pricing - we have it all at Valencia, and buyers recognize that the value we offer isn't available anywhere else," said
Michelle Graves, director of sales with The Marketing Directors LLC. "Many of our buyers this summer have been excited to own a piece of the beach
lifestyle. Our impressive success reflects the strength of our unique community. The variety of financing options available makes it easy for prospective
buyers to make Valencia their new home."
In addition to pricing for spacious two- and three-bedroom units from $189,900, Valencia is one of only a few new-construction condominium
communities in the Jacksonville Beach area. The Federal Housing Administration and Federal National Mortgage Association offer qualified buyers
fixed-rate mortgages at competitive rates and impressive down-payment options.
Valencia's excellent pricing and financing options offer great appeal. Prospective buyers are drawn to the community's luxurious lifestyle and coastal
location. Designed with richly detailed Mediterranean architecture and resort-style amenities, Valencia features elegantly appointed two- and three-
bedroom homes ranging in size from 1,356 square feet to 1,868 square feet.
Each residence boasts 10-foot ceilings with trey accents, dramatic arched openings, eight-foot solid wood doors and recessed lighting. Every home
includes a gourmet kitchen equipped with GE stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, 42-inch designer cabinetry, center island and breakfast
bar, and a luxurious master suite. The gated community features an elegant community clubhouse, fitness center with sauna, resort-style pool and
lounge area. Residents also enjoy a new community park with croquet lawn, a fenced community dog park and newly landscaped gardens.
The best way to experience Valencia is to visit the community and its stunning designer-decorated models. The Valencia Sales Center is
located at 4300 South Beach Pkwy., Jacksonville Beach. Office hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. To learn more, call (904) 285-1132 or visit www.ValenciaCondos.com.
Subscribe to The Florida Times-Union
TO BENEFI T
STEAKS AND SEAFOOD
AT
Segment Sponsor - $6,000
w (2) tickets to Dinner, Live filming and After-party
w Complete ownership of segment
w Segment sponsors will be chosen on a first come first serve basis
w Half-page advertisement in event program
w (1) commercial spot to be run during prime time on CW 17 during televised event
w Closing credit representation with logo
w No less than (3) mentions on the Tom McManus Uncensored radio show broadcasted on
The FOX 930 starting on September 15th, leading up to event
w Logo recognition on event website and Thank You material
w Featured signage at welcome table
w Logos featured on social media at time of commitment
w Opportunity to provide takeaway material to guests
Event Sponsor - $2,500
w (2) tickets to dinner, live filming and after-party
w Quarter-page advertisement in event program
w No less than (2) mentions during televised event airing on CW 17
w (2) commercial spots to be run during prime time on CW 17 during televised event
w Closing credit representation with logo
w No less than (3) mentions on the Tom McManus Uncensored radio show broadcasted on
The FOX 930 starting on September 15th leading up to event
w Logo recognition on event website
w Featured signage at welcome table
w Logos featured on social media at time of commitment
w Opportunity to provide takeaway material to guests
Note:
All companies choosing to display a commercial must provide the commercial to Renaissance Creative. If a company
does not have a commercial previously made, Renaissance Creative will partner with Iconic Innovations to provide a
negotiable rate. Other sponsorship opportunities are available. Opportunities can be tailored to individual donor needs.
Title Sponsor - $20,000
w (8) tickets to Dinner, Live Filming and After-party
w Named the Title Sponsor on all promotional materials
w Featured in (2) press releases distributed to print and electronic media
w No less than (8) mentions in televised event, airing on CW 17
w (2) commercial spots to be run prime time on CW 17 during televised event
w Lead graphic in (30) second spots running (4) times per day, starting on September 15th,
leading up to the event
w Logo representation on all televised event spots, totaling 13-25 per week
w Single-slate full page representation in opening and closing credits
w No less than (3) mentions daily on the Tom McManus Uncensored radio show broadcasted
on The FOX 930 starting on September 15th, leading up to event
w Full-page advertisement in event program
w Logo recognition on event website, tickets, invitations and Thank You materials
w Featured signage at Welcome Table
w Logos featured in social media at time of commitment
w Opportunity to provide takeaway material to guests
Presenting Sponsor - $10,000
w (4) tickets to Dinner, Live Filming and After-party
w Named the Presenting Sponsor on all promotional materials
w Featured in (2) press releases distributed to print and electronic media
w No less than (6) mentions in televised event airing on CW 17
w (2) commercial spots to be run prime time on CW 17 during televised event
w Secondary graphic in (30) second spots, running (4) times per day, starting on September 15th,
leading up to the event
w Logo representation on all televised event spots, totaling 13-25 per week
w Single-slate full page representation in opening and closing credits
w No less than (3) mentions daily on the Tom McManus Uncensored radio show broadcasted
on The FOX 930 starting on September 15th, leading up to event
w Full-page advertisement in event program
w Logo recognition on event website, tickets, invitations and Thank You materials
w Featured signage at welcome table
w Logos featured in social media at time of commitment
w Opportunity to provide takeaway material to guests
Note:
All companies choosing to display a commercial must provide the commercial to Renaissance Creative. If a company
does not have a commercial previously made, Renaissance Creative will partner with Iconic Innovations to provide a
negotiable rate. Other sponsorship opportunities are available. Opportunities can be tailored to individual donor needs.
The Joshua Frase Foundation Does!
Do you believe in miracles? Thats what Dave Widell asked when the Jacksonville
Jaguars made their unbelievable run to the AFC playoffs in 1996. Well, the Joshua Frase
Foundation believes in miracles too.
III Forks Prime Steakhouse is teaming up with the Joshua Frase Foundation (JFF),
a local nonprofit dedicated to finding treatment for congenital myopathies, a rare neuro-
muscular disease that took the life of Joshua Frase, son of former Jaguar and 1996
team member, Paul Frase. On November 6, from 4:30 to 9:30 p.m., they will host
The Run to the 96 Playoffs: A Season of Miracles Reunion. This televised 15-year
reunion special will be held at III Forks with proceeds benefiting JFFs mission to provide
financial, emotional and physical support for families around the world who are fighting
for the lives of their children.
Tom McManus, former Jaguar and local radio personality will moderate the event,
featuring players from the 96 team. The reunion will be filmed, then aired later in the
year on CW 17. McManus familiarity with this type of event is invaluable, especially in
combination with his experiences on that team.
Inside an intimate III Forks setting, viewers will be brought right to the dining
table for insightful conversations, shared passions and behind-the-scenes experiences
that fueled the 96 team to their historic playoff run. This event promises not only to
strike a nostalgic chord with loyal fans who were there when it happened, but also
enlighten a new generation to this poignant moment in Jaguar history. The event may
even coincide with an anticipated run by the 2011 Jaguars.
Following the production, a two-hour VIP after-party and silent auction will be held
to support JFF. Guests will mingle with the 96 players, enjoy cocktails, and bid in the
auction supporting pivotal research to advance the cure for congenital myopathies. With
the support of friends and sponsors, JFF has assembled a world-renowned team of
researchers at the Childrens Hospital Boston and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative
Medicine. Over the past 15 years, JFF has aided many discoveries that have been
published and distributed to the greater medical and scientific community. Groundbreaking
advancements have been pioneered with the support of sponsors and friends across
the country. Treatment breakthroughs are attainable as long as JFF funding continues.
Your support will make a difference in the worldwide crusade for a cure.
Sponsorship Level. Please check one:
Title Presenting Segment Event
Please indicate how your organization would like to be listed on event materials:
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Name: _____________________________________________ Title: ________________________________
Company: ________________________________________________________________________________
Street Address: ___________________________________________________________________________
City: _________________________________ State: ______________________ Zip___________________
Phone: ______________________ Fax: ______________________ Email: ______________________________
Make checks payable to Renaissance Creative and forward with a completed copy of this form to:
Renaissance Creative
Att: Gretchen Hamby
P.O. Box 2648
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32004
Deadline October 3, 2011
Payment Enclosed Invoice Requested Credit Card (fill out below)
Card Number: ___________________________________Exp. Date: __________________
Name as it appears on card: _____________________________Signature: __________________________
For more information please contact Roxie Lute at rlute@renaissancecreative.com.
Thank you for your support of this important event!
All proceeds will go to benefit the Joshua Frase Foundation.
www.JoshuaFrase.org
P: 904.607.1358
F: 904.273.9818
Alison@JoshuaFraseFoundation.org
www.SeasonofMiracles.com
Dear ___________________,
Do you believe in miracles? Thats what NFL veteran Dave Widell asked thousands of passionate
Jacksonville Jaguars fans when the inaugural team made their unbelievable run to the AFC playoffs
in 1996. Well, the Joshua Frase Foundation believes in miracles too.
III Forks Prime Steakhouse is teaming up with the Joshua Frase Foundation (JFF), a Jacksonville-
based nonprofit dedicated to finding treatment for congenital myopathies, to host The Run to the 96
Playoffs: A Season of Miracles Reunion. This exclusive televised 15-year reunion special event will
be held at III Forks, Tapestry Park on Nov. 6, 2011, and aired on the CW network later in the year.
Proceeds from ticket sales and a silent auction will benefit JFFs mission to continue to provide
financial, emotional and physical support for families around the world, fighting to find a cure for
congenital myopathies. Joshua Frase, 15-year-old son of former 96 Jaguar and NFL veteran Paul
Frase and his wife Alison, lost his battle with Myotubular Myopathy on Dec. 24, 2010.
Tom McManus, former Jaguar player and local radio personality, will moderate the event, featuring a
lineup of players from the 96 team. The intimate setting of III Forks Steakhouse will bring the viewer
right to the table for a great meal and insightful conversation on the hard-hitting world of professional
football. Viewers will relive the shared passion and behind-the-scenes experiences that fueled the 96
team to their historic playoff run.
This once in a lifetime event promises hope for the mission of Joshua Frase Foundation, through
funding ongoing research at Wake Forest University Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Childrens
Hospital Boston.
Following the production, a two-hour VIP after-party and a silent auction will be held to support JFF.
Guests will mingle with the 96 players, bid on unique silent auction items, and enjoy cocktails, while
supporting pivotal research necessary to advance the cure for congenital myopathies.
The dollars raised through the auction are critical to reaching fundraising goals and providing vital
resources to JFFs team of multi-disciplined researchers. Groundbreaking advancements have been
pioneered over the past 14 years, thanks to generous auction donors, sponsors and friends.
We ask that you give your support by joining us as an auction donor. We have included an Item
Confirmation Form. Please confirm your participation by returning the form to us or submit the form
electronically at www.SeasonofMiracles.com.
Thank you in advance for your consideration. Your support will make a difference in the worldwide
crusade for a cure.
Sincerely,
Paul and Alison Frase
Joshua Frase Foundation
STEAKS AND SEAFOOD
Thank you for your support by joining us as an Auction Donor! The critical dollars raised will
further the Joshua Frase Foundations mission of providing financial, emotional and physical
support to families around the world suffering with congenital myopathies. These families fight
for the lives of their children each day. By donating to our auction, you will make a difference
in the worldwide crusade for a cure.
This item has been given compliments of: ___________________________________________
Please describe the auction item, listing all restrictions:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
Please list the market value of the donated item (for tax purposes): _____________________
If your item is deemed priceless the IRS requires your best estimate of the fair market value
of the item donated.
Donor Information:
Name: _____________________________________________ Title: ________________________________
Company: ________________________________________________________________________________
Street Address: ___________________________________________________________________________
City: _________________________________ State: ______________________ Zip___________________
Phone: ______________________ Fax: ______________________ Email: ___________________________
Please send completed form and auction item(s) to:
Joshua Frase Foundation
124 Crossroad Lakes Dr.
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082
P 904.607.1358 F 904.273.9818
For questions or other pick up or delivery arrangements, please call Alison at 904.607.1358.
Thank you for your support of the Joshua Frase Foundation.
Youve made a difference in a childs life.
(Below is for office use only)
Donated Item: _________________________Quantity: ____________Fair Market Value:_____________
Auction Item Confirmation Form (to be completed by donor)







For more information contact:
Raquel E. Lute, Public Relations Practitioner
(904) 699 3769
raquelelute@mbf.org


Target Public
Families with young children (5 and under) in Jacksonville, Fla.

Nickname
Family friendly movie-goers

Demographics
In Jacksonville, Fla., out of 789,235 households, 53,938 are homes to children 5 and
under, the U.S. Census Bureau said. The research continued that these 53,938 children
make up 7.2 percent of the population within Duval County. Sixteen thousand and three,
or 7.9 percent, of these children are enrolled in a preschool. In the United States, 5.4
million young children live with married parents and 5.7 million live with single parents.
The research continues that most families, single parents and married, with children
under 5 live in the southern half of Duval County. Families with children younger than 6
are seldom in the northern half of Duval County. There is a heightened population of
these families near 103
rd
Street and Normandy Boulevard, which holds 19.1 percent of
the families with children 5 and under in Jacksonville.
Research from the National Center for Children in Poverty said that 44 percent of
young children in the United States live in low-income families. This income is defined
as below the 200 percentile of the federal poverty level. The research also said that for a
family of four, the federal poverty level is $22,050. Seventy seven percent of the children
in above low-income families live with a family that owns a home. On the other hand, 34
percent of those who live in low-income families live with a family that owns a home.
The median family income in Jacksonville, Fla., is $47,234. The average per capita
income in a family household is $20,337. Therefore, it is likely that debt is present.
The National Philanthropic Trust`s research said that 89 percent oI households
give charitable donations. It continued that the average annual contribution for
contributors is $1,620 a year.






Audience Analysis








Psychographic
Families and their young children have a variety of needs. The National Center for
Children Exposed to Violence said one of the needs that is significant to young families
is safety. These families also long to experience supportive, warm and
nurturing relationships between themselves and caregivers. Families with young children
also aim to fulfill their basic needs, such as food and shelter.
Research done by The Children Partnership explains that there are several trends that
remain common throughout the country of young families. These families usually play
the lottery, have busy lifestyles that revolve around kids and the families and shop by
catalog. Females usually read parenting magazines and follow soap operas, while males
focus on fitness and work. Young families usually attend family-friendly films and dine
out regularly.
There are some behavioral trends throughout families with children 5 and under. The
Children Partnership`s research said that young children, who live with no biological
parents or in single-parent households, are less likely to exhibit behavioral self-control.
Those living with two biological parents are more likely to obtain self-control. These
children with single parents are also more likely to be exposed to higher levels of
aggravated parenting. Research from The Children Partnership said that single-parent
families also have lower income, but this low income is responsible for negative effects
on the young children and their family such as: psychological well being, behavior
problems, education and health.

Monique Burr Foundation for Children`s Value
The Monique Burr Foundation for Children can be of great value to families with
young children. It has the ability to educate and support families regarding abused and
abandoned children. Educating the public on issues of child abuse may not only, decrease
abuse and abandonment rates, but also create an opportunity to raise donations for the
Monique Burr Foundation.

Public`s Informational Networks
Research from the Pew Research Center said the primary source of information
that families with young children use is television, at the 92.4
th
percentile. The secondary
source of information for this public is radio. Following is Internet and cable. The least
viewed informational network used by this public is the newspaper.

Local Print and Radio Outlets
Research from Nielsen Claritas provides information about local print and radio
outlet most used by the target public. Families with children 5 and under use a variety of
local print and radio outlets. Print outlets include: People Magazine, Men`s Health

Audience Analysis







Magazine and The Florida Times-Union. People Magazine acquires 11,204,000 readers
with children under 6. Men`s Health Magazine produces 38.9 percent oI it`s total
audience of 11,886,000. The Florida Times-Union claims it has 12.5 million page views
per month. Adults Irom 18 to 34 are accountable Ior 29.6 percent oI the newspaper`s
readers. Households with children make up 37.4 percent of The Florida Times-Union
readership.
The popular radio stations for this public include: KISS, WOKV, WQIK and
WAPE. KISS and WQIK claim to have 100 million listeners and their Web site is viewed
quite frequently. WOKV is the no. 1 station that is listened to by adults with families
under 5. These adults are known to have decision-making skills and are financially stable.
Claiming to appeal to the largest amount of women and families is WAPE. Although
there are many radio stations appealing to this market, these remain to be the most
popular.



























Audience Analysis







For more information contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Raquel E. Lute, Public Relations Practitioner
(904) 699-3769
raquelelute@mbf.org


ST AT E WI DE CHI LD ABUSE PROGRAM C OMI NG T O F L ORI DA

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. The Monique Burr Foundation for Children will begin a
statewide program to educate children about cyber bullying as a form of child abuse.
'The new program reIlects changing nature oI abuse and Florida Gov. Charlie
Christ`s priorities, said Lynn Layton, executive director of the Monique Burr
Foundation.
The new program will begin in Duval County and five other counties in Florida
this September. The Monique Burr Foundation`s goal is that the new program will do an
even better job of protecting children by incorporating cyber bullying into its curriculum.
Florida is ranked Iourth in the nation Ior child abuse, Layton said. 'It`s sad to
think how rampant this issue is in Florida, she said.
'The good news is, Layton said, 'we are doing things to make things happen to
allow abuse to be reported.
The statewide program will replace Good Touch/Bad Touch, which is aimed
toward children in kindergarten through fifth grade. Good Touch/Bad Touch will be
phased out of schools at the end of May.
-###-

News Release









For more information contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Raquel E. Lute, Public Relations Practitioner
(904) 699-3769
raquelelute@mbf.org

MONI QUE BURR F OUNDATI ON ASSISTS I NVESTI GAT ORS

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., March 1, 2010 A 3-foot pile of manila folders balances
atop Joanna Ale`s cluttered desk at the Florida Department oI Children and Families.
Ale, an investigator, sits amid four large mahogany desks, forced into a single
cramped room. Ale sways back and Iorth in her chair, but there`s barely enough space to
take a couple steps before bumping into a ringing fax machine. On every desk lies a
BlackBerry, sparking with light as new messages are received, continuously introducing
new cases of abused children in Jacksonville.
'Every hour in the United States, 377 children are abused, said Lynn Layton,
executive director of the Monique Burr Foundation. The foundation is a Jacksonville-
based non-profit that is dedicated to the prevention of child abuse and making it easier for
abuse to be reported.
'It`s sad how rampant this issue is in Florida, Layton said.
'In December 2009, there were nine inIant deaths due to physical abuse. When
parents can`t Iind a job, they leave their children with people who may not be child
Iriendly. People don`t know what to do with their children, Layton said.
-More-

Feature Article





DCF investigators, such as Ale, deal with abuse victims daily.
Ale recalled stepping into a cluttered home to greet a young mother with long
brunette hair that draped down her shoulders. She rocked slowly in a red stained recliner
and Ale noticed the slight glare oI tears as they drizzled down the woman`s Iace.
It was not the first time the investigator had walked into this heavy-hearted home.
Early in the young mother`s pregnancy, she had attempted to take her own liIe. Her Iour
young children run around the house, blind to their mother`s severe, suicidal depression.
Ale visits the home regularly to assure that the children are safe. Her routine
questions are constantly interrupted by the buzzing BlackBerry against her belt. It`s a
reminder that Ale must keep moving to continue evaluating the many cases for which she
is responsible.
'It`s busy, it`s Iast paced, it`s unpredictable, it`s long hours, it`s not-that-great
pay, but at the end of the day at least you know your doing something good, Ale said.
Florida is fourth in the nation for reports of abuse, according to Layton. The
foundation she works at has helped Jacksonville children report and prevent abuse by
educating children about abuse through the Good-Touch/Bad-Touch program. The
program would like to extend its work throughout the state of Florida.
Each night after a hectic workday, Ale sits at her cluttered desk and prioritizes


Feature Article

-More-





what needs to be completed in the following day, yet she knows no plan is permanent.
She realizes that new child abuse cases arise each day in Jacksonville causing her plans to
change rapidly at times.
The Monique Burr Foundation hopes to continue to aid children in reporting
abuse with ambitions to successfully prevent such child abuse from occurring in
Jacksonville. The organization gives hope to the lives of children.
'When Iamilies and the community pull together, Ale said, 'you can help make
a strong impact on society and more importantly a young child`s liIe.

-###-



















Feature Article










For more information contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Raquel E. Lute, Public Relations Practitioner
(904) 699 3769
raquelelute@mbf.org

Children behind gate (:00 - :.019)

Blond boy looking through red slide (:02 -
:041)

Two girls with life jackets (:.042 - :.062)

Baby crawling on mat (.:063 - :.089)

Blonde boy on beach looking up on camera
(:.09 - :.109)

Baby in covers (:.11 - :.13)

Baby in green bib (:.131 - :.155)

Boy on beach with mark on face (:.156 -
:.171)

Girl sitting in chair facing a corner (:.172 -
.18)

Boy in corner cowering (:.181 - :.198)

Girl with life jacket covering face (:.199 -
:.219)

Boy in water with squirt gun (:.22 - :.239)

Girl blowing bubbles (:.24 - :.26)

Girl with bicycle helmet on (:.261 - :.285)
YOU THINK YOUR CHILD IS SAFE
HERE . BUT IN REALITY 3 POINT 3
MILLION CHILDREN IN THE UNITED
STATES ARE ABUSED EVERY YEAR.
EVERY 15 SECONDS JUST IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA ANOTHER
CHILD IS EITHER ABUSED,
NEGLECTED OR ABANDONDED.
YOU CAN HELP MAKE A PLACE
WHERE CHILD ABUSE DOESN`T
EXIST.
HERE IN JACKSONVILLE, THE
MONIQUE BURR FOUNDATION
HELPS CREATE THAT PLACE BY
PROVIDING TRAINING AND
EDUCATION TO HELP PREVENT AND

Audio News Release


Man helping girl with fish on beach (:.286 -
:.309)

Strawberry blonde girl with green swim
suit (:.31 - :.331)

Young boy in blue laying on colorful mat
(:.332 - :.36)

Boy on beach holding up a fish (:.361 -
:.385)

Side view of a boy looking up at his fishing
rod (:.386 - :.408)

Girl in blue with brown hair looking at
camera (:.409 - :.431)

Blonde boy on beach look directly at the
camera (:.432 - :.462)

Monique Burr Foundation logo (:.463 -
:.473)

Girl in blue bathing suit with water
background (:.474 - :.496)

Two girls sitting on the grass (:.497 - :.53)

Girl sitting on sand with yellow bathing
suit (:.531 - :.559)

Baby with white clothes on green pillow
(:.56 - :.589)

Girl with brown hair and water on her face
looking directly at the camera (:.59 - :.613)

Holding hands (:.614 - :.64)


REDUCE THE RATES OF CHILD
ABUSE.
THE MONIQUE BURR
FOUNDATION NEEDS YOUR HELP.
GIVE HOPE TO A CHILD BY
MAKING A DONATION TODAY.
TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A
PLACE WHERE CHILD ABUSE
DOESN`T EXIST.
TO MAKE A DONATION CALL 9-
0-4-6-4-2-0-2-1-0 OR VISIT W-W-W
DOT MONIQUE BURR FOUNDATION
DOT ORG. THAT`S W-W-W DOT M-O-
N-I-Q-U-E-B-U-R-R FOUNDATION
DOT ORG.




For More Information Contact
Contact Name: Roxie Lute
Title: Public Relations Specialist
Phone: 904.699.3769
Email: rlute@renaissancecreative.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
III FORKS HOSTS WINE SAMPLING IN SEPTEMER
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 1, 2011) III Forks Prime Steakhouse, in Tapestry Park,
continues its series of weekly wine tastings. Each Monday from 5 to 6:30 p.m., patrons
are invited to sample III Forks featured wines, and indulge in complimentary hand-
passed hors doeuvres created by Executive Chef Dylan Hauge.

Guests will be able to enjoy a full glass or bottle of wine for half price. This month, III
Forks will feature Silver Oaks Alexander Valley and Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignons.

III Forks Prime Steakhouse is located in the live, work, and play hotspot, Tapestry Park,
just off Southside Boulevard, north of J. Turner Butler Boulevard. Dining hours are
Monday through Thursday: 5 10 p.m. and Friday and Saturday: 5 11 p.m.

For more information about upcoming events, or to reserve your own event, visit
Facebook.com/IIIForksJax or www.IIIForks.com.

###

III Forks offers a contemporary evolution of the classic steakhouse in Jacksonvilles
newest hot spot, Tapestry Park. This modern steakhouse is sizzling with style, an
energized bar and patio, and a savvy menu featuring USDA prime beef, seafood,
distinctive wine and local favorites.

1





For More Information Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact Name: Roxie Lute
Phone: 904.699.3769
Email: rlute@renaissancecreative.com



CANTINA LAREDO HOSTS EXCLUSIVE TEQUILA DINNER


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 6, 2011) Cantina Laredo, a gourmet Mexican
restaurant located in St. Johns Town Center, will host an exclusive Tequila Dinner on
September 13 featuring distinctive off-the-menu items paired with high-end tequilas.

Each course is paired with a tequila including 1800 Silver, Gran Centenario Roseangel
and Maestro Dobel Diamond Tequilas. A brand representative from 1800 Tequila will
also be available to discuss the tequila with guests.

Cocktails begin at 7 p.m., immediately followed by the exclusive four-course dinner.
Seating is limited and reservations are required. Ticket cost is $49.99. To make your
reservations, please contact 904.997.6110.

For more information about Cantina Laredo, visit
www.facebook.com/CantinaLaredoJacksonville or www.CantinaLaredo.com.

###

Cantina Laredo evokes the sophisticated gourmet taste of Mexico City. Combining the
traditional with modern flairs, the menu is unique and includes grilled fish, chicken and
steak complimented by signature sauces.



September 27th, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Fashion by Moonlights Silver, Gold and Moonlight
Sponsors are invited to join Cantina Laredo for an intimate
VIP Celebration with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.
Join us
for Cantinas famous Casa Rita bar,
light hors d oeuvres and
informal designer modeling.
To RSVP,
please call 904.733.3560 by Friday, Sept. 23.
Central Florida Education Guide
2010-11
SPECIAL NEEDS
year. Schools which accept McKay
Scholarships receive funding for provid-
ing ESE services. Funding is determined
through the use a Matrix of Services
document that calculates the specific
cost factor for children in special educa-
tion who have an IEP, these funds can
range from $5,000 - $19,000 per year
and vary by county.
Two case studies are listed below to
share the process Response to Interven-
tion, eligibility, and the development of
ESE services and supports.
Case Study 1:
Emotional
Behavior Disorder
Miriamis having severe behavioral is-
sues. On the school bus she pushes stu-
dents out of their seat, yells at cars and
then hides in her seat. Miriam punches
other students in the arm, back or chest.
She makes faces, sticks out her tongue
and/or calls names. There does not ap-
pear to be any patterns to her behavior
or specific students she is targeting.
When Miriamwas two years old she
was in a major car accident. As a result
of the accident, Miriam has difficulty at
times with maintaining balance and
mobility. She has been teased about this
over the years.
Prior to Referral: A Child Study
Teamhas met with Miriamand her par-
ents in several conferences. Several inter-
ventions were recommended, such as
practicingexpectedbehaviors three times
a week, with a preferred adult or assign-
ing Miriamto a group which meets one
time per week to work on social skills.
Reason for Referral: Imple-
mentation of these activities has had no
effect on Miriam's behavior. She has re-
ceived 10 discipline referrals which re-
sulted in 5 In School Suspension days
and 3 Out of School Suspension days.
Miriam's grades dropped one letter
grade in each academic subject area.
The parents requested an evaluation to
determine if she would be eligible for
exceptional education services.
Eligibility: Collected data reflects
that Miriam's discipline referrals have in-
creased, her participation in classroom
activities has decreased and her grades
have not improved. Behavior Assess-
ment for School Children validates that
Miriamhas not been able to form/main-
tain relationships with peers or adults,
she appears to have maladaptive be-
haviors to normal situations, and her
overall mood seems to be negative and
oriented toward isolating herself from
others. Miriamis eligible for exceptional
education services in the emotionally be-
havior disabilities program. Miriamwalks
with an ataxic gait, tripping when walk-
ing on uneven surfaces and is having dif-
ficulty with stairs and getting on/off of
the school bus. This makes it difficult for
her to access areas of the campus.
Educational Needs:
Miriam needs direct instruction on
expected behaviors for specific areas
on campus and the opportunity to
engage in positive practice sessions
to ensure that she is able to demon-
strate mastery of identified skills.
Miriam needs regular feedback to
ensure behavioral deficits are identi-
fied and that progress is celebrated.
Miriamneeds an assessment of aca-
demic strengths and weaknesses to
identify areas in need of remediation.
Miriam needs related services in the
area of physical therapy to assist her
in campus access.
Outcomes: Miriamwas able to re-
main in a general education classroom,
accessing the general curriculum. She
received exceptional education services
through the emotionally behavioral dis-
abilities program including individual-
ized behavioral support 3X per week for
10 minutes each session with behavior
personnel. An ESE teacher facilitated
support for Miriam in the regular edu-
cation classroom which provided her
with consistent training in appropriate
teacher pleasing behaviors. Miriam re-
ceived individual mental health coun-
seling with a focus on building and
maintaining positive peer and adult re-
lationships. Lastly, Miriamsees a physi-
cal therapist once per week for on-going
mobility training.
Case Study 2:
Specific Learning
Disabilities
Reason for Referral: Steven is
in second grade and has trouble blend-
ing sounds together to form words. His
teacher has tried working with himindi-
vidually, with advice froman ESE teacher,
but has made minimal progress. The
teacher is beginning to think that more
intense 1:1 time with a specialist like the
ESE teacher or speech therapist may be
necessary to address the problem.
After an additional month of inter-
ventions from the teacher and not see-
ing the level of progress she had hoped
for, a meeting was scheduled with the
parent and those who had observed
and worked with Steven.
Arecommendation of the school was
that the psychologist should conduct
observations in the classroom and do
some assessments.At this point because
all the committee members were think-
ing that Steven may be a student with a
specific learning disability, consent was
sought from the parents to do a more
comprehensive evaluation.
Eligibility: Over the next two
weeks the classroom teacher, speech
therapist and ESE teacher continued to
work with Steven looking for interven-
tions that would help address the prob-
lems Steven was having with reading,
math, comprehension, socialization and
handwriting. The psychologist was able
to complete their assessments and the
ESE teacher and speech therapist con-
ducted assessments as well.
Based on reviewing Stevens
performance, his rate of growth when
provided more intense interventions by
specialized staff, it was determined that
without the intense level of support
Steven would not be successful in clos-
ing the gap with his peers. He was
found eligible for the Specific Learning
Disabilities program and services from
specialized ESE personnel.
Educational Needs:
In the general education classroom
Steven was seated close to a Best
Buddy in the classroom - a student
whowas organizedandstayedontask
providingagoodmodel for Steven.
The Speech Therapist met Steven
twice a week for 30 minutes.
The teacher is repeating instructions
and asking Steven to either state
back what he is suppose to be doing
or demonstrate.
Outcomes: Due to all of these in-
terventions, Steven has made many
gains over the past 4 months. Ongoing
support will be needed from the staff
but when comparing his performance
on various assessments to his peers he
is closing the gap.
Central Florida Education Guide
2010-11
SPECIAL NEEDS
Students with disabilities are pro-
tected under the Individuals with Dis-
abilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004),
which governs how states and public
agencies provide early intervention, spe-
cial education and related services to
more than 6.5 million eligible toddlers,
children and youth with disabilities
within the US.
According to the Florida Department
of Education, a specific learning disabil-
ity is defined as a disorder in one or more
of the basic learning processes involved
in understanding or in using language,
spoken or written, that may manifest in
significant difficulties affecting the ability
to listen, speak, read, write, spell, or do
mathematics.Therefore, to ensure that a
child is receiving a proper education, the
state of Florida provides educational op-
tions for these students. The categories
of disabilities are as follows: Autism
SpectrumDisorder, Deaf / Hard of Hear-
ing, Visually Impaired, Emotional Behav-
ior Disability, Intellectual Disability,
Orthopedically Impaired, Speech /
Language Impaired, Specific Learning
Disability, Traumatic Brain Injured and
Developmentally Delayed (ages 3-6).
Exceptional
Student Education
Exceptional Student Education (ESE)
specializes in educating both students
with disabilities and the gifted in a vari-
ety of settings including general educa-
tion classrooms, resource classrooms,
self-contained classrooms, separate day
schools, residential schools, hospitals,
homes, and other non-educational set-
tings. ESE services may be full-time, a
fraction of the school day or have in-
structional accommodations and modi-
fications in the regular classroom.
Most students experiencing difficul-
ties in school will be engaged in the
process of problemsolving or Response
to Intervention (RtI). RtI is the practice
of providing high quality instruction and
interventions matching to student need,
monitoring progress frequently to make
decisions about changes in instruction
or goals and applying child response
data to important educational decisions.
(National Association of State Directors
of Special Education, 2006).
The intensity and duration of instruc-
tion or specialized curriculum and serv-
ices that may be identified through the
RtI process may lead to a referral to ESE.
Formal and informal evaluation infor-
mation, medical evaluations, and vi-
sion and hearing screening are
reviewed with a teamof school pro-
fessionals, therapists, parents and the
student. The team determines eligi-
bility, develops an individual educa-
tion plan that includes present level
of performance, learning goals, re-
lated services and supports that the
student will need to access the cur-
riculum.
The Gifted program operates
within ESE but is not classified
as a program for students with
disabilities. The State of Florida
has defined a gifted student as
one who has general intellectual
function at a very high level, demon-
strates behavioral and intellectual char-
acteristics of a gifted learner and
demonstrates a need for a specialized
program. Gifted students are not pro-
tected under the IDEA, however they are
served through programs and services
designed to meet their unique cognitive,
social and emotional needs. These serv-
ices may include pullout programs, dif-
ferentiated instruction in general
education classrooms, advanced curric-
ular options, consultative services or a
combined approach.
The process to determine eligibility
for the gifted programrequires a formal
evaluation by a school psychologist of
the students characteristics of the
gifted, the students intellectual devel-
opment. and need for special instruc-
tion. If eligible, an educational plan is
developed and implemented.
Individual
Education Plan
An Individual Education Plan is the
cornerstone of a quality education for
each child with a disability and is a doc-
ument created by the public school sys-
tem for children who qualify for special
educational services . When a child is
determined eligible for a special educa-
tion program, they are eligible to receive
specially designed instruction that meets
the unique needs of each student.
The process of developing an IEP
begins after eligibility for a special
education program is determined. It is a
document created by a teamof qualified
professionals and the parent and/or
guardian to determine the services and
specialized instruction necessary to meet
the unique needs of the student, where
instruction is delivered and the duration
of the services. After the parent and/or
guardian signs consent for their child to
receive services, these services will take
place immediately. Progress is monitored
and will be reviewed at least once a year.
The childs IEP may be reviewed more
often if conditions warrant or if the child's
parent or teacher request a meeting.
McKay Scholarships
The McKay Scholarships for Students
with Disabilities Programallows parents
of students with disabilities to choose
the best learning environment for their
child. Each year the McKay Scholarship
provides over 20,500 special needs stu-
dents with financial assistance to attend
participating private schools. These
school environments can include: the al-
ready assigned school, another public
school, a public school in another dis-
trict, or a participating private school.
The scholarship is equal to the amount
of state generated funding the student
would have received or the cost of the
private schools tuition and fees,
whichever is less. Any parent of a public
school student who is dissatisfied with
the students progress may receive a
McKay Scholarship if the student has at-
tended school for an entire year and has
a valid Individual Education Plan at the
time the student is withdrawn. Parents
must also fileIntentto use McKay on-
line at FloridaSchoolChoice.org.The par-
ent must then enroll the student in a
private school that accepts McKay and
communicate with that school regard-
ing its tuition, curriculum, procedure,
transportation, regulation and policy.
Parents must not withdraw their child
froma public school until the child is en-
rolled in a private school or the scholar-
ship will not be rewarded.After the child
is enrolled in a private school and the
scholarship is rewarded, it is the parents
responsibility to keep track of the dead-
lines and knowwhat percentage of the
scholarship will be paid throughout the
continued on next page
Educational Options for Special
Needs Students
Helpful Resources:
www.fldoe.org
www.floridaschoolchoice.org
www.mckayscholarship.com
http://idea.ed.gov/explore/home
www.fldoe.org/ese
Local ESE Contacts:
Orange County 407-317-3229
Seminole County 407-320-0216
Osceola County 407-343-8700
Lake County 352-253-6600
Volusia County 407-255-6475, 20443
Theres even
MORE online!
www.americaseducationguide.com
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tobeanimportant part of
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publicationdedicated
exclusivelytoeducation,
featuringpublic andprivate
schools, pre-schools,
colleges, post-secondary
schools, universities, andother
local educational resources.
80 www.americaseducationguide.com www.americaseducationguide.com 81
Central Florida Education Guide
2010-11
SPECIAL NEEDS
Irascible subways kisses the progres-
sive tickets, even though one obese
sheep comfortably bought Springfield,
but five slightly irascible televisions
laughed, yet the angst-ridden wart hogs
very lamely perused one chrysanthe-
mum, then two bourgeois orifices tastes
one quite purple poison, however the
partly bourgeois sheep annoyingly mar-
ries one orifice. Jupiter abused Kermit.
Darin fights five progressive chrysanthe-
mums, but Jabberwockies sacrificed
Pluto, yet two dogs slightly easily un-
tangles bourgeois orifices. Five irascible
botulisms towed one quite purple.
Two speedy televisions extremely
noisily bought subways, even though
Phil towed Minnesota. Umpteen almost
irascible bureaux laughed, yet one lamp-
stand auctioned off five wart hogs. One
putrid cat abused umpteen Klingons,
then the very silly cat cleverly auctioned
off Darin.
A Subhead Could
Go Here
Jupiter gossips, yet five progressive
bureaux kisses Kermit. Umpteen sub-
ways laughed slightly comfortably. Two
purple tickets drunkenly marries
umpteen very schizophrenic subways.
One Klingon noisily perused five trailers.
One lampstand grew up. Two
chrysanthemums laughed. Umpteen tel-
evisions quickly untangles one Macin-
tosh. Bourgeois mats laughed slightly
lamely. The mostly irascible chrysanthe-
mum noisily marries five pawnbrokers.
One orifice towed quixotic aardvarks,
then five extremely progressive botu-
lisms partly lamely telephoned two
schizophrenic dwarves, but the dogs ran
away easily. Pluto very cleverly fights
Darin, then umpteen chrysanthemums
telephoned two wart hogs, yet partly
purple botulisms mostly quickly tastes
the quite irascible mat.
Two dogs noisily marries the putrid
aardvark, and umpteen quixotic
dwarves easily bought cats, because five
subways gossips almost noisily, but one
obese dog slightly annoyingly marries
Mark, although the botulism grew up,
and five subways telephoned one mostly
progressive pawnbroker, even though
mats ran away, however the speedy
sheep cleverly untangles five orifices,
and pawnbrokers lamely telephoned the
obese trailer. Poisons kisses umpteen
schizophrenic Klingons. Two bureaux
tickled five bourgeois dogs, even though
one purple orifice almost comfortably
auctioned off slightly silly mats. Spring-
field abused five wart hogs, because
Dan gossips, even though two orifices
drunkenly tickled umpteen fountains,
then two partly quixotic botulisms tele-
phoned the purple bureau. One obese
Jabberwocky untangles the dwarf, al-
though irascible mats perused Spring-
field. One silly dog tastes schizophrenic
botulisms. Five silly Klingons ran.
The elephants sacrificed five mats,
and the speedy Macintoshes perused
two mostly irascible botulisms. Silly Klin-
gons marries five very bourgeois Macin-
toshes, although one quixotic chrysan-
themum grew up, because five sheep
gossips. Umpteen slightly schizophrenic
subways kisses the dwarves, but
umpteen mostly purple subways
laughed comfortably. The lampstands
annoyingly fights mats. Phil drunkenly
tastes five Klingons. One trailer marries
two fountains, yet five sheep lamely
kisses two tickets. The bureau gossips,
however five bourgeois botulisms un-
tangles two bureaux. Umpteen very pu-
trid mats grew up, even though two
bourgeois Macintoshes tastes the
quixotic bureaux, then two schizo-
phrenic Klingons drunkenly bought one
almost purple Macintosh.
The fountain slightly quickly towed
two quite speedy poisons, and one Jab-
berwocky noisily tickled the bourgeois
botulism. Subways drunkenly untangles
one cat, although five speedy Klingons
noisily towed one aardvark. Two tickets
tickled umpteen silly Klingons, then the
A Subhead Could
Go Here
The bourgeois botulism abused five
tickets, however one extremely silly
pawnbroker tastes the putrid subways.
One quixotic sheep gossips easily.
Umpteen speedy Klingons tastes bour-
geois lampstands, but umpteen Macin-
toshes ran away.Two bureaux drunkenly
fights almost purple orifices.
This article was supplied by Devereux. Contact
information and a little more information about
themwill go here. Please have themsupply the
information to go here. If article is 525 words,
this information paragraph would be close to
fifty words long.
Article should be approximately 525 words
Changing Lives And Nurturing
Human Potential
www.devereux.org
A
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Central Florida Education Guide
2010-11
SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOLS
M
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Orange County
Applied Behavior Center
113 W. Chatman Road YES 1-8 6 YES NO YES YES NO NO NO YES NO YES YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO NO
Oviedo, 32765
407-324-7772 Seeour adpg. 96
www.appliedbehaviorcenter.com
Academy for Autism
5232 B. South Orange Avenue YES 1-8 6 YES NO YES YES NO NO NO YES NO YES YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO NO
Orlando 32806
407-852-9922
www.Academy4Autism.com
Avalon School, Inc
5002 Andrus Avenue YES 1-8 6 YES NO YES YES NO NO NO YES NO YES YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO NO
Orlando 32804
407-297-4353
www.AvalonSchool.com
Bridge to Independence Inc
580 West Jackson Street YES 1-8 6 YES NO YES YES NO NO NO YES NO YES YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO NO
Orlando 32817
407-246-8474 Seeour adpg. 97
www.BridgetoIndependence.com
S
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e
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82 www.americaseducationguide.com www.americaseducationguide.com 83
!
!
!
FOR$IMMEDIATE$RELEASE$
! Contact$Information:$
Bobbi!Reid!Doggett,!APR!
University!of!North!Florida!
904.620.3866!
rdoggett@unf.edu!
!
MEDIA$ADVISORY$
!
!
What:! The!students!of!a!University!of!North!Florida!public!relations!campaign!class!are!
raising!awareness!of!youth!homelessness!by!sponsoring!the!decoration!of!a!
room!at!Community!Connections!in!honor!of!Forsaken!Generation,!the!campaign!
class!client.!!
!
Community!Connections!is!a!local!homeless!shelter!that!provides!transitional!
housing!for!women,!children!and!families!so!they!can!overcome!challenges!and!
become!responsible!productive!citizens.!The!decorated!room!will!be!given!to!a!
family!moving!in!to!the!shelter.!!
! !
Forsaken!Generation!partners!with!local!shelters,!like!Community!Connections,!
to!further!their!mission!of!ending!youth!homelessness!and!child!sex!trafficking.!!
!
Where:! Community!Connections,!Davis!Center!
! ! 327!East!Duval!Street!
! ! Jacksonville,!FL!32202!
!
When:!! The!room!transformation!will!take!place!on!the!following!days:!
!
! ! Monday,!March!21,!2011,!1Y4!p.m.!
! ! Wednesday,!March!23,!2011,!3Y4!p.m.!
! ! Saturday,!March!26,!2011,!2Y4!p.m.!
!
!
###!
!
!
1
Drafting a solid foundation for branding and marketing solutions.
2

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Gifj\Zlkfij1E\cjfejiXZ`jd
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I\^`fe<[`kfi Hike Harino (904) 359453 mike.marinoQjacksonville.com
NFUSP

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POQPMJUJDT
VotIng vas dIIIcrcnt In
:p8o.
For startcrs, pcopIc
turncd out. Throngs oI
thcm. It aIso vasn't as
cIIortIcss to bc countcd In
thosc days. EarIy votIng
dIdn't cxIst In FIorIda. II
you vantcd to votc, you
stood In IInc on EIcctIon
Day.
My parcnts' poIIIng sta-
tIon vas a smaII, onc-room
voodcn structurc, thc sIzc
oI a Iargc outdoor shcd.
It had no othcr usc than
a poIIIng sItc on EIcctIon
Day. Cars vouId park aII
aIong thc sIdcs oI County
Road A In ruraI Lcvy
County as rcsIdcnts camc
Irom mIIcs around to cast
a baIIot.
I rcmcmbcr vaItIng In
thc car.
Thosc vcrc thc days
vhcn you couId Icavc
your kIds unattcndcd In
a parkIng Iot vIthout too
much conccrn, aItcr aII.
In Iact, thc car ncxt to you
vas IIkcIy to havc a kId
or tvo In It as vcII. Thcrc
vcrc sIx oI us thcn and
vc cntcrtaIncd ourscIvcs
Ior vhat sccmcd IIkc an
hour vhIIc Dad and Mom
snakcd through thc IInc
to joIn thc mIIIIons vho
svcpt RonaId Rcagan Into
thc WhItc Housc.
I rcmcmbcr thc IIrst
tImc I cast a baIIot. Thc
ycar vas :ppz and a bII-
IIonaIrc vIth bIg cars and a
nasaI tvang vas tryIng to
turn thc poIItIcaI cstabIIsh-
mcnt on Its hcad. I vas
avay at coIIcgc, but I dIs-
tInctIy rcmcmbcr scndIng
In my abscntcc baIIot.
Thc rcsuIts vcrcn't vhat
I had In mInd, but I ncvcr
stoppcd votIng. NcIthcr
do AmcrIcans, at Icast
vhcn thc prcsIdcncy Is on
thc IInc. Turnout In thosc
ycars rcmaIns hIgh. In Iact,
ncarIy ;8 pcrccnt oI DuvaI
County votcrs turncd
out In zoo8. But Intcrcst
In IocaI cIcctIons - thc
oIIIcchoIdcrs vc arc most
IIkcIy to Intcract vIth on a
daIIy basIs - contInucs to
dIsappoInt.
Thcrc arc unIIkcIy to bc
any IIncs today.
DcspItc thc Iact that
carIy votIng has madc It
IncrcasIngIy cIIortIcss to
cast a baIIot, Icvcr than
:o pcrccnt oI ]acksonvIIIc
votcrs had partIcIpatcd In
carIy votIng or rcturncd
abscntcc baIIots by Sunday
nIght. Expcrts say vIth
that kInd oI IndIcator,
turnout Is unIIkcIy to top
o pcrccnt today.
WhIIc bravc rcbcIs
battIc a tyrannIcaI dIcta-
tor on thc othcr sIdc oI
thc vorId Ior a voIcc In
thcIr govcrnancc, votcrs
In ]acksonvIIIc appcar to
havc IIttIc Intcrcst In thosc
tappcd to Icad thc cIty vc
caII homc.
It's not just ]acksonvIIIc,
oI coursc. Turnout In
Tampa's munIcIpaI cIcc-
tIons vas barcIy zz pcrccnt
at thc bcgInnIng oI thIs
month. In GaIncsvIIIc Iast
vcck, It vas Icss than :
pcrccnt.
Many sImpIy havc no
apprccIatIon Ior thc rIght
so many oI our Iathcrs and
mothcrs Iought to dcIcnd.
On Sunday, as vc vcrc
IcavIng thc carIy votIng
sItc vhcrc I cast my baIIot,
my 8-ycar-oId Iookcd up
and mc and askcd a sImpIc
gucstIon.
Is votIng somcthIng thc
Iav says you havc to do?"
hc askcd.
Thcrc's no such Iav on
thc books, oI coursc, and
thcrc shouIdn't bc. But, as
I toId my son, It shouId bc
consIdcrcd a duty.
Educatc yourscII and
votc.
Thc Iuturc oI your cIty
dcpcnds on It.
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VIsIt jacksonvIIIc.com/
IIorIdamornIng Ior our
ncv carIy-mornIng dIgcst
oI FIorIda poIItIcaI ncvs.
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K8CC8?8JJ<< s FIorIda's
court systcm has Irozcn
hIrIng and Is bracIng Ior
possIbIc staII IurIoughs
duc to a s;z. mIIIIon dcII-
cIt bIamcd on a shortIaII In
IIIIng Iccs aItcr mortgagc
IorccIosurc cascs dramatI-
caIIy dccIIncd.
Suprcmc Court ChIcI
]ustIcc CharIcs Canady Iast
vcck vrotc Icttcrs rcIcascd
Monday to Gov. RIck Scott
and IcgIsIatIvc budgct
Icadcrs askIng Ior a sz:.;
mIIIIon suppIcmcntaI ap-
proprIatIon and sqz. mII-
IIon In budgct transIcrs to
makc surc vItaI IunctIons
contInuc through ]unc o,
vhcn thc IIscaI ycar cnds.
To mcct thc currcnt
IundIng crIsIs, thc judIcIaI
branch has aIrcady ImpIc-
mcntcd an cmcrgcncy
branch-vIdc hIrIng Ircczc
and an cmcrgcncy opcrat-
Ing budgct Ircczc," Canady
vrotc.
II thosc stcps arcn't ap-
provcd, IurIoughIng court
pcrsonncI vouId bc ncxt.
Such IurIoughs vouId
causc scvcrc dIsruptIon
In thc IunctIonIng oI thc
courts," Canady varncd.
In ]acksonvIIIc, ChIcI
CIrcuIt ]udgc DonaId Mo-
ran saId hc, IIkc most judgcs
around thc statc, Is takIng a
vaIt-and-scc approach.
Moran saId hc cxpccts thc
LcgIsIaturc and govcrnor
to kccp thc courts runnIng
but varncd II thcy don't,
thc courts couId bc shut
dovn Ior May and ]unc. II
that happcncd, hc saId, thc
!a1|c|a| ||arc|
|m(|emer|e1
||||r l|eete,
|a1e| l|eete,
la||aa| waa|1
|e re\| |e(
:FLIK car||rae ar 9$+
As a boy, PatrIck
GoIdcn Icarncd to Iovc
art by sccIng hov much
hIs matcrnaI grandIa-
thcr, ]ohn ]. CIark, Iovcd
It.
Thc bascmcnt
oI CIark's homc In
Northampton, Mass., vas IIIIcd vIth can-
vas-covcrcd pIcccs oI MasonItc, vhIch hc
vouId Ican agaInst a coIIcc can and paInt.
Hc vas a hobbyIst, a vcry taIcntcd hob-
byIst," saId GoIdcn, prIncIpaI and crcatIvc
dIrcctor oI thc ]acksonvIIIc advcrtIsIng
IIrm Burdcttc Kctchum.
GoIdcn got morc cncouragcmcnt aItcr
hIs IamIIy movcd to FIagIcr County and
hc camc undcr thc InIIucncc oI a von-
dcrIuI" hIgh schooI art tcachcr, ShcIIa
CravIord. Hc attcndcd FIagIcr CoIIcgc
In St. AugustInc, vhIch had a vondcrIuI
art program." HIs IacuIty advIscr vas thc
rcnovncd scuIptor Enzo TorcoIcttI.
But cvcn though GoIdcn vas studyIng
IInc art, hIs goaI Irom thc tImc hc got to
FIagIcr vas to bc a commcrcIaI artIst.
HIs Iast art shov vas In :p88. HIs vork
at thc tImc vas vcry rcprcscntatIonaI,"
GoIdcn saId. Thcrc vasn't a grcat
amount oI dcpth to thc story I vas tryIng
G8KKFE car||rae ar 9$/
laca| a|||| wa|| 1eca1e
|a arwe| || ||ae ca|||r
9fY%J\c]_jac|ar|||e.cam
latrick 6olden's 8eautiful/ugl,," 26 mixedmedia
pieces relating to the lussian lomanov famil,
including his painting titled urawing loom" can
be viewed b, appointment.
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An cmpIoycc In thc controIIcr's oIIIcc oI
Shands ]acksonvIIIc has bccn IIrcd vhIIc In-
vcstIgators unravcI a szoo,ooo dIscrcpancy
In paymcnts madc to vcndors sIncc zoop.
Thc cmpIoycc, vho Is not bcIng IdcntIIIcd
bccausc no arrcst has bccn madc, bcgan
vorkIng at Shands scvcraI ycars ago and
vas pInpoIntcd In an IntcrnaI audIt, ac-
cordIng to thc hospItaI and thc ]acksonvIIIc
ShcrIII's OIIIcc.
AccordIng to a poIIcc rcport, an oII-duty
oIIIccr vorkIng at thc hospItaI FrIday vas
toId InItIaI rcvIcvs oI IInancIaI rccords
shovcd sp8,ooo In ovcrpaymcnts to St.
]udc, a vcndor oI Shands.
ScvcraI purchasc ordcrs vcrc dIIIcrcnt
but had thc samc InvoIccs Ior thc samc pa-
tIcnt.
Paymcnts vcrc trackcd to St. ]udc at thc
samc tImc that sccond chccks usIng thc
samc vcndor numbcr but madc out In a dII-
Icrcnt namc vcrc scnt to a ]acksonvIIIc post
!|e cae |ra|e a :|ar1 car||a||e|'
all|ce em(|a]ee ar1 a |00,000 a(
J?8E;J car||rae ar 9$+
G_fkfjYp 9fY%J\c]_jac|ar|||e.cam
lachel lobertson, 23, tapes off the roof line for painting while Jodi Scott (center), 23, and lena John, 22, remove the mirror from the wall
as the, get started on the remodeling of a room at Communit, Connections on Honda,.
LE=ZcXjjkXb\jfe_fd\c\jje\jj
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ja||r.ac|a|all_jac|ar|||e.cam
FIorIda Is onc oI thc vorst statcs In thc country (qrd out
oI o) vhcn It comcs to chIId homcIcssncss, accordIng to Thc
NatIonaI Ccntcr on FamIIy HomcIcssncss.
Thc scrIousncss oI thc probIcm vas cnough to convIncc
studcnt Aryn Mooncy and hcr pubIIc rcIatIons cIass at thc
LnIvcrsIty oI North FIorIda to makc youth homcIcssncss
thcIr causc Ior thc scmcstcr.
Each scmcstcr thc studcnts In proIcssor BobbI Doggctt's PR
cIass vork on dcsIgnIng a campaIgn Ior an organIzatIon.
ThIs scmcstcr Doggctt chosc Forsakcn GcncratIon, a na-
tIonaI organIzatIon bascd In Ncv York aImcd at cndIng youth
homcIcssncss and scx traIIIckIng.
Thc studcnts arc dcdIcatIng a room at CommunIty Con-
ncctIons, vhIch provIdcs scrvIccs and transItIonaI housIng
:|a1er| |e|( |ema1e| |aa|r |a |e|(
]aa|| a| tammar||] tarrec||ar
I<DF;<C car||rae ar 9$/
lena John, 22,
tries to
remove a
screw in the
wall as Caitlin
worthington,
24, patches a
hole to
prepare a
room for
redecorating
at Communit,
Connections
on Honda,.
1.5 million children have no
place to call home.
Can you tell Im
homeless?
visit www.forsakengeneration.com
Volunteer.
Mentor.
Donate.
You can be
the difference.
My name is Mackenna
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
My name is Mackenna
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
and Im 12 years old. I
ran away from home
because my mommys
boyfriend hurt me.
The Youth Homeless Project
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
My name is Jordan
and Im 11 years
old. My daddy lost
his job and now we
have no where to
live.
1 in 50 children in the U.S. have
visit www.forsakengeneration.com
Volunteer. Mentor. Donate.
You can be the difference.
no place to call home.
Can you tell Im
homeless?
Can you tell Im
The Youth Homeless Project
Scan for more information:
Can you tell Im
13 children die each day from homelesness.
visit www.forsakengeneration.com
You can be the
difference.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
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live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
My name is Paul
and I am 5 years
old. My mommy
does drugs and
forgets to take
care of me. We
live on the street.
homeless?
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Volunteer. Mentor. Donate.
ORGANIZATION DESCRIPTION
The Joshua Frase Foundation (JFF) began in 1996, when little had been done to
advance a cure for congenital myopathies.
With the support of friends and sponsors, JFF assembled a world-renowned team
of multi-disciplined researchers at the Childrens Hospital Boston/Harvard and Wake
Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Over the past 15 years, JFF has supported
many discoveries that have been published and disseminated to the greater medical
and scientic community. Groundbreaking advancements have been pioneered, and the
2010 collaboration with French research company, Genethon, has accelerated progress.
MEDIA KIT
JOSHUA FRASE FOUNDATIONS GOALS
Continue to fund research worldwide
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with congenital myopathies
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Continue to develop treatments to transfer into clinical use
Continue to provide nancial, emotional & physical support for families around the
world, who, everyday, ght for the lives of their children
GETTING TO KNOW THE FOUNDATION
For more information on the foundation visit: http://youtu.be/jLRID49ZnIg
FACT SHEET
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advancing a cure for congenital myopathies.

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onset. As muscle cells of a baby develop in the womb, a blockage inhibits transmission
of vital genetic information needed for proper growth. The babys improper muscular
development ultimately translates into a quality of life that is greatly impaired.
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Boston, as well as cell regeneration at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative
Medicine in North Carolina.
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disease and myopathies, including muscular dystrophy.
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which can benet everyone aected by congenital myopathies.
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including muscle injection therapies, with the goal of reaching clinical trials.
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awarded a large grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and
Stroke to further support the research to understand and treat neuromuscular
diseases. This grant, about $1 million per year for ve years, would not have been
possible without support by the Joshua Frase Foundation.
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JccaLcracsvihCcrchcrararccLasccrcrrcLichcra,
lab, and Wake Forest University School of Medicine to further preclinical development
of a gene therapy for Myotubular Myopathy.
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Darryl Johnston and NFL veteran, Chad Hennings, who continue to be active
contributors and supporters since 1996.
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born each year with a neuro-muscular disorder
1995
1996
1997
1999 -
2004
2001
2004
2005
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2002 -
2003
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orccccscarchrc_ranaChicrcrscsiaLcscrarVarchrco_h
eorts by JFF
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in pushing research forward
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how weakness may be reversed.
OUR HISTORY
After nearly one and a half decades of medical research in the arena of neuro-muscular
disorders, conducted at two of the worlds most renowned research institutions, the
Joshua Frase Foundation embarks on discovering the future of neuro-muscular disease
treatments and cures. For details regarding the most advanced research being
accomplished in the elds of gene therapy and new vector development, and new
viable science of regenerative medicine, click below.
Joshua Frase, son of ex-Jaguar Paul Frase, creates a legacy of helping others
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Son of ex-Jaguar lineman loses ght with rare disease
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NFL star Frases son, 15, dies from rare MTM disease
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Joshua Frase Muscle Dream Team Gala
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Major Breakthrough: The Miracle of Nibs
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FROM THE NEWSROOM
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
Amy Walter
9O--Oo85-
awalter@renaissancecreative.com
Wake Forest, Childrens Hospital Boston, Genethon Unite
in Development of Treatment for Myotubular Myopathy.
Collaboration Initiated by the Joshua Frase Foundation
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Boston-based nonprot, announces their collaboration with Gnthon, a French bio-
therapy lab, Childrens Hospital Boston, and Wake Forest University School of Medicine,
to further the development of a groundbreaking new gene therapy for Myotubular
Myopathy (MTM).
MTM is the most common and severe form of centro-nuclear myopathy, an inherited
muscle disease. It is caused by defects in or deciencies of functional myotubularin, a
protein thought to promote normal muscle development. MTM aects skeletal muscles
and leads to respiratory failure from birth.
Gnthon /INSERM researcher Dr. Anna Buj-Bello has been working on mouse models
of MTM for many years, to understand the disease mechanism and design therapeutic
strategies. Buj-Bellos research group has developed an adeno-associated virus (AAV)
vector for transferring a healthy copy of the myotublarian gene into muscle cells.
The collaboration of Dr.Buj-Bello and Genethon will test a groundbreaking approach in
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Childrens Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, working together with Martin
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Institute for Regenerative Medicine. For the rst time ever, a colony of dogs with MTM
has been established at Wake Forest. Dr. Beggs and Dr. Childers will work with Gn-
thon, who will transfer its method for local-regional perfusion of AAV vectors, supply
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clinical trial of gene therapy in the United States.
Two other researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle,
WA, have dedicated time and resources to this important eort. Dr. Rainer Storb, Head
of Transplantation Biology and professor at University of Washington School of Medi-
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
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model. Dr. Zejing Wang, research assistant professor and associate in clinical research,
is currently studying immune responses to AAV vectors in canines, addressing immune
responses and advising on immunosuppressive drugs.
This unique transatlantic collaboration will help researchers understand mechanisms
involved in the disease and complement the data generated in mice. If the results are
conrmed in preclinical trials with the dogs, the therapy could then be clinically tested
in humans. This groundbreaking science will potentially benet human and veterinary
medicine worldwide. Development of a treatment could eradicate numerous muscle
diseases.
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treatment. The AFM [French Muscular Dystrophy Association] is delighted with the col-
laboration between its operational arm, Gnthon, Wake Forest and Childrens Hospital
Boston. With positive results in clinical trials, MTM patients and their families should
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Chairperson of AFM and Gnthon.
Through its international outreach and fundraising eorts, The Joshua Frase Founda-
tion is responsible for initiating the collaboration of Gnthon, Wake Forest Univer-
sity School of Medicine and Childrens Hospital Boston. Over the last 10 years, Joshua
Frase Foundation has raised nearly $6 million and supported many key discoveries that
have been published and disseminated to the greater medical and scientic commu-
nity. Most recently, the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) and the AFM funded a
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The Joshua Frase Foundation is named for Joshua Frase, the son of 11-year NFL veteran
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School, Joshua was one of 400 children in the world aicted with MTM. Joshuas im-
pact remains a beacon of hope to aected families worldwide.
For more information, or to make a donation to the Joshua Frase Foundation, please
visit www.joshuafrase.org. To schedule interviews and gain additional information,
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###
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Send your gift or pledge to:
The Joshua Frase Foundation
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~OR~
securely give online at: www.JoshuaFrase.org
For more information or for sponsorship
opportunities, please contact us.
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~OR~
email JFF at info@joshuafrase.org
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We thank you from all of our hearts
In loving memory of Joshua Frase, February 2, 1995 - December 24, 2010
We invite you to make a huge dierence in the lives
of many precious children by pledging a gift today.