Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 11

SECTION 3 - RISK ASSESSMENT FORMS GUIDE TO ASSESSMENT FORMS From Regulation 3(1) of the Management of Health and Safety

at Work Regulations 1999, an assessment must be carried out to assess the risks to the health and safety of workers and any others, who may be affected by the work carried out, and to identify the measures needed to be taken to comply with other legislation. Carrying out this assessment will help to identify all the protective and preventative measures that have to be taken to comply with the PUWER Regulations. When undertaking a risk assessment on work equipment it must be decided whether or not the requirements of these regulations are already being complied with, and if not, what additional measures are required for compliance. To help with the assessment two forms have been drawn up in relation to the Regulations, which you are required to complete in your faculty/schools/division/unit for all potentially hazardous work equipment other than simple and straightforward items where the risk associated with their use is negligible. The first form Work Equipment Inventory and Risk Assessment Summary Form is used to list all work equipment, and for the simpler equipment undertake a brief assessment of the risks. For more complicated work equipment it will be necessary to complete the Equipment Safety Checklist. Guidance on completing these two forms precedes the forms in this workbook. On completion of the assessment any significant defects that have been identified which would cause serious injury must be remedied immediately and any other defects/improvements identified must be remedied as soon as reasonably practicable. Once the assessment has been completed the information must be made available to the work equipment users as required under Regulation 8 of the PUWER Regulations. If advice is required in relation to these regulations and checklist please contact the Health and Safety Office, Civic Quarter (extension 23814/23334/23816).

Instructions for Completing Work Equipment Inventory and Risk Assessment Summary Form

The Faculty or Service where the assessment is being undertaken. eg Faculty of Arts and Society.
The physical location of the equipment. This will usually be a room or a series of rooms eg Metalwork Shop H101-2 City Site.

The name of the assessor undertaking the assessment.

The name of the manager who will approve the control measures suggested by the assessor in this assessment. The date of the assessment

A brief description of the work equipment. It will often be possible to group similar pieces of equipment under a generic heading eg hand-saws, glassware. This can only be done where the hazards and risks are very similar eg screwdrivers, but not hand-tools.

A tick should be placed in this box when the equipment requires that an Equipment Safety Checklist be completed. It will be necessary to complete a checklist for all equipment which contains dangerous parts, or which is powered and contains moving parts or hot/cold parts, eg lathes, circular saws, food slicing machines, blenders, electric drills etc. If a tick is placed in this column an Equipment checklist should be completed without delay, it is not necessary to complete columns 8, 9 & 10 of this form for that item of work equipment.

The hazards associated with the use of this item of work equipment should be recorded in this column. The supplier is required to give details of health and safety risks associated with the equipment. However the way it is used may present additional risks as will any changes in operation, maintenance or location.

Indicate the level of risk presented by the use of the item of work equipment L for low risk, M for medium, and H for high. The system used for risk assessment is a simplified version of the LMU General Risk Assessment Procedure. Further reference can be made to the above document if detailed consideration of the hazard likelihood and severity is necessary. Using the above method the Risk Zone obtained from the matrix should be converted as below: Risk Zone 1 = High Risk Risk Zone 2 = Medium Risk Risk Zone 3 = Low Risk

Describe any control measures which might be necessary to control the risk to an acceptable level.

This column should be signed and dated to indicate that the control measures suggested in 11 column 10 have been implemented. 2

WORK EQUIPMENT INVENTORY AND RISK ASSESSMENT SUMMARY FACULTY/SERVICE: LOCATION: ASSESSOR: APPROVING MANAGER: WORK EQUIPMENT 11
EQUIP SAFETY CHECKLIST REQUIRED

DATE:

HAZARD(S)

RISK CONTROL(S) LMH

ACTIONED BY NAME & DATE 11

LEEDS METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY - EQUIPMENT SAFETY CHECKLIST This checklist should be copied and used for all potentially hazardous equipment other than simple and straightforward items. The items in italics are to cover new requirements in the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 Faculty/Dept ............................................ ...................................................... Machine ................................................... ................................................................. Information, Instruction and Safe Use 1. Are there written instructions covering: (a) (b) 2. (a) any unusual hazards or complicated features? where appropriate, emergency shutdown? Has instruction in readily comprehensible form (written or verbal) on all hazards been passed on to all those who use the equipment? Y Y N N N/A N/A Location of Machine

Manufacturer

N/A (b) N/A 3. (a) Have all users of the equipment been given adequate training in correct use, risks and precautions? Are Young Persons given additional training and instruction?(under 18s) Is a training record kept which verifies this? Have any written instructions provided by the manufacturer been passed on to users?

N/A

(b)

(c) 4.

N/A

Is the equipment being used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions? If it has been adapted, is the adaptation suitable and safe?

N/A

5.

N/A

6.

Is the equipment used in an appropriate environment? 4

(consider eg ventilation, damp, flammable conditions). N/A 7. Does the location allow the equipment to be used safely? (consider space around moving parts and possible distractions to the operator) If the equipment may be moved, is the weight known? Y

N/A

8. N/A 9. N/A

(a)

Are the start and stop controls clearly marked?

(b) 10.

Are other operating controls, and the contents of any containers, clearly marked? Are there clear warning notices or markings (eg to wear personal protection, restriction on use, list of authorised users) where appropriate? Does any work equipment provided after 5th December 1998 conform with Community requirements (CE marked)?

Y Y

N N

N/A N/A

11.

N/A

Maintenance / Inspection 12. N/A Is the equipment tested at appropriate intervals: Y N

(a)

electrical safety? Interval:................................... (refer to the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989) any safety devices? Interval: .............................

N/A

(b) 13. N/A

N Y

N/A N

Does the safety of the work equipment rely on correct installation / re-installation (e.g. Mobile scaffolds)?

14.

Could deterioration of the equipment lead to an unsafe condition? (a) Is the equipment inspected at regular intervals?

N/A

15. N/A

(b) (c)

Are the inspections recorded? Is there a register of persons competent to carry out these inspections?

Y Y

N N

N/A N/A

16. N/A

If inadequate maintenance could cause the equipment, guards, or other protection to fail in a dangerous way, is

there a system of planned preventative maintenance, including where appropriate the periodic replacement or refurbishing of items before they reach the end of their useful life?

17.

(a)

Have clear maintenance instructions been given to those responsible for maintaining the equipment? Have all maintenance operations been assessed for risk? Is a register or other maintenance record kept?

(b) (c)

Y Y

N N

X N/A

Specific Hazards 18. Is protection adequate in relation to: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) 19. items falling from the equipment? items being ejected? overturning? collapse? overheating or fire? disintegration? explosion? Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N N N N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Is the equipment made stable where appropriate by bolting, clamping or tying? Y Is there sufficient general and (where necessary) local lighting? (a) N/A (b) N/A If the possibility of such contact is unavoidable has appropriate instruction and training been given? Is there protection against contact with hot or very cold temperature, so far as appropriate?

N Y

N/A N X

20. 21.

22.

In the case of pressurised equipment, is there a written scheme of examination? (This must be provided by 6

1.7.94 - Pressure Systems and Transportable Gas Containers Regulations 1989). 23.

N/A

If gas fume or dust is released when the equipment is used, is there: (a) (b) N/A local exhaust ventilation, tested annually? a COSHH specific assessment? Y N Y N/A N

Dangerous Parts of Machinery 24. 25. 26. Are all dangerous parts of machinery adequately guarded? Are all guards sound and in good working order? Do guards permit an adequate view of the operation where this is necessary? N/A Is it difficult to bypass or disable guards? Can the machinery only be started when a specific labelled start device is used? (NB the normal cycle of automated machinery is exempt from this requirement). Is it impossible to start the machine just by resetting a safety device? N/A Is there a readily accessible stop device which stops the machinery in a safe way? Where appropriate (ie where in a foreseeable emergency it could help) is there a prominent easily accessible emergency stop device? Can controls be operated safely and easily? Y Y Y N N N/A N/A

27. 28.

N/A

N/A

29.

30.

N/A

31.

Y Y

N N

N/A N/A

32. 33.

Is there any system of work which ensures that nobody is in a dangerous position when machinery is about to be started? Y Does the start device need to be activated to restart the machine if: (a) N/A the power fails?

N/A

34.

(b) 35.

a control or safety device fails to trips out?

N/A

If the power is isolated does the machinery come to rest safely without the possibility of access to dangerous parts?

N/A

36.

Can the equipment be securely isolated from power, to prevent inadvertent reconnection: (a) by removing a plug from a socket which is easily visible to the person at risk? by locking it off?

Y Y

N N

N/A N/A

(b)

Woodworking Machinery 37. Is suitable limited cutter projection tooling used where necessary? Y N N/A

38.

(a) Has the machine been assessed for the need to fit braking Y devices? (b) If braking devices are required, are they fitted? Y

N/A

39.

Is the safe working speed or the minimum saw blade diameter displayed? (a) Are anti kickback devices fitted to planing machines? (b) If not, are suitable notices displayed?

N/A

40.

Y Y

N N

N/A N/A

Mobile Work Equipment 41. Are there clear and concise instructions forbidding the carriage of persons on mobile work equipment, unless the work equipment has been proved to be suitable? Has the equipment been assessed to ensure that all tasks can be carried out safely? (consider seat belts, cabs, falling object protection etc.) Is the work equipment fitted with Roll over Protection where necessary? Is the drive shaft between the work equipment and any accessory adequately protected against seizure and accidental contact with the ground? Y Y Y N N/A

42.

43.

N/A

44.

N/A

Power Presses 45. (a) Is there a system for thorough examination in place (b) are all examination reports retained and available for inspection (2 years from date of examination). 46. (a) Is there a system in place whereby a nominated competent person carries out the inspection of guards and protection devices as required by Reg. 33. Y Y N Y X N X

(b) Is the current certificate of inspection displayed by the power press and superseded certificates held for 6 months Lifting Equipment 47. 48. Is the work equipment classified as Lifting Equipment? If Yes, has an assessment under LOLER 98 been completed? Y

(Refer to Lifting Operations & Lifting Equipment Workbook for guidance.) Summary

Action to be taken in order of priority:

Action Completed Signature.

Date

Date by which action to be taken: ...................................................................................................

Date for review (maximum interval 5 years) .................................................................................. 9

Assessor Name ................... .................................................... Signature............................................. Date

Responsible Manager Name ..SignatureDate OTHER REFERENCES HSE WEBSITE: http://www.hse.gov.uk/equipment/index.htm BRITISH STANDARDS British Standards can be found on the HIS (Ex Technical Index) database. http://uk.ihs.com/

BS 5304 1988: Code of Practice for Safety of Machinery. BS EN 292: Safety of Machinery Part 1: 1991: Basic Terminology and Methodology. Part 2: 1991: Technical Principles and Specifications. BS EN 294: Safety of Machinery. Safety Distances to Prevent Danger Zones Being Reached by upper Limbs. BS EN 349: Safety of Machinery. Minimum Gaps to Avoid Crushing Parts of the Human Body. BS EN 414: Safety of Machinery. Rules for The Drafting and Presentation of Safety Standards. BS EN 418: Safety of Machinery. Emergency Stop Equipment, Functional Aspects. Principles for Design. BS EN 457: Safety of Machinery. Auditory Danger Signals. General Requirements, Design and Testing. Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 1992 Supply of Machinery (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 1994

10

HSC/HSE CODES OF PRACTICE AND GUIDANCE Past and current HSC/HSE guidance is available a few months after publication for downloading on the HIS database as well as free information on the HSE website. Please respect copyright. Examples L22 L114 PM1 PM2 PM23 PM33 PM35 PM41 PM55 PM64 PM65 PM73 HS(G)17 HS(G)31 HS(G)35 HS(G)42 HS(G)43 HS(G)44 HS(G)55 HS(G)83 HS(G)89 HS(G)119 IND(G)153 Work Equipment - Guidance on Regulations Safe use of woodworking machinery Guarding of portable pipe threading machines Guards for planing machines Photo-electric safety systems Safety at bandsaws in the food industry Safety in the use of reversing dough breaks Application of photo-electric safety systems to machinery Safe working with overhead travelling cranes Electrical safety in arc welding Worker protection at crocodile (alligator) shears Safety at autoclaves Safety in the use of abrasive wheels Pie and tart machines Catering safety - food preparation machinery Safety in the use of metal cutting guillotines and shears Industrial robot safety Drilling machines: guarding of spindles and attachments Health and safety in kitchens and food preparation areas Training woodworking machinists Safeguarding agricultural machinery: moving parts Health and Safety in Engineering Workshops Computer control - a question of safety

The above list of publications is not comprehensive and guidance is constantly being updated and replaced

11