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Celebrate Heart Month
with exercise, education.
HEALTH, 1C
Take care of
your ticker
Super Bowl champion Giants
back in the Big Apple.
SPORTS, 1B
All hail the
conquerors
Amajority of Luzerne Coun-
ty Council on Monday ad-
vanced a 2012 budget amend-
ment that raises taxes 2 per-
cent and uses $1.4 million bor-
rowed for capital projects to
help repay debt.
County Interim Manager
Tom Pribula said the $122.6
million spending plan will re-
quire an estimated 50 to 60 lay-
offs in addition to 23 elimina-
tions from recent retirements
and terminations.
Thecountyspent $124.2mil-
lion last year, which means
overall cuts will total $1.56 mil-
lion, he said during a special
meeting Monday night.
The council will hold a man-
datory public hearing on the
amendment on Feb. 13, with fi-
nal adoption set the following
day. The tax increase will
amount to about $10.50 more
on a property assessed at
$100,000. Property taxes are
currently 5.215 mills, or $521
on a $100,000 property.
The prison must sustain the
most sizeable cuts of any sin-
gle department -- $1.7 million
because the amendment re-
duces its spending nearly 6
Budget amendment forwarded
County plan would raise taxes 2 percent
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See COUNCIL, Page 10A
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Elaine Maddon Curry, Harry Haas, Eugene Kelleher, Linda
McClosky Houck and JimBobeck at Mondays meeting.
County Council will hold a public
hearing on the 2012 budget
amendment at 6:01 p.m. Mon-
day, Feb. 13 in the countys
Emergency Management Agen-
cy building, 185 Water St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
I F YO U G O
DALLAS TWP. As Dallas High School
parents, players and assistant coaches
made one final appeal to keep Ted Jackson
on Monday night, the man destined to re-
place one of the Wyoming Valley Confer-
ences most successful football coaches sat
quietly.
The Dallas School Boards 7-2 decision
to hire Bob Zaruta met
with a similar silence as
Jackson supporters filed
out of the packed board
meeting room.
Thedecisionwasnt all
that surprising to Jack-
son, who accumulated a
227-83-3 career record in
his 27 years at Dallas.
His position opened in December after he
received a negative review from high
school Principal Jeffrey Shaffer and saw a
vote to retainhimfail 5-3 inJanuary after a
due process hearing before the board.
Yes and no, said Jackson, who didnt
attend the meeting. I thought we made
someprogress. I thought myguy(attorney
KimBorland) provedthe things right. The
sad part is (the board members) sit there
anddont evenpay attentiontothe parents
or the kids or the people that are talking.
Thats what bothers me. The kids are the
ones who are going to suffer.
Dr. Bruce Goeringer and Fred Parry vot-
ed against Zaruta, both making state-
ments in support of Jackson. Dr. Richard
Coslett, Karen Kyle, Maureen Matiska,
Charles Preece, Larry Schuler, Colleen
Jackson era at helm
of Mountaineers ends
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
New Dallas head football coach Robert
Zaruta, Shavertown, was selected to
succeed Ted Jackson on Monday night.
Dallas
tabs new
top coach
School Board votes 7-2 to name Bob
Zaruta as first new football head
coach in 27 years.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
Jackson
See DALLAS, Page 10A
NEW YORK Less than a
second stood between British
singer M.I.A. giving the finger
to 114 million people watching
the Super Bowl halftime show
and no one noticing at all.
Thats how close NBC censors
came to preventing the gesture
from being seen Sunday night,
but the Super Bowl instead
wound up with another enter-
tainment oops moment. The
gesture swept across social
media, showing up in screen
grabs and video, reminding
everyone of Janet
Jacksons in-
famous war-
drobe mal-
function in
2004 when
a nipple
was ex-
posed
ever so briefly to a Super
Bowl audience.
Both NBC and the NFL, which
puts on the halftime show, apol-
ogized.
M.I.A.s record label said Monday
Singers Super Bowl gesture almost went M.I.A.
By DAVID BAUDER
AP Television Writer
See M.I.A., Page 10A
M.I.A.
during
half-
time of
Super
Bowl
XLVI.
COMMERCIAL
SUCCESS
Shavertown
native one
of the stars
of a Super
Bowl ad. 10A
Fickle finger of blame
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 6A
Editorials 9A
B SPORTS: 1B
B BUSINESS: 9B
C HEALTH: 1C
Birthdays 8C
Crossword/Horoscope 9C
Television 10C
Movies 10C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
Comics 10D
WEATHER
John McGuire
Sunny to partly cloudy.
High 40, low 31.
Details, Page 10B
HARRISBURG The ranks
of homeless veterans are grow-
ing, and a state Senate commit-
tee Monday heard testimony
that the Marcellus Shale indus-
try is making the problem
worse.
Several
witnesses tes-
tified one ma-
jor reason for
the increase
in homeless-
ness lies with
the gas drill-
ing industry,
which drives
up rents and
makes affor-
dable hous-
ing more
scarce, result-
ing in more
people being
unable to find
or afford a
place to live.
State Sen.
Lisa Baker, R-
Lehman
Township,
chairs the
Senate Veter-
ans Affairs &
Emergency
Preparedness
Committee,
which held
the hearing titled, Preventing
and Eradicating Homelessness
Among the Veteran Popula-
tion.
In a way, whether the root
causeis medical or economic or
personal misjudgments, it does
not matter, Baker said to open
the hearing. Our obligations to
Pennsylvanias veterans do not
comewithanexpirationdateor
an opt-out clause when state
revenues falter.
Monsignor Joseph Kelly, ex-
ecutive director of Catholic So-
cial Services for the Scranton
Diocese, testified the Veterans
Administration estimates there
are nearly 68,000 homeless vet-
Shale
affects
homeless
veterans
Gas industry has increased
competition for housing,
witnesses tell officials.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See VETERANS, Page 10A
Our obli-
gations to
Pennsylva-
nias veter-
ans do not
come with
an expira-
tion date
or an opt-
out clause
when state
revenues
falter.
State Sen. Lisa
Baker
R-Lehman Twp.
NANTICOKE A tavern where po-
lice say a woman was slashed in the
face early on New Years Day was cited
with multiple violations by state police
Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement.
In a news release issued Monday,
state police said they cited the Prospect
Street Caf at 23 S. Prospect St. with
excessive noise and operating in a dis-
orderly manner on multiple dates in
2011, and on Jan. 1 when Jennifer
Mieczkowski was severely injured.
The tavern also was cited with per-
mitting minors to frequent the business
and furnishing alcohol to minors, oper-
ating gambling devices and failing to
abide by an agreement reached with the
state Liquor Control Board on Dec. 6
that allowed the tavern to remain open.
Mieczkowski, 30, said she entered the
tavern with Rickey Wells to buy a 12-
pack of beer to take home. While she
was talking to friends, a fight broke out
and a woman slashed Mieczkowski nu-
merous times in the face and neck, po-
lice said.
No charges have been filed in the
slashing.
Nanticoke bar cited with multiple violations
Tavern where cops say woman was
slashed cited by state police bureau.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
See VIOLATIONS, Page 8A
NICE WEATHER, NO KIDDING
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
I
an Finnegan, 4, of Edwardsville, calls to a playmate Monday as he climbs on the bars at the playground at Kirby
Park in Wilkes-Barre. Ian was enjoying another unseasonably warmwinter day. Slightly colder temperatures are
forecast for today with some light snow predicted for Wednesday. For weather details, see Page 10B.
K
PAGE 2A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Chung, Dr. Hiyoung
Hall, Francis
Killian, Rodger
Kupinewicz, Helen
Koytek, Mary
Mariani, Rita
Meeker, Patricia
Oliver, Peter
Orloski, Debra
Ramsey, Marie
Santoro, Maria
Shager, Ronald
Skovronsky, Otto
Smithonic, Louise
Wassil, Theresa
OBITUARIES
Page 6A
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG (AP) Tues-
days Pennsylvania Cash 5
jackpot will be worth at least
$500,000 because no play-
er matched the five winning
numbers drawn in Mondays
game.
Lottery officials said 169
players matched four num-
bers and won $135 each; 5,115
players matched three num-
bers and won $7.50 each;
and 50,266 players matched
two numbers and won $1
each.
Thursdays Pennsylvania
Match 6 Lotto jackpot will
be worth at least $750,000
because no player holds a
ticket with one row that
matches all six winning
numbers drawn in Mondays
game.
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 4-2-0
BIG 4 0-2-3-7
QUINTO - 0-8-7-1-4
TREASURE HUNT
01-17-18-24-30
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 2-2-5
BIG 4 - 4-1-8-9
QUINTO - 6-2-8-4-4
CASH 5
07-11-23-25-27
MATCH 6 LOTTO
06-07-08-18-27-33
DETAILS
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Issue No. 2012-038
WILKES-BARRE The era of
multiple valedictorians in each
high school of Wilkes-Barre Area
is set to end, with the School
Board planning a vote Wednes-
day on a new system that would
name only one valedictorian and
one salutatorian at each school,
giving other high academic
achievers the newtitle of distin-
guished scholars.
The board discussed the final
details of the change at Mondays
work session.
The move will take advantage
of a decision years ago to switch
from letter grades to numerical
grades, with extra weight given
for harder courses.
Supervisor of Curriculum An-
drew Kuhl said current seniors
have been told since they were in
ninth grade that a new system
was expected this year, the first
for which there are four years of
numeric scores. That means the
district can calculate a students
cumulative grade point average
for all four years to see who has
the highest scores.
Kuhl said that if more than one
student scored exactly the same
at the top of list, more than one
valedictorian would be ap-
proved.
He also said he and adminis-
trators had decided the district
should award any student with a
cumulative average of 98 or high-
er the distinguished scholar dis-
tinction, which should include a
pin or medal to wear at gradua-
tion.
Board member Dino Galella, a
former principal, saidhe thought
98 was a high threshold and
asked why it wasnt set at 95.
Kuhl said that, because of the
weighted system, students can
score above 100, adding that
right now there is a potential of
about 60 students hitting that
threshold in the three schools.
On Wednesday the board will
also consider giving all students
in-district email accounts to al-
low them greater access to web
programs that require email ad-
dresses for a log in.
Technology Coordinator Gene
Manning said the accounts
wouldwork only for communica-
tions within the system and
could not be used for general
email to non-district addresses.
He also said the students
would be told there would be no
expectation of privacy, and the
district would have access to all
messages sent in the system.
Manning said the option be-
came affordable because a new
agreement with Microsoft in-
cluded the email addresses free,
compare to $9 per address in the
past.
He also noted that students
would have to use their own
names and not an alias, and that
each would be given a password
from the district rather than cre-
ating their own.
W-B Area to pick distinguished scholars
New system would name only
one valedictorian and one
salutatorian at each school.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
The School Board regular meeting
will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday.
W H AT S N E X T
PLYMOUTH TWP.-- At Mon-
days meeting, the Board of Su-
pervisors discussed the fate of
Tilbury Terrace Road, which was
badly damaged by flooding.
There are roughly 60 homes in
the Tilbury Terrace neighbor-
hood, and the road is the only ac-
cess for the residents.
For the last few months, Joe
Yudichak, the townships roadde-
partment supervisor, and the
township engineer have moni-
tored the condition of the two-
way road, which has ripped apart
on one side.
In todays times, a develop-
ment of that nature would never
have been approved by the plan-
ning commission, said board
Chairman Gale Conrad, referring
tothe fact that there is nosecond-
ary access road for Tilbury Ter-
race.
The township hopes to receive
a report fromthe engineer on the
findings of soil tests conducted
under the road within about two
weeks, Conrad added.
The township will then meet
with the engineers to further as-
sess and come to a conclusion as
to what will need to be done to
repair the road, she said.
If the road is deemed unfixa-
ble, the township will have to re-
sort to plan B, which means shut-
ting down Tilbury Terrace Road
and constructing a secondary ac-
cess road, Conrad said.
A special public meeting will
be advertised for resident input
on the matter before any deci-
sions are made, Conrad said.
If the findings of the tests come
back close to the date of the
Board of Supervisors March
meeting, then the supervisors
will take public input regarding
the issue at that time.
We have to be very proactive,
Conrad said. The board has to
be prepared for what might hap-
pen. Astormcausedtheproblem,
but the Board of Supervisors has
the responsibility to take care of
the problem, and this is what we
have to do.
In a related matter, the board
voted to forgive sewer bills that
are paid to Berkheimer &Associ-
ates for business owners and resi-
dents whose properties have
been damaged by flooding.
The bills that will be forgiven
are for the fourth quarter of 2011.
Tilbury Terrace
Road fate discussed
Plymouth Twp. supervisors
hope to receive report on
road condition from engineer.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
The board next meets at 7 p.m.
March 5 at the township building.
W H AT S N E X T
E D I T O R S N O T E
The Diagramless and the Cryptogram puzzles in the Etc. section of
the Sunday Times Leader were discontinued by the syndicate that
had been providing them. No similar replacement was offered. We
regret faithful puzzle fans were disappointed by the change. We
hope fans of puzzles try the new Kenken numbers challenge.
WILKES-BARRE TWP. --
Council passed a resolution
on Monday night to extend
the townships agreement
with Trans-Med Ambulance
Inc. for 72 months.
In the present agreement,
the township provides Trans-
Med a large parking space and
restroom facilities for Trans-
Med employees. In return for
these in-kind services, Trans-
Med covers the co-pay cost of
ambulance and emergency
services to township resi-
dents. Trans-Med provides
residents without insurance
services for free.
It works well, Council-
man John Jablowski said of
the present agreement.
The council also discussed
correspondence from a resi-
dent about the creation of a
dog park. The resident sug-
gested the township fence in a
small portion of Al Karaska
Memorial Park for use as a
leash-free dog park.
Michael Revitt, township
administrator, said he was
concerned because the area is
used by young people for sled-
ding. Mayor Carl Kuren said
about the possible location of
a fence, Wed have to be ob-
servant.
Jablowski asked township
Solicitor Bruce Phillips about
possible legal problems with
creating a dog park. Phillips
said he didnt see any huge
problems with the idea but
pointed out the townships in-
surance agreement does not
now include a provision for a
dog park.
W-B Twp. extends pact with Trans-Med
Ambulance service provided
for residents in exchange for
in-kind services.
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader Correspondent
Work session on Feb. 27 at 7:30
p.m.
W H AT S N E X T
SWOYERSVILLE -- The main-
tenance and cleanup of a rental
property on Main Street was
once again a topic of discussion
at borough councils meeting on
Monday Night.
Sam Barbose, Courtdale, said
borough zoning officer Joseph
Ruscavage had erred in sending
him a letter asserting that Bar-
bose was illegally operating a
business on Main Street in the
borough.
The letter also said that Bar-
bose failed to maintain the prop-
erty in an appropriate manner.
Barbose shared photos of his
property with council, saying
that he was simply storing build-
ing materials in an orderly way.
He also said other property
owners were granted leniency in
regard to the upkeep of their
properties.
Barbose asked Council Presi-
dent Ron Alunni if other resi-
dents had complained about
Ruscavage.
To my knowledge, no one
else has had a problem with Mr.
Ruscavage, said Alunni.
Barbose referredtopendingli-
tigation, and borough Solicitor
Joseph Yeager said that his com-
plaints would be best addressed
in that forum.
In another matter, Chris Hos-
podar, representing the
Swoyersville Teeners Little
League program, asked permis-
sion for the league to use Roose-
velt Field.
Alunni said although the
council supports suchprograms,
he was reluctant to grant the re-
quest because of issues of sched-
uling and cleanup. He said other
leagues using the field often
pitched in regarding mainte-
nance.
Alunni said he would review
the matter further and get back
to Hospodar.
The meetingalsoprovidedop-
portunity for Kathy Breznay,
Swoyersville Kiwanis Club, to
present three dozen teddy bears
to the police department as part
of the Comfort Bear program.
Breznay said the bears were
provided to the police to share
with children in distress.
For example, the other night,
the bears were given out during
an accident to make children in-
volved feel better, said Breznay.
The bears could also be used in
instances of domestic disputes.
Breznay saidKiwanis was also
involved in other benefits to the
community, including support
of such organizations as the Red
Cross, Salvation Army and St.
Josephs Center.
Swoyersville official is criticized
Property owner complains to
council about letter he got
from the zoning officer.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
The next meeting of borough
council will be 7:30 p.m. March 5.
W H AT S N E X T
FORTY FORT Borough
council on Monday voted to
amend and re-advertise a pro-
posed ordinance to create a bor-
oughmanager positionajobfor
which the council president said
he might or might not apply.
During public comment, bor-
ough resident Jeff McLaughlin
questioned council on the ordi-
nance at length.
When McLaughlin first asked
if anyone on council was seeking
the position, Councilman Frank
Michaels, who was on the com-
mittee to research a borough
manager position, said the posi-
tion had not been created or ad-
vertised, so it was impossible for
anyone on council to apply.
McLaughlin said council
members were creating the posi-
tionalongwithasalaryandbene-
fits package, and then for a
council person to then take that
job is a concern.
Michaels said he would hope
any council member who ap-
plied for the position would re-
cuse themselves in salary and
benefit negotiations.
McLaughlin directly asked
council President Joe Chacke if
he attended to apply for the posi-
tion if it was created.
I may, I have to wait and see
what theyre considering,
Chacke said.
McLaughlin said he had a
problemwithChacke appointing
council members to a borough
manager committee if Chacke
would seek the position.
McLaughlin also said the ordi-
nance requiring six votes instead
of a simple majoritytohire or fire
a borough manager was contrary
to borough code and questioned
the reasoning behind it. He also
complainedabout thewaytheor-
dinance was advertised, and that
the move to advertise it and to
eliminate the position of bor-
ough coordinator Denise Syms
was made at a special Sunday
morning meeting on Jan. 29.
McLaughlin pointed to bor-
ough code, which states that a
council majority would be suffi-
cient to hire or fire a manager.
Michaels saidthe super-major-
ity clause was written to try to
make it as non-political as possi-
ble. But McLaughlin said it
would ensure that even two
council members who were
friends with the manager could
ensure that he keeps his job even
if he were doing a bad job.
He also noted borough code
required the entire ordinance to
be publishedina newspaper and,
if it was not, that the full ordi-
nancebeprovidedtothenewspa-
per.
Solicitor Sam Falcone asked
for time to check if the complete
ordinance was sent to the news-
paper and left the room.
Councilwoman Karen Marti-
nelli motioned to amend the or-
dinance to require a simple ma-
jorityfor hiringor firingamanag-
er and change some wording to
reflect another suggestion of
McLaughlins so that it was more
in line with borough code. That
motion was tabled.
After an executive session, Mi-
chaels made a motion to amend
the ordinance to reflect the
change in technical wording and
to require four votes to hire a
manager and six votes to fire a
manager. The motion passed 4-1
with Martinelli voting against it
and Chacke abstaining. Falcone
said the ordinance would be
readvertised in its entirety.
Forty Fort mulls manager
Council to amend, re-advertise
a proposed ordinance to
create the position.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
Council meets next for a special
meeting at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 17 at
borough hall.
W H AT S N E X T
KINGSTON -- Council passed
a measure Monday allowing the
Kingston Municipal Fire Depart-
ment, which shares responsibil-
ities with the Forty Fort Bor-
ough Fire Department, to bill
the insurance providers of indi-
viduals to recover costs for cer-
tain services.
Municipal Administrator Paul
Keating said these charges to in-
surance providers will never be
billed to individual residents. In
instances where home or auto-
mobile owners have the proper
insurance, the fire department
will be able to directly bill the
owners insurance provider.
If the owners do not have in-
surance, or the insurance is not
applicable, no charges will be as-
sessed.
In another emergency servic-
es-related matter, Kingston will
be applying for a state Safer
Grant in hopes that it will fund
the wages and benefits of a new
firefighter over the next four
years. Kingston is anticipating
the need for another member of
the force after the announce-
ment of veteran firefighter Mark
Evans upcoming retirement in
May.
In other business, the council
announced it will have a public
hearing prior to, and a special
meeting following, the Feb. 21
council work session at 7 p.m.
The purpose of the public
hearing andspecial meeting is to
discuss and possibly award a li-
quor license to Thomas Family
Market on Wyoming Avenue.
Tom Baseski of Thomas said
he hopes to convert a roughly
800-square-foot section of the
store intoanarea where beer and
hot food could be sold.
He said Thomas has seen a
great deal of success with a simi-
lar setupat its Back Mountainlo-
cation. He also said this is a pop-
ular trend within the grocery in-
dustry and cited Wegmans suc-
cess in selling beer as proof that
such a setup could be successful
within the Wyoming Valley.
Council unanimously ap-
proved a resolution permitting a
subdivision at the 200 block of
Wyoming Avenue that is on the
site of the former Pompei
Dodge. The subdivision will
soon be housing a new First
Keystone Community Bank fa-
cility.
Kingston gives authority to fire
dept. to bill insurance providers
By B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
Public hearing/council work ses-
sion/special meeting on Feb. 21, at
7 p.m. Regular meeting, Monday,
March 5 at 7 p.m.
W H AT S N E X T
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Kings picks security chief
R
etired state police Capt. Frank
Hacken has been named director
of campus safety and security at
Kings College.
He will coordinate all aspects of
campus safety and
security, including
oversight of the
campus security
department and
education and com-
pliance with work
safety.
Hacken retired in
January from the
state police after serving more than
25 years. At retirement he held the
rank of captain and served as Troop
Commander with Troop R based in
Dunmore.
HARRISBURG
DEP levies penalties
The state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection has ordered
William Wright, of Spring Brook
Township, Lackawanna County, to
surrender his state radon testing
certification and pay $43,750 in civil
penalties for numerous violations of
the Radon Certification Act and
Radiation Protection Act.
Our inspectors noted nearly 40
violations at four radon mitigation
systems installed by Mr. Wright and
his company, Tru Pro Remediation
Services Group, DEP Southeast
Regional Director Joseph A. Feola
said.
DEP first received a complaint in
May 2011. During a June 6 inspec-
tion of the system, staff found nu-
merous violations, including impro-
perly sealed radon vent pipe, perim-
eter drain channel, floor cracks and
sump pits.
DEP sent an initial notice of vio-
lation to Wright and Tru Pro on June
21, 2011, followed by a Sept. 2 vio-
lation notice and enforcement meet-
ing request. Despite numerous at-
tempts, Wright failed to meet with
agency representatives to discuss the
violations.
JENKINS TWP.
Pregnant teen is found
A pregnant teenager reported
missing by her family on Saturday
was found in Streetsboro, Ohio, near
Cleveland, Monday afternoon, Police
Chief Frank Mudlock said.
Mudlock said Brelyn Miller, 14, of
Jenkins Township, was found un-
harmed with 29-year-old Clyde Tonkin
at about 1 p.m.
Mudlock said Miller, who is 8
months pregnant, will likely be taken
into custody by caseworkers until her
family makes arrangements for her
return home.
Tonkin, of Pittston, and Miller left
the area Saturday when Tonkin
bought a used car. A surveillance
camera at Wal-Mart in Pittston Town-
ship recorded them before leaving.
It was not immediately known if
Tonkin will face any charges.
WRIGHT TWP.
Madry court date set
A court date has been scheduled
for Dan Madry, 51, who was charged
by Fairview Township police with
defiant trespass near his sons memo-
rial on Lake Road.
Madry was cited
while allegedly
walking his dog on
property owned by
Glen Summit Co.
on Jan. 23. Madry
was in the area to
visit a memorial on
Lake Road where
his son, Brian, 16, was killed in a
crash on July 18.
A summary hearing on the tres-
pass charge is scheduled on Feb. 29
before District Judge Ronald Swank
in Wright Township.
PLAINS TWP.
Multi-way stop sign set
The state plans to install a multi-
way stop sign in the next two weeks
at the intersection of Union Street
and Ridgewood Road in the Hudson
section of Plains Township.
The department will install a yel-
low flasher on the new Stop Ahead
sign and a red flasher on the stop
sign for a period of 30 days, while
motorists become accustomed to
this change.
N E WS I N B R I E F
Hacken
Madry
ThestateSuperior Court hasoverturned
a disgraced Luzerne County judges ruling
regardingacontroversial uninsuredmotor-
ist arbitration case that resulted in a
$500,000 award to a man who blamed a
phantom vehicle for causing a car crash.
James Haggerty, anattorneyfor Harleys-
ville Insurance, said the courts ruling in
the case of Forester Vanderhoff all but ends
thecompanys eight-year battletooverturn
what it claimedwas anunjust rulingby for-
mer Judge Michael Conahan, who is serv-
ing a17 year sentence on convictions re-
latedtotheLuzerneCountykids for cash
corruption scandal.
Haggerty saidVanderhoff canseektoap-
peal the courts ruling. If unsuccessful, the
case will return to Luzerne County Court
whereajudge, basedontheSuperior Court
decision, will be required to vacate the
$500,000 judgment and rule in Harleys-
villes favor.
Justicehas finallybeendone, Haggerty
said.
Vanderhoffs attorney, Brian Corcoran,
did not return a phone message seeking
comment.
The convoluted case centered on Van-
derhoffs claimthat a thirdvehicle playeda
role in a 2001 car crash in which he rear-
ended a vehicle driven by Ryan Piontkow-
ski on the Sans Souci Parkway in Hanover
Township.
Vanderhoff claimed the third vehicle
darted in front of Piontkowski as he ap-
proached a traffic light, forcing Piontkow-
ski to brake abruptly and leaving Vander-
hoff no time to avoid the collision.
The problem, Harleysville said, is that
both Piontkowski and the police officer
who investigated the crash insisted there
was no other vehicle involved. The compa-
nyalsonotedVanderhoff didnot report the
phantom vehicle to Harleysville until
eight months after the crash.
Despite that, Conahan, at a 2004 hear-
ing, found Vanderhoff to be more credible
and issued a ruling that the phantomvehi-
cle did exist. That allowed Vanderhoff to
Conahan ruling is overturned
Uninsured motorist arbitration case
resulted in half million dollar award.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See RULING, Page 10A
Prosecutors have asked the
U.S. Supreme Court to hear an
appeal of a court ruling that
deemed mass murderer George
Banks incompetent to be execut-
ed.
The state Office of Attorney
General recently asked the court
to address
whether the
state Supreme
Court misap-
plied the law
when it upheld
Luzerne Coun-
ty Senior Judge
Joseph Augel-
los ruling that
Banks is toomentallyill tobeexe-
cuted for the1982 shooting spree
in Wilkes-Barre and Jenkins
Township that left 13 people
dead, including five of his chil-
dren.
The appeal is the latest legal
maneuver in the decades-old
case that has worked its way
through multiple state and feder-
al appellate courts. If the request
is granted, it would mark the sec-
ond time the U.S. Supreme Court
has taken up an issue involving
Banks.
Augello ruled in May 2010 that
Banks could not be executed be-
cause he is so mentally ill that he
does not rationally understand
the reason he is facing execution.
Augello noted testimony of ex-
perts, who said Banks believes
his sentences have been vacated
by God, and that he is in jail due
to a conspiracy between police
and prosecutors.
The state Supreme Court up-
held that ruling in September
2011, finding that Banks has a fac-
tual understanding of his crimes,
but does not rationally under-
stand what that means to him.
In the appeal to the U.S. Su-
preme Court, Senior Deputy At-
torney General William Stoycos,
acting on behalf of Luzerne
County prosecutors, acknowl-
edged Banks is sometimes delu-
sional. But he said evidence pre-
sented at three separate compe-
tency hearings also showed that
Banks, at times, does have a ratio-
nal understanding of his death
sentence.
Stoycos saidthe state Supreme
Court erred in applying the legal
standard by which the case must
be judged. The issue is not
whether Banks is consistently in-
capable of understanding his sit-
uation, but whether his mental
Top court
asked to
hear issue
on Banks
Prosecutors say court that
ruled Banks incompetent to
be executed misapplied law.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Banks
See BANKS, Page 10A
WILKES-BARRE TWP. The town-
ship volunteer fire department has until
the end of the month to release its finan-
cial records and any donations received
from 2006, according to a ruling by the
state Office of Open Records.
The Times Leader was successful in its
appeal to the Open Records Office after a
Right-To-Knowrequest sent to Fire Chief
John Paul Yuknavich on Dec. 16 went ig-
nored.
Turning over the requested informa-
tion may be troublesome for the fire de-
partment.
State police at Wyoming seized five
boxes of records when a search warrant
was served at the de-
partment on Jan. 20. A
day before, on Jan. 19,
the township voluntari-
ly provided records to
state police.
A Right-To-Know re-
quest to the township
on Dec. 16 returned a
partial list of information, including the
township employment histories of Yuk-
navich and Assistant Fire Chief James
Youkoski.
Yuknavich and Youkoski are employed
as truck drivers inthe townships roadde-
partment. They each earn an annual sala-
ry of $37,286. Yuknavich was hired in
April 1989 and Youkoski was hired in Oc-
tober 2001.
Yuknavich and Youkoski could not be
reached for comment on Monday.
The township failed to provide, as re-
quested by The Times Leader, donation
amountsthemunicipalityhasgiventothe
fire department since 2006 and any con-
tracts that allows the fire department to
provide fire services within the township.
Mayor Carl Kurenpreviouslystatedthe
townshipprovides anannual $110,000do-
nation to the department in addition to
payingthedepartmentsutilitiesandbills.
Kuren has said the township has no con-
trol over the fire departments operations
or personnel.
The Times Leaders request to the de-
partment sought financial documents,
township and community donation
amounts from 2006, a list of active fire-
fighters andofficers, by-laws andminutes
of meetings among fire department offi-
cers from2006.
The request was sent to Yuknavich.
When Yuknavich failed to respond
within the required five business days,
The Times Leader appealed to the states
Open Records Office.
In a ruling issued Jan. 30, an open re-
cords appeals officer issued a ruling find-
ing in favor of The Times Leader. Prior
case law states volunteer fire depart-
ments are deemed a local governmental
agency and subject to the Right-To-Know
statute to disclose public records.
Yuknavich is facing theft charges filed
by state police alleging he withdrew
$11,865 in cash from the departments
bank account fromOctober 2008 and Au-
gust 2010that was not usedfor operations
or expenses. The charges further allege
Yuknavich used the fire departments
credit card for Sams Club to make a total
of $3,706 in purchases for personal use
from June 2009 and May 2011, according
to the criminal complaint. A preliminary
hearing was continued from Monday to
Feb. 22.
W-B Twp. Fire Dept. gets deadline to release records
TL appeal successful after
Right-to-Know request ignored.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Yuknavich
WILKES-BARRE Wilkes-
Barres first day of single-
stream recycling was a suc-
cess, city spokesman Drew
McLaughlin said, with resi-
dents putting out a tremen-
dous amount of materials they
ordinarily didnt put out.
But there are limits to what
can go into those city bins, and
McLaughlinsaidits important
people learn them.
The main thing is that they
can put all their recyclables
plastics, bottles newspapers,
magazines, books, phone
books intotherecyclablecon-
tainer, McLaughlin said.
They dont have to separate
them anymore.
And while the list of what
will be pickeduphas expanded
substantially, residents needto
resist the urge to start dump-
ing anything and everything
on the curb.
They cant put out electron-
ics, for example, McLaughlin
said. We had one case where
they put out a satellite dish.
Other unacceptable items
include hoses, plastic toys,
playground equipment, things
like that. The general rule of
thumb is: If its a household
container, it will be allowable.
White paper is fine, includ-
ing envelopes with those plas-
tic windows, but shredded pa-
per is not. Any cardboard that
is not waxed cereal boxes, pa-
perboard, corrugated is now
taken, as well as glossy paper
and magazines.
While it can all go into the
same bin, if there is a lot of
cardboard it might be better to
cut it up and bail it, setting it
alongside the bin, McLaughlin
said.
McLaughlin warned against
thinking of the new single-
streamsystemas a bulk pickup
or clutter cleanup. Residents
need to stick to the accept-
able list for the system to
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre city employee Tom Wignot picks up recyclables Monday on Dagobert Street.
New recycling system is hailed
More items being put out in
W-B, but official warns
about whats not OK.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Drinking glasses
Frozen food, juice or
ice creamcontainters
Hazardous or
biohazardous waste
Light bulbs
Plates or vases
Mirrors
Ceramic
Pyrex
Napkins
Needles
Paper to-go
containers
Paper towels
Plastic 6-pack
holders
Plastic microwave
trays
Plastics not listed
as acceptable
Scrap metal
Shredded paper
Stickers or sheets
of address labels
(afxed labels or
stamps are OK)
Styrofoam
Syringes
Tissues
Tyvek envelopes
Waxed paper
Waxed cardboard
Window glass
SINGLE-STREAM RECYCLING
Acceptable
1-7 numbered plastics
Aluminum Cans
Aluminum Foil
Cardboard
Cereal boxes
Color paper
Detergent bottles
Empty aerosol cans
Envelopes
(windowOK)
Egg cartons
File folders
Glass jars & bottles
Books (hard or
soft cover)
Juice/milk cartons
Junk mail
Newspapers
and inserts
Magazines
Brochures
Multi 3-ply paper
White paper
Paperboard boxes
Phone books
Catalogs
Plastic milk jugs
Plastic soda
bottles
Pots & pans
School papers
Small metals
Tin cans
Water bottles.
Non-acceptable
Source: Northeast Cartage Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
See RECYCLING, Page 10A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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What he lacks in money, U.S. Senate
candidate SamRohrer says he makes up
in enthusiasm among supporters and a
grassroots campaign and track record
that he believes make himbest suited to
defeat Sen. Bob Casey in the general
election.
But to have that chance, he must first
defeat a large field of fellowRepublicans
in the April 24 primary.
Over the weekend, Rohrer, 56, kicked
off a three-month-long tour of Pennsyl-
vania, which brought him to Northeast
Pennsylvania on Monday with a coffee
chat inTannersville, a visit to The Times
Leader and a town hall in Clarks Sum-
mit.
The tour continues today with a chat
over coffee from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. at
the Iron Skillet Restaurant at the Petro
Truck Plaza in Dupont.
The Robeson Town-
ship, Berks County resi-
dent, servednine terms in
the state House before
opting to forgo a reelec-
tion campaign in favor of what became a
failed bid for governor in 2010 when he
lost to TomCorbett in the GOP primary.
Last year, he announced a run for the
U.S. Senate seat currently heldby Casey.
Of the six Republican candidates, none
besides Rohrer has either held elected
office or run a statewide campaign be-
fore.
He said each of his opponents has is-
sues with their candidacies that he
doesnt. In addition to the two front-run-
ners, party-endorsed candidate Steve
WelchandTomSmith, a millionaire who
made his money in the coal industry, the
other candidates areattorneyMarc Scar-
ingi, businessman David Christian and
pharmacist John Kensinger.
Rohrer, with his wife, Ruth Ann, sit-
ting next to him, said both Welch and
Smith have ties to the Democratic Party
and track records that conservative Re-
publicans cant get behind.
Welch has said he has voted for Presi-
dent Barack Obama and gave money to
former Congressman Joe Sestak, both
Democrats. Smith identifies himself as a
lifelong Democrat who switched his reg-
istration to Republican last year.
While Welch and
Smith both report-
ed raising more
than $1 million last
year, Rohrer report-
ed $122,000. But
money wont be as
big an issue in the
primary, Rohrer
said, because he has
name recognition
and the support of
voters whowill turn
out, not the partys
establishment and
big donors.
He said the partys endorsement of
Welch, with backing by Corbett, only
motivates his supporters even more and
gets other Republicans behind him be-
cause theyre tired of being told what to
do.
Rohrer saidthe party shouldnot try to
anoint a candidate.
That is the purpose of the primary,
he said.
U . S . S E N AT E The former Pa. state House member, who lost the GOP gubernatorial nomination to Corbett in 2010, now seeks seat currently held by Sen. Bob Casey
Rohrer says hes best choice for conservatives
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Sam Rohrer, one of six Republican
candidates for U.S. Senate.
20 1 2
ELECTION
Marc Scaringi,
candidate for the
Republican nomi-
nation to the U.S.
Senate, will be a
featured speaker
at a meeting of
the North East PA
Tea Party, tonight
at 6:15 at The Caf,
1120 Highway 315,
Plains Township.
S C A R I N G I
I N T O W N ,
T O O
Age: 56
Resides: Robeson Township, Berks Coun-
ty
Family: Wife Ruth Ann Rohrer, six children
and five grandchildren
Alma mater: Bob Jones University
S A M R O H R E R
PHILADELPHIA A federal
judge is mullingchallenges tothe
use of Pennsylvanias 2001 legis-
lative district maps in this years
elections after the state Supreme
Court rejected the states legisla-
tive redistricting plan.
Senior U.S. District Judge R.
Barclay Surrick heard arguments
in Philadelphia on Monday over
whether this years races can be
held under the old maps.
Last month, the Supreme
Court rejected the proposed 2012
redistricting plan. A justice said
in an opinion filed Friday that he
believed this years elections, in-
cluding the April 24 primary, will
have tobe heldunder the decade-
old maps.
But lawyers for Senate Major-
ity Leader Dominic Pileggi, R-
Delaware, are seeking an injunc-
tiontoprevent the use of the 2001
maps in elections this year, citing
population shifts over the past
decade.
Judge considers challenges to
use of 01 state legislative maps
The Associated Press
WILKES-BARRE AMocana-
qua man pleaded guilty Monday
to charges that he had inappro-
priate contact two young girls.
MatthewRobert Bonser, 20, of
Pond Hill Road, entered the plea
to two counts of indecent assault
and one count of corruption of
minors for giving one of the girls
marijuana.
County Senior Judge Kenneth
Brown said Bonser will be sen-
tenced on May 7, and he will be
required to register his address
under Megans Law for a period
of 10 years.
Bonser will also undergo an
evaluation by the state Sexual
Offenders Assessment Board,
Brown said.
According to court papers, on
April 29, 2010, state police were
contacted by a local school dis-
trict after two seventh-grade stu-
dents reported they had had sex-
ual contact with Bonser.
In an interview with police
that same day, a 12-year-old girl
said she was at a friends house
when Bonser arrived. The girl
said she, her friend and Bonser
were hanging out when Bonser
and her friend, a 13-year-old, be-
gan kissing and touching.
The 12-year-old said she was
going to leave when Bonser ap-
proached her and sexually as-
saulted her.
The girl said she didnt say
anything because she was afraid.
Police later spoke with the 13-
year-old girl, who said she had
been having a relationship
with Bonser for a fewweeks, and
that they had only kissed and
touched. The girl said Bonser
was aware of how old she was,
and she knew he was 18-years-
old at the time.
The 13-year-old said that on
one occasion, Bonser brought
marijuana to her house, andthey
smoked it.
When police questioned Bon-
ser about the contact with the
two girls, he denied any sexual
contact with them. He said the
13-year-old was the one who sup-
plied marijuana to him and that
hewas therewithanother friend.
Police said they interviewed
Bonsers friend, who said he had
never been in the 13-year-old
girls home and did not knowthe
other girl.
Bonser was orderedtohave no
unsupervised contact with mi-
nors, and to stay away fromplac-
es children frequent.
Man pleads guilty to inappropriate contact
Matthew Robert Bonser, 20,
was charged with indecent
assault, corruption of minors.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Sheena Delazio, a Times Leader
staff writer, may be reached at
829-7235.
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 5A

N A T I O N & W O R L D
HARRISBURG
Drilling fees considered
P
ennsylvanias booming natural gas
industry would pay an estimated
$190 million in fees in the first year,
money spread across drilling communi-
ties and to state infrastructure and envi-
ronmental programs, under legislation
that sped toward votes in the state Legis-
lature Monday.
The 15-year fee would be paid by all
Marcellus Shale wells, and the total
amount would rise in ensuing years as
more wells are drilled, said key people
involved in the negotiations.
The proposal is a result of weeks of
talks between leaders of the Republican-
controlled state Legislature and Gov.
Tom Corbett, a fellow Republican.
HARRISBURG
Senior Democrat convicted
A jury on Monday convicted a senior
Democrat in the Pennsylvania House of
Representatives on all but one of six
charges in the latest corruption trial
stemming from a five-
year investigation into
the use of taxpayers
resources for political
purposes.
Rep. Bill DeWeese
was convicted of felony
counts of conspiracy,
conflict of interest and
three counts of theft,
while the Dauphin
County jury acquitted him of one other
theft count.
The verdict was reached early on the
third day of deliberations.
DeWeeses lawyer vowed to appeal.
DeWeese said he intended to keep his
House seat and continue his re-election
campaign in his southwestern Pennsylva-
nia district.
CAIRO
Americans facing trial
Egypt on Monday released the names
of 19 Americans who face trial over
foreign funding of activities of their
nonprofit groups in Egypt, a case that
has soured U.S.-Egypt relations.
One of the 19 is the son of U.S. Trans-
portation Secretary Ray LaHood. Sam
LaHood and five other Americans are in
Egypt while the others have left, accord-
ing to a statement from the Egyptian
prosecutors office.
Altogether, 43 people face trials over
illegally operating in Egypt and receiving
funds from abroad without permission
from Egyptian authorities for their hu-
man rights and pro-democracy groups.
Egypt charges that they fund and sup-
port anti-government protests. The
groups deny that.
LOS ANGELES
Official: Faculty removed
The entire faculty at an elementary
school where two teachers were arrested
on suspicion of lewd conduct will be
removed while the school district in-
vestigates, the Los Angeles school super-
intendent told parents Monday.
Superintendent John Deasy told par-
ents and media on Monday night that
the Miramonte Elementary School staff-
ers are being replaced because a full
investigation of allegations is disruptive
and staffers require support to get
through the scandal, too.
An entire staff has been trained to
come into classrooms at Miramonte to
take over teaching for the time being,
and there will be a psychiatric social
worker in every classroom to help stu-
dents and staff cope with any issues.
School officials canceled classes at the
school today and Wednesday as a cool-
ing-off period, said district spokesman
Tom Waldman.
Deasy emphasized that all staff mem-
bers being brought into the classroom
went through a very rigorous screening
process.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Illegal factory blast in Pakistan deadly
Rescue workers carry a woman who
was pulled Monday from the debris of
a collapsed building in Lahore, Pakis-
tan. A three-story factory illegally set
up in a residential area of the city
collapsed when several gas cylinders
inside exploded, killing at least two
people and trapping more than 40
others in the rubble, officials said.
DeWeese
BEIRUT The U.S. closed
its SyrianembassyMondayand
Britain recalled its ambassador
to Damascus in a dramatic es-
calationof Westernpressure on
President Bashar Assad to give
up power, just days after diplo-
matic efforts at the United Na-
tions to end the crisis col-
lapsed.
TheU.S. evacuatedall its dip-
lomats fromthe country as Syr-
ian forces intensified a shelling
assault on the restive city of
Homs. The offensive beganSat-
urday, the same day Syrias al-
lies in Russia and China vetoed
a Western- and Arab-backed
resolution aimed at trying to
end the brutal crackdown on
dissent.
We have been relentless in
sending a message that it is
time for Assadtogo, President
Barack Obama said during an
interview with NBC. This is
not goingtobe a matter of if, its
going to be a matter of when.
Also Monday, British For-
eign Secretary William Hague
told lawmakers that Britain is
using multiple channels to ex-
press its abhorrence at the vi-
olent crackdown, and has sum-
moned Syrias ambassador to
the Foreign Office to convey
that message.
This is a doomed regime as
well as a murdering regime,
Hague said. There is no way it
can recover its credibility inter-
nationally.
The onslaught on Homs has
reinforcedoppositionfears that
Assadwill unleashevengreater
violence to crush dissent, now
that protection fromChina and
Russia against any U.N.-sanc-
tioned action appears assured.
Already, more than 5,400
people have been killed since
the Arab Spring-inspired upris-
ing that began in March, ac-
cording to the U.N.
The decision to close the em-
bassy is the most dramatic U.S.
move so far after 11months of a
violent crackdown by Assads
regime.
Even as the U.S. stepped up
pressure on Assad to quit, Oba-
masaidanegotiatedsolutionin
Syria is possible and it should
not be resolved by foreign mil-
itary intervention.
The State Department
warned last month it would
close the embassy unless As-
sads government stepped up
its protection. It cited concerns
about the safety of personnel
and recent car bombs.
U.S. shutters embassy in Syria
President Obama says Syrian
presidents surrender of
power a matter of when.
By BASSEMMROUE
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
All American diplomats in Syria have been evacuated from the
country and from the U.S. embassy building in Damascus.
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama levied tough new
sanctions on Irans Central Bank
on Monday amid increased ten-
sions over Tehrans nuclear pro-
gramand the specter of an Israe-
li attack on the Islamic republic.
In a letter to Congress, Obama
said more sanctions were war-
ranted, partic-
ularly in light
of the decep-
tive practices
of the Central
Bank of Iran
and other Ira-
nian banks.
He said the
problems in-
cluded the hid-
ing of transac-
tions of sanc-
tioned parties,
the deficien-
cies of Irans
anti-money
laundering regime and the unac-
ceptably high risk posed to the
entire international financial
systemposed by Irans activities.
The Central Bank sanctions
were included as an amendment
in the wide-ranging defense bill
that Obama signed into law at
the end of the year. The White
House said Obama signed the
executive order enforcing the
sanctions on Sunday.
The stronger sanctions come
as the White House tries to
ratchet up pressure on Iran to
abandon its nuclear program
and dissuade Israel from launch-
ing a unilateral strike on Iran, a
move that could roil the Middle
East and jolt the global econo-
my.
Obama said Sunday he does
not believe Israel has yet decid-
ed whether to attack Iran and
still believes a diplomatic solu-
tion is possible.
Iran insists that its nuclear
pursuit is for peaceful purposes,
but the West accuses Tehran of
developing the know-how to
build a nuclear bomb. Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta last
week would not dispute a report
that he believes Israel may at-
tack Iran this spring in an at-
tempt to set back the Islamic re-
publics nuclear program.
The White House said Mon-
day that the timing of the stric-
ter sanctions was unrelated to
the prospect of an Israeli attack.
A Treasury Department state-
ment said Monday the newsanc-
tions underscore that the admin-
istration is determined to hold
Iran accountable for meeting in-
ternational obligations over its
nuclear program.
Irans
Central
Bank is
sanctioned
Move made to pressure Iran
on nuke issue and perhaps
deter Israel from attack.
By JULIE PACE
Associated Press
Obama
cites de-
ceptive
practices
of the Cen-
tral Bank
of Iran and
other Ira-
nian
banks.
GRANDJUNCTION, Colo. Sensing
a possible threat, Mitt Romney criticized
Rick Santorums time in the Senate as
not effective because of his past sup-
port for spending on pork-barrel projects
as he worked to fend off an unexpected
challenge in the next states to vote.
Santorumcountered that Romney, the
front-runner in the GOP presidential
race, should not be our nominee be-
cause he was dead wrong on the most
important issue of the day when, as gov-
ernor, he signeda healthcare overhaul in-
to law in Massachusetts.
The two sparred from afar one day be-
fore Republicans in Colorado and Minne-
sota holdnominatingcaucuses, the latest
contests in whats become almost a plod-
ding race for the GOP nomination com-
paredtothe rapid-fire cam-
paign of last month. Newt
Gingrich and Ron Paul al-
so are competing but nei-
ther was expected to have
a breakout performance in
either state.
Romney, who won both states four
years ago, hopes to extend his winning
streak, though advisers acknowledged
that a first-place finish would be more
likely tocome inColoradothaninMinne-
sota. The Republican Party in Minnesota
has become more conservative in recent
years and Santorums strong conserva-
tive positions on social issues could res-
onate with evangelical voters.
Santorum, a Catholic, has a strong an-
ti-abortion record and consistently focus-
es on the issue. Romney, who once sup-
ported abortion rights, has struggled to
win over those voters. But in a sign that
hes trying to do just that, Romneys cam-
paign on Monday rolled out a petition fo-
cusingonreligious liberty. The move was
intendedtochallenge a recent Obama ad-
ministrationdecisiontorequire hospitals
to distribute free birth control.
Clearlymindful of the shift inMinneso-
ta, Santorumhas been working that state
and conservative areas of Colorado ag-
gressively in the past two weeks while
Romney campaigned in Florida and Ne-
vada and scored back-to-back victories.
Inanappearance across the street from
the highly regarded Mayo Clinic in Roch-
ester, Minn., Santorum assailed Romney
withgusto onMonday andsaidthat mak-
ing him the nominee would be a devas-
tating thing for Republicans who want
to see President Barack Obama lose in
the fall.
Republican presidential front-runner Romney says rival Santorums
tenure in Senate marred by support for pork-barrel spending
AP PHOTO
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney ducks out onto stage to speak at a rally Mon-
day in Grand Junction, Colo. Romney may face a strong challenge from Rick Santorum in todays caucuses in Minn.
GOP votes today in Minn., Colo.
By KASIE HUNT and PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press
20 1 2
ELECTION
GRAHAM, Wash. Josh
Powell planned the house fire
that killed him and his young
sons for some time, dropping
toys at a charityover theweek-
end and sending final emails
to several acquaintances in
the minutes before the blaze,
authorities said Monday.
But nowhere does he ap-
pear to have revealed what
happened to his wife, Susan
Powell, who vanished from
their Utah home two years
ago.
Powell had been named a
person of interest in her disap-
pearance and just last week
was denied custody of his chil-
dren, who had been living
with Susans parents. When a
social worker arrived at his
home with the boys Sunday,
he barred her from the house
and ignited the fire.
The three bodies were
found in the central part of the
house, whichis about 45miles
south of Seattle, authorities
said.
Pierce County sheriffs
spokesman Sgt. Ed Troyer
said police found two 5-gallon
gasoline cans inside. One was
used to spread gas throughout
the house. The other was
found near the bodies.
Troyer said Josh Powell
sent emails to several people
saying, Im sorry. Goodbye.
To others, including his cou-
sins and pastor, he sent longer
emails, with instructions such
as where to find his money
and how to shut off his utili-
ties.
In at least one email, he
wrote that he couldnt live
without his boys, Troyer said.
But, he added, theres no
indication about Susan in any-
thing that weve found so far.
He had taken boxes of toys
and books and donated them
tothegoodwill sometimeover
the weekend, Troyer said.
So this was definitely a delib-
erate, planned-out event.
Officials: Dad planned fire that killed boys
Josh Powell was seen as
person of interest in the
disappearance of his wife.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
An investigator walks through debris Monday at the home
where Josh Powell and his two sons died Sunday.
K
PAGE 6A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Children, Grandchildren,
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CHROPOWICKI June, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday in Holy Rosary
Church, Duryea. Friends may call
6 to 8 p.m. today at the Bernard
J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. Family and
friends are asked to go directly to
the church the morning of the
funeral.
CONWAY Joan, celebration of life
10:30 a.m. Thursday in McLaugh-
lins The Family Funeral Service,
142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre. Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. in
the Church of St. Aloysius,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 9
to 10:30 a.m.
DAVIS Naomi, funeral 11 a.m. today
in the Richard H. Disque Funeral
Home, Inc., 2940 Memorial High-
way, Dallas.
HOSEY Leonard, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
in St. Ignatius Church, Maple
Street, Kingston. There will be no
calling hours.
LETOSKI Frank, funeral 10 a.m.
Wednesday in the Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140
N. Main St., Shavertown. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
LOPUHOVSKY Alyce, funeral 9:30
a.m. Wednesday in the Bednarski
Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming. Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity Church,
Swoyersville. Friends may call 5 to
8 p.m. today at the funeral home.
PETRILLO Lucy, funeral 9 a.m.
Thursday in the Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the
funeral home.
FUNERALS
PETER D. OLIVER, 36, of
Plains Township, died unexpect-
edly Sunday evening, February 5,
2012, inGeisinger WyomingValley
Medical Center, Plains Township.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Lehman Family
Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
P
atricia Ann (Conner) Meeker
was born February 2, 1925 in
Bloomsburg and died February 3,
2012 at the Bonham Nursing Cen-
ter, Stillwater.
Pat, as she was affectionately
known, graduated fromOrangeville
Vocational School in1942 with Aca-
demic Honors. She was co-captain
of the O. V. S. Girls Basketball Team.
Their rival team, Benton, kept them
from a perfect season in 1941.
Pat trained at Geisinger Hospital
in Danville as a medical secretary.
She later worked for a doctor in Co-
lumbus, Ohio. She married James
C. Meeker in1952 and they enjoyed
50 years of married life together.
They were blessed with one son,
Steven Paul, who was born in 1954
and died in 1966; two step-sons,
Harry LeRoy, who was born in1939
and died in 1998; James J. Meeker
and his wife, Jean, who reside in
Huntington Mills; three grand-
daughters, Leslie Hennigan and her
husband, Richard; Chaplain Major
Karen L. Meeker; Kathleen Puso
and her husband, Jason; and four
great-grandchildren. She was also
blessed with two beautiful sisters
and a brother, John "Jack" Conner,
deceased; Molly Curilla, deceased;
and Mary Burns, living in Naples,
Florida; seven nieces and one neph-
ew and their extended families.
Her parents were the late L. Clair
Conner andBertha(Welsh) Conner,
both of Orangeville. Pat had many
dear friends in Leesburg, Florida,
and Huntington Mills, where she
hadbeenactive inchurchchoirs and
womens groups. She was a member
of the United Methodist Women at
the Town Hill United Methodist
Church, which was her home
church. She also sang in the church
choir and served as pianist.
She came back home from Flor-
ida approximately four years ago to
reside at BonhamNursingCenter in
Stillwater. Bonhams was truly
home as they provided wonderful
care for Pat. The staff was profes-
sional and very caring. Bonham
Nursing Center has a beautiful
country setting with deer and wild
birds to for the residents to enjoy.
The family would also like to
thank the staff fromColumbia Mon-
tour Home Hospice for their loving
support in Pats final week before re-
ceiving her extended life with no
more suffering or pain.
There will be a Memorial Service
Saturday, February 11, 2012 at 11
a.m. at the TownHill UnitedMetho-
dist ChurchwithPats granddaught-
er, ChaplainMajor KarenL. Meeker,
officiating. There will be a luncheon
served for family and friends at the
church following the services.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the McMichael Funeral
Home Inc., Benton. For online con-
dolences, please visit our website:
www.mcmichaelfuneralhome.com.
Patricia Ann (Conner) Meeker
February 3, 2012
LOUISE (GOLEMBIEWSKI)
SMITHONIC, 84, passed away
Monday, February 6, 2012, at Riv-
erside Rehab and Nursing Center,
Taylor.
Funeral arrangements are
pending Kiesinger Funeral Servic-
es Inc., 255 McAlpine St., Duryea.
Mary (Cebula)
Koytek, 78, of Tay-
lor, passed away
Saturday, Febru-
ary 4, at Riverside
Rehab and Nurs-
ingCenter, Taylor.
She was born in
Dupont, on March 28, 1933 and was
the daughter of the late Stanley and
Helen (Karkut) Cebula.
Mary was a member of Nativity Of
Our Lord Parish Church, Duryea.
She attended Dupont schools, and
throughout her life worked in the lo-
cal garment industry.
In addition to her parents, her
brothers John and Stanley Cebula,
preceded her in death.
Mary is survived by her husband of
58 years, Stanley A. Koytek; her sons,
Stanley J., of Taylor; Ronald, of Du-
ryea, and David Koytek, of Altoona.
Her brother Andrew Cebula, of Avo-
ca; sister, Rosalie Dudeck, of Plains;
six grandchildren and several nieces
and nephews also survive Mary.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday, February 9, at 9 a.m. from
Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea, with Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at Holy
Rosary Church, 127 Stephenson St.,
Duryea, with Fr. Charles Rokosz offi-
ciating.
Friends may call Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 8, from 5 to 8 p.m.
Interment will be held at Holy Ros-
ary Cemetery.
Online condolences may be made
to www.kiesingerfuneralservices-
.com.
Mary (Cebula)
Koytek
February 4, 2012
R
ita (Callahan) Mariani, of Exe-
ter, passed away February 5,
2012, in Exeter.
She was born September 3, 1925,
Pittston, daughter of the late Ray-
mond and Jesse (Harrison) Call-
ahan.
Her husband, Leo Mariani, died
in 1995. She was also preceded in
death by brother Raymond Call-
ahan and sister Margaret Catell.
Surviving are son, Leo, and wife
Sylvia Mariani. She also survivedby
her dog, GiGi, whom she so loved
and adored.
Funeral Services are entrusted
toGrazianoFuneral Home Inc., Pitt-
ston Township.Viewing hours will
be held on Wednesday, February 8,
2012 from5 to 7 p.m. Funeral servic-
es will begin at the funeral home on
Thursday, February 9, 2012 at 9 a.m.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
held from St. Barbaras Parish (St.
Cecelias R.C. Church), Exeter, at
9:30 a.m. on Thursday, February 9,
2012.
Interment will follow at Memo-
rial ShrineParkof NortheasternPa.,
Carverton.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.grazianofuneralhome-
s.com.
Rita (Callahan) Mariani
February 5, 2012
R
odger Wesley Killian, of Shick-
shinny, went home to be with the
Lordandhis savior onSunday, Febru-
ary5, 2012at Geisinger Hospital ICU,
Danville. He was surrounded by his
family and friends.
Born in Shickshinny, on Septem-
ber 9, 1936, he was the son of the late
Charles and Grace (Ridall) Killian.
He was a graduate of Shickshinny
High School and served in the Na-
tional Guard. He had many physical
jobs throughout his life.
He was last employed by Huffy
Bike Company, prior to his failing
health in 1993.
Helovedhis familyandspent alife-
time showing his love for them. He
alsoenjoyednatureandtheoutdoors.
He bridged this gap by teaching his
children and grandchildren to hunt
and fish. He also taught them about
conservation.
He had a special relationship with
his youngest grandson, Wesley,
whom he did not have a chance to
teach some of these things due to his
failing health.
He was a member of Bible Baptist
Church, Shickshinny. He also en-
joyed carpentry and woodworking.
He made a hobby out of model air-
planes, motorcycles and cars.
He was preceded in death by his
son, Rodger Tinker Killian, in1993;
son-in-law, David Wojciechowicz, in
1996; brothers C. Edwin and Leroy
Killian; sister-in-law Yvonne Killian;
and nephew Richard Killian.
He is survived by his devoted wife,
Janet (Carter) Killian, with whomhe
celebrated55 years of marriage onJa-
nuary 19. He is also survived by his
lovingdaughters, Sue Beaver andher
husband, Brett, Mocanaqua; Kelly
Sweet and her husband, Dallas, Glen
Lyon; Nikki Seigfried and her hus-
band, Michael, of Shickshinny; 15
grandchildren, four great grandchil-
dren; sister, Emily Culver, and her
husband, Paul, Shickshinny; brother
Thomas and his wife, Judy, Buck-
horn; as well as many nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral services will be held
on Thursday at 11 a.m. from
Heller Funeral Home, 633 East Third
Street, Nescopeck, with Daniel Pot-
ter officiating.
Interment will be in Sorber Ceme-
tery, Reyburn, Pa.
Friends may call Wednesday from
6 to 8 p.m. or Thursday from10 a.m.
until time of service at the funeral
home.
Rodger Wesley
Killian
February 5, 2012
MARIE RAMSEY, 94, of Wash-
ington Square Apartments,
Wilkes-Barre, passed away on
Monday, February 6, 2012, at the
Little Flower Manor in Wilkes-
Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre.
THERESA F. (ZAVADA) WAS-
SIL, 83, formerly of Falls, passed
away Saturday evening, February
4, 2012, in the Bethesda Care Cen-
ter of Fremont, Ohio.
Arrangements are pending
from the Metcalfe and Shaver Fu-
neral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Avenue, Wyoming.
RONALD E. SHAGER, a resi-
dent of West Pittston, died Mon-
day, February 6, 2012, at his home.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced by the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., a
Golden Rule Funeral Home, 211
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston.
O
tto Skovronsky, of Keelersburg
Road, Tunkhannock, died at his
home on Saturday evening Febru-
ary 4, 2012.
He was born in Tunkhannock on
May 3, 1924, son of the late Joseph
and Mary Lulewicz Skovronsky.
Ottowas a1943graduateof Tunk-
hannock High School, Army veter-
an and, prior to his retirement, he
was employed by No.1 Contracting
Company as a Bridge Superintend-
ent for 38 years.
He was preceded in death by
brothers, Thomas and Leo Skovron-
sky; sisters, Alice Nametko, Marie
Madigovich, Marjorie Duffy, Gene-
vieve Padgett.
Surviving are his wife of 64 years,
Betty Hoover Skovronsky; sons,
Robert and wife Patty Skovronsky;
Steven and wife Shawn, both of
Tunkhannock; daughter Nancy and
husband Chester Golden of Mesh-
oppen; sisters, Catherine Dugan of
Branchville, N.J.; Sylvia Staton of
Mountain Top; grandchildren, Ra-
chel Bandarenko, Karen Daerau,
Meredith Spencer, Nicholas Puza,
Evan Skovronsky and James Wynd,
and seven great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held
on Saturday February 11, 2012
at 11a.m. fromthe Sheldon-Kukuch-
ka Funeral Home Inc, 73 W. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock, with Pastor Da-
vid Stucky, Pastor of the Communi-
ty Bible Church, officiating. Inter-
ment will be in Memorial Shrine
Cemetery, Carverton. Friends may
call at the funeral home from 9 a.m.
until the time of service.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the char-
ity of the donors choice.
Online condolences may be sent
to the family at www.sheldonku-
kuchkafunearlhome.com.
Otto Skovronsky
February 4, 2012
D
ebbie Orloski, loving wife,
amazing mother and loyal
friend to many, passed away unex-
pectedly, yet seemingly peaceful, at
home on Saturday evening, Febru-
ary 4, 2012.
Debbie, daughter of Edward
Roadway and the late Patricia Road-
way, had been a Mountain Top resi-
dent since 1971. Debbie graduated
from Crestwood High School in
1975 and proceeded to Edinboro
University, where she earned a
bachelors degree in art. After col-
lege, Debbie worked for numerous
advertising agencies, achieving
both local and national recognition.
It was during this time that she re-
connected with an old high school
friend, Frank Orloski Jr., of Moun-
tain Top. The couple married in
1981 at St. Judes Church in Moun-
tain Top.
Debbie and Frank enjoyed 30
wonderful years together; most of
this time was happily shared with
their four loving children. The fam-
ily made annual trips to the Maine
coast, Scottsdale, Arizona; Avalon,
New Jersey; they are blessed with
countless memories of good times
spent with both family and friends.
Debbie was always on the go. She
was passionate about life and lived
it to its fullest. She was an active
member of St. Judes Parish, taught
a fifth-grade CCD class and volun-
teered at the Mountain Top Hose
Co.s annual bazaars. Debbie will be
remembered for her warm heart,
her extreme optimism and her sin-
cere devotion to family and friends.
She was always eager and willing to
aidanyfriendina time of need, even
at a moments notice. Her generos-
ity and selflessness were unparallel-
ed.
For Debbie, the needs of others
ALWAYS came first. She surround-
ed herself with those she loved, and
so many loved her in return. Debbie
will be deeply missed by those
whose lives she impacted daily. Her
favoritesongandwhat seemedtobe
her life motto was I Hope You
Dance by Lee Anne Womack.
Debbie is survived by her hus-
band, Frank; her sons, Frank and his
wife, Alison, Mountain Top; Mi-
chael, Hollywood, Calif; Mark,
sophomore at Penn State Universi-
ty, State College; daughter Kaitlin
Brown and husband Tyler, Philadel-
phia; father, Edward Roadway,
Mountain Top; sisters, Sue OBryne
and husband Fred, and Lori Road-
way, Mountain Top; in-laws, Frank
and Adeline Orloski; many broth-
ers-in-law and sisters-in-law, and 15
nieces and nephews.
The funeral will be held on Fri-
day, February 10, at 9:15 a.m. from
McCune Funeral Home, 80 S.
Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top, fol-
lowed by a Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. at St. Judes Church,
Mountain Top. Interment will take
place at the convenience of the fam-
ily. Friends may call on Thursday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. at
the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, the family
would appreciate memorial dona-
tions be made to St. Judes Church
Building Fund, South Mountain
Boulevard, Mountain Top. View
obituaries online at mccunefuneral-
serviceinc.com.
Debra Ruth Orloski
February 4, 2012
M
aria Santoro, of East State
Street, Nanticoke, passed away
Friday at the Guardian Eldercare,
Newport Township.
Born on July14, 1919, in Bari, Ita-
ly, she was the daughter of the late
Giovanni and Veronica Maisto Ber-
len. Mrs. Santoro came to America
in 1973, residing in New York until
coming to Nanticoke to live with
her daughter Angela in 1990.
She was a professional seam-
stress. Mrs. Santoro was a member
of St. Faustinas Parish, Nanticoke.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Rocco, on Nov. 7, 2006;
son-in-law, Giuseppe Pignataro, on
Sept. 2, 1990, and sisters Filomena,
Catherine, Rita and Rosa.
Survivingareher daughter, Ange-
la Pignataro; granddaughter, Mrs.
Giuseppe (Giovanna) Tomasino;
great-granddaughter, Sophia, all of
Nanticoke; sister Colomba; nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday at 10:30 a.m. from the
Stanley S. Stegura Funeral Home
Inc., 614 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke,
with a Mass of Christian Burial at 11
a.m. inthe mainsite of St. Faustinas
Parish, 520 S. Hanover St., Nanti-
coke. Interment will beinHolyTrin-
ity Cemetery, Newport Township.
Friends may call Wednesday from 2
to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.
Maria Santoro
February 3, 2012
FRANCIS C. HALL, 67, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away Satur-
day, February 4, 2012, at home. He
was born in Pittston, a son of the
late Lehman and the late Alice
Hall. He graduated from Jenkins
Township High School and earned
an associates degree in business
from Luzerne County Community
College. He workedfor many years
at the Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal as a unit secretary and was a
member of Christ Community
Church, Kingston. In addition to
his parents, he was preceded in
death by brothers Robert and Er-
nie Aksomitus. Surviving are a sis-
ter, Mary OBrien, Inkerman, anda
brother, Philip Aksomitus, Street,
Md., and several nieces and neph-
ews.
Private services will be held at
the convenience of the family. Ar-
rangements are by the Kizis-Loku-
ta Funeral Home, Pittston.
B
elovedobstetricianandgynecol-
ogist Dr. Hiyoung (Charles)
Chung has passed away peacefully
in Florida on February 3, 2012, at
the age of 78.
Dr. Chung, better knowntomany
as Doc, practiced medicine in the
Wyoming Valley for over 40 years
and delivered more than 7,000 ba-
bies. He began his practice in 1968
as a member of the medical staff at
the former Wyoming Valley Hospi-
tal and Mercy Hospital in Wilkes-
Barre. He also servedas the medical
director and a member of the board
of trustees at the former NPWMed-
ical Center, which is now known as
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center.
Dr. Chung earned both his under-
graduate and medical degrees from
the Seoul National University of Ko-
rea. He finished an internship at St.
Marys Hospital in Hoboken, N.J.
He completed his residencies at St.
Lukes Hospital inBethlehemandat
St. Johns General Hospital in New
Foundland. He also did his fellow-
ship at the Worchester Foundation
for Experimental Biology in
Shrewsbury, Md., andspecializedin
reproductive endocrinology and
physiology from 1963-1964. At the
same time, he served on the board
of directors for the Luzerne County
Housing Corporation and the Com-
munity Cancer Corporation. His
memberships included: Luzerne
County Medical Society, Pennsylva-
nia Medical Society, the American
Medical Association, the American
Fertility Society, the Catholic Youth
Center and the Wilkes-Barre Lions
Club.
Dr. Chung earned the respect of
his peers and colleagues as well as
the love from the many moms who
benefited from his medical exper-
tise. He felt that managing pain was
as crucial as any other part of the
childbirth process. According to Dr.
Chung, medicine had been an inte-
gral part of his life. He loved people,
but, especially towards the end, he
loved sharing time with his family
and only grandchild.
He was preceded in death by his
daughter Charlene Lisa Chung,
who died in 1989.
He is survived by his wife, Helen
Chung; his daughter Christine Zu-
ba, and his granddaughter, Char-
lene Zuba. He is also survived by his
four younger sisters.
Funeral will be held Friday at 9
a.m. from the Mamary-Durkin Fu-
neral Service, 59 Parish St., Wilkes-
Barre. Mass of Christian Burial will
beheldat 9:45a.m. inSt. Anthonyof
Padua Church (St. Barbaras Par-
ish), Exeter. Interment will be in St.
Marys Cemetery, Hanover Town-
ship. Friends may call at the funeral
home Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, please make
memorial contributions to the
Charlene Lisa Chung Memorial
Scholarship at Wyoming Seminary
College Preparatory School inKing-
ston.
Dr. Hiyoung (Charles) Chung
February 3, 2012
H
elenT. Kupinewicz, 93, of Park
Towers, Nanticoke, passed
away early Monday, February 6,
2012, at The Laurels, Kingston.
She was born July 20, 1918, in
Nanticoke andwas the daughter of
the late Stanley & Stella Grevera.
Helen attended Nanticoke schools
and was a member of the former
St. Francis Church, Nanticoke.
Prior to retirement, she was em-
ployed as a factory worker by Gen-
eral Cigar in Nanticoke, and also a
housewife.
She was preceded in death, in
additiontoher parents, by her hus-
band, Michael Kupinewicz; broth-
er Frank Grevera, and a sister,
Agnes Wisniewski.
Presently surviving are sons,
Donald, New Wales, Pa.; Robert
and wife Theresa, Mountain Top;
daughter, Sylvia Walters, King-
ston; brothers Stanley, Levittown,
Pa.; Edward, New Jersey; nine
grandchildren; seven great-grand-
children.
A Memorial Mass will be held
Friday, February 10, 2012 at St.
Faustina Parish, primary site, Nan-
ticoke, at 10 a.m. withinterment in
St. Marys Cemetery, Hanover
Township. There will be no prior
calling hours.
Arrangements are byGrontkow-
ski Funeral Home P.C., 51-53 West
Green Street, Nanticoke.
Helen T.
Kupinewicz
February 6, 2012
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 7A
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WILKES-BARRE A Luzerne
County deputy sheriff is denying
charges that she threatened her
former domestic partner at a tav-
ern on Blackman Street.
City police on Monday filed
charges of terroristic threats and
harassment against Mary Jean
Farrell, 51, of Mountain Top, with
District Judge Rick Cronauer in
Wilkes-Barre.
Farrell was charged after her
former partner, Jennifer Roberts,
a former deputy sheriff, claimed
she was threatened on Jan. 24.
The two women ended their rela-
tionship in early 2011.
Farrell strongly denied the alle-
gations.
She said she was returning
property to Roberts, who works
as a bartender at the Pitchers
Mound.
Jen called me to bring a micro-
wave to her, and I told her Imnot
bringinganythingtoyour house,
Farrell said. She said bring it to
my place of work. I thought,
great, its a public place.
Farrell said she arrived at the
tavern and called Roberts to say
she was outside. Farrell entered
the kitchen to say hello to a mu-
tual friend, Terri Vesek.
Farrell said that after she en-
teredthe tavern, Roberts gave her
a menu that included a cheese-
burger made the way she enjoys
the food.
That flipped me off. Its listed
on the menu of how I eat my
cheeseburger, Farrell said. I told
her youhavetostopblamingme.
Farrell and Roberts have been
involvedinarelatedcaseinwhich
Roberts allegedly assaulted Far-
rells girlfriend Sheila Sult on July
22. Farrell is a witness against Ro-
berts and testified against her for-
mer partner at the preliminary
hearing.
Roberts is facing aggravatedas-
sault charges in county court for
allegedlyholdingSult over achair
and punching her several times
inside Sults residence, according
to the criminal complaint and
court records.
ShetoldmeYoudidnt haveto
testify against me, Farrell said.
I told her, You did this. I saw
you.
Farrell said she left the tavern
and did not threaten Roberts.
Roberts told police Farrell
threatened her saying, Imgoing
to get you, you and your girl-
friend. I will (expletive) you so
bad, you will pay for everything
you have done to cost me my kids
for three months and all the mon-
ey you cost me to get themback,
according to the criminal com-
plaint against Farrell.
Vesek, ina writtenstatement to
police, said she heard Farrell
threatening to bury Roberts
and Roberts girlfriend.
Roberts could not be reached
for comment on Monday.
Farrell said Sheriff John Gilli-
gan called her Monday to tell her
she was suspended and to surren-
der her badge and weapon pend-
ing a termination hearing.
Gilligan said Monday after-
noon that Farrell has not worked
for nearly a year due to a disabil-
ity.
County deputy sheriff denies charges
Mary Jean Farrell accused by
former domestic partner of
terroristic threats, harassment.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Edward Lewis, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7196.
KINGSTON A woman who
eluded authorities for 18 months
on charges she stole guns during
a burglary and cashed forged
checkswascapturedlast weekby
state police in Northampton
County.
Michelle Lynn Beagle, 33, last
known address as Taylor, was
wanted on a series of charges by
police in Kingston and Wilkes-
Barre and by state police at
Wyoming.
Beagle was arrested by state
police on Thursday in Belfast on
charges of receiving stolen prop-
erty and driving with a suspend-
ed license.
As the arrest was processed,
authorities learned Beagle had
activewarrantsinLuzerneCoun-
ty.
Kingston police allege Beagle
forged four checks she cashed at
the Bank of America branch on
Wyoming Avenue in December
2010 andJanuary 2011, for a total
of $690, according to the crimi-
nal complaint.
Beagle allegedly tried to cash
another forged check in the
amount of $200at the same bank
branch on Jan. 10, 2011. She ran
out of the bank when the teller
learned the check was stolen.
Wilkes-Barre police say the
checks Beagle cashed were sto-
len from a residence on South
FranklinStreet, whereshewasal-
lowedtostaybythehomeowners
until she was evicted in early Ja-
nuary 2011.
City police allege Beagle also
cashed a few stolen checks at a
Bank of America branch on
South Main Street.
Beagle was arraigned Friday
byDistrict JudgeDavidBarillain
Swoyersville on five counts of
forgery, four counts of theft anda
single count of criminal attempt
to commit forgery, which were
filed by Kingston police.
Barilla set bail at $5,000 and
Beagle was returned to the
Northampton County Jail.
Beagle has not been arraigned
on related charges filed by
Wilkes-Barre police and on bur-
glarycharges filedbystate police
at Wyoming.
State police allege Beagle,
Kristopher Lamb, 29, and Todd
Junevitz, 33, stole two shotguns
and a rifle from a Plymouth
Township residence on Sept. 17,
2010, andsoldthegunsat asport-
ing goods store in Nanticoke.
Arrest records allege Beagle
purchased heroin with proceeds
fromthe sale.
Lamb pleaded guilty to theft
andwas sentencedinJune to169
days time served in jail. Junevitz
pleaded guilty to prohibited pos-
session of a firearmand was sen-
tenced in August to three to six
years in state prison, court re-
cords say.
Beagle is scheduled for a pre-
liminary hearing on Wednesday
before District Judge Paul Ro-
berts in Kingston.
Woman charged in gun
thefts, forgery captured
Michelle Lynn Beagle, 33,
was wanted on a series of
charges by area police.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Edward Lewis, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7196.
HARRISBURG Top state
senators say they expect Gov.
Tom Corbett to propose a bud-
get plan today that relies on
cuts in spending for education
and social services to balance
sluggish tax collections and the
rising costs of pensions and
debt.
It will be a bare bones-type
of a budget presentation, Sen-
ate Majority Leader Dominic
Pileggi said Monday. I dont
expect to see programs or new
spending of any sort.
Pileggi, R-Delaware, and Sen-
ate President Pro Tempore Joe
Scarnati, R-Jefferson, both said
that Republicans who control
the Senate have no interest in
raising taxes to ease the sting of
cuts to education and services
for the poor, disabled and elder-
ly.
Scarnati said Pennsylvanians
should be prepared for a debate
on how best to use existing tax
dollars, and he warned that the
cuts in Corbetts budget propos-
al would be dramatic and dif-
ficult.
For now, top Corbett adminis-
tration officials have declined
to discuss what the Republican
governor will propose in the
budget for the 2012-13 fiscal
year that begins July 1.
Corbetts budget plan is ex-
pected to propose spending of
about $27 billion, approximate-
ly the same level as this year.
Corbett, who campaigned on
a pledge not to increase taxes,
pushed through a 3 percent
spending reduction for this fis-
cal year to address a multibil-
lion-dollar deficit. The current
budget cut more than $1 billion
in aid for public schools and
universities, including Penn
State, and cut taxes for busi-
nesses.
Last month, he ordered a
mid-year spending freeze of less
than 1 percent that left the bud-
get at $26.9 billion this year
about the same amount that
was spent in the 2007-08 fiscal
year.
Business advocates are press-
ing again this year for more tax
cuts.
Dramatic cuts in Pa. state budget expected
Gov. Corbett to announce plan
today that will call for more
sacrifice, officials say.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 8A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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NOTICE:
THE NEWLY RECONSTITUTED LUZERNE COUNTY RETIREMENT
BOARD REQUIRES A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE PARTICIPANTS IN
THE LUZERNE COUNTY EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM. THE
PARTICIPANT REPRESENTATIVE WILL SERVE FOR A 4-YEAR TERM.
THIS NOTICE PROVIDES INFORMATION ABOUT THE ELECTION
PROCEDURE AND THE NAMES OF CANDIDATES FOR THIS
POSITION.
ELECTION PROCEDURE FOR RETIREMENT BOARD REPRESENTATIVE
The nomination period for the participant representative to the Retirement Board 1.
has closed. The following individuals have received 2 or more nominations and
have accepted the nomination. Their names shall be placed on the ballot for
consideration as the elected representative.
Candidates (in alphabetical order by last name) are:
Lawrence Defuri
John Evanchick, Jr.
Walter Griffith
Clifton Madrack
Robin Muth
Keith Perluke
David Roberts
Basil Russin
Eugene Shinal
Voting shall take place during the hours of 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM on Wednesday, 2.
February15, 2012, intheOfficeof thePensionCoordinator, 20NorthPennsylvania
Blvd., Suite 213, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701. The Election Bureau shall provide
2 machines to facilitate the election. Eligible Retirement System participants
may request absentee ballots from the Office of the Pension Coordinator which
must be received in the Office of the Pension Coordinator no later than 4:30 PM
on Wednesday, February 15, 2012. Absentee ballots shall be counted at the
conclusion of the election in the presence of interested citizens.
Votes shall be tallied at the conclusion of voting and the results reported to the 3.
Luzerne County Council Chair immediately. The nominee receiving the highest
number of votes shall be confrmed as the Elected Representative at the next
meeting of the Luzerne County Council.
Please direct questions about this procedure to:
Richard R. Hummer, Pension Coordinator
20 North Pennsylvania Blvd. Suite 213
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Phone: (570) 825-1628 Fax: (570) 825-5118
Email: Rick.Hummer@luzernecounty.org
WILKES-BARRE A White
Haven man was sentenced Mon-
day to two to six years in state
prisononcharges heattemptedto
sell several guns and participated
intheburglaryof ahometoobtain
guns that couldbe soldtosupport
a heroin addiction.
James David Oko, Jr., 30, of In-
dian Lake Trail, was sentenced on
charges of criminal conspiracy to
sell or transfer a firearmandcrim-
inal conspiracy to commit burgla-
ry by county Senior Judge Ken-
neth Brown.
Oko pleaded guilty to the fire-
arms-related charge Monday and
the burglary-related charges in
December.
Okos attorney, Mark Bufalino,
said his client has had a longtime
battle with drug addiction, and
that half a dozen crimes commit-
tedinthelast fiveyearsweredrug-
related.
Okosaidhe has beencleanfor a
number of months while incarcer-
ated, andhehopes toseekrehabil-
itation to improve his life.
Oko was charged in May 2010
after a Bear Creek Township man
reported to police that his resi-
dence had been entered and two
handguns were stolen.
Frankelli said he discovered a
.22-caliber pistol and .357-caliber
revolver missing from his home,
and a window to his home was
open.
Police were able to identify the
two men as Oko and David Pas-
cucci, 29, of Wilkes-Barre.
Pascucci pleaded guilty in Oc-
tober 2010 to two related charges
and was sentenced that Decem-
ber tonine to18months incounty
prison followed by three years
probation.
In the most recent incident, po-
licesaidthat onJune26, 2011they
werecontactedbyapoliceinform-
ant, a convicted felon, who told
police Oko had contacted him to
sell pistols and assault rifles.
The informant told police Oko
said he was selling two assault ri-
fles and a few pistols for $3,000,
and that the guns belonged to his
father.
Police saidthe informant spoke
with James David Oko, Sr., 54, of
Trucksville, who gave the inform-
ant details on the weapons and
said he would sell three pistols
and an AR-15 assault rifle for
$1,300.
Oko Sr. pleaded guilty in No-
vember toachargeof criminal use
of a communication facility and
was sentenced on Jan. 24 to 18
months inthecountys Intermedi-
ate Punishment Program, with
the first six months on house ar-
rest with an electronic monitor.
Man is sentenced
on firearms charges
James David Oko Jr., of White
Haven, received two to six
years in state prison.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A city
woman pleaded guilty Monday
to a reckless endangerment
charge in an incident where
police say they were called to a
residence where a toddler was
on the roof.
Amber Miller, 22, of Madison
Street, was also sentenced Mon-
day to 12 months probation by
County Senior Judge Joseph
Augello.
According to court papers, in
October 2010, police responded
to a call that a toddler was on the
roof of a Madison Street home.
Police said that when they ar-
rived they did not see a toddler
on the roof, and when question-
ing Miller, she said she wasnt
aware her then-3-year-old may
have been on the roof.
Police said they found an open
window and no screen on the
second floor of the home.
WILKES-BARRE A man
sentenced to 25 to 50 years in
prison on charges he sexually
assaulted a woman over a 10-
year-period said in court papers
filed Monday he is appealing his
sentence to a higher court be-
cause of several errors he says
were made before and during his
trial.
Ralph E. Lewis, 34, of Plains
Township, was convicted in July
of 26 charges relating to the case,
in which prosecutors said the
assault began in1993 when the
now-27-year-old woman was 8,
and resulted in the birth of two
children. He was later sentenced
to the lengthy prison term.
Lewis said in court papers
filed Monday through his at-
torney Nanda Palissery that his
appeal should be granted be-
cause a judge did not suppress
DNA evidence, and because a
witness called to testify said the
statements of another witness
were false and the criminal com-
plaint filed against him did not
include that information.
WILKES-BARRE A man
and woman charged for their
roles in manufacturing and traf-
ficking methamphetamine in
Luzerne and Columbia counties
waived their right to a formal
arraignment Monday.
Donna Kocher, 52, of Wilkes-
Barre, and Glen Kocher, 49, of
Wilkes-Barre, waived their ar-
raignments on13 counts each.
They are both represented by
attorney Demetrius Fannick.
The Kochers were among
several people charged in June
for their alleged roles in the case
in which17 meth labs were
dismantled. Investigators say
there were eight organizations
that did not work as one single
group but independently to
produce and provide enough
methamphetamine for individ-
uals within their groups.
Meth labs were uncovered
in Wilkes-Barre, Newport
Township, Dorrance Town-
ship, Nescopeck Township,
Nanticoke, Edwardsville,
Hollenback Township and
Beach Haven, according to the
state Office of the Attorney
General.
Agents allege they found
large amounts of methamphe-
tamine, chemicals, medica-
tions and generators at the
labs.
COURT BRIEFS
Police obtained a video sur-
veillance system that may have
captured the assault.
Mieczkowski and Wells have
filed separate civil lawsuits
against the tavern and owner
Paul Halliday.
Wells was beaten with a pool
stick when he tried to help
Mieczkowski, police said.
Halliday could not be reac-
hed for comment Monday.
Citations filed against the
tavern on Monday add to 16
others since 2004, according to
online records maintained by
the state Liquor Control Board.
The LCB ordered the tavern
to shut down after a series of
administrative citations but
successful appeals by Halliday
allowed the business to stay
open.
In the latest appeal, a three-
member panel of the LCB ob-
jected to renewing the liquor
license in September based up-
on the 16 citations and nine dis-
turbances at or near the tavern.
Under a conditional agree-
ment signed on Dec. 6, Halliday
pledged to remain in compli-
ance with the liquor code and
to employ a security guard ev-
ery Friday and Saturday from
10 p.m. to 2:30 a.m.
State police allege the tavern
did not adhere to the agree-
ment on Dec. 20 and Jan. 1.
While the news release does
not specify the agreement vio-
lations, police said Mieczkow-
ski was slashed on Jan. 1 and
Lee David Antonik, 35, alleged-
ly assaulted Vincent Rodriguez
with a pool stick on Dec. 20.
VIOLATIONS
Continued from Page 1A
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
The Prospect Street Cafe in Nanticoke, where police say Jen
Mieczkowski was slashed with a box cutter on Jan. 1.
Knowing who is making decisions
at any given time inside of Iran is
tough.
Barack Obama
The president said the United States has a very
good estimate of when Iran could complete work
on a nuclear weapon, but during an interview broadcast on NBC Monday
he cautioned that there are still many unanswered questions about
Tehrans inner workings.
Senior driver has some
advice for younger set
T
his is in response to a letter to the
editor in the Jan. 30 edition. To the
person who wrote that senior drivers
should be re-tested every five years, there
are a few things you should know.
First, we can read the road signs quite
well. See, we wear our glasses; and if we
had cataracts, they were removed and we
can now see perfectly. We use our turn
signals as everyone should. We use our
seat belts.
We dont use cell phones when we are
driving. We dont text when we are driv-
ing. We rarely use the radio, etc.
We dont drink and drive; at least most
of us dont. If the police want us to pull
over, we pull over not lead them on a
chase. We dont eat when were driving.
I have been driving since I was 16 years
old. When I took my driving test, it wasnt
behind the police barracks, it was in the
heart of Buffalo, N.Y., on the busy streets.
And, yes, it was scary.
Maybe if the state changed the testing
area and took these junior drivers out into
very busy traffic to do their driving tests,
youd see a big difference in younger driv-
ers.
Claire Lowe
Warrior Run
Reader: City watchdogs
have gone a little too far
T
he concerned citizens (aka watch-
dogs) have in my opinion come on a
bit too robust. Kind of like a runaway
train (runaway fire truck).
One example is the travel expenses and
related credit card use.
As a CEO I have had to yes, had to
attend seminars both in and out of state. It
was necessary at times to send board
members and staff. We were careful on
numbers and frequency. We also evaluated
the information gathered to determine if
we would return to that convention or
seminar.
Attendance at these types of activities
affords the opportunity to have valuable
interaction with counterparts who might
be facing the same challenges in their
cities or school districts. There are prob-
lems that cannot always be solved in a
workshop or presentation. That face-to-
face discussion with a counterpart is how
we solved it.
Another consideration is that the award-
ing of state and federal grants often comes
with the requirement to attend imple-
mentation and evaluation workshops,
which are not always paid for by the gran-
tor. In my opinion, the amount of money
expended by the city in recent years, or the
$10,000 earmarked in the budget for travel
for a city this size, is not out of line.
Two people taking a trip two months
prior to leaving office is not acceptable.
It appears that our watchdogs are
playing gotcha. Dont get me wrong; we
need this activity as long as it does not
go overboard.
Richard A. Holodick
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the
writers name, address and daytime
phone number for verification. Letters
should be no more than 250 words. We
reserve the right to edit and limit writers
to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1
SEND US YOUR OPINION
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 9A
THE RECENT Pennsylvania Supreme Court
decision should teach us one thing about the
reapportionment process: There is too much
party control.
Redistricting is supposed to be based on
census data and population changes to help
balance out uneven districts. Instead, it has
become a political tool for the majority party
to gain an upper hand over its opposition.
Both parties are to blame for this mess.
Democrats have done it in the past, and this
year its the Republicans using reapportion-
ment to their advantage. They sought to
manipulate districts in order to strengthen
Republicans re-election bids and challenge
vulnerable Democrats. To do this, many
Democratic municipalities got reapportioned
out of these districts and placed into one
heavily Democratic territory where Repub-
licans already have conceded victory. This
political chess match results in partisan
districts, partisan politicians and partisan
stalemate.
We see this in Harrisburg all the time:
legislators unwilling to meet in the middle
and compromise for the common good,
because its not in their self-interests. With
these heavy red and blue districts, the legis-
lator representing this area has to stay parti-
san and hold the line for the best interest of
their constituents. Politicians seemingly
arent looking for compromise, they are
looking toward their re-elections, and they
wont get re-elected if they dont represent
their district properly. It stifles debate and
leads to bad governance.
We need to reform this system.
As a Republican candidate, I would like to
praise the leadership of Sen. Lisa Boscola,
D-Bethlehem, and parts of Senate Bill 650,
co-sponsored by Sen. John Yudichak, D-
Nanticoke, and Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman
Township.
The bill includes five considerations by
which a district will be created: ideal pop-
ulation, municipal boundaries, contiguous
territory, compactness and communities of
interest. It also would prohibit reapportion-
ment based on the address of incumbent
legislators, previous election results and,
most important, party affiliation. Lastly, the
bill calls for a full-time Legislative Reappor-
tionment Bureau in hopes of fixing the parti-
san nature of this issue.
Although I agree with most of this bill, I
do not believe a separate full-time Legisla-
tive Reapportionment Bureau is necessary
for a job that is done only once a decade.
Instead, we should look to other models that
have had success. In Iowa, a separate non-
legislative staff draws the map and the legis-
lature votes on it. In California, a panel of
state residents picked by the state auditor
handles the map-drawing. Both models have
been lauded by numerous independent agen-
cies.
It is important to note that these changes
in Iowa and California happened only due to
mounting public pressure. Finally that same
pressure exists in Pennsylvania, and we must
make the necessary changes for a better
governmental model.
I ask you this: Just because weve done
something one way for such a long time,
does it make it right? I say no.
The reapportionment process must be
reformed. Our democracy is at the mercy of
partisan politics, and its time for a change.
The Legislature can remedy this with a
constitutional amendment, but I would also
support a constitutional convention. This
can be a faster and more efficient way to
begin this reform process. Lets hear what
the citizens have to say.
My father once told me that its better to
agree for the common good than to disagree
for no good. Politicians should heed that
advice. The reapportionment process is a
perfect example, but only one of the many
examples of partisan politics that permeate
our system. We need a voice to stand up to
this political culture of Harrisburg. I hope to
be that voice.
Aaron Kaufer, a Kingston resident, is a Republican
candidate running for the state House of Repre-
sentatives in the 120th District.
Political parrying to blame for reapportionment mess
COMMENTARY
A A R O N K A U F E R
The reapportionment process must be
reformed. Our democracy is at the mercy of
partisan politics, and its time for a change.
A
FTER A BLIZZARD
of criticismon its pro-
posal to reinstate an
asset test for food
stamp eligibility, the adminis-
tration of Gov. TomCorbett de-
cided Wednesday to replace its
harsh initial standard with
something humane.
It was the right thing to do.
As noted in an earlier Post-
Gazette editorial, there is noth-
ingwrongwiththe state check-
ing a food stamp applicants as-
sets, along with income, to de-
termine eligibility. In fact,
Pennsylvania had done so until
2008.
But the current Department
of Public Welfare wanted to
give food stamps to no one
younger than age 60 with more
than $2,000 in savings or other
assets, andtonoone older than
60withmorethan$3,250. That
was way too low.
Nowit wants the savings cut-
off for those younger than 60 to
be$5,500andfor thoseolder or
disabled to be $9,000 num-
bers that are very close to the
Post-Gazettes proposal on Jan.
11.
Exempt fromthe total would
be a persons home, car, house-
hold contents, burial plot, life
insurance and pension plan.
Counted toward the limit
would be cash, bank accounts,
stocks, bonds and additional
vehicles.
This is a more realistic test of
need, and the Corbett adminis-
tration deserves credit for lis-
tening to Pennsylvanians and
revising its plan.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
OTHER OPINION: ASSET CHECK
Pa. rightly revises
food stamp test
P
OWER BROKERS IN
Harrisburg have con-
cocted another sweet-
heart deal for Pennsyl-
vanias natural gas drillers, and
as you learn the specifics, you
should be hearing alarm bells.
If so, respond quickly; you
and like-minded residents dont
have much time to stop this
travesty.
Alarm bell 1: Gov. Tom Cor-
betts office and a handful of
House and Senate leaders re-
portedly negotiated their plan
over amatter of weeks inclosed-
door sessions. Republicans
didnt notify rank-and-file law-
makers about the deal until Sat-
urday night, much less include
theminanalysis, discussionand
debate. Such secrecy rarely
spawns good public policy.
Alarmbell 2: GOPleaders, af-
ter announcing the pending
deal on the eve of the Super
Bowl, intend to rush the pack-
age to the House floor for a vote
as early as today. By now, the
Senate already might have act-
ed. So much for gauging the
publics views. Ditto for
thoughtful deliberation. It
seems that whenit comes tothe
well-being of Pennsylvanias
Marcellus Shaleindustryandits
impacts on the Keystone State,
residents are simply supposed
to accept this hastily passed
package. Shall we call it Cor-
bettCare?
Alarm bell 3: Pennsylvanias
natural gas will be siphoned
away for a bargain-basement
price. Theplancalls for thedrill-
ers to pay animpact fee far be-
low the average tax rates levied
in other gas-producing states.
Thats good for the companies
and their stockholders, but not
so good for state residents. By
failing to enact a tax in recent
years, Pennsylvania already has
forfeited an estimated $300 mil-
lion, according to one tally.
Alarm bell 4: Under the plan,
counties that host drilling
wouldhave the optionof impos-
ing the fee. This potentially
could pit counties against one
another and also expose offi-
cials in rural, Northern Tier
communities to pressure from
drilling proponents. In short, it
seems like a built-in mechanism
to quash the fee.
Alarm bell 5: The state in-
tends to use certain revenue
from impact fees and state for-
est drillingroyalties for a hodge-
podge of purposes, including
bridge repairs and the purchase
of natural-gas fleet vehicles, ac-
cording to an Associated Press
report. In other words, rather
than dedicate the money to re-
mediate troubles caused by
drilling, some of it will be used
to plug holes in the state bud-
get. Getting lawmakers hooked
on this new and temporary
revenue streamis horrible idea.
If botheredby one or more as-
pects of this Marcellus Shale
legislative package, call your
state electedofficials todaybe-
fore this pre-Valentines Day
madness becomes law.
OUR OPINION: NATURAL GAS
Hasty drill bill
deeply disturbing
Find phone numbers for Penn-
sylvanias lawmakers at this
website: www.house.state.pa.us.
F U E L D E B AT E
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
C M Y K
PAGE 10A TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
seek to recover damages for his in-
juriesthroughanuninsuredmotor-
ist claim.
Thecasewenttoarbitration, and
a three-member panel ruled 2-1
that Vanderhoff was entitled to
$500,000. The case dragged
through the court systemover the
years as Harleysville and Vander-
hoff appealed various court rul-
ings.
It landed back in Luzerne Coun-
ty Court in 2010 before Judge Le-
wis Wetzel, who held a hearing to
determine whether Harleysville
had suffered any harmdue to Van-
derhoffs delay in reporting the
phantomvehicle.
Wetzel, who has since left the
bench, ruled in Vanderhoffs favor,
findingthat theendresult of thein-
vestigation would not have been
different even if Harleysville had
beengivenearlier notice.
The Superior Court disagreed,
saying Wetzels ruling does not
comport withreason.
The court noted Harleysville
presented testimony of several in-
surance and accident reconstruct-
ion investigators, all of whomsaid
their investigations were signifi-
cantly hampered by the eight-
monthdelay.
For instance, the delay prevent-
edinvestigators fromtryingtofind
witnesses who may have seen the
crash. It also made it difficult to
document skid marks, which were
washedaway by the weather.
Though it was not tasked with
deciding that issue, the court also
notedit haddoubts about whether
the phantomvehicle existed.
Thereisnophysical evidenceof
a phantom vehicle. Furthermore,
the only available eyewitness testi-
fied as to the absence of any phan-
tom vehicle, the court said. Un-
der these specific circumstances,
weconcludethetrial court erredin
requiring Harleysville to establish
conclusivelywhat evidencea time-
lyinvestigationwouldhavediscov-
ered.
RULING
Continued from Page 3A
illness precludes him from ev-
er understanding the reason
for his sentence, Stoycos said.
Banks documented delu-
sions of mind do not, by defi-
nition, have the effect of ren-
dering him unaware and inca-
pable of comprehending his
sentence and the reason for
it. The record establishes that
he has at least a partial capac-
ity to rationally understand
his current situation, Stoy-
cos said.
Banks attorneys have until
March 2 to file a reply to the
legal brief. The court will
then render its decision on
whether to accept the case.
BANKS
Continued from Page 3A
work.
If unacceptable items are put
out, the city initially plans to
leave them on the curb, along
with a note explaining why they
werent picked up. Eventually,
the city will probably issue cita-
tions and fines for putting unac-
ceptable material in with recy-
clables, comparable to a litter-
ing fine, McLaughlin said.
But we dont anticipate that
to be a significant thing, once
people learn what can be put
out, he said.
Because the new system ac-
cepts a broader array of materi-
als than the old system, the city
expects to see the overall recy-
cling rate climb, with a corre-
sponding drop in garbage being
left on the curb. The savings in
tipping fees the city pays to
dump garbage at landfills could
be dramatic.
McLaughlin said the city
spends about $440,000 a year on
tipping fees. Even if we see a 25
percent drop, thats a savings of
$110,000.
RECYCLING
Continued from Page 3A
Mark Guydish, a Times Leader staff
writer, can be reached at 829-7161
erans nationwide, with more
than 5,000 of them women.
The need is extraordinary,
Kelly said. The Scranton area
homeless population has risen
due to the Marcellus Shale hous-
ing crisis. Shale (area) residents
no longer are able to afford living
intheregionandaremigratingto
Scranton for accessibility to ser-
vices such as education, training
and employment opportunities.
Kelly said more veterans seek-
ing shelter are young men and
women in their 30s. He detailed
thenumber of shelters andtransi-
tional housing units available in
the region.
He said more are coming. The
former St. Hedwigs School in
Kingston will house 12 apart-
ments for veterans as part of a $2
million project set for construc-
tionnext year, aDioceseof Scran-
ton representative said. The pro-
ject wasdelayedbyzoningissues,
but Kelly said all permits have
been secured.
Kelly cited an independent
study by Real Property Research
Groupthat foundthere is a clear
and strong need to provide mod-
ern, nurturing residential facili-
ties for veterans who have fallen
on hard times.
Quoting the study, Kelly said,
to break the cycle of unemploy-
ment and homelessness, veter-
ans need a place that is secure,
substance-free with supportive
services in place that include
counseling, job rehabilitation,
medical care and nutritional
meals.
Baker said recent estimates
put the number of homeless vet-
erans in Pennsylvania at around
1,400. She said too many are
bouncing between shelters and
temporary addresses onthe com-
passion and capacity of friends,
charities and churches.
Couch hoppers
TimCleveland, director of Vet-
eran Affairs in Tioga County,
calledthese veterans couchhop-
pers they move from friend to
friendor familymember tofriend
and sleep on a couch or spare
bed.
These veterans sometimes do
not even classify themselves as
homeless, because they do not fit
the stereotype homeless person
with a shopping cart and living
under the bridge, Cleveland
said.
Todd Knowlton, a veteran
from the Lancaster area, talked
about ways to prevent homeless-
ness and what to do about it
whenit occurs. He is a resident of
Tabor Transitional Living Center
in Lancaster.
I know youve heard it a thou-
sand times before, but funding is
imperative, he said. This is our
state, Pennsylvania. These are
our residents Pennsylvanians,
veterans, human beings who put
their lives on the line so all of us
can enjoy the freedoms we have.
Knowlton said he is a recover-
ing addict. He said that when he
was dischargedfromtheArmyhe
was an alcoholic and I didnt
know it.
Veterans become homeless
because they are not prepared to
face post-military life, he said.
As soldiers we become accus-
tomed to a certain lifestyle. This
lifestyle becomes our bible, the
code we live by, and this code
doesnt translate well in the civil-
ian world.
Knowlton said veterans often
dont have the training necessary
to get a job. He said that when he
got out of the Army in 1997, he
didnt know about the services
provided by the Veterans Admin-
istration.
Larry N. Reece, state com-
mander of the Veterans of For-
eign Wars, commended the ef-
fortsthat aredirectedat veterans,
but he said they are not enough.
Sometimes it feels like we are
using Band Aids to cover a grow-
ing wound that, quite frankly, is
an embarrassment for our state
and nation, Reece said.
Baker said its good to have
Pennsylvanians back from Iraq,
and she anticipates the day
troops return from Afghanistan.
This hearingis not about find-
ing fault or assigning blame,
Baker said. It is intended to de-
velop better solutions, in preven-
tion up front, and in response
when things go wrong. We have
to ask whether all these new vet-
erans will further strain servic-
es.
VETERANS
Continued from Page 1A
it had no comment and her Twit-
ter account was silent since not-
ing she was in Lucas Oil Stadium
with Madonna. And the Material
Girl, who invited M.I.A. to appear
during her performance of Give
Me All Your Luvin, had no im-
mediate comment.
The Nielsen Co. said that 114
million people watched Madon-
nas halftime show, even more
than the average of 111.3 million
whowatchedthe game. It was the
most-watched halftime entertain-
ment show ever.
The gesture was so shocking
that I had no idea she even did it
until NBC issued an apology for
it, wrote Time magazine TVcrit-
ic James Poniewozik on his blog.
The digital videorecorder mak-
er Tivo said there were no appre-
ciable bumps in playbacks at the
time of M.I.A.s gesture, meaning
manypeople either didnt see it or
shrugged it off. Tivo has about 2
millioncustomers intheU.S., said
TaraMaitra, thecompanys senior
vice president.
I never even noticed, said
Joan Kistner, a marketer from
Chicago who watched the game.
It wasnt until this morning
when I heard the news and so
manypeople were talkingabout it
that she knew it happened.
I dont know why they glorify
bad behavior, Kistner said.
Some things should just be left
alone. I really think she owes Ma-
donna, who obviously wantedher
to be part of the show, an apol-
ogy.
The NFL and NBC should take
steps to hold people accountable
for their actions, said TimWinter,
president of the Parents Televi-
sion Council.
Most families would agree
that the middle finger aimed di-
rectly at them is not appropriate,
especially during the most-
watched television event of the
year, Winter said.
Back in M.I.A.s native Britain,
the London Times noted that
while all eyes may have been on
Madonna at halftime, it was the
extended middle finger of the
British hip-hop star M.I.A. that
caused the most controversy.
The Guardian wondered
whether anyone would really be
outraged.
Youd be forgiven for not hav-
inga coronary over the fact M.I.A.
gave Super Bowl viewers the fin-
ger duringher halftimeguest spot
with Madonna, the newspaper
wrote in its music blog. For most
fans, it was probably more shock-
ing to see M.I.A. performing a re-
hearsed dance routine than flip-
ping the bird.
Indeed, M.I.A. is provocative
and an artist taking advantage of
all those TVviewers might not be
all that surprising. Still, host
Gretchen Carlson on Fox News
Channels Fox & Friends urged
M.I.A. to get a life and culture
vulture Perez Hilton tweeted:
Think shell ever be invited on
live TV again?
Jacksons incident raised a
stormof controversy andput CBS
in hot water with the Federal
Communications Commission
amid questions about the respon-
sibility of TV networks to police
their airwaves. The network and
FCC are still fighting over wheth-
er CBS should pay a $550,000
fine.
One person who didnt miss
M.I.A.s message was Marlee Mat-
lin. The actress, who is deaf,
tweeted: When we expected
some beautiful signlanguage dur-
ing the (hash)SuperBowl Nation-
al Anthem, wegot insteadasign
during M.I.A.s rap. Ahem.
M.I.A.
Continued from Page 1A
New York Giants fullback
Henry Hynoski and Chris Snee
werent the only people connect-
ed to Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia to have big
days on Super
Bowl Sunday.
Craig Lee
Thomas, a
Shavertown
native who
currently lives
in Los Angeles,
appeared in a
Budweiser commercial that
appeared during Sundays Super
Bowl.
In commercial, titled Prohib-
ition, Thomas plays a newsboy
who rushes through a Depres-
sion-era town announcing that
Prohibition has ended.
Its over. Prohibition is over,
Thomas can be seen exclaiming
during the first few moments of
the spot.
At the end of the spot, the
Budweiser Clydesdales bring
beer back to the town.
Of course, Hynoski and Snee
walked away from Sundays
game with something a little
more valuable than a case a
beer.
They won a Super Bowl
championship.
SCREEN GRAB FROM FACEBOOK PAGE
Craig Lee Thomas, a Shaver-
town native, appears in a Bud-
weiser commercial.
TV ad role
for area man
Thomas
percent, from an actual $28.6
million last year to $26.9 million
this year, according to Pribulas
summary.
Judicial branches will end up
witha 3.17percent increaseover-
all, receiving $23.7 million com-
pared to last years $22.9 million
in actual spending.
Steep cuts were avoided be-
cause court officials identified
additional revenue in probation
services and domestic relations
last week, reducing layoffs from
an original estimated 17 to no
more than 10.
Kingston Township resident
Tom Dombroski asked council
how court officials suddenly
came up with more revenue.
Pribula said he requested noti-
fication of all revenue immedi-
ately after he was appointed in-
terim manager on Jan. 2, but
court officials held off on disclos-
ing this money as they have in
the past. He emphasized the
courts must plan for additional
cuts because its one-time reve-
nue wont be available next year.
Spending will increase in
court administration, domestic
relations, stenographers and
probation services next year,
though orphans court and cen-
tral court/magistrate offices will
have reductions. Cuts in central
court and district judge offices
will total $168,712 compared to
last years spending.
ThecountyDistrict Attorneys
Office will lose about $236,000
compared to last years $4.7 mil-
lion in spending. District Attor-
ney Stefanie Salavantis has not
yet announced if she will absorb
cuts or sue over the budget.
Affected workers will be noti-
fied of layoffs shortly after the
budget adoption next week,
Pribula said.
His roughlayoff estimate: pris-
on, 14; probation, seven; 911,
five; and central court/magist-
rate, three. Two layoffs are pro-
jected in the council administra-
tion, assessors, building-and-
grounds, security, road-and-
bridge, sheriff, public defender
and district attorney offices. The
following offices should each
have one layoff: treasurer, deeds,
clerk of courts, prothonotary,
register of wills and controller.
Six of the 11 council members
agreed to the tax hike: Harry
Haas, Elaine Maddon Curry, Jim
Bobeck, Tim McGinley, Linda
McClosky Houck and Eugene
Kelleher.
Haas read a lengthy statement
prepared by the group explain-
ing the rationale for supporting
the spending plan.
We can, and we will, reinvent
our local government by right-
sizing it and making it account-
able to those who pay the bills.
This cannot be done in one
month, in one budget or even in
one term on council, but we
move in that direction starting
today, he said.
McClosky Houck compared
the countys more than $400 mil-
lion in outstanding debt to the
rack of ribs thrown on a car in
The Flintstones TV cartoon.
Council members Edward
Brominski, Stephen J. Urban,
Stephen A. Urban, Rick Morelli
and Rick Williams opposed the
plan.
Brominski was critical of the
prepared statement, saying, I
didnt know we were going to
have a state of the union address
here. He said hes offended a
majority wants to give incoming
permanent manager Robert
Lawton a budget with a tax in-
crease, saying they are paying
him to implement efficiencies.
Morelli concurredandsaidthe
tax hike will hurt public percep-
tion of the new home rule gov-
ernment.
Williams opposed the use of
capital funding, saying it goes
against the countys efforts toob-
tain a credit rating to refinance
debt at a lower interest rate. He
proposed a 3.93 percent tax hike
to proceed as planned without
tapping capital funding but
couldnt get a second vote.
StephenJ. Urbansaidhe never
sees overworked people in the
courthouse andwill alert council
and Lawton if he spots workers
slackingoff whentaxes are being
increased.
Bobeck said continued cuts
will be required because the $1.4
million in capital funding wont
be available in 2013.
Several property owners ob-
jected to the tax hike Monday. A
few county employees were in
the audience, but nowhere near
the crowd of union representa-
tives attending last weeks meet-
ing, when it was still unknown
whether a council majority
would agree to a tax increase.
Who runs this place? The
unions? said taxpayer Ed Gusti-
tus.
Taxpayer Ed Chesnovitch
challenged councils transparen-
cy because Pribula was instruct-
ed to start preparing the tax-hike
plan after a majority of council
had publicly agreed to no tax in-
crease or use of capital funding.
Michael Lacey, a taxpayer and
pharmacy owner, asked council
if unions will be sacrificing.
Haas said he expects union re-
quests to be scaled back when
expired contracts are renegotiat-
ed.
Williams said he believes
union contract negotiations
should be held in public.
Bobeck said he would like to
see all union contracts reopened
this year.
Pribula said new union con-
tracts typically implement sig-
nificant changes for new hires
only, and the county has been
largely unsuccessful forcing pay
and benefit reductions with sev-
eral unions that have binding ar-
bitration.
COUNCIL
Continued from Page 1A
The amended budget may be
viewed on the county website,
www.luzernecounty.org, under the
county council link.
V I E W T H E B U D G E T
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Luzerne County Councilman
Rick Williams vehemently
opposes the use of capital
funding borrowed with interest
in the past to help repay debt.
Slocumand Catherine Wega vot-
ed to hire Zaruta.
Coslett had voted to retain
JacksoninJanuary, joiningGoer-
inger and Parry. Jackson said he
was particularly disappointed in
Preece, Schuler and Wega. All
three are former Dallas teachers
whom Jackson said he worked
with when dealing with issues
with his players.
Jackson taught in the Wilkes-
Barre Area School District be-
fore retiring a few years ago.
What surprises me the most
are the three teachers who were
against me, Jackson said. I
worked with those teachers with
kids that had problems and stuff
like that. Theyre the ones that
disappoint me the most.
Jackson also expressed how
grateful he was toall his support-
ers.
I appreciate all the support of
the kids, the parents and the
community, he said. Ive had
the best kids and 99 percent of
the best parents and the best as-
sistant coaches.
I think our results have pro-
venwehavenoshameinwalking
out of there with three cham-
pionships ina rowand30 wins in
three years.
Zaruta, 54, is a resident of Sha-
vertownandunderstands the sit-
uation he has inherited. He said
at no time did he consider with-
drawing as a candidate as Jack-
sons supporters turned out in
force at recent board meetings.
I know the traditions, I know
the student athletes at Dallas;
theyre very special, said Zaru-
ta, whose son Doug played for
Jackson in the early 2000s. Its
an exciting time and Imlooking
forward to the challenges, and
there certainly will be both on
and off the field. But Im confi-
dent things will work out just
fine.
His coaching resume is limit-
ed with no head-coaching expe-
rience on the varsity level. He
spent a season at GAR as fresh-
men and assistant varsity coach
and five years with the Dallas
freshmen program, the final four
as its head coach. He said his fi-
nal season at Dallas was in 2007.
I understand their frustra-
tions and disappointments,
Zaruta said. There is a lot of loy-
alty. Most coaches build that, es-
pecially over a long period of
timewiththeir players. But I also
knowI worked with many, many
young people here at Dallas and
when I was at GAR. But lets talk
Dallas. There are a lot young
people who had a great experi-
ence working with me as their
coach and would probably come
into a room for my support if I
needed it.
Zaruta said he plans on meet-
ing with the players today as a
group and later individually. He
declined to say what hell tell
them, but believes they will re-
spond to his message.
Were going to build cham-
pions on and off the field, he
said. When the players see the
components of this program,
theyre going to be really excit-
ed.
Jacksons 227 career victories
ranked him behind only Dun-
mores Jack Henzes (357) and
Mid Valleys Frank Pazzaglia
(340) among active District 2
coaches at the end of the 2011
season.
However, Dallas has been un-
der probation by District 2 for
the past four seasons. The first
two were for a bench-clearing
fight in the 2008 season opener
versus Williamsport. The proba-
tion was extended through the
2010 and 2011 seasons after an
unspecified number of Dallas
players urinated on the tennis
courts during halftime of a 2009
game at Tunkhannock.
Jacksonwas suspendedfor the
entire 2010 season by the Dis-
trict 2 athletic committee, a pun-
ishment later reducedto the first
four games after an appeal hear-
ing before the PIAA Board of Di-
rectors.
Dallas received seven penal-
ties in all for the urination inci-
dent, including the public cen-
suring of Shaffer andAthletic Di-
rector Nancy Roberts.
The District 2 athletic com-
mittee wrote that those two ad-
ministrators hold the primary
responsibility for the action and
conduct of their students and
coaches involved in the athletic
programs of the District.
DALLAS
Continued from Page 1A
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012
timesleader.com
T
hey went all the way down to
something called tiebreaker H to
determine who won the District
2 Class 2A wrestling championship.
And when you have to sort through
that much criteria to find a winner, you
really dont have a true champion.
Because its sort of hard to tell the
other team it just lost.
A gallant Lake-Lehman fell short of
advancing to the PIAAs team competi-
tion only because the scorebooks
showed Western Wayne scored more
first points of Saturday nights district
finals than the Black Knights did.
So a match that finished even on the
scoreboard, 34-34, was awarded to
Western Wayne based on some obscure
condition that rarely matters in the
outcome of an individual battle. They
do wrestle three two-minute periods to
determine a winner.
And they dont decide the Super
Bowl winner based on whos ahead at
halftime, or who scored first in each of
the four quarters.
Whats next, pulling out a quarter to
decide a champion based on a coin
flip?
Oh wait, thats criterion P, the last
final tiebreaker in the PIAA wrestling
rule book.
Heads you win, tails youre not in the
state tournament.
Everyone just wrestled as hard as
they could, said Lake-Lehman 126-
pounder Austin Harry, who recorded a
fall to complete a run of three consec-
utive pins and four straight wins at the
lower weights to give the Black
Knights a 34-31 lead with one match
remaining. We fought back.
It just went their way.
This is no way to determine some-
thing as important as a district title.
Its not fair to the champion to win
by declaration and it certainly doesnt
seem reasonable to the losing team to
be beaten in a match by just one com-
ponent of it.
Its tough, Lake-Lehman coach
Tom Williams said, losing a 34-34 tie.
Look, this has nothing to do with
downplaying Western Waynes ac-
complishment. The Wildcats powered
their way to a 31-12 lead with three
punishing pins at the upper weights.
And the Wildcats forced officials to dig
deep into the tiebreaking process when
Morgan Fuller worked his way to a
decision at 132, the nights last bout,
forging the tie.
They may be deserving champions.
But Lehman deserves a better fate.
The Black Knights rallied from19
points down to forge three points
ahead when Harrys first-period pin
completed a strong run through the
lower weights that lifted Lehman into a
three-point lead with one match left.
The Black Knights didnt merit being
left out in the cold when they accumu-
lated just as many points as their oppo-
nent.
Its sad to see we lost by criteria,
said Bryan Carter, Lehmans senior
captain who registered a pin at 160.
Yeah, were upset. Its never easy to
accept a loss.
Especially one that comes this way.
Heres another way.
In a match with this much at stake,
where one team goes on to states and
the other goes back to preparing for
individual districts, hold an extra
match as a tiebreaker. Coaches can
agree beforehand on a weight class and
the guys to wrestle in it whether or
not theyve wrestled that night or not
to square off in one extra match in case
the first 14 end in a tie.
Itd be as thrilling and intense as
sudden death overtime in football, a
shootout in hockey, extra innings in
baseball.
And itd decide championships
where theyre supposed to be won, on a
mat instead of in a statasticians score-
book.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Criteria is a
tough way to
decide champ
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
WILKES-BARRE TWP. The board
that oversees Mohegan Sun Arena has
terminated its license agreement with
Kings Lacrosse, LLC the owner of the
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Shamrocks.
The termination by the Luzerne
County Convention Center Authority
stems from Kings Lacrosses failure to
fulfill its obligations under an agree-
ment dated June 3, 2011, according to
arena officials.
The agreement assures that the
Shamrocks would play in the newly-
formed North American Lacrosse
League, and the Shamrocks originally
scheduled their first regular-season
game to take place on Jan. 19 at the
arena.
However, Kings Lacrosse later uni-
laterally announced that the Sham-
rocks would not begin their regular
season until some undetermined time
in the fall, and further advised they
would not be a member team of the
NALL, according to an arena press re-
lease.
The authority reluctantly decided
to terminate its contractual relation-
ship with Kings Lacrosse, authority
chairwoman Donna Cupinski said.
For months, Kings Lacrosse has not
complied with various contractual obli-
gations under the authoritys license
agreement. Arena personnel repeated-
ly reached out to Kings Lacrosse and
demanded its compliance with these
various obligations and even offered to
assist their efforts, Cupinski said. Un-
fortunately, those demands were sim-
ply not met. We regret that the author-
ity was left no alternative but to termi-
nate the agreement and address its
L A C R O S S E
Arena cuts ties with Shamrocks
Arena general manager urges
season ticket holders to seek
refunds from team.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
See TIES, Page 3B
INDIANAPOLIS Tom Coughlin
has never won the NFLs coach of the
year award. Eli Manning has never been
the leagues MVP.
With two Super Bowl victories in the
past five seasons, though, they have
emergedas the NFLs topcoaching-quar-
terback tandem.
And the best may be yet to come.
The 65-year-old Coughlin and the 30-
year-old quarterback are getting better
withtime, andit wasnever moreobvious
than in this past season, which the Gi-
ants capped with a 21-17 victory over the
New England Patriots on Sunday night
for the franchises fourth Super Bowl ti-
tle.
ThebondbetweenCoughlinandMan-
ning is there for all to see. It is found in
the word, team.
He epitomizes everything that I be-
lieve in as a player, Coughlin said of
Manning at a news conference Monday.
(Thats) In terms of the quality, the way
he produces, the way he handles it
among his teammates, on and off the
field.
Its sometimes hard to tell whether
Coughlin has rubbed off on Manning, or
vice versa.
Eitherway, CoughlinandManningare
theperfect matchinastatethat oncehad
anadvertisingsloganof NewJerseyand
you, perfect together.
He is confident, Coughlin said of
Manning. He is not arrogant. He has al-
ways thought about teamfirst. He is the
perfect guyinregardtothat becauseheis
continuously spreading things around.
He hands the praise out, he distributes it
well. He looks to his teammates. He is a
guywhois anoutstandingleader. Hehas
taken responsibility for his team.
Never was that leadership more evi-
dent than late in games this season. Sev-
en times Manning led the Giants (13-7)
to fourth-quarter victories and the last
was the most impressive an 88-yard
SUPER BOWL XLVI
The dynamic duo
AP PHOTO
Giants quarterback Eli Manning and head coach TomCoughlin smile as they listen to NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell speak during a news conference after Super Bowl XLVI Monday.
Manning, Coughlin feed off each other
By TOMCANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
See GIANTS, Page 4B
He epitomizes everything
that I believe in as a player.
(Thats) In terms of the qual-
ity, the way he produces, the
way he handles it among his
teammates, on and off the
field.
Giants coach TomCoughlin
on quarterback Eli Manning
WRIGHT TWP. As a freshman,
Megan Kane was still waiting her turn
with a talented Wyoming Valley West
squad.
That turn came Monday at Crest-
wood.
Entering the game after Taylor Reilly
was called for her fifth foul, Kane had a
back-breaking stickback, snuffing out a
Crestwood rally and lifting Valley West
to a 59-52 triumph over the Comets in
Wyoming Valley Con-
ference girls basketball
play.
"Megan came in and
gave us big minutes,"
Spartans coach Curt
Lloyd said. "We played
without our best de-
fender tonight in
Cheyenne Reese, who has a hip flexor.
Megan, like Cheyenne is a street kid.
They will run through a brick wall for
you."
Or make a key basket.
The win moves Valley West to 4-0 in
the WVC-I second half race and 14-5
overall. Crestwood is 2-2 in WVC-I and
13-6 overall. Hazleton Area, a 42-28 win-
ner over Wyoming Area, is also 4-0 in
WVC-I.
"Once we started the second half, we
had silly turnovers here, silly turnovers
there," Crestwood coach Isiah Walker
said after his team gave away the ball 12
times after the break. "We had a chance
to tie the game and we missed a layup,
then they came down and scored. The
second half title may be out of our reach
now, so weve got to gear up for the (Dis-
trict 2) playoffs."
Crestwood trailed by as many as 11,
but rode the post moves of Sydney
Myers back into the game, as the junior
scoredsix straight points for the Comets
to cut the deficit to three, 51-48 with
three minutes remaining.
But Valley West, which led through-
out, saw Kane enter the game and, 30
seconds later, go up surroundedby a trio
of Comets and grab an offensive re-
bound. Her shot sparked the Spartans,
who scored eight of the next 10 points to
put the game away.
The Spartans started strong, with
their lead swelling to 10 (at 16-6) in the
first 10 minutes. It reached 30-19 in the
final minute of the first half.
Then Crestwood made a run, outscor-
ing Valley West 12-2 in a span of 3:41
bridging the second and third quarters
to cut the Spartans lead to 32-30.
"Obviously, we wanted to limit Syd-
neys touches in the paint," Lloyd said.
"We did a very good job of it in the first
half. But inthesecondhalf, wewantedto
concentrate on their three-point shoo-
ters. Its tough to play Crestwood, you
have to pick your poison."
The teams traded baskets before a
flowing left-handed hook by Tara Zdan-
cewicz reestablished a two-possession
H . S . G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L
Freshman
aids WVW
in win vs.
Crestwood
Kanes late entry sparks a Spartans
rally to pull away for the victory.
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
See COMETS, Page 3B
59
VALLEY WEST
52
CRESTWOOD
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Smiles were the order of the day, as the
Super Bowl-champion New York Gi-
ants returned home, victorious once
again.
The teams charter plane from Indi-
anapolis touched down around 1:55
p.m. Monday at Newark Liberty Inter-
national Airport in New Jersey.
Several players saluted the crowd as
they departed the aircraft, and some
used cameras and video recorders to
capture the moment and the scene.
Coach Tom Coughlin also had a big
smile as he waved to the crowd.
Once on the ground, the players,
coaches and team officials were greet-
ed by several hundred airport employ-
ees and a Port Authority bagpipe band.
Crews also fired water cannons to sa-
lute the teamwhile the plane taxied to
a hangar.
The players then took buses to the
Champions return home greeted by joyful fans
AP PHOTO
Supporters of the Super Bowl champion Giants cheer as the teamarrives at
Newark Liberty International Airport, Monday in Newark, N.J. a day after
beating the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLVI. See CHAMPS, Page 4B
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 2B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
to sign up who reside in Plains,
Laflin, Bear Creek, Parsons, Miners
Mills, North End, East End, Avoca,
Dupont, Jenkins Twp and Pittston
Twp East of the Pittston By-pass.
For more information contact Don
at 822-0537 or Jack at 947-7246.
The Wyoming Valley Babe Ruth
League will hold signups on Tues-
day, Feb. 7, from 6-8 p.m. at Franks
Pizza, 198 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Players and teams ages 13-15 and
16-18 from throughout the Wyom-
ing Valley are welcome. Season
runs from late May to October.
Cost is $85 per player or $150 per
family. Individual teams pay only
registration and insurance fees
under the Babe Ruth charter and
provide for their expenses. For
more information, contact the
SWB Teener League at 793-6430.
Ashley/Newtown Little League will
be holding registrations for this
season on the following dates and
times at the Hanover Area High
School cafeteria: Feb. 13 from 6-8
p.m. and Feb. 25 from10 a.m. to 12
p.m. Registrations will be $40 per
child or $60 per family for little
league and $65 per child or $90
per family for junior and senior
league baseball. Remember to
bring a copy of you childs birth
certificate along with three forms
of proof of residency to meet Little
Leagues requirements. At regis-
tration, you will be given 10 lottery
tickets to sell or you many select
the buyout of $30.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
will hold a 2nd registration for all
baseball and softball divisions on
Wednesday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at
the Kingston American Legion
(next to Kost Tire). A copy of birth
certificate (for all new players) and
copies of three proofs of residency
dated between Feb. 1 2011 and Jan.
31 2012 are required. Interested
managers and coaches should
bring a copy of a drivers license
and should apply at this regis-
tration. Visit www.eteamz.com/
kbsi for registration and medical
release forms, fees and fundraising
information. Aditional questions,
call 331-4817 or 714-4035.
Jenkins Twp. Little League will be
holding a second registration on
Wednesday, Feb. 8 from 6:30-7:30
p.m. at the Jenkins Twp. Municipal
Building. Fees due at sign up are
$65 for major/minor baseball/
softball, $55 for Coach Pitch, $50
for T-Ball and $75 for Teeners.
Additional child cost is $30 with no
rebate for Teeners. Please bring a
copy of childs Birth Certificate and
three Proofs of Residency. Forms
and information can be found at
www.jenkinstwplittleleague.com.
Any player who wishes to sign up
after the third registration date
will be assessed a $20 late fee. If
you are unable to sign up by one
of the registration dates, other
arrangements can be made.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Jenkins Twp. Little League will hold
a field preperation day on Sat-
urday, March 10 from 8 a.m. 12
p.m. All managers and coaches
must be present on this day for
field preperations for the up-
coming season. If you can not
make it on this day, you must
designate someone to be there in
your absence. An alternate day will
be scheduled in case of inclement
weather.
LEAGUES
Brews Brothers Summer Softball
League has openings for mens and
co ed. For more information call
Tony at 693-0506.
Kingston Soccer is forming a spring
soccer league U8-U14. Online
registration can be found at
www.kingstoncornerkicksystem-
s.com. Contact Ben for additional
information at 332-0313.
MEETINGS
GAR Memorial High School Football
Booster Club will meet Wednesday
at 7 p.m. in the choral room at the
high school. New members are
welcome.
Greater Nanticoke Area Softball
Booster Club will be holding a
meeting on Wednesday, at 6:30
p.m. at Time Out Pizza. All are
invited to attend. For further in-
formation you may contact Tammy
at 735-0661, Lynn at 239-1604, Lisa
at 735-8151, or Patty at 735-3830.
Jenkins Twp. Little League will hold
its monthly meeting on Wednesday
from 6-6:30 p.m. at the Jenkins
Twp. Municipal Building. Items to be
discussed are 2012 season prep-
arations and golf tournament. All
interested parents are urged to
attend. All manager letters of
intent are due by this meeting.
Anyone interested in managing a
team MUST have a letter of intent
submitted by this meetingNO
EXCEPTIONS.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
will meet Monday, Feb. 13 at 7 p.m.
at the Kingston Rec Center. All
interested members are encour-
aged to attend.
Plymouth Little League will have a
mandatory meeting for all manag-
ers, coaches and volunteers on
Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at Happy
Pizza to discuss and plan the Night
at the Races fundraiser.
The Dallas Softball Booster Club will
be holding a meeting on Wednes-
day, Feb. 8 at Leggios Restaurant
in Dallas. The meeting will start at
7:30 p.m. All parents of girls in
grades 7-12 who will be playing this
season are urged to attend. For
more information, please call Brent
at 793-1126 or Bill at 498-5991.
The Lady Patriot Booster Club will
meet Tuesday, Feb. 7 at Lizzas
Mezzo Mezzo at 7 p.m. Upcoming
events will be discussed. All parents
are encouraged to attend.
The Crestwood Football Booster
Club will meet Thursday, Feb. 16 at
7 p.m. at Tonys Pizza in the back
room. Any questions, call Melanie
at 606-4223.
Swoyersville Little League will meet
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the
Borough Building.
REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS
Pittston Township Little League will
hold registrations on the following
dates: Feb. 7 and 9. Registration
will take place at the Pittston
Township Municipal Building from
6-8 p.m. each day. Fee is $50 per
player, or $75 per family. Little
League Divisions include: Little
League, Girls Softball, and Junior/
Senior Little League. All new play-
ers must provide a copy of birth
certificate and proof of residency.
T-Ball players must be age 5 by
May 1. Questions can be directed to
Art at 655-6996.
Plains American Legion Baseball
Teams will hold a registration on
Sunday, Feb. 19 at the Plains Amer-
ican Legion home on East Carey
Street in Plains. Registration time
will be from1-3 p.m. Players be-
tween the ages of 13-19 are eligible
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off
at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
PACERS 8.5 Jazz
HEAT 13.5 Cavaliers
CELTICS 14 Bobcats
TWOLVES [6] Kings
BUCKS 7.5 Suns
Thunder 3 WARRIORS
[]-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a va-
riety of reasons, withtheprimefactor beinganinjury.
When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wa-
gering. The line could move a fewpoints in either di-
rection, depending on the severity (probable, ques-
tionable, doubtful, out) of the injury.
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
OKLAHOMA ST 1 Iowa St
KENTUCKY 9.5 Florida
CLEMSON 8.5 Maryland
Creighton 5 EVANSVILLE
KANSAS ST 18.5 Texas Tech
VILLANOVA 8 Providence
Alabama 5.5 AUBURN
OHIO ST 14.5 Purdue
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
Wild -$125/
+$105
BLUE JACKETS
FLYERS -$185/
+$165
Islanders
RANGERS -$170/
+$150
Devils
CAPITALS -$160/
+$140
Panthers
Penguins -$140/
+$120
CANADIENS
LIGHTNING -$120/
even
Kings
Blues -$125/
+$105
SENATORS
PREDATORS -$120/
even
Canucks
JETS -$110/-
$110
Maple Leafs
STARS -$145/
+$125
Coyotes
Blackhawks -$135/
+$115
AVALANCHE
AME RI C A S L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Twolves - Kings circle is for Minne-
sota forward Kevin Love who has been suspended for two games.
Follow Eckstein on Twitter at www.twitter.com/vegasvigorish.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC middleweight title fight on February 4 in San Anto-
nio, Texas, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. is -$380 vs. Marco Antonio Rubio at +$320; in
the WBA super welterweight title fight on May 5 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd
Mayweather Jr. is -$600 vs. Miguel Cotto at +$400.
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer, at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Coughlin at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Meyers, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
HS RIFLE
Team Tournament Semi Finals, 4 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Dallas at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Berwick at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m.
Meyers at Lake-Lehman, 4:30 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Abington Heights, 4:30 p.m.
West Scranton at Scranton High, 4:30 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Valley View, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Honesdale at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
Lehigh-Carbon at Luzerne CCC, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Lehigh-Carbon at Luzerne CCC, 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8
HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.)
Hanover Area at Scranton Prep
Lackawanna Trail at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Valley West at West Scranton
Valley View at GAR
HS SWIMMING
Wyoming Area at Pittston Area, 4 p.m.
Dunmore at Meyers, 4:30 p.m.
Elk Lake at Scranton Prep, 7 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Hazleton at PSU York, 8 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Kings, 8 p.m.
Wilkes at FDU-Florham, 8 p.m.
Misericordia at Eastern, 6 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Delaware Valley at Kings, 6 p.m.
Wilkes at FDU-Florham, 6 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at PSU York, 6 p.m.
Misericordia at Eastern, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Kings at Elizabethtown, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 9
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Berwick at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
Coughlin at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m.
GAR at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 7:15 p.m.
HS BOWLING
Berwick at Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech, 3 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Central Penn, 8:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Central Penn, 6:30 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL
7:15 p.m.
SE-2 Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Florida at Kentucky
ESPN2 Iowa St. at Oklahoma St.
8 p.m.
YES Texas Tech. at Kansas State
9 p.m.
ESPN Purdue at Ohio St.
NHL
7:30 p.m.
CSN N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia
MSG, PLUS2 --- New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Los Angeles at Tampa Bay
ROOT --- Pittsburgh at Montreal
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLBSuspendedSeattleminor leagueCChristian
Carmichael (Clinton-MWL) 50 games for testing
positive for Methylhexaneamine.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLESTraded RHP Jeremy
Guthrie to Colorado for RHP Jason Hammel and
RHPMatt Lindstrom. Designated LHPClay Rapada
for assignment.
SEATTLEMARINERSAgreedtoterms withRHP
Shawn Camp and LHP Hong-Chih Kuo to one-year
contracts. Designated OF Mike Wilson and C Chris
Gimenez for assignment.
TEXASRANGERSAgreedtoterms withLHPJoe
Beimel and 1B-OF Conor Jackson to minor league
contracts.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIESAgreed to terms with
RHP Jeremy Guthrie on a one-year contract.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALSAgreed to terms with
INF Alex Cora on a minor league contract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALSAgreed to terms
with OF Rick Ankiel and INF/OF Mark Teahen on
minor-league contracts.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBASuspended Minnesota F Kevin Love two
games for driving his foot into the upper body and
face of Houstons Luis Scola as Scola was lying on
the floor during a Feb. 4 game. Suspended Los An-
geles Lakers coach Mike Brown one game and
fined him $25,000 for making contact with a game
official and failing to leave the court in a timely man-
ner following his ejection during a Feb. 4 game at
Utah.
CHICAGO SKYSigned C Ruth Riley.
CLEVELAND CAVALIERSWaived G Mychel
Thompson.
Women's National Basketball Association
SEATTLE STORMSigned C Ann Wauters.
CYCLING
COURT OF ARBITRATIONStripped Alberto
Contador of his 2010 Tour de France title and
banned him for two years after rejecting his appeal
of a positive test for clenbuterol.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFSNamed Brian Daboll of-
fensive coordinator.
OAKLAND RAIDERSNamed Jason Tarver de-
fensive coordinator.
GOLF
LPGANamed Leslie Greis chairwoman of the
board of directors.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHLFined Colorado F Chuck Kobasew $2,500
for tripping Vancouver D Dan Hamhuis after Ham-
huis touched the puck on an icing call in a Feb. 4
game.
CAROLINA HURRICANESReassigned F Riley
Nash to Charlotte (AHL).
MINNESOTA WILDSigned D Nate Prosser to a
two-year contract extension.
MONTREAL CANADIENSAssigned RW Ryan
White to Hamilton (AHL) for conditioning. Returned
RW Aaron Palushaj to Hamilton.
NEW YORK ISLANDERSRecalled D Aaron
Ness from Bridgeport (AHL) on an emergency ba-
sis.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
D.C. UNITEDSigned M Marcelo Saragosa. Ac-
quired allocation money from Portland for an inter-
national roster spot.
NEW YORK RED BULLSSigned GP Ryan Mea-
ra.
COLLEGE
PAC-12CONFERENCEExtendedthecontract of
commissioner Larry Scott through 2016.
ALABAMASuspended junior basketball F Tony
Mitchell indefinitely for conduct detrimental to the
team.
LOUISVILLEPromoted Shawn Watson to offen-
sive coordinator. Named Sherrone Moore tight
ends coach, and offensive line coach Dave Borber-
ly running game coordinator.
W V C B O Y S B A S K E T B A L L
S T A T I S T I C S
(Statistics are for WVC divisional games only; divisional and overall records in parentheses)
DIVISION I
COUGHLIN (1-2, 5-13) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Marcus Cobb ...................................... 9 52 7 27 46 .587 138 15.3
Nate Oliver .......................................... 9 35 14 15 24 .625 99 11.0
Phil Trout ............................................. 9 21 8 25 42 .595 75 8.3
Connor Flaherty.................................. 9 28 0 15 22 .682 71 7.9
Devon Davis........................................ 9 27 0 6 11 .545 60 6.7
Eric Heffers ......................................... 8 8 6 7 8 .875 29 3.6
CRESTWOOD (2-1, 9-9) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
John Fazzini........................................ 8 37 13 36 41 .878 123 15.4
Chris Fazzini ....................................... 8 27 3 12 21 .571 69 8.6
Steve Roberts..................................... 9 22 15 2 5 .400 61 6.8
Mike Judge.......................................... 9 21 4 9 16 .563 55 6.1
Brady Gallagher.................................. 9 14 8 11 14 .786 47 5.2
Josh Jones.......................................... 9 12 4 3 7 .429 31 3.4
HAZLETON AREA (3-0, 15-3) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Travis Buckner.................................... 9 59 10 23 34 .676 151 16.8
Frankie Vito......................................... 9 45 7 19 30 .633 116 12.9
Sal Biasi............................................... 9 40 20 4 10 .400 104 11.6
Tyler Plaksa ........................................ 9 30 1 22 30 .733 83 9.2
Adam Hauze ....................................... 7 17 0 5 13 .385 39 5.6
Hunter Samec..................................... 8 9 0 3 7 .429 21 2.6
PITTSTON AREA (1-2, 11-7) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Steve Stravinski.................................. 9 69 21 16 19 .842 175 19.4
Steve Sklanka..................................... 9 39 13 15 20 .750 106 11.8
Jordan Houseman.............................. 9 32 7 18 27 .667 89 9.9
Shaun McDermott .............................. 9 20 14 5 8 .625 59 6.5
Mason Gross ...................................... 8 20 3 9 10 .900 52 6.5
Mike Schwab ...................................... 9 3 1 4 6 .667 11 1.2
WYO. VALLEY WEST (2-1, 9-10) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
James McCann................................... 8 38 9 22 28 .786 107 13.4
Jaquan Ingram.................................... 9 39 0 23 33 .697 101 11.2
Jonathan Gimble................................ 9 32 1 8 16 .500 73 8.1
Brett Good........................................... 9 24 10 11 18 .611 69 7.7
Ryan Hoinski....................................... 8 24 0 12 14 .857 60 7.5
Chris McCue....................................... 9 13 6 3 7 .429 35 3.9
DIVISION II
BERWICK (0-3, 3-14) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Jimmy Gaizick................................... 9 24 6 19 26 .731 73 8.1
James Morrison ................................ 6 18 1 6 9 .667 43 7.2
Eric May............................................. 8 18 8 1 4 .250 45 5.6
Zach Ladonis..................................... 9 20 0 8 16 .500 48 5.3
Jeremy Clausen................................ 8 6 3 11 20 .550 26 3.3
Will Morales....................................... 7 8 4 2 2 1.000 22 3.1
DALLAS (1-2, 11-6) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Shane Dunn....................................... 9 50 5 29 51 .569 134 14.9
Paul Brace......................................... 9 47 4 13 28 .464 111 12.3
Jason Simonovich ............................ 9 39 1 16 26 .615 95 10.6
Bob Saba........................................... 9 22 10 7 9 .778 61 6.8
Don Behm.......................................... 8 18 0 7 13 .538 43 5.4
Matt Ross........................................... 9 7 2 9 12 .750 25 2.8
HOLY REDEEMER (3-0, 9-9) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Ryan DeRemer ................................. 9 40 24 10 13 .769 114 12.7
Shahael Wallace............................... 9 34 4 25 30 .833 97 10.7
Will Cavanaugh................................. 9 25 15 11 20 .550 76 8.4
Dalton Ell ............................................ 8 14 3 15 21 .714 46 5.8
Mike Prociak...................................... 9 19 0 12 24 .500 50 5.6
Christian Choman............................. 9 16 0 15 22 .682 47 5.2
TUNKHANNOCK (1-2, 10-8) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
James Hawk...................................... 9 56 0 22 36 .611 134 14.9
Brian Stephenson............................. 9 32 0 14 30 .467 78 8.7
Austin Yanora.................................... 9 21 16 8 11 .727 66 7.3
A.J. Bevan ......................................... 9 19 1 3 8 .375 42 4.7
Jordan Faux....................................... 9 11 8 7 15 .467 37 4.1
Derik Franklin.................................... 9 12 6 2 3 .667 32 3.6
WYOMING AREA (1-2, 2-16) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Lou Vullo............................................ 9 41 10 24 27 .889 116 12.9
Jordan Zezza..................................... 9 20 1 7 15 .467 48 5.3
Dan Newhart...................................... 9 21 1 8 12 .667 51 5.7
E.J. Driving Hawk ............................. 9 16 0 3 15 .200 35 3.8
Mike Carey ........................................ 9 18 8 3 6 .500 47 5.2
Joe Adonizio...................................... 9 8 1 4 7 .571 21 2.3
DIVISION III
GAR (3-0, 17-1) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Darrell Crawford .............................. 10 45 26 8 14 .571 124 12.4
Isaiah Francis................................... 10 46 0 12 24 .500 104 10.4
Shaliek Powell ................................. 10 37 5 13 20 .650 92 9.2
Matt Sharpe...................................... 10 35 4 17 30 .567 91 9.1
Christian Skrepenak ....................... 10 39 0 4 22 .182 82 8.2
Zach Ellis.......................................... 10 15 4 6 10 .600 40 4.0
HANOVER AREA (1-2, 7-11) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
ShaQuille Rolle................................ 9 67 4 33 46 .717 171 19.0
Jeorge Colon.................................... 9 30 2 24 33 .727 86 9.6
Austin Bogart ................................... 10 18 13 1 1 1.000 50 5.0
Jacob Barber.................................... 10 35 8 10 15 .667 88 8.8
Martin Steve..................................... 9 14 0 4 8 .500 32 3.6
Parrish Bennett................................ 9 8 3 3 6 .500 22 2.4
LAKE-LEHMAN (1-2, 10-8) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Pete Borum...................................... 10 57 0 24 47 .511 138 13.8
Chris OConnor................................ 8 35 0 10 22 .455 80 10.0
Kevin Bohan..................................... 9 36 6 10 19 .526 88 9.8
Jared James .................................... 10 36 5 12 27 .444 89 8.9
Cody Poepperling............................ 10 18 4 9 16 .563 49 4.9
Adam Dizbon ................................... 10 11 8 0 4 .000 30 3.0
MEYERS (3-0, 13-2) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Eugene Lewis .................................. 10 84 2 18 30 .600 188 18.8
Rasheed Moore............................... 10 65 1 18 31 .581 149 14.9
Ryan Krawczeniuk .......................... 10 45 12 32 42 .762 134 13.4
Fabian Smith.................................... 9 21 6 5 10 .500 53 5.9
Dominic Johnson............................. 10 17 13 2 4 .500 49 4.9
Alex Pape......................................... 10 14 2 6 6 1.000 36 3.6
MMI PREP (0-3, 4-14) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
George Gera.................................... 8 24 3 11 13 .846 62 7.8
Cory Rogers..................................... 10 23 11 8 9 .889 65 6.5
Charlie Karchner ............................. 10 27 3 3 4 .750 60 6.0
Aaron Kollar ..................................... 9 21 6 3 6 .500 51 5.7
Alex Van Hoekelen ......................... 7 9 1 3 6 .500 22 3.1
Tim Connors .................................... 9 8 4 6 8 .750 26 2.9
NANTICOKE (1-2, 5-13) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Luke Casey ...................................... 10 39 0 34 50 .680 112 11.2
Kevin Zaykoski ................................ 9 42 3 13 23 .565 100 11.1
Joey Yudichak ................................. 10 18 8 33 40 .825 77 7.7
Zak Matulewski................................ 8 17 3 15 25 .600 52 6.5
Brandon Kairo.................................. 4 7 0 4 6 .667 18 4.5
Brian Bevan...................................... 10 14 7 9 16 .561 44 4.4
NORTHWEST (1-2, 6-12) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Devon Mazonkey ............................ 10 63 9 33 50 .660 168 16.8
Christian Foley................................. 10 27 6 26 42 .619 86 8.6
Garret Yustat.................................... 8 15 10 7 14 .500 47 5.8
Kyle Cragle....................................... 8 18 7 1 2 .500 44 5.5
Jeff Nelson ....................................... 9 9 3 4 5 .800 25 2.8
Dalton Tomko................................... 10 9 7 2 2 1.000 27 2.7
WYOMING SEMINARY (2-1,
7-10) G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
E.J. Flippen........................................ 9 32 0 26 31 .839 90 10.0
Seth Callahan.................................... 9 30 16 16 24 .667 92 10.2
Josh Lefkowitz................................... 10 31 0 9 17 .529 71 7.1
Jason Ellis.......................................... 8 22 7 4 6 .667 55 6.9
Alex Barilla......................................... 10 25 0 11 19 .579 61 6.1
Brad Sedor......................................... 8 10 0 5 7 .714 25 3.1
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers............... 50 33 12 5 71 141 102
Philadelphia ................ 52 30 16 6 66 173 156
Pittsburgh .................... 53 30 19 4 64 161 138
New Jersey ................. 52 30 19 3 63 149 148
N.Y. Islanders.............. 51 21 22 8 50 125 150
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston.......................... 51 33 16 2 68 180 111
Ottawa.......................... 55 27 21 7 61 161 171
Toronto ........................ 52 27 19 6 60 161 152
Buffalo.......................... 52 22 24 6 50 126 154
Montreal....................... 53 20 24 9 49 137 145
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida.......................... 51 24 16 11 59 131 145
Washington................. 52 27 21 4 58 145 149
Winnipeg...................... 54 24 24 6 54 129 150
Tampa Bay................... 51 23 23 5 51 147 173
Carolina ....................... 54 20 25 9 49 137 165
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit .......................... 53 35 16 2 72 171 126
Nashville...................... 53 32 17 4 68 149 136
St. Louis....................... 51 30 14 7 67 126 105
Chicago........................ 53 29 17 7 65 169 158
Columbus .................... 52 14 32 6 34 120 174
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver ................... 52 32 15 5 69 167 130
Minnesota.................... 52 25 19 8 58 121 133
Colorado...................... 54 26 25 3 55 135 151
Calgary ........................ 52 24 22 6 54 124 141
Edmonton.................... 52 21 26 5 47 138 152
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose...................... 50 29 15 6 64 145 117
Los Angeles ................ 53 25 18 10 60 115 116
Dallas ........................... 51 27 22 2 56 136 144
Phoenix........................ 52 23 21 8 54 136 141
Anaheim ...................... 51 19 24 8 46 132 154
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Sunday's Games
Boston 4, Washington 1
New Jersey 5, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Rangers 5, Philadelphia 2
Montreal 3, Winnipeg 0
Monday's Games
Toronto 6, Edmonton 3
Phoenix 3, Detroit 1
Calgary at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Calgary at San Jose, 10 p.m.
American Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. Johns .............. 46 28 12 5 1 62 155 135
Manchester ........... 49 27 20 0 2 56 131 132
Worcester.............. 44 21 14 4 5 51 119 115
Portland ................. 46 22 19 2 3 49 128 145
Providence............ 47 22 20 2 3 49 111 131
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Penguins.............. 48 28 13 2 5 63 157 142
Hershey................. 47 26 14 4 3 59 171 142
Norfolk ................... 48 27 18 1 2 57 166 138
Syracuse............... 44 19 18 4 3 45 145 148
Binghamton........... 48 20 25 2 1 43 130 151
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Bridgeport ............. 46 23 18 3 2 51 137 135
Connecticut........... 46 21 16 4 5 51 137 137
Springfield............. 47 22 22 1 2 47 136 145
Albany.................... 45 19 18 5 3 46 115 137
Adirondack............ 46 22 22 1 1 46 128 136
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte................ 48 28 16 2 2 60 140 127
Chicago................. 46 25 17 1 3 54 133 121
Peoria .................... 47 24 20 2 1 51 143 136
Milwaukee ............. 44 23 19 1 1 48 124 117
Rockford................ 47 20 22 1 4 45 139 158
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto.................. 47 25 17 3 2 55 136 117
Rochester.............. 47 21 17 6 3 51 130 139
Grand Rapids........ 45 19 18 4 4 46 143 145
Lake Erie............... 47 21 22 2 2 46 114 131
Hamilton ................ 45 20 20 1 4 45 112 135
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City...... 47 30 12 2 3 65 139 103
Houston................. 47 23 12 3 9 58 129 127
Abbotsford ............ 47 26 18 3 0 55 114 118
San Antonio .......... 46 24 20 2 0 50 113 125
Texas..................... 45 20 22 1 2 43 132 139
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee 2, Houston 1
Hershey 4, Penguins 3, SO
Springfield 4, Norfolk 2
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
San Antonio at Hamilton, 10 a.m.
Houston at Chicago, 12 p.m.
Providence at St. Johns, 6 p.m.
Syracuse at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Portland at Manchester, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Rochester at Toronto, 11 a.m.
Providence at St. Johns, 6 p.m.
Lake Erie at Rockford, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
College Basketball
Men's College Basketball Top 25 Poll
The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN mens
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in pa-
rentheses, records through Feb. 5, points based on
25 points for a first-place vote through one point for
a 25th-place vote and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Kentucky (31) ............. 23-1 775 1
2. Syracuse..................... 23-1 740 2
3. Ohio State................... 20-3 715 3
4. Missouri....................... 21-2 673 4
5. North Carolina............ 20-3 639 6
6. Baylor........................... 21-2 635 6
7. Florida ......................... 19-4 536 11
7. Murray State ............... 23-0 536 9
9. Duke............................ 19-4 525 5
10. Kansas ...................... 18-5 480 8
11. Georgetown ............. 18-4 454 14
12. Michigan State.......... 18-5 444 10
13. Saint Marys ............. 22-2 382 16
14. San Diego State....... 20-3 332 17
15. Creighton.................. 21-3 316 12
16. UNLV......................... 21-4 302 13
17. Florida State............. 16-6 247 24
18. Mississippi State...... 18-5 241 19
19. Marquette ................. 19-5 239 15
20. Virginia...................... 18-4 192 18
21. Harvard..................... 20-2 153 23
22. Wisconsin................. 18-6 133 20
23. Indiana ...................... 18-6 93 20
23. Louisville................... 18-5 93 25
25. Michigan.................... 17-7 79 22
Others receiving votes: Notre Dame 19, Gonzaga
14, NewMexico13, IowaState10, Nevada9, South-
ern Miss. 9, Long Beach State 8, UConn 6, Middle
Tennessee 6, Temple 6, California 5, Vanderbilt 5,
Wichita State 5, Saint Louis 2, VCU 2, Cleveland
State 1, Drexel 1.
Men's College Basketball Schedule
Today's Games
EAST
Hartford at UMBC, 7 p.m.
Providence at Villanova, 8 p.m.
SOUTH
Maryland at Clemson, 7 p.m.
Campbell at Coastal Carolina, 7 p.m.
Mid-Continent at E. Kentucky, 7 p.m.
Florida at Kentucky, 7 p.m.
Alabama at Auburn, 9 p.m.
MIDWEST
Texas Tech at Kansas St., 8 p.m.
IPFW at Chicago St., 8:05 p.m.
Creighton at Evansville, 8:05 p.m.
Purdue at Ohio St., 9 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Iowa St. at Oklahoma St., 7 p.m.
FAR WEST
Seattle at Idaho, 10:05 p.m.
Women's College Basketball Top 25
The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press
womens college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 5, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and previ-
ous ranking:
..........................................Record Pts Prv
1. Baylor (40) ................... 23-0 1,000 1
2. Notre Dame................. 23-1 960 2
3. UConn.......................... 21-2 917 3
4. Stanford ....................... 20-1 882 4
5. Duke............................. 18-3 805 5
6. Miami............................ 20-3 803 7
7. Kentucky...................... 21-3 728 6
8. Maryland...................... 19-3 709 9
9. Green Bay.................... 20-0 659 10
10. Ohio St....................... 20-2 651 11
11. Tennessee................ 17-6 582 8
12. Delaware ................... 20-1 556 12
13. Nebraska................... 19-3 507 16
14. Georgetown.............. 18-5 444 17
15. Texas A&M............... 16-5 417 18
16. Purdue....................... 19-5 385 15
17. Rutgers...................... 17-6 334 13
18. Penn St...................... 18-5 307 19
19. Gonzaga.................... 21-3 268 20
20. Louisville ................... 17-6 217 14
21. Georgia...................... 18-6 207 21
22. Georgia Tech............ 17-6 128 24
22. North Carolina .......... 17-5 128 23
24. South Carolina.......... 18-5 123
25. St. Bonaventure ....... 22-2 82
Others receiving votes: DePaul 38, BYU 28, Cali-
fornia 25, Texas Tech 24, Oklahoma 18, Arkansas
14, Princeton12, St. Johns12, FloridaGulf Coast 8,
Kansas St. 7, UTEP7, Fresno St. 6, Bowling Green
1, West Virginia 1.
National Basketball
Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia................... 17 7 .708
Boston ............................ 13 10 .565 3
1
2
New York ....................... 9 15 .375 8
New Jersey.................... 8 17 .320 9
1
2
Toronto........................... 8 17 .320 9
1
2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami .............................. 18 6 .750
Atlanta............................. 16 8 .667 2
Orlando........................... 15 9 .625 3
Washington.................... 4 20 .167 14
Charlotte ........................ 3 21 .125 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago.......................... 20 6 .769
Indiana............................ 16 7 .696 2
1
2
Milwaukee...................... 10 13 .435 8
1
2
Cleveland ....................... 9 13 .409 9
Detroit ............................. 6 20 .231 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio.................. 16 9 .640
Dallas ............................ 14 11 .560 2
Houston ........................ 13 11 .542 2
1
2
Memphis....................... 12 12 .500 3
1
2
New Orleans ................ 4 20 .167 11
1
2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City............... 18 5 .783
Denver............................ 15 9 .625 3
1
2
Utah ................................ 13 9 .591 4
1
2
Portland.......................... 14 10 .583 4
1
2
Minnesota ...................... 12 12 .500 6
1
2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers.................. 14 7 .667
L.A. Lakers..................... 14 10 .583 1
1
2
Phoenix .......................... 9 14 .391 6
Golden State.................. 8 13 .381 6
Sacramento ................... 8 15 .348 7
Sunday's Games
Boston 98, Memphis 80
Miami 95, Toronto 89
Monday's Games
L.A. Clippers 107, Orlando 102 OT
Washington 111, Toronto 108 OT
Philadelphia 95, L.A. Lakers 90
Phoenix 99, Atlanta 90
Chicago 108, New Jersey 87
New York 99, Utah 88
Sacramento 100, New Orleans 92
San Antonio 89, Memphis 84
Houston at Denver, late
Oklahoma City at Portland, late
Today's Games
Utah at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Miami at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 10 p.m.
NBA LEADERS
THROUGH FEB. 5
Scoring
G FG FT PTS AVG
Bryant, LAL ................ 24 256 159 705 29.4
James, MIA................ 23 243 169 672 29.2
Durant, OKC.............. 23 221 140 616 26.8
Love, MIN................... 24 192 175 601 25.0
Rose, CHI .................. 21 177 111 496 23.6
Anthony, NYK............ 21 164 134 489 23.3
Aldridge, POR........... 24 226 101 554 23.1
Westbrook, OKC....... 23 189 105 498 21.7
Griffin, LAC................ 21 188 72 449 21.4
Ellis, GOL................... 20 159 85 426 21.3
Howard, ORL............. 24 173 143 489 20.4
D. Williams, NJN....... 24 166 104 485 20.2
Jennings, MIL............ 23 172 59 458 19.9
Martin, HOU............... 22 151 85 437 19.9
Bosh, MIA .................. 24 180 105 472 19.7
J. Johnson, ATL........ 24 167 66 447 18.6
Pierce, BOS............... 20 117 101 372 18.6
Jefferson, UTA.......... 19 151 49 351 18.5
Gay, MEM.................. 24 181 60 441 18.4
Lee, GOL.................... 20 154 59 367 18.4
FG Percentage
FG FGA PCT
Chandler, NYK............................ 89 125 .712
Bynum, LAL................................. 137 244 .561
Gortat, PHX................................. 151 269 .561
Howard, ORL .............................. 173 313 .553
James, MIA ................................. 243 440 .552
Nash, PHX................................... 121 222 .545
Okafor, NOR............................... 98 180 .544
Griffin, LAC.................................. 188 347 .542
Millsap, UTA................................ 153 291 .526
Boozer, CHI................................. 172 330 .521
Rebounds
G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Howard, ORL.......... 24 84 279 363 15.1
Love, MIN................ 24 100 228 328 13.7
Bynum, LAL ............ 20 62 178 240 12.0
Varejao, CLE........... 22 103 158 261 11.9
Cousins, SAC......... 22 95 152 247 11.2
Griffin, LAC ............. 21 65 164 229 10.9
Humphries, NJN..... 23 89 152 241 10.5
Gasol, MEM............ 24 54 193 247 10.3
Gortat, PHX............. 23 56 180 236 10.3
Gasol, LAL .............. 24 66 175 241 10.0
Assists
G AST AVG
Nash, PHX..................................... 21 208 9.9
Rondo, BOS.................................. 15 143 9.5
Paul, LAC....................................... 16 143 8.9
Rubio, MIN..................................... 24 213 8.9
D. Williams, NJN........................... 24 211 8.8
Calderon, TOR.............................. 25 213 8.5
Rose, CHI ...................................... 21 173 8.2
Lowry, HOU................................... 22 179 8.1
Parker, SAN................................... 25 192 7.7
Wall, WAS...................................... 24 170 7.1
Monday's College Basketball Scores
EAST
Baruch 77, CCNY 51
Boston U. 81, Albany (NY) 78
Brooklyn 83, Berkeley (NY) 78
Gwynedd-Mercy 100, Keystone 96
Penn St.-Altoona 58, Lancaster Bible 45
Stony Brook 57, New Hampshire 48
Vermont 73, Maine 63
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 3B
S P O R T S
WILKES-BARREHolding a
one-game lead over Dallas in
Division II of the Wyoming
Valley Conference, Holy Re-
deemer sorely wanted to earn
its second victory of the season
over the Mountaineers in order
to go up by two games with
just three left to play.
The Royals didnt go home
disappointed, as they were able
to defeat Dallas 66-46 on Mon-
day night.
Our gameplan was to worry
not so much about what the
other team was doing, Re-
deemer coach Chris Parker
said. I always preach to the
girls that if we do what we do
and we do it the right way,
well be fine. This just put us in
the drivers seat.
Early in the first quarter, it
quickly became known that
Dallas came to play. After win-
ning the tipoff for her team,
Tanner Englehart immediately
put the Mountaineers on the
board first with a wide open
jumper.
Dallas was also dominant
rebounding the ball in the early
going, which helped contribute
to their ability to keep Holy
Redeemer off the scoreboard
until the Royals Julia Wignot
stole the ball and passed it to
Alexis Lewis for an easy two.
The Royals took the lead late
in the first quarter and the
scoring continued in the sec-
ond as Wignot kicked off the
scoring for Redeemer in the
second quarter when she col-
lected three points on an and-
one after her shot rolled in
despite being hit on the arm.
Alyssa Platko also scored two
points after shedding a defend-
er and making a jump shot
from underneath.
Meanwhile, the Mountain-
eers continued to find holes in
the Redeemer defense, but had
a tough time capitalizing on
the penetration until Sara Fla-
herty drove to the net twice for
two buckets. These were fol-
lowed by a high floater by
Maggie Michael inside the
perimeter and drew Dallas to
within seven as it went into the
halftime break down 28-21.
The Royals came out in the
third quarter looking like a
whole new team as they out-
scored Dallas 16-10. Lewis
ignited Redeemer with her
physical play under the net,
nabbing rebound after rebound
before converting them into
points. Her inside prowess was
highlighted by a rebound after
which Lewis ran down the
court and shook off two defend-
ers before passing to Sara Alte-
mose for a deep three-pointer.
Holy Redeemers strong play
continued into the final quar-
ter, as it opened up with an 8-2
run, aided by two scores from
beyond the arc by Alana Wilson
to open a 53-33 lead early in
the fourth quarter. At the same
time, the Royals defensive play
elevated, keeping Dallas off the
scoreboard for a solid two min-
utes.
The Mountaineers seemed to
become flustered in the final
four minutes as they began
making very sloppy decisions
passing the ball. This led to a
lack of offensive possessions
and hurt any real chances of a
comeback.
Obviously any time you win
a game, it feels good, Parker
said. Dallas has been playing
well lately, beating both Pitt-
ston and Scranton Prep, so we
knew it was going to be a
tough game for us and that
they were going to come ready
to play.
However, I thought my
team responded extremely well
in the second half. We started
rebounding the basketball and
our defensive intensity picked
up a lot.
Lewis led the Royals with 14
points in the game while Shan-
non Murray followed with 11
points. Paige Makowski
chipped in with 10.
Ashley Dunbar led the
Mountaineers with nine tallies.
Holy Redeemer 66, Dallas 46
DALLAS (46): Dunbar 1 4-9 9, Kelley 2 1-1 6,
Englehart 4 1-4 9, Szatkowski 2 0-2 4, Hiscox 1
0-0 3, Missal 2 0-0 6, Comitz 1 0-0 2, Volpetti 0
0-0 0, Micahel 1 0-0 2, Flaherty 3 2-2 8, Olszew-
ski 0 0-0 0. Totals 17 8-18 46.
HOLY REDEEMER (66): Wignot 2 1-1 5,
Makowski 3 4-4 10, Smith 0 0-0 0, Dougherty 0
0-0 0, Claherty 0 0-0 0, Warnagiris 2 1-1 5,
Murray 5 0-0 11, Altemose 1 2-2 5, Slavoski 0 0-0
0, Frascella 1 0-0 2, Wilson 3 0-0 8, Platko 3 0-0
6, Lewis 5 4-4 14. Totals 25 12-12 66.
Dallas........................................... 7 14 10 15 46
Holy Redeemer ......................... 10 18 17 21 66
3-Point Field Goals DAL 4 (Missal 2, Hiscox,
Kelley); HR 4 (Wilson 2, Altemose, Murray)
Hazleton Area 42,
Wyoming Area 28
Alyssa Sitch racked up 16
points as the Cougars defeated
the Warriors on Monday night.
Serra Degnan was the lead-
ing scorer for Wyoming Area
with 11 points.
HAZLETON AREA (42): Bono 1 4-4 6,
Schoennagle 2 1-2 7, Wolk 0 0-0 0, B. Marchetti
0 0-0 0, Sitch 7 0-0 16, Kozel 0 0-0 0, Pfeil 1 0-0
3, Woznicki 2 0-0 4, Bachman 0 0-0 0, Ciccozzi 0
1-2 1, Carter 2 1-2 5, Zamonas 0 0-0 0; Totals:
15 7-10 42
WYOMING AREA (28): Degnan 3 5-14 11,
Radzwilka 1 0-0 2, Blannett 1 1-2 3, Thornton 1
4-6 6, Bott 0 0-0 0, Coolbaugh 1 2-2 4, Turner 1
0-0 2; Totals: 8 12-24 28
Hazleton Area................................. 9 13 9 11 42
Wyoming Area................................ 5 9 7 7 28
3-Point Field Goals HAZ 5 (Sitch 2, Schoen-
nagle 2, Pfiel)
Pittston Area 40, Coughlin 17
The Patriots shut out the
Crusaders for two straight
periods to eventually go onto
win the game on Monday
night.
Mia Hopkins led all scoring
with 13 points for Pittston
Area.
PITTSTON AREA (40): Balchune 0 0-0 0,
Barber 2 1-2 5, Fereck 0 0-0 0, Walesky 2 2-2 6,
Mitchell 0 0-0 0, Rabender 1 2-2 4, ONeill 3 0-0
7, Hopkins 6 1-2 13, Owens 0 0-0 0, Zanta 0 0-0
0, Brady 2 0-0 4; Totals 16 7-12 40
COUGHLIN (17): Hayward 1 0-0 2, Oliver 2
0-0 4, Flaherty 2 0-0 4, Graham 0 0-0 0, Zigler 0
0-0 0, Sebastian 1 0-0 2, Harper 0 0-0 0, Ge-
orgetti 0 2-2 2, Williams 1 1-2 3, Lavery 0 0-0 0;
Totals: 7 3-4 17
Pittston Area................................. 10 6 13 11 40
Coughlin........................................ 0 0 8 9 17
3-Point Field Goals PIT 1 (ONeil)
Northwest 49, GAR 42
The Rangers rallied for the
victory coming back from a
three-point deficit after the
third quarter to outscore the
Grenadiers 18-8 in the fourth.
Alivia Womelsdorf led the
way for Northwest scoring 23
points, while Sarah Shaffer
added 10 points.
Unique Twyman and Quie-
terriua Gross paced GAR with
nine points apiece.
GAR (42): Twyman 3 1-2 9, Mosier 5 0-0 8,
Nichol 0 0-0 0, Spence 2 1-2 6, Leco 1 0-0 2,
Seabrook 1 0-0 2, Quin. Gross 3 0-2 6, Quie.
Gross 4 0-0 9. Totals 19 2-6 42.
NORTHWEST (49): Yustat 0 0-0 0, Shaffer 4
0-3 10, Womelsdorf 8 6-7 23, Koehn 3 0-0 6,
Bosak 2 0-0 4, Gill 1 4-4 6. Totals 18 10-14 49.
GAR............................................... 17 10 7 8 42
Northwest...................................... 12 10 9 18 49
3-Point Field Goals GAR 2 (Spence, Quiet.
Gross); NW 3 (Womelsdorf, Shaffer 2)
Nanticoke 66, MMI Prep 16
The Trojans led 41-10 at
halftime and held the Preppers
to only six points in the second
half.
Katie Wolfe led the scoring
for Nanticoke with 22 points
and Samantha Gow contrib-
uted three three-point field
goals.
MMI PREP (16): Purcell 2 0-0 4, Stanziola 0
3-4 3, Lobitz 1 1-1 3, Shearer 1 0-0 2, Karchner 2
0-0 4, Laura 0 0-2 0, Carrato 0 0-0 0, Darrow 0
0-0 0; Totals: 6 4-7 16
NANTICOKE (66): Brassington 1 0-0 3,
Sugalski 3 0-0 6, Wolfe 9 4-6 22, Schinski 4 1-2
11, Yalch 1 0-0 3, Gow 4 2-2 13, Kile 1 0-0 2,
Holl 2 2-2 6, Higgins 0 0-0 0, Hughes 0 0-0 0,
Swanberry 0 0-0 0; Totals: 25 9-12 66
MMI Prep ...................................... 6 4 0 6 16
Nanticoke ...................................... 23 18 17 8 66
3-Point Field Goals NAN 7 (Gow 3, Schinski 2
Brassington, Yalch)
Lake-Lehman 38,
Meyers 37 OT
Cayle Spencer totaled 20
points and Nikki Sutliff scored
three three-point field goals as
the Black Nights defeated the
Mohawks in overtime on Mon-
day night.
Salimah Biggs led Meyers
effort with 12 total points.
MEYERS (37): DiMaggio 3 0-0 7, Quinones 0
0-2 0, Kowalczyk 3 0-0 8, Biggs 5 0-2 12,
Robertson 3 0-0 6, Winder 2 0-0 4; Totals: 16 0-4
37
LAKE-LEHMAN (38): N. Sutliff 4 2-4 13,
Sutton 1 0-0 2, Mosier 0 0-0 0, Moosic 0 0-0 0,
Leskowski 1 1-2 3, Mahoney 0 0-0 0, Spencer 8
4-4 20, D. Sutliff 0 0-0 0; Totals: 14 7-10 38
Meyers....................................... 11 10 6 7 3 37
Lake-Lehman............................ 10 9 5 10 4 38
3-Point Field Goals MEY 5 (Biggs 2, Kowalc-
zyk 2, Dimaggio); LEH 3 (N. Sutliff 3)
Tunkhannock 41, Berwick 38
The Tigers trailed 8-6 after
the first period but came back
to defeat Berwick Monday
night.
Kassie Williams led Tunk-
hannock with 12 points and
Gabby Alguire contributed
with 11 points.
Berwick was led by Alexis
Steebers 10 points.
BERWICK (38): Steeber 4 2-2 10, Davenport
2 4-7 8, Shortlidge 1 0-0 2, Welsh 1 0-0 2, Bridge
2 0-0 4, Floryshak 3 2-2 8, Seely 1 2-2 4, Lynn 0
0-0 0, Rinehimer 0 0-0 0; Totals: 14 10-13 38
TUNKHANNOCK (41): Ayers 0 2-2 2, Nafus 3
2-5 8, Proulx 0 0-2 0, Alguire 3 5-10 11, Williams
4 4-11 12, Kintner 3 2-5 8, Bonner 0 0-0 0;
Totals: 15 15-35 41
Berwick.......................................... 8 8 4 18 38
Tunkhannock................................ 6 12 14 9 41
3-Point Field Goals None
Wyoming Seminary 62,
Hanover Area 42
Jess Neare totaled 14 points
and Ann Romanwoski totaled
13 points as the Blue Knights
defeated the Hawkeyes on
Monday night.
Danielle Tuzinski led Hanov-
er Area with 13 points.
HANOVER AREA (42): Smith 1 0-1 2,
Mizenko 2 2-2 7, Zuronski 1 0-0 3, Growhowski 2
1-2 5, Kaminski 1 0-0 3, Miller 1 4-4 6, Fine 0 0-0
0, Tuzinski 3 7-9 13, Masher 0 2-2 2, McCary 0
1-4 1; Totals: 11 17-24 42
WYOMING SEMINARY (62): Romanowski 5
3-7 13, Neare 3 8-10 14, Gabriel 0 1-2 1, Karg 4
3-8 11, Williams 0 0-2 0, Davis 0 1-2 1, Henry 2
2-4 6, McMullan 7 2-8 16, Stemrich 0 0-0 0;
Totals: 24 20-43 62
Hanover Area............................. 10 5 9 18 42
Wyoming Seminary .................. 14 17 11 20 62
3-Point Field Goals HAN 3 (Mizenko, Zuran-
ski, Kaminski)
WOMENS COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Misericordia 79,
PSU-Altoona 31
Christine Marks and Jesse
Robinson combined for 31
points and 13 different players
scored as the Misericordia
cruised.
Marks had 16 points and
eight rebounds and Robinson
added 15 points. Amanda
Greene added nine points and
eight rebounds as the Cougars
improved to 12-9.
Robinson got the Cougars off
to a fast start with 15 points in
the first eight minutes as Mi-
sericordia opened a35-9 lead.
Misericordia will host East-
ern in a key Freedom Confer-
ence contest, Wednesday at 6
p.m.
PSU-Wilkes-Barre 68,
PSU-Worthington 50
Aubrey Wargowsky closed
out the game with the 15 total
and was points to lead Penn
State Wilkes-Barre to the victo-
ry.
Tiara Brathwaite assisted
with 13 points and was 5-of-8
from the free-throw line.
Jessica Segilia led Worthing-
ton Scranton with 18 points
while Kin Madensky contrib-
uted 16 points.
L O C A L R O U N D U P
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Holy Redeemers Alexis Lewis has a rebound pulled away fromher by Tanner Englehart of Dallas during Monday nights game.
Royals extend Division II lead
Holy Redeemers Julia Wignot has the ball knocked away by
Samantha Missal of Dallas as she set for a shot at the basket.
By ZACH DOLEIDEN
For The Times Leader
rights under the law.
The authority has demanded
that the Shamrocks offer refunds
to season ticket holders.
At this time, our primary con-
cern is that the season ticket
holders who have already pur-
chased their tickets be contacted
by the Shamrocks to make ar-
rangements for full refunds, are-
na General Manager Rebecca
Bonnevier said.
Bonnevier advised any season
ticket holders who have not yet
contacted or been contacted by
the Shamrocks to do so immedi-
ately at (570) 371-3825.
Season ticket holders who
contact the arena may leave their
name and contact information to
be forwarded to the Shamrocks,
but the arena, which has not re-
ceived any monies from and has
no control over ticket sales, will
understandably not be issuing re-
funds and cannot accept respon-
sibility for a response fromKings
Lacrosse/the Shamrocks, Bon-
nevier said.
JimJennings, Shamrocks own-
er, said Kings Lacrosse has re-
turned approximately $80,000 to
$90,000 inseasontickets andcor-
porate sponsorships that had
been sold and still has about
$8,000 left to return.
Jennings said the Shamrocks
are still a member of the NALL,
but the Shamrocks and three oth-
er teams that decided to start the
season in the fall Charlotte,
Hershey and Jacksonville are in
a lawsuit with the league.
Were disappointed that we
could not come to an agreement
with(the authority) toplay inthe
fall. We are looking for a newven-
ue, Jennings said.
While no indoor lacrosse
games are presently scheduled to
take place in the arena, the au-
thority continues to look for ex-
citing and entertaining events to
bring to Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia, Bonnevier said.
Because of the failures of
Kings Lacrosse to abide by its
promises and assurances, we are
clearly unable tomove forwardas
originally planned with the
Shamrocks; we will, however,
continue to aggressively explore
future initiatives and opportuni-
ties that will be of interest to our
patrons, Bonnevier added.
In the immediate term, our
priorities are ensuring that the
Arena continues to offer profes-
sional, first-rate entertainment
options for all age groups in our
community and that our patrons
are treated with consideration
and courtesy, she said.
TIES
Continued fromPage 1B
After further review, Lake-Leh-
man and its head wrestling coach
did nothing wrong prior to Satur-
days District 2 Class 2A Duals fi-
nals against Western Wayne.
It was previously reported that
Black Knights head coach Tom
Williams overlooked signing the
weigh-in sheet and if he was
called on that, the team would
have lost by default.
Incorrect information was pro-
vided to The Times Leader and
that was confirmed by PIAA
State Rules Interpreter JohnHos-
sage on Monday.
According to Hossage, no one
even the head referee is man-
dated to sign the sheet with the
wrestlers weights on it and it has
never been a rule nationally or by
the PIAA. The only signing that
has to take place is the official
scorers book, also known as the
home book.
I thinkthe intent is that the ar-
gument later is that the referee
verifies the weights, said Hos-
sage, who has been an official for
49 years and the state rules inter-
preter since the 1980s. The sig-
nature is to solve a problem. But
there is nothing in the rule book
and nothing mandated by the
PIAA that the weigh-in sheet has
to be signed.
The apparent discrepancy
arose when Western Wayne
coach Dante Terenzio and the
media received two weigh-in
sheets of Western Wayne and
Lake-Lehman unsigned by Wil-
liams.
On Monday, Williams said that
the sheet he supplied to the offi-
cials was signed, submitted earli-
er and copies were made of the
lists without his signature. Wil-
liams also said that he had a copy
of his signed papers on his clip-
board and Terenzio had an un-
signed copy.
H I G H S C H O O L W R E S T L I N G
Unsigned weigh-in sheet
was no big deal after all
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
game, 39-35 with two minutes
remaining in the third quarter.
Valley West then got baskets
from Kait Smicherko, Cassie
Smicherko and Olivia Hoffman
to build its lead back up to
eight, 48-40.
"Tara did everything shes
supposed to do," Walker said.
"Shes a very talented player.
And Olivia did a great job of
getting her second-chance
points. We had too many girls
watching them (inside)."
Zdancewicz was a force
throughout for the Spartans,
scoring 26 points -- including
her teams final six points dur-
ing the tense final moments.
Hoffman added a season-high 12
points and a game-high 14 re-
bounds. Kait Smicherko had
nine rebounds and five assists
as Valley West enjoyed a 46-34
edge on the boards.
Myers paced Crestwood with
16 points and 12 rebounds, but
the Comets were hindered by
32 percent shooting from the
field. Kayla Gegaris added 10
points for the Comets.
WYOMING VALLEY WEST (59): Judge 0
4-4 4, C. Smicherko 2 3-5 7, Reilly 1 1-2 3, K.
Smicherko 1 0-3 3, Kane 2 0-1 4, Zdancewicz 9
8-9 26, Hoffman 5 2-2 12; Totals: 21 18-26 59
CRESTWOOD (52): Kendra 0 0-0 0, Lutz 1
6-6 8, Andrews 3 3-6 9, Mazzoni 0 0-0 0, Rutkow-
ski 0 1-2 1, Gegaris 4 0-0 10, Cronauer 0 0-0 0,
Wagnar 2 0-0 6, Myers 7 1-1 16, Jesikiewicz 1 0-0
2, Hislp 0 0-0 0, Ciaverella 0 0-0 0; Totals: 18
11-15 52
Wyoming Valley West .............. 10 20 12 17 59
Crestwood.................................... 9 19 10 17 52
3-Point Field Goals WVW 1 (K. Smicherko);
CRE 4 (Gegaris 2, Wagnar 2)
COMETS
Continued fromPage 1B
DENVER The Colorado
Rockies acquired veteran right-
hander Jeremy Guthrie from the
Baltimore Orioles on Monday, a
move that bolsters their young
rotation.
In exchange, the Rockies sent
reliever Matt Lindstrom and
right-hander Jason Hammel to
the Orioles.
Guthrie, the Orioles opening
day starter three of the last four
seasons, lost 17 games last sea-
son, the most in the American
League, and finished with a 4.33
ERA.
He agreed to a one-year, $8.2
million contract with the Rock-
ies, avoiding an arbitration hear-
ing that had been scheduled for
Monday in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Guthrie, who turns 33 in April, is
eligible to become a free agent af-
ter the season.
They got two great arms,
Rockies general manager Dan
ODowd said. But we got a guy
we feel fits in with our younger
pitchers very well.
The acquisition of Guthrie cer-
tainly gives the Rockies another
experienced pitcher in their rota-
tion, especially with lefty Jorge
De La Rosa still mending after el-
bow surgery that sidelined him
last season.
Guthrie will be in the mix to
start on opening day along with
hard-throwing righty Jhoulys
Chacin, the ace of the staff last
season. Chacin is part of the
Rockies young stable of arms,
which also includes Drew Pome-
ranz and Alex White, who were
acquired in the deal last summer
that sent Ubaldo Jimenez to the
Cleveland Indians.
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Rockies acquire Guthrie from Os
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 4B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S U P E R B O W L X L V I
NEW YORK GI ANTS 21, NEW ENGLAND PATRI OTS 17
INDIANAPOLISBill Belich-
ick gave clear instructions to his
defensive unit: Let the runner
score.
Playing the odds and inviting
critics, the calculating coach of
theNewEnglandPatriotstoldhis
players toget out of the way, open
a wide path for Ahmad Bradshaw
and give Tom Brady a chance to
winthe Super Bowl inthe final 57
seconds.
Unusual? Certainly.
Crazy? Not at all.
ThestrategyfailedandtheNew
York Giants won 21-17 on Sunday
night. But Belichickwascertainit
gavethePatriotstheir best oppor-
tunity.
Theyled17-15with1:04left but
hadjust one timeout as NewYork
faced a second down only 6 yards
fromthe goal line.
If the Patriots tackled Brad-
shaw, the clock would keep run-
ning if they didnt use the time-
out. If they did use it, the Giants
could let the clock run after the
next play, leaving precious few
secondswithLawrenceTynesset-
ting up for a chip-shot fieldgoal.
A field goal, Belichick said
Monday, that had a well over 90
percent success rate from that
distance.
And that strategy was used, al-
though it also failed, in the 1998
Super Bowl byGreenBayPackers
coachMikeHolmgrenagainst the
Denver Broncos.
Still, it went against the com-
petitive nature of defensive play-
ers, whose job it is to keep oppo-
nentsoutof theendzone, andrun-
ners, whose goal it is to get there.
It killed me, said linebacker
Brandon Spikes, a hard-hitting li-
nebacker who simply stepped
aside. When the call came in to
let them score, I was kind of like,
What? Imhere to do my job and
its my job to play defense and let
themscore? It was tough. It defi-
nitely was tough.
Bradshaw also had to fight off
his instincts. As he approached
the goal line, he tried to stop, like
someone trying to avoid losing
his balance. But his momentum
carried him across the goal line,
falling backward, even as game
MVPEli Manningyelledat himto
go down.
I tried, Bradshaw said, but I
couldnt do it.
So it was 21-17 and Brady had
those57seconds toscoreatouch-
down. He haddone it many times
before.
Starting at his 20, he threwtwo
incompletions and then was
sacked. But on fourth down, he
connected with Deion Branch for
19yardsandafirst downat the33.
Then he hooked up with Aaron
Hernandez for 11 yards to the 44
before spiking the ball. The Gi-
ants then drew a 5-yard penalty,
movingtheball tothePatriots 49.
Still a chance, however slim.
With nine seconds left, Brady
threwanincompletiontoBranch.
With five seconds left, there
was just one option a despera-
tion pass into a crowd in the end
zone. It got there but, with tight
ends Hernandez and Rob Gron-
kowski nearby, it dropped to the
ground and the Patriots cham-
pionshipchancesandtheclock
fell to zero.
Belichicks strategy, sound
though it might have been, didnt
work out.
He made a good decision,
Brady said. We left ourselves
witha little bit of time.
Early this season, the Patriots
lost to the Buffalo Bills 34-31 in
the third game when they
couldnt get the ball back.
The Bills appeared to score
with 1:43 left on a 39-yard pass
playfromRyanFitzpatricktoFred
Jackson. But the ruling that Jack-
son crossed the goal line was re-
versedafterreplayandBuffalogot
the ball at the 1. Fitzpatrick kept
kneeling on every play until Rian
Lindell kicked a winning 28-yard
fieldgoal as time expired.
Belichicks clear-the-way order
was similar to Holmgrens deci-
sion in the 1998 Super Bowl. The
score was tied at 24 when he let
Terrell Davis scoreona1-yardrun
with1:45leftratherthanallowthe
Broncos torundowntheclockfor
a short fieldgoal attempt.
Brett FavrethenledthePackers
from their 30 to the Broncos 31.
But after three straight incomple-
tions, Denver regained posses-
sion with 28 seconds to go and
John Elway kneeled down to end
the game.
Coachs unconventional call not unprecedented
AP PHOTO
New York Giants running back Ahmad Bradshaw (44) crosses into
the end zone for a touchdown during the second half of Super
Bowl XLVI.
Green Bay let Denver score in
1998 Super Bowl, but that
didnt work either.
By HOWARD ULMAN
AP Sports Writer
title-winning drive that he started
with a pinpoint 38-yard pass.
Achampionship is a champion-
ship, said Manning, who threw
for a career-best andfranchise-best
4,933 yards this season. Each one
is special. Eachonehas special mo-
ments duringtheseasonand, obvi-
ously, different teammates. This
year, I amjust happy for a number
of guys getting a championship.
...To give them that opportuni-
tyfor thesenext fiveor sixmonths,
we can say, Hey, we are the best.
We are the champs. Thats a pretty
nice feeling.
The one thing Manning didnt
want to hear anything about was
having bragging rights over his
brother, Peyton, with two cham-
pionships.
This isnt about bragging
rights, Eli said. This is a lot big-
ger. This is about a team, an orga-
nizationbeingnamedworldcham-
pions, and that was the ultimate
goal. Thats the only thing thats
important, is the team finding a
waytoget avictory. Thats theonly
thingI careabout andPeytonandI
both know thats what the goal is
every year. Its not about anything
else.
Giants chief executive John Ma-
rasaidthesecret toMannings suc-
cess is his calm demeanor.
The more his back is against
the wall, the better he performs,
Mara said before the team left its
hotel for a flight toNewJersey and
a planned parade up the Canyon
of Heroes in Manhattan on Tues-
day. Thereis nobodyI wouldrath-
er havewiththeball inhis hands at
the endof the game, witha chance
to win, than Eli Manning.
Linebacker Mathias Kiwanuka
said Manning is the perfect quar-
terback for the New York metro-
politan area because he is so resil-
ient on and off the field. He gets
knocked down, he gets back up.
He gets criticized by the media, he
doesnt care.
If youcant get back up, youare
not going to stay around that
long, Kiwanuka said.
Coughlinleft little doubt that he
wants to go for a third title next
season, joking he was only 45.
I mean, its what I do, Cough-
lin said at the news conference
where Manning was presented an-
other automobile for winning his
second Super Bowl MVP award.
So, the alternative Ive never real-
ly given it a whole lot of consider-
ation. (Just coach) as long as I
can.
Coughlin could be around for a
while following his second title as
a head coach. He signed a contract
extensioninJulythat runsthrough
next season, but it looks as the Gi-
ants could revisit that deal follow-
ing the franchises fourth Super
Bowl win.
Its obvious he still wants to
coach.
I dont fish, I dont golf, hesaid.
My wife keeps telling me, You
better have something to do, bud-
dy boy. If you think youre going to
hang around here, youre crazy.
GIANTS
Continued from Page 1B
FOXBOROUGH, Mass
WhenNewEnglandPatriotsown-
erRobertKraftsitsdownwithnet-
work executives to negotiate the
NFLs television contracts, he
knows what theyrelookingfor.
OnSunday, heexperiencedthe
wrongsideof it.
Look, wereall disappointedin
whathappened,hetoldreporters
after returningtotheteamsstadi-
um on Monday, the day after the
NewYorkGiantsbeatthePatriots
21-17intheSuper Bowl. I cansay
this as chair of the (NFL) broad-
cast committee: The reason that
the networks payus the large fees
that they do is that no one knows
whatisgoingtohappeninagame.
Head coach, quarterback, owner,
D-linemennooneknows.
Its two or three plays that
make the difference, that makes
thegamesoexciting.
Those plays went against the
Patriots on Sunday, when they
lost totheNewYorkGiants inthe
SuperBowl forthesecondtimein
five seasons. Among the turning
points was coach Bill Belichicks
decision to allow Ahmad Brad-
shawtoscorethego-aheadtouch-
downwith57 seconds left so that
the Patriots might have enough
timefor a comeback.
The Patriots flew back to Bos-
ton on Monday afternoon and
rode buses to Gillette Stadium,
whereafewhundredfans greeted
them.
Only a handful of players were
available in the locker room;
spokesman Stacey James said
most players met their families in
the parking lot and went home
without comingin.
Safety James Ihedigbo said the
flight home was especially diffi-
cult because he realized the team
would probably not be together
againas a whole.
Its the National Football
League. The group of guys that
are on that plane, its rare that all
these guys are going to be back
and be one team, he said. We
have a very special group. We
worked hard, were a family and
weplayedlikethat. Itsatoughpill
toswallow.
Defensive back Antwaun Mol-
densaidSundaynight was rough,
but byMondayhe hadtakentime
toreflectontheseasonasawhole.
To see where we came from
Aug. 30tothispoint, itsdefinitely
a journey, he said. I know we
played well. We just came up
short. Its a good thing to learn
from.
AP PHOTO
Patriots defensive back James Ihedigbo responds to questions in the teams locker room Monday, after the Patriots returned from
the Super Bowl, which the New York Giants won 21-17.
Disappointed Patriots return home
By JIMMY GOLEN
AP Sports Writer
Despite Gisele, Pats say no finger-pointing
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. The Patriots say theres no
finger-pointing after their Super Bowl loss, even if supermodel
Gisele Bundchen wont abide by that code.
The wife of New England quarterback Tom Brady was caught on
camera complaining that dropped passes
doomed the team to a 21-17 loss to the New
York Giants on Sunday the Patriots second
loss in the NFL title game in five seasons.
Late in the game, usually dependable
receiver Wes Welker dropped a pass that went
off his hands; Aaron Hernandez and Deion
Branch also had trouble coming up with
catches. Bundchen was caught on video by
TheInsider.com responding to a pro-Giants
heckler after the game by saying, My
husband cannot (expletive) throw the ball and catch the ball at the
same time.
Brady was not available for comment on Monday, when the
team flew back from Indianapolis and arrived at Gillette Stadium
on buses. Asked if the team had any comment, Patriots
spokesman Stacey James pursed his lips together and shook his
head from side to side.
But defensive back James Ihedigbo says Welker was a big
reason the Patriots made it to the Super Bowl, and hes not to
blame for the loss.
You cant point fingers at anybody. Wes made amazing plays all
season, Ihedigbo said. You win it as a team; you win it and lose it
as a team. And we lost to a good football team.
Gisele Bundchen
teams headquarters in East
Rutherford, where thousands of
fans lined the gates waiting to
catch a glimpse of the cham-
pions.
At around 2:15 p.m., a caravan
of five charteredbuses pulledup
to the gate at the Timex Per-
formance Center. The first bus
had Coughlin sitting in the front
seat, waving to the cheering
fans.
When all five buses made it
safely inside, the players started
to filter out and to their own ve-
hicles. Wide receiver Mario
Manninghamand defensive end
Justin Tuck came over to the
fence to greet the cheering fans,
offering handshakes and high
fives.
Every time we came into the
huddle, we just tried to take it
one play at a time, Tuck said
later Monday, inaninterviewon
New York City radio station
WFAN. It was just another
team effort. We were so fo-
cused.
Tight end Jake Ballard was
spotted coming off the bus, don-
ning crutches to help him ma-
neuver with his injured right
knee.
He managed to smile and
wave to the adoring fans.
Defensive end Dave Tollefson
heard chants of D-Line, D-
Line from the crowd and
pumped his fist into the air.
But there were two key com-
ponents missing: the Vince
Lombardi Trophy and Super
Bowl MVP Eli Manning.
The scene at the facility was
an ironic twist to the entire sea-
son, one that began in July with
the media being forced to try to
gain access from outside the
same gate during the final
stages of the lockout.
CHAMPS
Continued from Page 1B
NEW YORK For the third
consecutive year, the Super
Bowl has set a record as the
most-watched television show in
U.S. history.
The Nielsen Co. said Monday
that an estimated 111.3 million
people watched the New York
Giants beat the New England
Patriots on Sunday night. That
narrowly beat the 111 million
who watched Green Bays win
over Pittsburgh last year.
NBC was blessed by a com-
petitive game between two
teams that played one of the
Super Bowls most memorable
games four years ago, with one
of them representing the largest
media market in the country.
Fans bet $94M
at Nevada casinos
Sports fans bet $93.9 million
at Nevada casinos on Sundays
Super Bowl matchup between
the New York Giants and New
England Patriots, the most
wagered in the past decade.
The Gaming Control Board
says unaudited tallies show184
sports books won a little over $5
million on the football action.
New England was about a 3
point favorite, but the Giants
won 21-17.
It was a different story for
Nevada casinos when the same
two teams played in the 2008
Super Bowl. The Patriots
opened as 14-point favorites four
years ago, but Giants backers
bet the line down to 12 points
and got paid when New York
earned a 17-14 win. Nevada
casinos lost the most money
ever on the Super Bowl that
year $2.6 million.
Ochocinco pleads
to Ohio charge
CINCINNATI New En-
gland Patriots wide receiver
Chad Ochocinco has pleaded
guilty to a misdemeanor charge
in Cincinnati hours after playing
in the Super Bowl.
A Hamilton County court
bailiff says the former Cincinna-
ti Bengal pleaded guilty Monday
to a charge of failure to display a
valid drivers license during a
July 21 traffic stop.
Court documents show Ocho-
cinco, whos listed under his
former name Chad Johnson,
was originally charged with
driving with a suspended li-
cense and a window tint vio-
lation. The documents also state
that his out- of-state drivers
license was suspended. The
bailiff says he has a valid license
now.
Game a hit
with TV
viewers
N O T E S
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 5B
S P O R T S
Its going to
go right down
to the wire for
the Lake-Leh-
man Black
Knights.
Win two of
their final four
Wyoming Valley Conference
games, and the mark of 18 con-
secutive losing seasons ends.
Win just one and the streak
will click over to 19 for Lehman,
which brings a 10-8 overall re-
cord into tonights game at
powerful Meyers.
Theres no question thats
something that will propel us,
third-year coach Brian Cutter
said. But I thought wed be a
14-8 or 15-7 team.
Getting over the .500 hump is
just one goal that is attainable.
While the Black Knights go into
the Meyers game as heavy un-
derdogs, the other three teams
remaining on the schedule are
MMI Prep, Northwest and
Wyoming Seminary. Theyve
defeated all three previous,
although the Sem game went to
overtime.
Another goal is tougher.
Cutter wants his team to stick
to the game plan. That was a
problem in a 60-37 loss to GAR
last week. The Black Knights
wanted to slow down the pace,
Cutter joked he wanted the
score 4-2 at halftime, but instead
got caught up in GARs fast-
paced offense.
Thats easier said than done,
especially against quality oppo-
nents like GAR. The Grenadiers,
like all the WVC elite, dont
always go out there and immedi-
ately dictate the style of play.
They sort of probed and probed
at Lehman until the game pro-
gressed into a track meet.
There are situations we can
run against certain teams,
Cutter said. GAR obviously
isnt one of them.
HITTING 400
Hazleton Areas 73-50 victory
Friday over Coughlin marked
the 400th victory in the schools
20-year existence.
It doesnt take a math major
to figure out thats an average of
20 wins per season with more
expected this year. And it
doesnt take a basketball guru to
realize thats quite impressive
on the high school level.
Bruce Lieb had the job of
cobbling together a team after
Hazleton, West Hazleton and
Freeland high schools merged.
He handed the reins over to
Mike Joseph, one of his former
players at Hazleton, six seasons
ago.
BLUE BLUE KNIGHTS
Wyoming Seminary could be
riding a four-game winning
streak into this week if not for a
couple hard luck losses.
The Blue Knights fell 45-44 to
Nanticoke on Friday on a last-
second shot by Kevin Zaykoski.
They ended the first-half season
with a 70-63 overtime loss to
Lake-Lehman.
BACK ON THE COURT
Two injured players recently
returned to their teams after
missing the first-half season.
Wyoming Areas Bart Chupka,
a junior center, has made an
impact the last three games. He
scored 15 points in his first
game, a 53-42 victory over Ber-
wick, and is averaging 11 points.
Chupka missed eight games
after breaking his arm Dec. 26
diving for a loose ball against
Old Forge.
Meyers Tyriek Steward is
also back after having a good
chunk of the season wiped out
by an ankle injury. The 6-foot-3
sophomore has added some
depth to the Mohawks and is
averaging 5.3 points since his
return.
STRANGE PLAYS
Two oddities occurred in
recent games.
The first was the GAR at
Meyers contest that decided the
WVC Division III first-half title.
Meyers guard Fabian Smith fell
to the floor just after passing to
a teammate after a drive to the
basket. His teammate missed
and the rebound went past play-
ers from both teams to Smith,
who was flat on his back on the
court.
The other occurred in GARs
game at Lake-Lehman last
week. GARs Isaiah Francis went
up for a dunk, but instead of
stuff the ball through the rim he
jammed it between the rim and
backboard.
Obviously, the game was
stopped until the ball was dis-
lodged.
DEFENSE, DEFENSE
GAR defeated MMI Prep
48-18 last Friday. It was the
lowest points allowed by the
Grenadiers since defeating St.
Michaels 77-17 last season, a
stretch of 29 games.
H I G H S C H O O L B OY S B A S K E T B A L L
Lehman closing in on ending below .500 streak
JOHN ERZAR
N O T E B O O K
Warrior headed to Lindenwood
Wyoming Area senior Jenna Skrinak signed a letter of
intent to play field hockey at Lindenwood University in St.
Charles, Mo. She is the first player from Wyoming Area to
be offered an athletic scholarship for field hockey. Jenna is
the daughter of Kathy and the late Bob Skrinak. Pictured
seated are: Kathy and Jenna Skrinak. Standing: Frank Par-
ra, Wyoming Area athletic director and Vito Quaglia, princi-
pal, Wyoming Area Secondary Center.
PHILADELPHIA Lou
Williams nailed the go-ahead
3-pointer, scored 14 of his 24
points in the fourth quarter, and
spoiled Kobe Bryants record-
setting night while leading the
Philadelphia 76ers to 95-90 win
over the Los Angeles Lakers on
Monday night.
With Beat L.A.! echoing
through a second straight sell-
out crowd, Williams hit the
tying jumper, then followed
with the 3 for a 91-88 lead. He
hit another floater to make it
93-88, part of a fantastic fourth
that saw him hold off Bryant
and help the Sixers improve to
13-3 at home.
Bryant scored 24 of his 28
points in the first half. He
passed former teammate Sha-
quille ONeal and moved into
fifth place on the NBAs career
scoring list.
Kings 100, Hornets 92
NEW ORLEANS DeMar-
cus Cousins had 28 points and
19 rebounds, and the Sacra-
mento Kings erased an 18-point
deficit en route to a victory
over the slumping New Orleans
Hornets.
Tyreke Evans scored 11 of his
20 points in the fourth quarter,
when Sacramento took its first
lead on Marcus Thorntons free
throw with 6:24 left. Isaiah
Thomas scored 17, including a
31-foot 3 with 2:15 to go that
gave the Kings a 94-88 lead.
Thornton added 12 points.
Wizards 111, Raptors 108
WASHINGTON John Wall
scored 31 points, Nick Young
had a season-high 29 and Tre-
vor Booker added a season-high
19 as the Washington Wizards
blew an 18-point third-quarter
lead then hung on to beat the
Toronto Raptors in overtime.
The Wizards outscored To-
ronto 6-3 in the overtime.
Bulls 109, Nets 87
NEWARK, N.J. Carlos
Boozer scored 24 points and
the Chicago Bulls beat the New
Jersey Nets.
Luol Deng scored 19 points
and C.J. Watson added 14
points and 10 assists for the
Bulls, who improved to 4-2 six
games into a nine-game road
trip that is their longest of the
season.
Knicks 99, Jazz 88
NEW YORK Jeremy Lin
scored a career-high 28 points
in his first career start, Steve
Novak added a season-best 19,
and the New York Knicks over-
came the absence of Amare
Stoudemire and early loss of
Carmelo Anthony to beat the
Utah Jazz.
Clippers 107, Magic 102
ORLANDO, Fla. Chris
Paul scored 29 points, including
11 points in the fourth quarter
and overtime, and the Los
Angeles Clippers slipped by the
Orlando Magic.
Blake Griffin and Chauncey
Billups each added 18 points for
the Clippers.
Suns 99, Hawks 90
ATLANTA Steve Nash
scored 24 points and the Phoe-
nix Suns broke open a close
game with a 24-6 run to close
the third quarter and beat the
Atlanta Hawks.
Spurs 89, Grizzlies 84
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Tony
Parker scored 21 points, and
Tim Duncan added 19 points
and 17 rebounds to lead the San
Antonio Spurs to a victory over
the Memphis Grizzlies.
Duncan scored 13 of his
points in the second half as the
Spurs opened a nine-game road
trip with a win.
AP PHOTO
The Los Angeles Lakers Kobe Bryant and assistant coach John
Kuester talk during a game against the Philadelphia 76ers in
Monday in Philadelphia.
N B A R O U N D U P
Williams rallies 76ers
to win over Lakers
The Associated Press Stoudemire out after
death of brother
LAKE WALES, Fla. A
brother of New York Knicks
star Amare Stoudemire died in
a Florida car crash Monday
after the SUV he was driving
slammed into the back of a
trailer.
Authorities are still
investigating and awaiting test
results to find out if alcohol
was a factor. The Florida
Highway Patrol said
35-year-old Hazell Stoudemire
was not wearing a seatbelt and
died at the scene.
Amare Stoudemire returned
to Florida to be with his family
and was to miss Monday
nights game against Utah.
Knicks spokesman Jonathan
Supranowitz said he doesnt
know how long Stoudemire will
be away.
Our thoughts and prayers
and everythings with him, and
whatever time he needs to
take, hell take, and then well
get him back as soon as
possible, Knicks coach Mike
DAntoni said after the teams
morning workout in
Greenburgh, N.Y.
The highway patrol report
said Hazell Stoudemires SUV
struck a trailer that was being
towed by a truck early Monday
morning. He had been driving
on a highway in the heart of
Floridas citrus country.
Hazell Stoudemire, who
lived in Lakeland, Fla., was one
of Amares four brothers.
NORMAN, Okla. Marcus
Denmon scored 25 points,
Ricardo Ratliffe added 15 points
and 10 rebounds and No. 4
Missouri claimed first place in
the Big 12 by edging Oklahoma
71-68 on Monday night.
Oklahoma (13-10, 3-8) had
the ball with a chance to tie
with 5 seconds left. Romero
Osby was fouled with 2.5 sec-
onds left and missed both free
throws, and Steven Pledger
missed a 3-pointer at the buzzer
when the offensive rebound
was tapped back to him.
The Tigers (22-2, 9-2) moved
a half-game ahead of No. 6
Baylor and No. 7 Kansas in the
standings. Those teams meet
Wednesday night for a chance
to pull even with Missouri.
Pledger led Oklahoma with
22 points and Sam Grooms had
a career-high 17 points and 10
assists.
Pledger slumped to the
ground and put his hands over
his face after his potential tying
shot clanged off the rim to end
the game. He stayed on the
floor until two Missouri players
and teammate Barry Honore
came over to lift him up.
Louisville 80, Connecticut 59
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Gorgui
Dieng returned from a sprained
right ankle to score 15 points
and freshman Chane Behanan
added 12 rebounds as No. 24
Louisville beat Connecticut, the
Cardinals fifth straight win.
Louisville (19-5, 7-4) is quick-
ly ascending the Big East stand-
ings after a rough start. While
most of the 31 credential NBA
personnel were scouting the
Huskies, it was the Cardinals
who outworked them all eve-
ning.
WOMENS ROUNDUP
Duke 96, North Carolina 56
DURHAM, N.C. Tricia
Liston scored 16 of her 23
points during the decisive first-
half run in No. 5 Dukes rout of
No. 22 North Carolina.
Richa Jackson added 17
points for the Blue Devils (19-3,
10-0 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence). They shot 54 percent
and led by 41 in claiming their
third straight win over their
fiercest rivals and their most
lopsided since a 101-58 romp in
2000.
Maryland 64, Ga, Tech 56
DULUTH, Ga. Alyssa
Thomas scored 23 points and
pulled down 12 rebounds, Tian-
na Hawkins added a career-high
23 points and Maryland beat
Georgia Tech.
Despite a difficult shooting
night from the field, Thomas
went 12 of 12 on free throws to
help Maryland (20-3, 7-3 Atlan-
tic Coast Conference) win its
second straight.
Ohio State 72, Wisconsin 58
COLUMBUS, Ohio Sa-
mantha Prahalis scored a ca-
reer-high 34 points and No. 10
Ohio State made the most of an
eight-day layoff to beat Wiscon-
sin, the Buckeyes 20th consec-
utive victory over the Badgers.
Tayler Hill, the Big Tens
leading scorer, added 18 points
for the Buckeyes (21-2, 8-2),
who had lots of time to mull a
disappointing 76-65 loss at
Minnesota on Jan. 29.
Ohio State broke the game
open with a 16-3 second-half
run.
M A J O R C O L L E G E S
No. 4 Missouri holds on to beat Oklahoma
Kentucky starts 3rd straight week at No. 1
Kentucky is on top of The Associated Press college basketball
poll for a third straight week.
The Wildcats, who were also No. 1 for two weeks earlier this
season, received 63 first-place votes Monday from the 65-member
national media panel.
Syracuse, which got the other No. 1 votes, Ohio State, Missouri,
North Carolina and Baylor held second through sixth from last
week. Kansas moved up one spot to seventh, while Florida jumped
four places to eighth. Murray State, the lone unbeaten in Division I,
moved one spot to ninth and Duke dropped three places to 10th.
The Associated Press
TORONTO Phil Kessel
scored twice and Mikhail Gra-
bovski assisted on Torontos first
two goals to lead the surging
Maple Leafs past the Edmonton
Oilers 6-3 on Monday night.
The Oilers played without
coach Tom Renney, who stayed
back at the team hotel after
taking a puck in the head during
the morning skate. The cut
required stitches and left Ren-
ney experiencing headaches.
Associate coach Ralph Krueger
took over in his absence.
Toronto has climbed back
into playoff position in the East-
ern Conference by going 5-0-1 in
its last six games. Grabovski has
led the charge with 12 points
during that stretch.
Clarke MacArthur, Jake Gar-
diner, Tyler Bozak and Joffrey
Lupul also scored for the Maple
Leafs. Kessel added an assist,
passing the 300-point plateau
for his career.
Jordan Eberle scored twice
and Jeff Petry had a goal for
Edmonton, which lost in regu-
lation for the first time since
Jan. 21.
Oilers rookie forward Ryan
Nugent-Hopkins didnt play
after taking a hit from Mike
Brown early in the third period.
Nugent-Hopkins just returned to
the lineup Saturday after mis-
sing a month with a shoulder
injury.
James Reimer entered the
game with a long shutout streak
after blanking Torontos previ-
ous two opponents, but it ended
quickly. Eberle collected a puck
in front that Maple Leafs defen-
seman Dion Phaneuf was unable
to clear and beat Reimer just 21
seconds in.
Coyotes 3, Red Wings 1
GLENDALE, Ariz. Mike
Smith stopped 30 shots, Martin
Hanzal scored twice and the
Phoenix Coyotes ended a seven-
game losing streak to Detroit
with a win over the Red Wings.
Boyd Gordon had a short-
handed goal in the first period
and Hanzal scored on a power
play in the second for Phoenix.
Detroit picked up the pressure
in the third, but Smith made
some difficult saves and Hanzal
scored his eighth of the season
into an empty net in the closing
seconds to give the Coyotes
consecutive wins over San Jose
and Detroit, two of the Western
Conferences best teams.
N H L R O U N D U P
Kessel scores twice,
Leafs beat Oilers
Sydney Crosby
practices with
Penguins
MONTREAL Pittsburgh
Penguins captain Sidney
Crosby practiced Monday but
said he is no closer to returning
from a concussion and neck
injury that have sidelined him
for most of the season.
Coach Dan Bylsma felt with
Jordan Staal and Simon
Despres ready to resume
skating after their injuries, it
was better to include Crosby in
the main practice rather than
have him skate on his own.
Crosby moved with plenty of
energy and took part in every
drill.
It was good to be out
there, he said. I wasnt going
to skate by myself if I didnt
have to.
This weeks been pretty
good. I feel like Im getting
there. I dont know the
timeframe. I wish I did.
Crosby said he is not ready
to resume practicing regularly
with his teammates.
Ill be back (skating) by
myself and doing the type of
things injured guys usually do,
he said.
You play hockey because
you love being part of the team
and being around that type of
atmosphere. When youre
injured its not like that. Youre
out there with one or two guys
and youre on your own. Its
nice to be with the group.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ASKOUR DOCTORS
The No. 13 appears to be a
good luck charm for Paige Se-
menza of the Ohio State wom-
ens ice hockey team.
Semenza, from Pittston
(North American Hockey Acad-
emy), scored 13 points as a
freshman (four goals and nine
assists), 13 points as a sopho-
more (seven goals and six as-
sists) and has scored 13 points
(four goals and nine assists)
thus far this season.
The 5-foot-4 forward and
assistant captain had a goal and
an assist in a recent 6-2 victory
over No. 5-ranked North Dako-
ta, and added another goal the
next night as the Buckeyes
came up short in a 5-2 loss to
the Fighting Sioux.
But, according to coach Nate
Handrahan, scoring isnt the
main reason why Semenza is a
key performer on the team.
Paige has done some great
things for us, mostly, the kind
that doesnt get recognized, the
coach said. She has been a
consistent player who battles
hard, kills penalties and lately
has been on our power play.
Handrahan sees the confi-
dence building in Semenza,
especially on the offensive end.
Paige has matured as a play-
er, he said. Shes getting
smarter as well as mastering her
game and how she needs to
play. Im confident she will
continue to have an impact for
us down the stretch.
The Buckeyes, 15-11-4 overall
and tied for fourth in the West-
ern Collegiate Hockey Associ-
ation with a 12-11-1 mark, battle
Minnesota on Friday and Sat-
urday in Columbus and then
wrap up the regular season at
Wisconsin on Feb. 17-18.
DAILEY OFF AND RUN-
NING Sophomore Chris Dai-
ley is doing the job as a middle
distance runner for the Connec-
ticut mens indoor track team.
Dailey (Dallas) finished
eighth out of 22 runners in the
600-meter dash at the Sykes and
Sabock Challenge last Saturday
at Penn State. His time was a
season-best 1:21.49. Prior to
that, he finished fifth out of 30
runners in the 500 in 1:05.28 at
the Great Dane Classic in New
York City and eighth out of 39
runners in the 400 (50.67) at the
Donahue Indoor Games in Bos-
ton.
Chris has raised his level of
training considerably this year,
both with respect to volume and
quality, coach Greg Roy said.
He is already qualified for the
Big East in the 500 and we look
forward to gearing his training
and competitions toward the
championship season.
The Huskies compete in the
Rider/Lafayette Invitational on
Friday in New York City and
then return to the Big Apple for
the Big East Championships on
Feb. 17-18.
HONORS FOR RAVA Bap-
tist Bible sophomore Kacee
Rava is on a roll and shes earn-
ing awards for her efforts.
Rava (Coughlin) has helped
the womens basketball team
record six straight victories with
her scoring and rebounding, and
has won back-to-back Colonial
States Athletic Conference Play-
er of the Week honors and was
named player of the week by the
National Christian College Ath-
letic Association.
In the last six games, the
6-foot-2 center is averaging 23.3
points and 15.3 rebounds, and
has six straight double-doubles.
She had a season-high 36 points
and 14 rebounds against Cedar
Crest, 27 points and 19 re-
bounds against Immaculata and
25 points and a season-high 20
rebounds against Keystone.
Kacee was injured at the
beginning of the season and
missed a few games but she is
finally healthy and in a rhythm,
playing like she can, coach
Amber Jacobs said. Most peo-
ple see her and think shes good
because of her size. While thats
true, her footwork and individu-
al moves in the post are what
set her apart from any other
post player. She has an array of
moves and counter moves that
keep the defenses guessing. She
also has the ability to hit the 15
foot jumper, which is an added
weapon she is continually refin-
ing.
On the season, Rava leads the
14-5 Defenders in scoring (16.9),
rebounding (11.2) and blocked
shots (22). She also has 26 as-
sists and 17 steals.
AYERS COMPETING High
Point freshman Reece Ayers
(Tunkhannock) had a strong
season with the cross country
team last fall and figures to
score points in the 10,000-meter
run this spring. This winter, hes
competing in the 3,000 and
5,000 for the Panthers.
Ayers kicked off his indoor
season by finishing second in
the 5,000 (15:30.06) at the Cap-
tains Invitational in Newport
News, Va. In his latest effort, he
competed in the 3,000 for the
first time ever and finished sixth
out of 26 runners at the Kent
Taylor Invitational in Chapel
Hill, N.C. His time was 8:42.05.
Reece had a tough time with
injuries following cross country
his senior year in high school,
coach Mike Esposito said.
Once the injury situation was
figured out, he was able to train
normally and progressed very
nicely.
Ayers was named Big South
Freshman of the Year in cross
country and was a member of
the High Point first five at the
end of the season. He also did
well academically.
Reece has fit in very well,
Esposito said. He has a great
work ethic and is extremely
coachable. He will focus on the
10k this outdoor season and hes
excited about the event. Hes a
great kid and wed love to have
more like him.
MAZUR STEPPING UP
Senior Matt Mazur (Hazleton
Area) is a key performer for the
Lock Haven mens track team.
Mazur recently finished sev-
enth in the mile (4:35.19) and
helped the 3,200 finish third
(8:19.58) at the Freedom Games
in Edinboro.
Matt has really stepped it up
this season, coach Aaron Rus-
sell said. In the wake of a num-
ber of injuries to the mens
team, he has emerged as one of
our team leaders. Hes been very
versatile, competing wherever
weve needed him. Hell be a
major part of our plans for the
PSAC Championships.
Freshman John Poli (Pittston
Area) is also on the squad. He
competes in the shot put and
weight throw.
John has been improving
each week, Russell said. Every
time he steps into the circle
things click more and more for
him. Learning a new event (35-
pound weight throw) takes time
to catch on to but hes been
working hard and doing a great
job and its paying off. Hes on
the verge of qualifying for the
PSACs.
The Bald Eagles compete in
the St. Valentines Invitational
on Friday and Saturday in Bos-
ton.
RECORD FOR EYER Soph-
omore Zach Eyer (Berwick) set
a new standard in the 800-meter
run for the Bloomsburg mens
indoor track team.
Eyer finished 16th out of 52
runners at the Division II Chal-
lenge last Saturday in Geneva,
Ohio. His time was 1:57.91. The
old record was 1:58.57.
Zach has transitioned into
his sophomore year excellently,
coach Bernard Empie said.
Already this indoor season he
is showing large improvements
over his performances at the
same time last year.
Empie sees even better things
for Eyer down the road.
As we wind down the indoor
season and then move into the
outdoor season, I expect Zach
to position himself among the
top runners in the PSAC. His
steady development and early-
season performances indicate he
should eclipse his marks from
last season.
The Huskies return to action
in the Happy Valley Classic
Saturday in State College.
MESSINGERS DOING THE
JOB The University of the
Sciences in Philadelphia mens
basketball team is struggling to
earn a spot in the Central Atlan-
tic Collegiate Conference but
brothers Myer and Henry Mess-
inger are giving it all theyve got
down the stretch. They are
former Dallas High performers.
The Devils are 3-16 overall
and 1-11 in league play and need
to finish strong to earn a playoff
spot.
Myer, a 6-foot-7, 210-pound
senior, is averaging 10.6 points
and 3.8 rebounds but has scored
in double figures in four of the
teams last five games. Henry, a
6-foot-5, 190-pound junior, is
doing even better. Hes averag-
ing 12.4 points and 4.1 rebounds
and has scored in double figures
in 10 of his last 11 contests in-
cluding a pair of 25-point nights.
Both Myer and Henry are
playing well at the right time of
the year, coach David Pauley
said. As the team has im-
proved, so has their play. Their
continued improvement will be
needed as we vie for a playoff
spot.
INJURY SLOWS RYAN New
Hampshire junior Michael Ryan
(Lake-Lehman) had two solid
efforts with the mens indoor
track team this winter. He fin-
ished fourth in the 3,000
(8:52.34) at a quad meet in
Durham, N.H., and then finished
53 out of 82 runners at the Bos-
ton Indoor Games with a time
of 4:32.77.
That 3k time was a PR (per-
sonal record) for Mike, coach
Jim Boulanger said. But right
now hes nursing an Achilles
injury and will probably not race
again until the outdoor season.
He has been doing alternative
training the past two weeks and
is feeling better. We will be
looking for him to run the 5 and
10k outdoors.
Semenza helping Buckeyes women on the ice
ON CAMPUS
B I L L A R S E N A U L T
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Paige Semenza (back) is a Pittston Area graduate and has helped
Ohio States womens hockey team this season with 13 points.
C M Y K
PAGE 8B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Plains, PA 18705
TOOLMAKER
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LADIES CLOTHING
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MADRID Eddy Merckx
wonders if someone is trying to
kill cycling.
The cycling great deplored
the decision Monday to strip Al-
berto Contador of his 2010 Tour
de France title and ban him for
two years for doping.
The Court of Arbitration for
Sport rejected Contadors claim
that his positive test for clenbu-
terol was caused by eating con-
taminated meat. The Spaniard,
who also won cyclings premier
race in 2007 and 2009, joined
Floyd Landis as the only riders
to lose a Tour title.
Its very bad for cycling. Its
bad for everybody. Its like some-
one wants to kill cycling,
Merckx, a five-time Tour de
France winner, told The Associ-
ated Press at the Tour of Qatar.
Im very surprised, very sur-
prised. Its bad for the sponsors.
Its bad for the Tour (de France).
Its bad for cycling.
Contador said he ate tainted
beef eaten on a Tour rest day.
The top court in international
sports calledthat unlikely, say-
ing the result was more likely
caused by the ingestion of a
contaminated food supple-
ment.
Cycling always receives a bad
name. Its always cycling thats
attacked and other sports are
never attacked. In other sports
they dont go so far, Merckx
said. If you go zero-zero-zero-
zero-zero (tolerance) you can al-
ways find something in every-
one.
Contador has been banned
from racing until Aug. 6 with all
his results since Jan. 25, 2011,
erased, including his Giro dItal-
ia victory last May. He is ineligi-
ble for this years Tour, Giro and
the London Olympics.
Miguel Indurain, who dom-
inated the Tour from 1991-95,
said he was certain Contador
would be cleared.
The longer he waited, the
more time passed, andat the end
the penalty was the maximum
that he could receive, Indurain
was quoted as telling Marca TV
by the Spanish news agency Eu-
ropa Press. Now he has to keep
working and stay in shape. He
has known how to fight through
the tough moments and he will
continue doing so.
Andy Schleck, who finished
39 seconds behind Contador in
the 2010 Tour, is now in line to
become that years champion.
But the Luxembourg rider said
that will not make me happy.
I feel sad for Alberto. I always
believedinhis innocence. This is
just a very sad day for cycling,
Schleck said. The only positive
news is that there is a verdict af-
ter 566 days of uncertainty. We
can finally move on.
Tour director Christian Prud-
homme said he was relieved a
resolution was reached, al-
though the case had revealed
many of the sports problems in
dealing with doping cases.
(The decision) is obviously
very late, too late, Prudhomme
said. It is absolutely necessary
that, even though sports justice
like any type of justice needs se-
renity and even though the case
was extremely complex, the out-
come of that type of case come
sooner.
Spanish cyclist Oscar Pereiro,
who was elevated to 2006 cham-
pion after Landis was stripped,
called the verdict disgraceful.
But Spains Sports Ministry
backed the CAS decision with-
out offering a word of support
for Contador.
We, once again, completely
reject all forms of doping, the
ministry said.
The Spanish cycling federa-
tion was surprised CAS decided
to overrule its decision to allow
Contador to escape without a
ban after the Saxo Bank-Sun-
Guard rider had successfully ap-
pealed the federations initial
one-year suspension. The Span-
ish Association of Professional
Cyclists also denounced the rul-
ing.
We feel a lot of sympathy for
the athlete, Spanishcyclingfed-
eration President Juan Carlos
Castano said. Its a sad day for
Spanish sport and cycling.
Spains national association of
cattle farmers also felt vindicat-
ed, saying it had been subjected
to false accusations.
This shows that our system
of traceability and food safety is
one of the best around and is ho-
mogeneous with all other EU
countries, the organization
said.
AP FILE PHOTO
Three-time Tour de France
winner Alberto Contador of
Spain was banned by sports
highest court on Monday for
two years after finding the
Spanish cyclist guilty of dop-
ing. The decision will strip
Contador of his 2010 Tour title.
C YC L I N G
Tour title taken
from Contador
He was rejected of a claim
that a positive drug test was
from contaminated meat.
By PAUL LOGOTHETIS
AP Sports Writer
CHICAGO The Big Ten is
not only ready tolistentopropos-
als regarding a national four-
team football playoff, league and
school officials are kicking
around an intriguing idea.
Sources told the Tribune that a
Big Ten plan would remove the
top four teams from the BCS
bowl pool and have semifinal
games played on the college cam-
pus of the higher seed. That
would do away with the facade of
"neutral" sites such as New Or-
leans, Miami and Pasadena, Cal-
if., and ease travel concern for
fans.
The championship game then
could be bid out, like the Super
Bowl.
The concept of the Big Ten
even entertaining playoff propos-
als seemed laughable as recently
as two months ago. But in the
wake of a low-rated BCS title
game that satisfied few outside
the Southeastern Conference
footprint, the conference is ready
to study and contribute ideas.
"We have to listen to the fans;
we cannot be tone-deaf," said
Northwestern athletic director
Jim Phillips, who chairs the Big
Tens Administrators Council.
"The Big Ten is open and curi-
ous."
In 2008, the SEC proposed a
Plus-One a more palatable
term for a four-team playoff
during BCS discussions, and the
ACC supported it. But with the
Big Ten, Pac-10, Big 12, Big East
and Notre Dame disapproving,
the plan never materialized.
"There has beena lot of banter-
ing and rhetoric," Phillips said,
"but no one has come up with a
formal plan."
BCS Executive Director Bill
Hancock said that 50 to 60 BCS
bowl/playoff plans were present-
ed the day after the BCS title
game in New Orleans, but they
apparently lack details. The next
college football cycle begins with
the 2014 season, and most expect
a newsystemto be approved this
fall.
Also on the table: Creating a
seven-win requirement for bowl
teams, a rule that could torpedo
more than a half-dozen money-
losing games and end embarrass-
ing contests between schools
that dumped their head coaches.
And moving up the BCS title
game. Alabamas trouncing of
LSUtook place Jan. 9, a day after
the NFLs wild-card weekend.
Fourteen percent of the country
tuned in, marking the third-low-
est rating in the 14 years of the
BCS.
"There is a very strong sense
that we have missed the boat and
are playing games too late," Big
Ten Commissioner Jim Delany
told the Tribune. "Students are
back in class, people are back at
work."
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P
Big Ten mulling four-team playoff
By TEDDY GREENSTEIN
Chicago Tribune
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012
timesleader.com
Philanthropy bounces back
The Chronicle of Philanthropy re-
ports Monday in its annual report of
the nations most generous people that
the top 50 donors made pledges in 2011
to give a total of $10.4 billion.
The donors gave a total of $3.3 bil-
lion in 2010, the smallest total since
The Chronicle began tracking the big-
gest donors in 2000. A decade ago, the
top 50 givers gave $12.5 billion.
It took gifts totaling at least $26
million to make the list this year. Peo-
ple on the list gave a median of $61
million in 2011, compared to $39.6
million in 2010.
Rendell eyes Inquirer
Former Gov. Ed Rendell says he has
assembled a group of corporate and
political leaders that has offered to buy
Philadelphia Media Network, the own-
er of The Inquirer, the Daily News and
Philly.com.
Rendell said the group was motiva-
ted to take over the financially strug-
gling media company more out of a
sense of civic duty than a desire to earn
profits.
The bidders have signed nondis-
closure agreements with the company.
Rendells group is one of several that
may be interested in bidding on PMN,
which is owned by a consortium of
hedge funds that bought the company
out of bankruptcy in 2010.
iPhone leads in sales
Global smartphone shipments
surged 55 percent in the fourth quarter,
as demand for Apples iPhone 4S coun-
tered declines by Research In Motion
and Nokia, International Data Corpora-
tion said Monday.
Shipments advanced to 158 million
units from102 million a year earlier,
exceeding IDCs forecast for a gain of
40 percent, the research firm said .
Apples share of the global smart-
phone market jumped to 24 percent
from16 percent a year earlier, regain-
ing its top spot from Samsung Elec-
tronics, which had overtaken the
iPhone-maker in the third quarter.
Greece to cut workers
Greeces coalition government on
Monday caved in to demands to cut
civil service jobs, announcing 15,000
positions would go this year, amid
mounting international pressure to
agree on austerity measures needed to
secure major new debt agreements.
State jobs have so far been protected
during the countrys acute financial
crisis.
I N B R I E F
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McKesson 82.30 +1.50 +5.6
Merck 38.40 +.03 +1.9
MetLife 37.68 +.05 +20.8
Microsoft 30.20 -.04 +16.3
NCR Corp 19.03 +.05 +15.6
NatFuGas 50.18 +.05 -9.7
NatGrid 50.27 -.34 +3.7
NY Times 7.54 -.20 -2.5
NewellRub 18.90 +.18 +17.0
NewmtM 60.89 -.12 +1.5
NextEraEn 59.97 -.24 -1.5
NiSource 22.97 -.04 -3.5
NikeB 103.46 -.04 +7.4
NorflkSo 72.14 -1.47 -1.0
NoestUt 35.27 -.03 -2.2
NorthropG 58.80 +.49 +.5
Nucor 45.13 -.28 +14.1
NustarEn 57.41 -.59 +1.3
NvMAd 15.14 -.04 +3.1
OcciPet 104.00 +1.37 +11.0
OfficeMax 5.58 -.09 +22.9
ONEOK 81.73 +.03 -5.7
PG&E Cp 41.15 -.26 -.2
PPL Corp 27.49 -.05 -6.6
PennVaRs 25.80 -.24 +1.1
PepBoy 15.46 +.35 +40.5
Pfizer 20.95 -.25 -3.2
PitnyBw 19.22 -.07 +3.7
Praxair 108.33 +.31 +1.3
ProgrssEn 54.07 -.49 -3.5
ProvEn g 11.80 +.08 +21.8
PSEG 30.23 -.04 -8.4
PulteGrp 8.26 -.04 +30.9
Questar 19.39 ... -2.4
RadioShk 7.39 ... -23.9
RLauren 157.41 +1.44 +14.0
Raytheon 49.30 +.33 +1.9
ReynAmer 40.00 +.25 -3.4
RockwlAut 81.27 -.26 +10.8
Rowan 36.73 +.12 +21.1
RoyDShllB 72.89 -.57 -4.1
RoyDShllA 71.69 -.79 -1.9
Ryder 52.50 -.12 -1.2
Safeway 21.70 -.04 +3.1
SaraLee 19.94 -.06 +5.4
Schlmbrg 79.64 +.98 +16.6
Sherwin 97.74 -.03 +9.5
SilvWhtn g 35.95 -.01 +24.1
SiriusXM 2.15 +.01 +18.1
SonyCp 19.44 +.23 +7.8
SouthnCo 44.20 -.10 -4.5
SwstAirl 9.75 -.29 +13.9
SpectraEn 30.75 +.19 0.0
SprintNex 2.46 +.14 +5.1
Sunoco 39.79 +1.29 +16.6
Sysco 29.79 -1.11 +1.6
TECO 18.12 -.16 -5.3
Target 52.05 -.09 +1.6
TenetHlth 5.94 -.03 +15.8
Tenneco 38.53 +1.13 +29.4
Tesoro 25.80 +.39 +10.4
Textron 25.93 -.10 +40.2
3M Co 87.56 -.17 +7.1
TimeWarn 37.97 -.22 +5.1
Timken 51.87 -.16 +34.0
Titan Intl 24.97 -.62 +28.3
UnilevNV 33.16 -.16 -3.5
UnionPac 115.05 -1.06 +8.6
Unisys 18.33 ... -7.0
UPS B 76.92 +.22 +5.1
USSteel 31.87 -.39 +20.4
UtdTech 80.57 -.48 +10.2
VectorGp 17.58 -.01 -1.0
ViacomB 48.72 +.36 +7.3
WestarEn 28.81 +.20 +.1
Weyerh 20.70 -.60 +10.9
Whrlpl 70.74 +2.08 +49.1
WmsCos 29.41 -.29 +9.1
Windstrm 12.28 -.02 +4.6
Wynn 112.83 -2.15 +2.1
XcelEngy 26.41 -.11 -4.5
Xerox 7.94 -.02 -.3
YumBrnds 63.19 -.65 +7.1
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrB m 15.34 +.02 +5.9
CoreOppA m 13.04 +.02 +7.9
American Cent
IncGroA m 26.01 ... +7.0
ValueInv 6.00 -.01 +6.2
American Funds
AMCAPA m 20.58 -.03 +9.3
BalA m 19.17 -.02 +5.3
BondA m 12.70 +.02 +1.5
CapIncBuA m50.39 -.09 +2.4
CpWldGrIA m34.52 -.14 +7.5
EurPacGrA m38.48 -.23 +9.4
FnInvA m 38.08 -.06 +7.6
GrthAmA m 31.59 -.03 +10.0
HiIncA m 11.00 ... +4.0
IncAmerA m 17.28 -.02 +3.1
InvCoAmA m 28.94 -.06 +6.8
MutualA m 26.94 -.04 +4.2
NewPerspA m28.62 -.09 +9.4
NwWrldA m 50.78 -.25 +10.1
SmCpWldA m37.45 -.03 +12.9
WAMutInvA m29.57 -.05 +4.1
Baron
Asset b 49.02 -.13 +7.3
BlackRock
EqDivI 18.96 -.02 +4.2
GlobAlcA m 19.37 -.01 +6.7
GlobAlcC m 18.04 -.01 +6.6
GlobAlcI 19.46 -.01 +6.7
CGM
Focus 29.85 -.10 +16.4
Mutual 27.89 -.10 +14.2
Realty 29.76 -.06 +11.0
Columbia
AcornZ 31.11 -.05 +12.9
DFA
EmMktValI 30.83 -.18 +18.8
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.43 +.01 +4.6
HlthCareS d 26.09 ... +7.9
LAEqS d 43.14 -.10 +15.7
Davis
NYVentA m 35.09 -.14 +8.0
NYVentC m 33.86 -.13 +7.9
Dodge & Cox
Bal 72.63 -.04 +7.7
Income 13.60 +.03 +2.3
IntlStk 32.10 -.15 +9.8
Stock 111.04 -.15 +9.2
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 33.00 -.17 +10.5
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.35 ... +3.6
HiIncOppB m 4.36 +.01 +3.5
NatlMuniA m 9.93 -.02 +6.0
NatlMuniB m 9.93 -.01 +6.0
PAMuniA m 9.16 -.01 +4.0
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.06 ... +2.7
Bal 19.19 ... +5.5
BlChGrow 47.03 -.01 +10.8
CapInc d 9.08 ... +5.3
Contra 72.50 -.10 +7.5
DivrIntl d 27.92 -.10 +9.4
ExpMulNat d 22.15 -.02 +7.1
Free2020 13.86 ... +5.6
Free2030 13.69 -.01 +6.6
GNMA 11.87 +.01 +0.5
GrowCo 91.15 +.26 +12.7
LatinAm d 55.28 -.15 +13.0
LowPriStk d 39.19 -.07 +9.7
Magellan 68.99 -.03 +9.5
Overseas d 29.66 -.14 +12.0
Puritan 18.78 ... +6.2
StratInc 11.05 +.01 +2.6
TotalBd 11.03 +.02 +1.3
Value 70.19 -.24 +10.6
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 26.29 -.09 +12.8
Fidelity Select
Gold d 46.67 -.33 +10.5
Pharm d 14.01 +.01 +3.2
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 47.64 -.01 +7.1
500IdxInstl 47.64 -.02 +7.1
500IdxInv 47.63 -.02 +7.1
First Eagle
GlbA m 47.86 +.02 +6.1
FrankTemp-Frank
Fed TF A m 12.42 ... +2.6
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.30 ... +3.0
GrowB m 46.47 -.06 +9.0
Income A m 2.16 ... +4.0
Income C m 2.18 ... +3.9
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon Z 12.49 -.01 +6.9
Discov Z 28.97 -.02 +5.5
Euro Z 20.22 -.03 +6.7
Shares Z 21.13 -.03 +5.9
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBond A m 13.20 -.04 +6.8
GlBond C m 13.23 -.04 +6.8
GlBondAdv 13.16 -.04 +6.8
Growth A m 17.92 -.02 +10.0
GMO
QuVI 22.83 -.01 +3.5
Harbor
CapApInst 40.65 -.12 +10.2
IntlInstl d 58.81 -.23 +12.1
Hartford
CpApHLSIA 41.79 -.07 +12.3
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 49.60 -.38 +14.7
AT&T Inc 29.97 +.02 -.9
AbtLab 55.39 +.39 -1.5
AMD 6.92 -.16 +28.1
Alcoa 10.74 -.03 +24.1
Allstate 30.63 -.06 +11.7
Altria 28.64 -.20 -3.4
AEP 39.61 +.03 -4.1
AmExp 51.81 -.44 +9.8
AmIntlGrp 26.80 -.37 +15.5
Amgen 69.12 -.16 +7.6
Anadarko 82.87 -1.47 +8.6
Apple Inc 463.97 +4.29 +14.6
AutoData 55.13 -.39 +2.1
AveryD 28.84 +.28 +.6
Avnet 36.09 -.13 +16.1
Avon 18.46 -.06 +5.7
BP PLC 46.87 +.30 +9.7
BakrHu 52.09 +1.09 +7.1
BallardPw 1.28 +.01 +18.5
BarnesNob 13.30 +.71 -8.1
Baxter 57.11 +.07 +15.4
Beam Inc 54.00 -.11 +5.4
BerkH B 79.85 -.15 +4.7
BlockHR 17.19 -.01 +5.3
Boeing 75.46 -.88 +2.9
BrMySq 32.13 -.13 -8.8
Brunswick 23.36 -.03 +29.3
Buckeye 63.25 -.37 -1.1
CBS B 29.63 +.15 +9.2
CMS Eng 21.80 -.23 -1.3
CSX s 22.32 -.85 +6.0
CampSp 31.85 -.05 -4.2
Carnival 31.97 -.03 -2.1
Caterpillar 113.78 -.16 +25.6
CenterPnt 18.77 -.11 -6.6
CntryLink 37.11 -.29 -.2
Chevron 106.67 +1.17 +.3
Cisco 20.19 +.10 +12.0
Citigrp rs 33.30 -.24 +26.6
Clorox 69.41 -.45 +4.3
ColgPal 91.24 -.30 -1.2
ConAgra 26.78 -.02 +1.4
ConocPhil 71.32 +.86 -2.1
ConEd 58.80 -.02 -5.2
ConstellEn 36.46 +.11 -8.1
Cooper Ind 61.36 +.12 +13.3
Corning 13.73 +.15 +5.8
CrownHold 36.73 +.44 +9.4
Cummins 119.80 -.29 +36.1
DTE 53.17 -.54 -2.4
Deere 87.82 -.58 +13.5
Diebold 33.24 +.02 +10.5
Disney 40.46 +.46 +7.9
DomRescs 50.27 -.11 -5.3
Dover 65.06 -.57 +12.1
DowChm 33.98 -.20 +18.2
DryShips 2.81 +.40 +40.3
DuPont 51.78 -.23 +13.1
DukeEngy 21.27 -.13 -3.3
EMC Cp 26.26 -.13 +21.9
Eaton s 51.09 +.16 +17.4
EdisonInt 40.93 -.15 -1.1
EmersonEl 53.37 +.91 +14.6
EnbrEPt s 31.62 -.07 -4.7
Energen 49.19 +.60 -1.6
EngyTEq 42.33 -.21 +4.3
Entergy 68.76 -.28 -5.9
EntPrPt 50.39 +.44 +8.6
Exelon 39.86 +.14 -8.1
ExxonMbl 85.75 +.83 +1.2
Fastenal s 48.06 -.24 +10.2
FedExCp 95.25 +.71 +14.1
FirstEngy 43.25 -.28 -2.4
FootLockr 27.10 +.10 +13.7
FordM 12.96 +.17 +20.4
Gannett 15.14 +.23 +13.2
Gap 21.67 -.04 +16.8
GenDynam 71.15 +.64 +7.1
GenElec 19.05 +.03 +6.4
GenMills 39.67 -.18 -1.8
GileadSci 56.03 +1.33 +36.9
GlaxoSKln 45.09 +.24 -1.2
Goodrich 125.54 -.02 +1.5
Goodyear 13.98 +.12 -1.3
Hallibrtn 37.40 +.57 +8.4
HarleyD 45.32 -.79 +16.6
HarrisCorp 41.83 -.10 +16.1
HartfdFn 19.33 -.04 +19.0
HawaiiEl 26.11 +.13 -1.4
HeclaM 5.36 -.04 +2.5
Heico s 57.95 -1.58 -.8
Hess 61.12 +.74 +7.6
HewlettP 28.76 -.31 +11.6
HomeDp 45.20 +.03 +7.5
HonwllIntl 60.31 -.43 +11.0
Humana 85.25 -4.87 -2.7
INTL FCSt 27.26 +.48 +15.7
ITT Cp s 22.64 +.06 +17.1
ITW 55.58 -.02 +19.0
IngerRd 37.35 -.17 +22.6
IBM 192.82 -.82 +4.9
IntPap 31.47 -.38 +6.3
JPMorgCh 38.14 -.14 +14.7
JacobsEng 46.53 -.68 +14.7
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
98.01 72.26 AirProd APD 2.32 89.93 -.47 +5.6
34.00 25.39 AmWtrWks AWK .92 33.87 -.04 +6.3
51.50 36.76 Amerigas APU 3.05 43.24 +.18 -5.8
23.57 19.28 AquaAm WTR .66 22.25 -.01 +.9
38.02 23.69 ArchDan ADM .70 29.60 +.05 +3.5
356.80 247.36 AutoZone AZO ... 350.76 -2.42 +7.9
14.95 4.92 BkofAm BAC .04 7.97 +.13 +43.3
32.32 17.10 BkNYMel BK .52 21.95 +.01 +10.2
17.49 2.23 BonTon BONT .20 5.06 +.06 +50.1
43.98 31.30 CVS Care CVS .65 43.27 -.24 +6.1
52.95 38.79 Cigna CI .04 42.92 -.63 +2.2
71.77 61.29 CocaCola KO 1.88 68.03 -.05 -2.8
27.18 19.19 Comcast CMCSA .45 27.09 -.06 +14.3
28.95 21.67 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.04 28.51 -.29 +2.6
42.50 14.61 CmtyHlt CYH ... 19.77 -.24 +13.3
42.34 29.57 CoreMark CORE .68 40.82 -.29 +3.1
64.56 39.50 EmersonEl EMR 1.60 53.37 +.91 +14.6
13.63 4.61 Entercom ETM ... 8.22 -.06 +33.7
21.02 10.25 FairchldS FCS ... 15.02 -.33 +24.8
9.55 3.81 FrontierCm FTR .75 4.34 -.17 -15.7
18.16 13.09 Genpact G .18 15.60 -.05 +4.3
13.24 7.00 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.75 -.16 +7.3
55.00 46.99 Heinz HNZ 1.92 52.16 +.22 -3.5
62.38 49.46 Hershey HSY 1.52 61.01 -.15 -1.2
39.06 30.24 Kraft KFT 1.16 38.70 -.18 +3.6
27.57 18.07 Lowes LOW .56 27.01 -.19 +6.4
91.05 66.40 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 80.99 -1.46 +6.1
102.22 72.89 McDnlds MCD 2.80 99.49 -.52 -.8
24.10 17.05 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 23.06 -.32 +4.2
10.28 4.59 NexstarB NXST ... 8.49 -.01 +8.3
65.19 42.70 PNC PNC 1.40 61.07 -1.13 +5.9
30.27 24.10 PPL Corp PPL 1.40 27.49 -.05 -6.6
17.34 6.50 PenRE PEI .60 13.73 +.19 +31.5
71.89 58.50 PepsiCo PEP 2.06 66.52 -.14 +.3
79.96 58.46 PhilipMor PM 3.08 76.85 +.23 -2.1
67.72 57.56 ProctGam PG 2.10 63.51 +.74 -4.8
67.52 42.45 Prudentl PRU 1.45 59.99 +.12 +19.7
1.54 .85 RiteAid RAD ... 1.51 +.01 +19.8
17.11 10.91 SLM Cp SLM .50 15.88 -.12 +18.5
60.00 39.00 SLM pfB SLMBP 4.63 46.86 +.36 +20.2
44.65 26.83 SoUnCo SUG .60 43.30 -.06 +2.8
34.68 23.92 TJX s TJX .38 34.32 -.21 +6.3
33.53 24.07 UGI Corp UGI 1.04 27.58 -.03 -6.2
40.48 32.28 VerizonCm VZ 2.00 38.14 +.30 -4.9
62.63 48.31 WalMart WMT 1.46 61.88 -.15 +3.5
44.22 36.52 WeisMk WMK 1.20 43.39 -.66 +8.6
34.25 22.58 WellsFargo WFC .48 30.20 -.43 +9.6
USD per British Pound 1.5827 +.0003 +.02% 1.6362 1.6098
Canadian Dollar .9965 +.0033 +.33% .9796 .9881
USD per Euro 1.3125 -.0028 -.21% 1.4265 1.3587
Japanese Yen 76.59 +.04 +.05% 78.34 82.24
Mexican Peso 12.6746 -.0020 -.02% 12.0237 11.9950
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Copper 3.86 3.90 -0.98 -6.18 -15.51
Gold 1722.80 1737.90 -0.87 +4.49 +27.84
Platinum 1629.80 1631.90 -0.13 -5.19 -11.63
Silver 33.72 33.73 -0.01 -11.72 +14.90
Palladium 705.55 708.45 -0.41 -4.75 -13.77
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Foreign Exchange & Metals
INVESCO
ConstellB m 21.00 -.04 +10.2
GlobEqA m 10.99 -.03 +6.9
PacGrowB m 19.56 -.15 +9.6
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.91+.02 +0.9
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 12.99 ... +6.4
LifGr1 b 12.86 -.02 +8.0
RegBankA m 13.44 -.12 +11.3
SovInvA m 16.48 +.01 +6.7
TaxFBdA m 10.29 -.01 +2.7
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 19.30 -.12 +14.9
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 29.25 -.01 +9.8
Loomis Sayles
BondI 14.58 +.03 +5.0
BondR b 14.52 +.03 +5.0
MFS
MAInvA m 20.22 +.02 +8.2
MAInvC m 19.55 +.02 +8.1
Merger
Merger m 15.63 -.02 +0.3
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.52 +.02 +1.9
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 19.12 -.06 +8.5
Oakmark
EqIncI 28.52 ... +5.4
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 40.74 +.06 +8.5
DevMktA m 32.96 -.22 +12.4
DevMktY 32.58 -.21 +12.5
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.20 +.02 +5.7
ComRlRStI 6.94 +.03 +6.1
HiYldIs 9.27 +.01 +3.9
LowDrIs 10.43 +.01 +1.6
RealRet 12.05 +.05 +2.3
TotRetA m 11.12 +.02 +2.6
TotRetAdm b 11.12 +.02 +2.6
TotRetC m 11.12 +.02 +2.5
TotRetIs 11.12 +.02 +2.6
TotRetrnD b 11.12 +.02 +2.6
TotlRetnP 11.12 +.02 +2.6
Permanent
Portfolio 49.24 -.03 +6.8
Principal
SAMConGrB m13.70 -.03 +6.7
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 30.36 -.02 +9.2
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 16.26 ... +9.3
BlendA m 18.12 -.04 +10.4
EqOppA m 14.93 -.02 +9.8
HiYieldA m 5.52 +.01 +3.7
IntlEqtyA m 5.86 -.01 +9.3
IntlValA m 19.16 -.05 +9.2
JennGrA m 19.91 -.06 +10.1
NaturResA m 51.81 +.25 +11.8
SmallCoA m 21.95 -.11 +10.3
UtilityA m 10.98 -.03 +1.6
ValueA m 15.18 -.02 +10.1
Putnam
GrowIncB m 13.62 -.01 +9.2
IncomeA m 6.85 +.02 +1.5
Royce
LowStkSer m 16.41 -.05 +14.7
OpportInv d 12.04 -.03 +16.7
ValPlSvc m 13.66 -.10 +13.8
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 20.95 -.01 +7.1
Scout
Interntl d 30.80 -.09 +10.1
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 42.34 -.03 +9.5
CapApprec 21.81 ... +5.8
DivGrow 24.78 -.04 +6.2
DivrSmCap d 17.35 -.01 +12.3
EmMktStk d 32.08 -.32 +12.5
EqIndex d 36.26 -.02 +7.0
EqtyInc 24.73 -.05 +7.2
FinSer 13.32 -.04 +12.2
GrowStk 34.97 -.02 +9.9
HealthSci 37.04 +.10 +13.6
HiYield d 6.70 ... +4.0
IntlDisc d 41.44 -.04 +11.1
IntlStk d 13.62 -.10 +10.8
IntlStkAd m 13.57 -.10 +10.8
LatinAm d 45.86 -.08 +18.1
MediaTele 51.35 -.11 +9.5
MidCpGr 57.86 +.01 +9.7
NewAmGro 34.58 -.06 +8.7
NewAsia d 15.30 -.13 +10.0
NewEra 46.50 +.20 +10.6
NewIncome 9.75 +.02 +1.0
Rtmt2020 17.05 -.02 +7.2
ShTmBond 4.84 ... +0.8
SmCpVal d 38.18 -.20 +10.7
TaxFHiYld d 11.27 ... +3.3
Value 24.54 -.04 +8.9
ValueAd b 24.30 -.05 +8.8
Thornburg
IntlValI d 26.93 -.01 +9.6
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 22.77 +.05 +4.2
Vanguard
500Adml 123.97 -.05 +7.1
500Inv 123.96 -.05 +7.0
CapOp d 32.36 +.02 +9.7
CapVal 10.65 +.01 +15.4
Convrt d 12.86 +.02 +8.6
DevMktIdx d 9.26 -.03 +9.1
DivGr 16.06 -.03 +4.2
EnergyInv d 64.60 +.34 +7.7
EurIdxAdm d 56.45 -.28 +9.4
Explr 79.86 -.12 +11.8
GNMA 11.09 +.01 +0.5
GNMAAdml 11.09 +.01 +0.5
GlbEq 17.51 -.07 +10.1
GrowthEq 11.76 -.03 +9.0
HYCor d 5.84 ... +3.3
HYCorAdml d 5.84 ... +3.3
HltCrAdml d 56.15 -.08 +3.4
HlthCare d 133.09 -.17 +3.4
ITGradeAd 10.18 +.02 +2.3
InfPrtAdm 28.22 +.11 +1.8
InfPrtI 11.50 +.05 +1.9
InflaPro 14.37 +.06 +1.8
InstIdxI 123.17 -.05 +7.1
InstPlus 123.17 -.05 +7.1
InstTStPl 30.60 -.01 +8.1
IntlExpIn d 14.40 -.02 +12.3
IntlGr d 18.26 -.10 +11.7
IntlStkIdxAdm d24.12 -.11 +10.4
IntlStkIdxIPls d96.48 -.45 +10.5
LTInvGr 10.41 +.08 +1.7
MidCapGr 20.79 -.02 +10.4
MidCpAdml 98.23 -.08 +10.2
MidCpIst 21.70 -.02 +10.2
MuIntAdml 14.27 ... +2.1
MuLtdAdml 11.20 ... +0.6
MuShtAdml 15.95 ... +0.3
PrecMtls d 22.52 -.08 +16.1
Prmcp d 66.88 -.07 +8.3
PrmcpAdml d 69.38 -.08 +8.3
PrmcpCorI d 14.45 -.02 +7.1
REITIdx d 20.95 -.08 +8.8
REITIdxAd d 89.42 -.32 +8.8
STCor 10.74 ... +1.2
STGradeAd 10.74 ... +1.2
SelValu d 19.83 -.07 +6.7
SmGthIdx 24.07 -.03 +12.0
SmGthIst 24.11 -.03 +12.0
StSmCpEq 20.95 -.07 +11.3
Star 19.92 -.01 +6.4
StratgcEq 20.44 -.02 +11.5
TgtRe2015 12.94 -.01 +5.2
TgtRe2020 22.96 -.02 +5.9
TgtRe2030 22.40 -.03 +7.1
TgtRe2035 13.47 -.02 +7.7
Tgtet2025 13.06 -.02 +6.4
TotBdAdml 11.05 +.02 +0.8
TotBdInst 11.05 +.02 +0.8
TotBdMkInv 11.05 +.02 +0.7
TotBdMkSig 11.05 +.02 +0.8
TotIntl d 14.42 -.07 +10.4
TotStIAdm 33.81 -.02 +8.0
TotStIIns 33.82 -.01 +8.1
TotStIdx 33.80 -.02 +8.0
TxMIntlAdm d10.66 -.05 +8.9
TxMSCAdm 30.32 -.14 +11.2
USGro 20.00 +.02 +10.8
USValue 10.88 -.01 +6.7
WellsI 23.47 +.03 +2.4
WellsIAdm 56.87 +.08 +2.4
Welltn 32.86 ... +4.9
WelltnAdm 56.76 +.01 +4.9
WndsIIAdm 48.78 -.06 +6.6
WndsrII 27.48 -.04 +6.6
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 6.91 +.01 +8.6
DOW
12,845.13
-17.10
NASDAQ
2,901.99
-3.67
S&P 500
1,344.33
-.57
RUSSELL 2000
828.37
-2.74
6-MO T-BILLS
.10%
+.01
10-YR T-NOTE
1.91%
-.01
CRUDE OIL
$96.91
-.93
q q p p q q p p
q q q q q q q q
NATURAL GAS
$2.55
+.05
WHENI RECEIVEDa
box with the LGlogo
on it last week, I was
skeptical. LGphones
had always been a
little bit on the vanilla
side they didnt have
the snazzy interface of HTCor the
chassis appeal of Samsung. They were
certainly competent, but I hadnt seen
anything that made me think, Gee,
thats cool.
The Spectrumhas done quite a bit to
change that opinion. First impressions
can be everything -- so when I opened
the case and found myself staring at a
4.5-inch, high-definition display, set off
by a minimalist bezel, I thought per-
haps this was something different.
Turning it on proved a bit awkward
the length of the phone meant that it
wanted to slide out of my hand. If
youre left-handed, however, its actual-
ly quite ideal. It might just be me.
LGhas considerably spruced up its
interface the lock screen is intuitive,
the home screen and widgets are all
quite attractive.
Its running Android 2.3, which is an
older version, but LGhas indicated it
will provide an upgrade to the latest
version of the Google Operating sys-
tem(Ice-CreamSandwich) shortly.
The phone is quite responsive, as it
should be, since its powered by a 1.5
GHz dual core Snapdragon proc-
essor. The Internet also is admirably
fast in Wilkes-Barre, I was able to
connect to the 4Gnetwork and surf
with ease. The large
screen made this a
treat as its especial-
ly suited for In-
ternet use.
I found the cam-
era to be particularly crisp, even for an
8-megapixel model. It seemed to be
less sensitive to darkness and motion
than other phones in this class. It also
features a 1.3 megapixel front-facing
camera for video calls.
In terms of build quality, the Spec-
trumis solid. It isnt overly heavy, but
it isnt flimsy. Refreshingly, the SD
memory card is not underneath, along-
side of or otherwise athwart the bat-
tery an annoying trend. I can under-
stand that the SDcard is not frequently
moved or replaced, but I have had
reason to do so, and it doesnt make
good sense to have the port obstruct-
ed. The battery life could be better. Id
still rate it as good but it didnt
seemto last quite as long as some of its
rivals.
The Spectrumcosts $199 fromVeri-
zon Wireless with a 2-year contract.
Without the contract, it costs about
$589.
For more information on the LG
Spectrum, scan the QRcode or visit
http://tlgets.me/lgspectrum.
TECH TALK
N I C K D E L O R E N Z O
Nick DeLorenzo is director of interactive
and new media for The Times Leader. E-mail
him at ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
Review: LG Spectrum from Verizon Wireless a pleasant surprise
HOT DOG CHAIN SELLS FOR $5.5 MILLION
AP PHOTO/THE BLADE, JEREMY WADSWORTH
T
ony Packos main restaurant at 1902 Front St., Toledo, Ohio, was made famous on the 1972-1983 TV
series M-A-S-H. It is in new hands after a yearlong family feud. Representatives of a private restau-
rant group in Toledo said Monday they have finalized their $5.5 million purchase of the chain, whose
future had been in doubt since a bank foreclosed on its loans and a court-appointed third party was put
in charge.
NEWYORKPhone company Veri-
zon Communications Inc. will chal-
lenge Netflix and start a video stream-
ingservicethis year withRedboxandits
DVD rental kiosks.
Verizon and Coinstar Inc., Redboxs
parent, said Monday that the service
will be national and available to non-Ve-
rizon customers as well. It adds another
dimension to Verizons quest to become
a force in home entertainment, and it
looks set to compete to some extent
with the cable-TV services it already
sells.
Unlike competingservices fromAma-
zon.comand Wal-Mart, the newservice
will combine Internet delivery of mo-
vies with DVDs, the way Netflix does.
DishNetworkCorp. offers asimilar bun-
dle through its Blockbuster subsidiary.
Getting an extensive library of
streaming content to rival Netflixs will
be expensive, though. The rising cost
for streaming rights is the main reason
that Netflix raised its U.S. prices by as
much as 60 percent last year in a move
that triggered a customer backlash.
Redbox, whose DVDrental kiosks are
located in more than 29,000 stores, has
been looking to expand into online
streaming for more than a year. Its busi-
ness so far has revolved around renting
DVDs for as little as $1.20 per day.
Verizon has its own cable-TV service,
called FiOS, in some areas. Its Verizon
Wireless subsidiary has also signed a
deal to sell service from Comcast Corp.
and other cable TV companies in its
stores.
To get people to try the service, Veri-
zon and Redbox may try to undercut
Netflixs price.
Verizon to set up streaming service with Redbox
By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
A new report claims U.S. casinos and
the industries that depend on them
made a $125 billion economic splash in
2010 the equivalent of 1percent of the
total U.S. gross domestic product.
The study released Monday by the
American Gaming Association counts
direct casino industry spending and tal-
lies the indirect spending that comes
from industries supported by casinos
and activities spawned by casinos.
The report shows 566 casinos in 22
states supported about $125 billion in
spending and nearly 820,000 jobs in the
U.S. in 2010.
Direct consumer casino spending ac-
counts for about 350,000 jobs and $50
billion of that spending. About one-third
of the money came from non-gambling
sources, such as food sales, hotels and
entertainment.
Pennsylvanias 10 casinos had $4.8 bil-
lion in total economic impact the report
said, and employed 29,400, 13,076 at ca-
sinos and the rest in supporting busi-
nesses.
Taxes paid directly by the industry in
2010 totaled nearly $16 billion, with
Pennsylvania casinos accounting for
$1.3 billion of that.
Report: Casinos
boost economy
Staff and wire reports
C M Y K
PAGE 10B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 48/23
Average 35/19
Record High 57 in 1938
Record Low -9 in 1906
Yesterday 29
Month to date 173
Year to date 3147
Last year to date 3895
Normal year to date 3802
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.01
Month to date 0.01
Normal month to date 0.47
Year to date 1.91
Normal year to date 2.84
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 5.55 -0.49 22.0
Towanda 3.48 -0.24 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 4.21 -0.09 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 39-48. Lows: 21-28. Partly cloudy
and seasonably mild. Mostly cloudy
tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 50-54. Lows: 32-36. Mostly sunny.
Increasing clouds tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 25-38. Lows: 1-21. Mostly cloudy.
Partly to mostly cloudy tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 52-53. Lows: 32-34. Mostly sunny
and mild. Increasing clouds tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 50-55. Lows: 34-42. Mostly sunny
and mild. Increasing clouds tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 27/17/.00 30/22/pc 33/24/sn
Atlanta 57/48/.00 62/41/s 60/37/pc
Baltimore 53/27/.00 54/34/s 44/34/sh
Boston 50/28/.00 45/26/s 35/28/c
Buffalo 39/33/.00 34/21/c 31/26/pc
Charlotte 47/39/.00 61/38/s 59/36/pc
Chicago 33/30/.00 36/29/sn 32/27/pc
Cleveland 47/28/.00 36/27/c 34/25/sn
Dallas 54/33/.00 58/36/pc 49/33/pc
Denver 32/14/.00 24/5/pc 38/21/pc
Detroit 49/27/.00 34/20/c 31/24/pc
Honolulu 69/63/.28 77/66/sh 76/67/s
Houston 60/43/.00 62/44/pc 62/42/c
Indianapolis 48/26/.00 45/29/pc 36/22/c
Las Vegas 59/39/.00 59/46/pc 65/47/c
Los Angeles 68/49/.00 62/54/r 68/52/pc
Miami 81/72/.04 81/69/sh 81/69/pc
Milwaukee 41/28/.00 30/24/sn 30/24/pc
Minneapolis 45/25/.00 22/9/s 28/18/s
Myrtle Beach 52/43/.00 62/44/pc 64/46/pc
Nashville 50/42/.00 55/37/pc 48/30/pc
New Orleans 62/51/.00 65/50/pc 61/48/pc
Norfolk 49/30/.00 55/39/s 53/38/pc
Oklahoma City 53/27/.00 50/23/pc 38/23/pc
Omaha 33/16/.00 26/9/c 26/11/pc
Orlando 81/64/.67 79/60/c 77/58/c
Phoenix 67/47/.00 73/50/pc 72/46/c
Pittsburgh 47/24/.00 43/27/pc 36/22/rs
Portland, Ore. 54/36/.00 51/38/pc 53/38/c
St. Louis 48/30/.00 46/27/c 36/24/pc
Salt Lake City 41/23/.00 43/30/s 44/29/c
San Antonio 50/43/.02 62/44/pc 56/39/sh
San Diego 69/49/.00 63/52/r 65/50/pc
San Francisco 58/46/.00 56/47/r 59/45/pc
Seattle 61/35/.00 53/38/s 54/39/sh
Tampa 84/67/.00 79/62/sh 78/59/c
Tucson 68/39/.00 72/47/pc 68/44/c
Washington, DC 53/29/.00 55/37/s 46/35/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 25/14/.00 26/16/s 29/19/pc
Baghdad 64/32/.00 64/44/c 65/46/c
Beijing 30/14/.00 30/12/s 32/13/s
Berlin 12/-4/.00 21/14/sf 24/15/pc
Buenos Aires 95/68/.00 89/72/t 85/70/t
Dublin 48/39/.00 43/36/c 42/34/pc
Frankfurt 21/5/.00 21/6/sf 27/17/pc
Hong Kong 73/66/.00 67/61/sh 61/57/sh
Jerusalem 59/38/.00 61/46/sh 59/40/pc
London 41/34/.00 35/29/c 36/28/pc
Mexico City 66/46/.00 61/43/sh 67/44/sh
Montreal 37/30/.00 18/0/pc 23/10/pc
Moscow 16/1/.00 7/-6/pc 8/-6/pc
Paris 30/21/.00 28/19/s 31/18/pc
Rio de Janeiro 97/77/.00 93/75/pc 92/75/t
Riyadh 66/41/.00 71/48/pc 79/51/s
Rome 41/30/.00 40/28/rs 45/31/c
San Juan 82/70/.03 83/72/sh 82/73/sh
Tokyo 43/39/.00 52/40/r 45/32/pc
Warsaw 9/-2/.00 20/8/c 18/5/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
52/33
Reading
50/31
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
42/23
43/24
Harrisburg
49/31
Atlantic City
52/35
New York City
51/32
Syracuse
32/12
Pottsville
45/28
Albany
41/20
Binghamton
Towanda
38/21
41/23
State College
42/28
Poughkeepsie
46/25
58/36
36/29
24/5
62/37
22/9
62/54
56/49
38/24
32/15
53/38
51/32
34/20
62/41
81/69
62/44
77/66
37/29
30/22
55/37
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:09a 5:27p
Tomorrow 7:08a 5:28p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 5:36p 6:36a
Tomorrow 6:46p 7:08a
Full Last New First
Feb. 7 Feb. 14 Feb. 21 Feb. 29
Our winter so far
is in the top 10
warmest winters
on record. In
fact, we current-
ly stand in third
place. This refers
to the meteoro-
logical winter of
December,
January and
February. Despite
having more
than 20 days left
to go, this winter
will probably still
end up being in
the top 10.
Slightly colder
air will arrive
from the north
today, then a
weak storm
could bring a
light snowfall
here Wednesday
afternoon.
Beautiful winter
weather returns
Thursday, fol-
lowed by the
arrival of an arc-
tic cold front this
weekend. Snow
showers could
arrive as well,
followed by
another warm-
up next week.
- Tom Clark
NATIONAL FORECAST: A storm system off of the coast will bring rain and higher elevation snow to
much of California today, with breezy to windy conditions likely, as well. An upper-level storm system
will also produce light snow over portions of the central Plains while sunny to partly cloudy skies can
be expected across the northern and southern Plains.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Sunny to partly
cloudy
WEDNESDAY
Light
snow
38
25
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny
42
25
SATURDAY
Snow
showers,
colder
30
20
SUNDAY
Snow
showers
possible
25
20
MONDAY
Partly
sunny
25
15
THURSDAY
Sunny
43
25
40

31

K
Heart Month S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012
timesleader.com
Cardiac exercise program
offered in Bloomsburg
Bloomsburg University of
Pennsylvania, in cooperation
with Bloomsburg Hospital, is
offering a cardiac rehabilitation
exercise program on Tuesdays
and Thursdays. The program is
designed for adults age 18 and
older with known stable heart
disease and risk factors for heart
disease. The sessions are de-
signed to help individuals re-
duce their risk for heart disease
by increasing their level of regu-
lar exercise and physical activ-
ity. In addition, participants will
receive individualized instruc-
tion on cardiovascular risk re-
duction.
Classes are from 6:30- 7:30
a.m. and 5-6 p.m.; however,
other times may be offered.
The one-time enrollment and
assessment fee is $30. Member-
ship fee is $120 for 30 sessions
during each fall and spring
semester. Classes also will be
available during the summer
academic sessions at a fee of
$100 for 24 sessions.
For more information or to
participate, contact Carol Klia-
movich in BUs exercise-science
department at 389-4361.
Heart-healthy programs
In honor of Heart Month, the
Greater Hazleton Health Alli-
ance is offering the following
heart-healthy programs to edu-
cate men and women about
heart disease:
Have A Heart, Save A
Child event will take place
from 5 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Feb. 20-24
at the Hazleton Health & Well-
ness Fitness Center. For every
minute someone works out, a
donation will be made to St.
Judes Research Hospital. Spon-
sors are needed. For informa-
tion, call 501-6750.
Senior Choice Lunch And
Learn is set for 11:15 a.m. Feb.
22 at the 5th Street Cancer
Treatment Center. Topic will be
Coronary Artery Disease.
Guest speaker will be Dr. Joseph
M. Laureti, cardiologist, Alli-
ance Medical Group. The pre-
sentation is free for senior
choice members and $5 for
nonmembers. Lunch will be
provided. To register, call 454-
4752.
For more information log on
to www.ghha.org and click on
Calendar of Events.
Heart-healthy fair
The Luzerne-Wyoming Coun-
ties Intellectual Disabilities
Training Council on Quality will
have a heart-healthy fair titled
Obesity and Individuals with
Intellectual Disabilities from10
a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 23 at the Lu-
zerne County West Side Annex
Building, 2009 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort.
Demonstrations and informa-
tional booths on dental health,
healthy recipes, the SMART 911
program and blood-pressure
screenings will be offered.
For more information, call the
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties
MH/MR Program at 825-9441
or (800) 816-1880.
HEART BRIEFS
With the Super Bowl still fresh in our
minds and other upcoming
events, it may be helpful to review
some key terminology relating to
these affairs ... nutrition-related of
course:
Couch potato: An immovable body
known to lie prone on furniture
for long periods of time. Syn-
onymous with armchair quar-
terback. May be accompanied
by nearby food and beverages.
Not surprising, nutrition scientists
advise us to avoid these long
times of inactivity. One interest-
ing new reason: A recent study
found that when muscles are
laid out and inactive for long
stretches, the activation of
processes that manufacture fat
cells is increased.
Plant-based dipping imple-
ments: Coined by someone I
know who wishes to remain
anonymous. Refers to edible
vegetable matter such as car-
rots, cucumber slices and red-
pepper strips used in place of
salty dip-scooping chips. Appro-
priately served while jumping up
and down and rooting for a
favorite sports team.
Go Red for Women: Not to be
confused with a college cheer for
the Nebraska Cornhuskers. De-
scribes the campaign of the
American Heart Association to
remind us that heart disease is
still the No. 1 killer of women.
Mascot is a cute little red dress.
Accompanied Wear Red Day on
Friday, Feb. 3. Although a serious
event for women, men were
invited to participate.
Cardiovascular disease: Also
known as CVD. Dysfunction of
key players in the body in-
cluding the heart (cardio) and
the blood vessels (vascular).
Can cause major heartache and
distress. Remains the No. 1
reason for deaths in men and
women in the United States.
Modifiable risk factors: Health
blows we can defend against,
such as high blood pressure or
cholesterol, diabetes and smok-
ing. (Does not include genetic
makeup and age.)
And good news, say investigators
at the National Institutes of-
Health (a.k.a. NIH). They recent-
ly analyzed 50 years of data
involving American men and
women and found that the care
we give (or dont give) our bod-
ies predicts our risk for devel-
oping cardiovascular disease
(CVD) more than our age.
For example, men age 55 with at
least two major risk factors
(high blood pressure, high cho-
lesterol, diabetes, and smoking)
were six) times as likely to die
from CVD by age 80 than those
with one or no risk factors.
Women in their mid-50s with at
least two risk factors were three
tim)es as likely to die by 80
from CVD as those with one or
no risk factors.
-- Barbara Quinn
The Monterey County Herald
O N N U T R I T I O N Terminology review
Insecurity about falling in-
surance payments and the im-
pact of impending health-care
changes are driving droves of
cardiologists among the
highest-paid doctors to
leave private practice and be-
come hospital employees.
The doctors are seeking to
protect their income and get
relief from the hassles of ma-
naging a business, as pressure
mounts to reduce costs and in-
vest in expensive computer
systems. Hospitals, mean-
while, want closer relation-
ships with doctors as changes
loom that will reward efficien-
cy and care coordination both
in and out of the hospital.
The deals, said Bob De Luca,
managing partner of IMA Con-
sulting in Chadds Ford, are an
attractive alternative in this
time of chaos and uncertain-
ty.
Lourdes Health System in
South Jersey has embraced the
trend. Last year, it put 47 car-
diologists from two large pri-
vate practices on salary.
Main Line Health, which em-
ployed six cardiologists in
2008, now has 28. It recently
announced the hiring of the
last four, a group in Roxbor-
ough. And Temple University
Health System announced that
eight cardiologists from Chest-
nut Hill Cardiology Group in
Flourtown would join its physi-
cian group in March.
The acquisitions apparently
are a touchy subject. Many ar-
ea hospitals did not respond to
requests for information about
their strategies or the number
of employed cardiologists.
At least for the time being,
there are financial rewards:
Medicare often pays more for
procedures and treatments
performed in hospital-owned
facilities than it does for the
same services in offices owned
by doctors. The higher bills
from shifting doctors to hospi-
tal employment in general, not
just cardiologists, have already
caught the attention of Wash-
ington policymakers. An influ-
ential advisory agency has rec-
ommended that payments be
equalized for standard office
visits. That alone could save
Medicare from $250 million to
$750 million a year, the Medi-
care Payment Advisory Com-
mission says.
While the tighter relation-
ships between doctors and
hospitals could improve care,
some experts say the trend,
along with insurers efforts to
control costs through smaller
networks, may mean that pa-
tients more often have to
choose between their doctor
and the hospital they prefer.
Cardiologists who have cho-
Heart doctors
leave practice
for hospitals
By STACEY BURLING
The Philadelphia Inquirer
See DOCTORS, Page 2C
She never used to worry
about heart disease.
I exercised every day. I al-
ways walked my dog, Sha-
ron Kittrick, 52, of Wilkes-
Barre said. I walked up
hills.
She felt good, and she be-
lieved she came from hardy
stock.
My father lived to be 84.
My mom is in her 80s now.
But every now and then,
Kittrick would have this up-
set-stomach kind of feeling.
One morning last year, she
woke up with what she
thought was indigestion. She
called her boss, who persuad-
ed her to go to the emergen-
cy room.
If it wasnt for her, I would
not be here today, said Kit-
trick, whose indigestion
turned out to be acute myo-
cardial infarction, otherwise
known as a heart attack.
In Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania, people with heart dis-
ease have plenty of company.
The national Centers for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion in Atlanta recently re-
leased figures showing the
region of Luzerne, Lacka-
wanna, Columbia, Sullivan
and Wyoming counties has
the highest incidence of
heart-disease death in the
state.
According to the CDC, 455
to 651 of every 100,000
deaths in people 35 and older
are a direct result of heart
disease.
Eager to avoid becoming a
fatal statistic, Kittrick em-
braced several lifestyle
changes.
First, she gave up the ciga-
Knowing risk factors can stave off heart disease
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
After her heart attack, Sharon Kittrick of Wilkes-Barre, who
was always an exerciser, gave up smoking and started to make
more healthful dietary choices.
See RISKS, Page 7C
S
tamping and stretching
every which way, a dozen
children danced like
cats, like an Egyptian and
then like the actors in the final
scene of Slumdog Million-
aire.
When the music stops,
freeze, teacher Joey Kupstas
said, temporarily turning a
Zumbatomic class at the
Wilkes-Barre YMCA into a
kind of red light/green light
game.
If you dont freeze, youre
out, a young voice piped up.
No, Kupstas replied. No-
body gets out in this.
Co-taught on Saturday after-
noons by Kupstas and YMCA
Wellness Director Linda Reilly,
Zumbatomic is a kid-size ver-
sion of Zumba, designed to help
6- to 12-year-olds stay active.
The eight-week session,
which started three weeks ago
in downtown Wilkes-Barre,
came at the perfect time for
Candice Muenchs daughter.
Other times of the year, she has
soccer and swimming,
Muench, of Nanticoke, said of 7-
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Co-teachers Linda Reilly and Joey Kupstas teach the Zumbatomic class to children including Cianna Isamoyer,
8, Hannah Chocallo, 9, Riley Bowers, 12, Allison Chocallo, 6, Katelyn George, 9, and Christian Clinton, 12.
Cianna Isamoyer, 8, practices a move in
Zumbatomic class as if she is strum-
ming a guitar.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
See ZUMBA, Page 5C
C M Y K
PAGE 2C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
H E A R T M O N T H
7
3
5
2
2
4
OAK ST PITTSTON TWP.
654-1112
SAT. 9-1
ALIBI and
BETWEEN BEERS
WED. 7-11
LINE DANCING
(Lessons 7-9)
THURS. 8-11
TONES
LUZERNE COUNTY: The Wyom-
ing Valley Chapter of the Amer-
ican Red Cross hosts community
blood drives throughout the
month. Donors who are 17 years
of age or older, weigh at least
1 10 pounds and are in relatively
good health or 16 years old and
have a parental permission form
completed, may give blood
every 56 days. To learn more
about how to donate blood or
platelets or to schedule a blood
donation, call 1-800-REDCROSS
(733-2767). In addition to those
listed below, blood drives are
conducted at the American Red
Cross Regional Blood Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Hanover
Industrial Estates, Ashley, Mon-
days and Tuesdays from 9:30
a.m.-7 p.m.; Fridays and Sat-
urdays from 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m.;
and Sundays from 7:30 a.m.-
noon. Appointments are sug-
gested but walk-ins are accept-
ed. Platelet appointments can
be made by calling 823-7164,
ext. 2235.
For a complete donation schedule,
visit: REDCROSSBLOOD.ORG or
call 1-800-REDCROSS (733-
2767).
Area blood donation sites include:
Today, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd, Ashley;
10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Miser-
icordia University Insalaco
Center, 301 Lake St., Dallas
Township; 10 a.m.-4 p.m., John
Heinz, 150 Mundy St., Wilkes-
Barre.
Wednesday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Luzerne
County Community College,
Prospect and Middle Road,
Nanticoke.
Thursday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Wilkes
University Henry Student Cen-
ter, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-
Barre.
Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Wilkes-Barre
Blood Donation Center, 29 New
Commerce Blvd, Ashley.
Saturday, 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd, Ashley.
Sunday, 7:30 a.m.-noon, Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd, Ashley;
8:30 a.m.-2 p.m., St. John the
Evangelist Church, 35 William
St., Pittston.
Monday, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd, Ashley.
Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Wilkes-
Barre Blood Donation Center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Ashley.
BLOOD DRIVES
BACK MOUNTAIN FREE
MEDICAL CLINIC: 6:30 p.m.
Fridays, 65 Davis St., Shaver-
town. Volunteers, services
and supplies needed. For
more information, call 696-
1144.
BMW FREE COMMUNITY
HEALTH CLINIC: 6-8 p.m.,
second Thursday, New Cov-
enant Christian Fellowship
Church, rear entrance, 780
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Free basic care for people
without health insurance
and the underserved. Call
822-9605.
CARE AND CONCERN FREE
HEALTH CLINIC: Regis-
tration 5-6:30 p.m. Wednes-
days, former Seton Catholic
High School, 37 William St.,
Pittston. Basic health care
and information provided.
Call 954-0645.
THE HOPE CENTER: Free
basic medical care and pre-
ventive health care informa-
tion for the uninsured or
underinsured, legal advice
and pastoral counseling, 6
p.m.-8 p.m. Mondays; free
chiropractic evaluations and
vision care, including free
replacement glasses, for the
uninsured or underinsured,
6-8 p.m. Thursdays; Back
Mountain Harvest Assembly,
340 Carverton Road, Trucks-
ville. Free dental hygiene
services and teeth cleanings
are available 6-8 p.m. on
Mondays by appointment.
Call 696-5233 or email
hopecenterwv@gmail.com.
VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE:
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday
through Friday, 190 N. Penn-
sylvania Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Primary and preventive
health care for the working
uninsured and underinsured
in Luzerne County with
incomes less than two times
below federal poverty guide-
lines. For appointments, call
970-2864.
WILKES-BARRE FREE CLIN-
IC: 4:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays,
St. Stephens Episcopal
Church, 35 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Appointments
are necessary. Call 793-4361.
A dental clinic is also avail-
able from1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday
by appointment. Call 570-
235-5642. Physicians, nurse
practitioners, pharmacists,
RNs, LPNs and social work-
ers are needed as well as
receptionists and interpret-
ers. To volunteer assistance
leave a message for Pat at
793-4361.
FREE CLINICS
James Siberski, assistant profes-
sor, coor-
dinator of
gerontological
education and
director of the
Geriatric Care
Management
program at
Misericordia
University,
and Christine
L. Hischmann, a former profes-
sor of occupational therapy at
Misericordia University and
director of occupational therapy
at Clarks Summit State Hospital,
recently had a chapter publish-
ed in the second edition of the
textbook, A Practitioners
Guide to Clinical Occupational
Therapy.
The colleagues collaborated on
the chapter, Dementia, to
outline the different forms of
the disease and to summarize
the approaches occupational
therapists need to take in order
to slow a patients deterioration
from the disease, such as sup-
port health and participating in
life through engagement in
occupation.
Published by Pro-Ed, the chapter
also provides various assess-
ment tools, such as the Mon-
treal Cognitive Assessment and
Allen Cognitive Levels Test,
available to clinicians as they
carefully plan a method of
intervention, and also incorpo-
rates the importance of family
on treatment.
HEALTH PEOPLE
Siberski
Editors note: The complete
health calendar can be
viewed at www.timesleader-
.com by clicking the Health
link under the Features tab.
To have your health-oriented
event listed, send information
to Health, Times Leader, 15 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250; by fax: 829-5537;
or email health@timeslead-
er.com
Next Call the Doctor topic
Foot health will be the next
topic on WVIA-TVs Call the
Doctor at 7 tonight. Joining
George Thomas, moderator,
will be panelists Barry Bern-
stein, doctor of podiatric med-
icine with Geisinger Health
System and Laura Virtue-De-
layo, medical and surgical
podiatry with Physicians
Health Alliance.
Viewers may call in questions
during the live show at (800)
326-9842 or submit their ques-
tions online at wviatv.org/live-
show-comments.
An encore broadcast will air
at 2 p.m. Sunday.
Community invited to
participate in survey
As the national search begins
for a permanent dean of The
Commonwealth Medical Col-
lege, the TCMC Board of Trust-
ees and the TCMC Search
Advisory Committee are in-
viting the public to participate
in a brief survey to identify the
essential qualities and charac-
teristics necessary to lead the
medical school.
Individuals interested in
taking the brief survey can
and help prevent tooth decay,
free pit and fissure sealants and
dental X-rays (when indicated),
free oral hygiene instruction,
and a free toothbrush.
Table clinics will be on dis-
play providing dental health
information for parents and
children. For more information
or to schedule an appointment,
call 740-0448 or (800) 377-
LCCC, ext. 7448.
Dining With Diabetes class
Penn State Cooperative Ex-
tension will be offering a four
session Dining with Diabetes
class on Wednesdays, Feb. 29,
March 7, 14, and 21 from 5:30
7:30 p.m. at the Cooperative
Extension Office in Tunkhan-
nock.
A light dinner from the Din-
ing With Diabetes Cookbook
will be included each week. A
three-month follow up session
will be scheduled. Cost is $35
per person, or $50 per family.
Class instructor is Marlene
Nash. In addition to education-
al materials, participants will
receive recipe books, an exer-
cise DVD and stretch band, and
have the opportunity for a
blood pressure screening and
lab tests for HbA1c.
Preregistration is required; to
register, call 836-3196.
held from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb.
23 at LIFE Geisinger Scranton,
2300 Adams Ave., Scranton , on
the Marywood University cam-
pus.
Before or after donating
blood, donors and visitors will
have the chance to attend an
open house and speak with
LIFE Geisinger Scranton staff
about the medical, social and
behavioral services they pro-
vide for the frail elderly. At-
tendees may also tour the day
health center and enjoy light
refreshments until 5 p.m.
To make a blood donation
appointment, call Maria Hastie,
outreach coordinator, at (800)
395-8759. No appointment is
needed to attend the open
house.
Kids Cavity Prevention Day
The Luzerne County Com-
munity College Dental Depart-
ment and the Northeast Penn-
sylvania Dental Hygiene Asso-
ciation will hold a Kids Cavity
Prevention Day from 9 a.m. to
noon Feb. 25 at the Colleges
Dental Clinic at the LCCC
Health Sciences Center in
downtown Nanticoke.
The program is for children
ages 3 to 16, and will include
free dental exams, free cavity
varnish to strengthen enamel
visit: www.thecommonwealth-
medical.com/DeanSearch until
Friday. Feb.10
The survey will close at 5
p.m. for compilation, analysis
and summary. All submissions
are confidential and will be
reviewed and considered as
part of the complete response
group.
Special community forum
A special community forum,
designed to help families plan
for better care for themselves
and their loved ones, will be
held from 2-3:30 p.m. Feb. 16 at
Oakwood Terrace Memory
Care Community, 400 Gleason
Drive, Moosic.
Representative Kenneth J.
Smith, 112th Legislative Dis-
trict Lackawanna County, will
give the address and will be
joined by six other guest speak-
ers.
The event is free and open to
the public. Light refreshments
will be served. Seating is limit-
ed. RSVP by Feb. 14 by calling
Sylvia at 451-3171, ext. 116.
Blood drive, open house
LIFE Geisinger Scranton is
teaming up with the Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania chapter of the
American Red Cross to host a
blood drive. The event will be
IN BRIEF
sen to sit out the exodus from
private practice think their
fellow doctors are panicking
and may come to miss their
autonomy. They also question
whether the new arrange-
ments will stabilize income or
are necessary to improve
care.
Alice Gosfield, a health-care
lawyer in Philadelphia, said
many of the deals were fueled
by mutual delusions. Be-
cause aging baby boomers
will need more heart care, she
said, cardiologists dont nec-
essarily need to become em-
ployees.
Whether or not they give up
private practice, though, doc-
tors will need to get more effi-
cient. The doctors are going
to have to change their behav-
ior, she said.
Everyone is trying to avoid
the problems in the mid-1990s
that plagued the last round of
practice acquisitions by hospi-
tals. Many hospitals then
scooped up primary-care doc-
tors in an attempt to capture
patients and market share.
Many of those relationships
fell apart. Hospitals felt they
had overpaid for the doctors
and complained that doctors
stopped working as hard once
they went on salary. The new
contracts typically include
productivity and quality in-
centives. Doctors also are of-
ten involved in managing hos-
pital cardiac care.
The trend is stronger in oth-
er parts of the country, local
experts said, but is picking up
steam in southeastern Pa.
On average, cardiologists
make about $450,000 per
year. Their income has fallen
slightly as Medicare has cut
reimbursements for imaging
and procedures such as cathe-
terization.
The idea of working for a
hospital has become more
palatable in recent years, and
the change is particularly no-
ticeable among young doc-
tors, who put a greater prior-
ity on work-life balance than
peers from earlier genera-
tions. In 2003, just 4 percent
of medical residents said their
first choice was to get a hospi-
tal job. By 2011, 32 percent
said that, according to con-
sultants Merritt Hawkins &
Associates.
DOCTORS
Continued from Page 1C
The idea of working for a hospital has become more
palatable in recent years, and the change is particularly
noticeable among young doctors, who put a greater
priority on work-life balance than peers from earlier
generations. In 2003, just 4 percent of medical
residents said their first choice was to get a
hospital job. By 2011, 32 percent said that, according to
consultants Merritt Hawkins & Associates.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 3C
Accredited Chest Pain Center.
Primary Stroke Center.
Two lifesaving reasons
to choose us.
In this area, only Wilkes-Barre General Hospital has both an Accredited Chest Pain Center and
a Certied Primary Stroke Center. This means that during a stroke or a heart attack, Wilkes-Barre
General can ofer you a greater chance of survival. In an emergency, call 911 and know where to go.
WVHCS.org
C M Y K
PAGE 4C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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MINNEAPOLIS Carter
Holmes loved to run. He ran
track in high school and was on
the University of Minnesotas
Big 10 cross-country champion-
ship team in 1969. For 35 years,
Carter ran across courts as a
high school and college-level
sports official.
Four years ago, while training
for the World Masters Track &
Field Championships, he had a
massive heart attack, then a
stroke. Hewalks now, slowlyand
deliberately, largely thanks to a
very special neighbor.
I could set my watch by when
shed be over, says Carter, 62, of
11-year-old Charlotte DeVaughn,
who lives a block away in south
Minneapolis.
For three years, Charlotte and
Carter have walked around the
block together after school.
Their stroll takes up to 45 min-
utes, but they never feel rushed.
At first when we would go
around, it wouldnt be quite
fast, says Charlotte, who gets a
few dollars a week from Carter
or his brother Tom. Then it got
quicker and quicker.
Charlottes mom, Michelle,
has a theory about why thats
true. Theyre both good talk-
ers.
After they walk, Carter stands
at his door while Charlotte does
a twirl around his clothesline
post. Its their way of saying
goodbye.
In cold weather, they walk in-
doors or find other ways to be
buddies. Carter attends Char-
lottes basketball games, where
she plays on a team coached by
her dad, Mike.
She does a bounce pass real
good, Carter says. She spots
the open players. Most people
that age dont do that.
Hes watched her compete in
track, too (Charlotte placed sec-
ondinlongjumpat the2011Min-
nesota State Junior Olympic
meet), and enjoyed her school
musical.
She would dance, but she
didnt do the watusi, Carter
says.
Charlotte, a sixth-grader at
Anthony Middle School, doesnt
know what that means, but it
makes her laugh. They also at-
tend the games of her brother
Nathan, 18, a senior at South-
west High, and her sister Au-
drey, 16, an 11th-grader at Wash-
burn High.
Carter uses Metro Mobility to
get around. On Tuesdays, his
brother visits him.
But without Charlotte, Carter
says, he would have been far less
eager to get back on his feet. I
might have fallen.
Last year, when Charlotte was
to be named Student of the
Month at Kenny School, Carter
secretly secured an additional
community service award for
her.
She had done a good job ...
Carter says. She did it. No ques-
tions asked.
Aging athlete steps back to health with pre-teens help
By GAIL ROSENBLUM
Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
MCT PHOTOS
Charlotte De Vaughn, 11, checks to make sure the way is clear in a hallway at Southwest High
School for her friend, Carter Holmes, 62, as the pair attended a girls basketball game along
with Charlottes father.
Enjoy food
fried with
the right oil
By JEANNINE STEIN
Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES Rejoice,
those who love fried foods: Eat-
ingthemmay not put youat high-
er risk for coronary heart disease
if youre frying those foods in
olive or sunflower oils.
A study published in the Brit-
ish Medical Journal analyzed da-
ta on 40,757 Spanish adults age
29 to 69 who were followedfor an
average11years. Free of coronary
heart disease at the beginning of
the study, they were asked what
they ate and what cooking meth-
ods they used, then were tracked
to see who developed coronary
heart disease and who died.
During those 11 years, 606
events were linked to coronary
heart disease, such as heart at-
tack or chest pain, and1,135 peo-
ple died from all causes. Howev-
er, eating fried foods was not as-
sociated with incident coronary
heart disease or coronary heart
disease events, even after adjust-
ing for various factors suchas cal-
orie intake, age, sex, body mass
index and high blood pressure.
The types of oils usedto fry foods
olive, sunflower or other vege-
table oils didnt change the
outcome.
Eating fried foods cooked with
those oils was also not linked
with death from all causes.
Onaverage the study participa-
nts ate about five ounces of fried
food a day, or about 7 percent of
their total amount of food. As for
what oil they used for frying, 62
percent used olive oil, and the
rest used sunflower or other
types of vegetable oil. Of all fried
food eaten, 24 percent was fish,
22 percent was meat, 21 percent
were potatoes and 11 percent
were eggs.
Although the participant
group was large and they were
followed for a number of years,
one of the studys limitations was
that researchers couldnt sepa-
rate the effects of frying with oil
fromthe foodthat was fried, such
as fish, some of which is high in
omega-3 fatty acids, shown in
some studies to be beneficial for
heart health.
Frying foods with some types
of oils or solids, such as partly hy-
drogenated vegetable oil, can in-
crease intake
of trans fats,
considered the
worst type of
fat because it
raises bad
cholesterol
and lowers
good choles-
terol.
FOTOLIA.COM PHOTO
Ideal cardiovascular health
means maintaining a healthy
lifestyle.
More women than men die
of cardiovascular disease each
year, according to the Ameri-
can Heart Association. Addi-
tionally, women are less likely
than men to receive appropri-
ate treatment after a heart at-
tack.
For women, generally the
primary caregiver, personal
health concerns are often put
on hold as family and loved
ones tend to take priority.
Due to this, improper diet,
not enough exercise and daily
stresses become the norm,
and women put themselves at
highriskfor developinghealth
problems including heart at-
tack and stroke.
More than 400,000 female
deaths inthe UnitedStates are
caused by cardiovascular dis-
ease each year, according to
AHA.
Metabolic syndrome is a
medical termused when a per-
son has three or more risk fac-
tors, which increases the risk
of developing coronary artery
disease, stroke and type-2 dia-
betes, or other vascular diseas-
es, according to the National
Institutes of Health and Na-
tional Center for Biotechnolo-
gy Information.
Provided by the AHA, risk
factors of metabolic syndrome
include: the waist being grea-
ter than 35 inches; triglyce-
rides higher than 150 mg/dL;
HDL (good cholesterol) less
than 50 mg/dL; blood pres-
sure higher than 130/85 mm
Hg; and fasting blood glucose
higher than 100 mg/dL.
Dr. Michael S. Fenster, inter-
ventional cardiologist with
Women at a greater
risk for heart disease
By ANNA LAMY
Hernando Today (Brooksville, Fla.)
AmyHeinl hadbegunher usual
workout onthemorningof June2,
2010.
Five minutes into her exercise
routine, she felt pain in her chest.
Thinkingshe pulleda muscle, she
tried to walk it off, stretch it out.
She thought if she just lay downit
would go away.
Then she collapsed.
Thats how quickly it hap-
pened, says the42-year-oldsingle
mother of three boys from Glen-
shaw. That day changed my life
forever. Thank goodness my
friendwastheretocall 911. If not, it
could have ended so tragically dif-
ferent for me and my family.
Spontaneous coronary artery
dissection, which has a high fatal-
ity rate, was diagnosed. Eight per-
cent of cases affect youngwomen.
Heinl tore her left main artery 2
1/2 inches and underwent sur-
gery. Shespent fivedaysinUPMC
Passavant Hospital, followed by
eight weeks of cardiac rehabilita-
tion. Aboutthreemonthslater, she
ran her first 5Krace.
Heinl didnt fall into any of the
risk categories.
When it comes to heart health, seeing red is good
By JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Hernando Heart Clinic in
Brooksville, Fla., advised wom-
en at risk can experience warn-
ing signs in many different
ways.
For women and men, the
most common warning sign is a
discomfort in the center of the
chest lasting more than a few
minutes. It maycome andgo, of-
ten in relation to exertion or
stress. It can manifest as an un-
comfortable pressure, squeez-
ing, fullness or pain, Fenster
said.
Sometimes the discomfort
can be felt in one or both arms,
as well as the back, neck, jaw or
stomach, he added.
Some women experience a
shortness of breath, that may or
may not include chest pain,
Fenster said. Additionally,
breaking out in a cold sweat,
nausea or feeling light-headed
are possible. What is important
to realize is that many women
present without these classical
symptoms. These atypical
symptoms may range from a
general ill feeling to severe
shortness of breath or abdom-
inal pain.
Women who are at high risk
for heart disease are those who
have existing coronary artery
disease, such as stents, bypass
surgery, and/or history of
heart attack, stroke. Addition-
ally, blocked arteries in the
legs, abdominal aortic aneu-
rysm, chronic kidney disease
and diabetes are included as
high-risk factors, the AHA ad-
vises.
She has no family history of heart
disease, doesntsmoke, hercholes-
terol was good, and she worked
out regularly.
Women can do right by their
hearts by quitting smoking, con-
trollingbloodpressureandcholes-
terol, adding an exercise routine
and watching their weight.
I wanted to prove to myself
that I could get back to normal,
says Heinl, who made lifestyle
changestoimproveherhealthout-
look. It was important to me to
know I could still live a full life
andbeabletodoalot of things.
... If my personal story can
change any womans thinking of
heartdiseaseandissues, thatismy
goal.
Helping broaden heart-health
awarenessiswhyshewantstostay
involved.
I think women just need to be
reminded to take care of their
hearts, said Heinl, vice president
of theFederal ReserveBankof Cle-
veland, Pittsburgh Office.
Heart disease is silent, and its
hidden and its misunderstood,
says Sue McMurdy, chairwoman
for the Go Red for Women cam-
paign, which encourages heart-
health awareness through wear-
ing of the color red, and executive
vice president and chief informa-
tion officer for First Common-
wealthFinancial Corp. If wom-
en dont take care of them-
selves, then they wont be
able to take care of any-
one else.
8 million women in the United States are living with heart disease,
yet only one in six American women believe heart disease is her great-
est health threat.
90 percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing
heart disease.
While one in 30 American women dies from breast cancer each year,
one in three dies of cardiovascular disease.
Only 43 percent of African American women and 44 percent of
Hispanic women know that heart disease is their No. 1 killer, compared
with 60 percent of white women.
42 percent of women die within a year of suffering a heart attack,
compared with 24 percent of men.
Women younger than 45 who suffer a heart attack are at a higher
risk of death. Some 26 percent of women in this age group die within a
year of a heart attack compared with 19 percent of men and 47 per-
cent of women are dead after five years versus 36 percent of men.
Women are less likely to call 911 for themselves when experiencing
symptoms of a heart attack than they are if someone else were having
a heart attack.
STARTLING STATS
MCT ILLUSTRATION
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 5C
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Sexual activity is safe for many
people who have experienced
heart problems or stroke, experts
announced recently in a state-
ment containing recommenda-
tions for safe sexual activity.
The report, issuedby a panel of
major medical organizations,
notes that the question of resum-
ing sexual activity after cardio-
vascular events is a major issue
for patients.
Sexual counseling of cardio-
vascular disease patients and
their partners is an important
component of recovery; unfortu-
nately, it is rarely provided, the
authors wrote.
The report contains detailed
recommendations aimed at help-
ing doctors and patients discuss
sexual activity. In general, most
patients canresumesexafter adi-
agnosis of cardiovascular disease
if they are first evaluated by a
health-care professional. Howev-
er, people with a severe disease
who tend to have symptoms,
such as chest pain, with minimal
physical activity or while resting,
should not be sexually active un-
til they receive further care tosta-
bilize their conditions.
Peoplewhoundergocardiacre-
hab or who exercise regularly
have a lower risk of complica-
tions related to sexual activity,
the authors said. In general, med-
ications for erectile dysfunction
are safe for men with stable car-
diovascular disease.
Recommendations are listed
by each type of cardiovascular di-
agnosis, such as for patients with
pacemakers, congenital heart dis-
ease, valvular heart disease and
other conditions. The paper is
published online in Circulation:
Journal of the American Heart
Association.
Sexual activity not
thing of past after
heart attack, stroke
By SHARI ROAN
Los Angeles Times
year-old Maya. This is the
downtime.
The big thing about this is
its fun, co-teacher Reilly
said. Most kids love to dance,
and most of the dances are
pretty easy. A lot of it is pre-
sented as a game.
With a pop song lending
some Baby-I-like-it-the-way-
you-move-on-the-floor musi-
cal encouragement, the young
exercisers worked their mus-
cles and burned calories.
They might not have real-
ized theyre building healthier
hearts and lungs at the same
time, but in the waiting room,
some of their parents were
thinking about those benefits.
Most certainly. My parents
have had heart issues, said
Jocelyn Chocallo of Wilkes-
Barre, who brought 9-year-old
Hannah and 6-year-old Allison
to the class.
According to the national
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention in Atlanta,
more than one-third of chil-
dren in the United States are
overweight or obese, and
those conditions are linked to
high cholesterol, high blood
pressure, pre-diabetes and fu-
ture health concerns such as
heart disease.
CDC statistics from 2009 al-
so reveal 30 percent of chil-
dren in kindergarten through
fourth-grade are in the highest
15 percent of body mass index
for their age group.
By encouraging their chil-
dren to spend an active hour,
parents of the Zumbatomic
participants were taking steps
to alleviate all those risks.
And theyd rather not sim-
ply sit and wait for their chil-
drens class to finish.
Approaching Reilly on a re-
cent Saturday, Muench asked
if a class for adults could take
place simultaneously.
How many would partici-
pate in a class like that? Reil-
ly asked.
Around the waiting room,
hands shot up.
I think I can arrange that
for the next session, Reilly
said.
ZUMBA
Continued from Page 1C
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Allison Chocallo, 6, moves to the beat of the music in Zumba-
tomic class.
EDITORS NOTE: To learn more about
YMCA classes, call 570-823-2191 or
visit wbymca.org.
LOSANGELESRobEvans, a
61-year-old social worker from
Apache Junction, Ariz., got the
goodnewsonFathersDay: After3
years, doctors had found him a
heart and were preparing to bring
it to the University of California-
Los Angeles, where he was being
treated for a slow, steady decay of
his cardiac muscle. Evans had
been hospitalized at UCLAfor six
weeks.
Excited, hopeful andanxiousall
at once, Evansdaredimagineadif-
ferentlife: outinthegarageremod-
elinghis69Nova, ridinghishorse,
wrestling with his grandson and
helping his wife, Gail, take care of
their barn instead of sitting, ex-
hausted, inhis chair all day.
But the heart destined for
Evans chestwasnotlikemostthat
transplant recipients get. Instead
of comingtohiminicyslumberin-
sideacooler, itwaswarmandbeat-
ing. Though it had been excised
from its donor, blood flowed
through it until shortly before it
was stitched into Evans body on
June19.
Evans was taking part in a na-
tionwide clinical trial to test
whether suchbeatinghearts are
as good as, or better than, hearts
packed in ice and slowed down
with potassium and other chem-
icals. Doctors at UCLA, one of the
studysleadingsites, haveenrolled
multiplepatients, andother trans-
plant centers across the country
will soonstart recruitingtoo.
The human heart was never
meant tobeonice,saidDr. Abbas
Ardehali, the surgical director of
UCLAs heart and lung transplan-
tationprogramandthetrialsprin-
cipal investigator. Chilling donor
hearts before a transplant slows
therateof cell deathandbuystime
to get the organ to a recipient but
only a little bit, he said. Thats
why having a human heart in a
warm, beating state has always
beenexciting.
Fromtheoutside, itlookslikean
ordinary gray-and-white storage
unit on wheels. At 40 inches tall,
30incheswideand20inchesdeep,
it weighslessthan100poundsand
fits comfortably in the back of an
SUV. But inside, it houses a living
humanheart.
The beating organ rests in a
clear, sterile chamber equipped
withapacemakerincaseitneedsa
jump-start. Warm blood flows
through tubing connected to the
aorta because the veins that nor-
mally bring blood to the heart are
sewn shut. The blood travels
through the heart, feeding it ox-
ygen and nutrients so it can func-
tion while removing waste prod-
ucts, which are filtered out by a
machine. Fresh oxygen and nutri-
entsareaddedtothedonorsblood
beforeit ispumpedbackin. All the
while, doctorscankeeptabsonthe
hearts rhythm, blood pressure
and other vital signs to make sure
it is healthy for surgery.
The heart believes its still in
the body, said Dr. Waleed Hassa-
nein, who founded TransMedics,
the Massachusetts-based medical
device company that developed
the apparatus and is sponsoring
the trial.
Impressiveresults
The technology was tested in
Europeina2006clinical trial of 20
heart transplant patients. Nine-
teen of these patients were out of
intensive care within 24 hours, a
muchshorter stay thanthe twoto
five days patients usuallyspendin
the ICU, said Dr. Bruce Rosen-
By DANIELA HERNANDEZ
Los Angeles Times
Study tests use of warm-heart transplants
See TRANSPLANT, Page 6C
C M Y K
PAGE 6C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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AKRON, Ohio She nor-
mally prays silently.
Deanna Dee Norflee
prayed aloud the day she
saved Bart Skinners life.
Please, Lord Jesus, she
said between sobs as she
hooked an automatic external
defibrillator, or AED, unit to
Skinner, who was in cardiac
arrest. Right now, if you give
me the strength to do your
will ...
Norflee, a recreation direc-
tor at Summit Lake Commu-
nity Center in Akron, Ohio,
had just watched the 55-year-
old Skinner take what could
be his last breath. Only sec-
onds earlier he was sprinting
up and down the basketball
court.
Press the button, the AED
unit told her.
Norflee did as instructed
and felt like she was being
shocked as she watched Skin-
ners body jerk. He began to
make a gurgling noise that
meant he was breathing
again.
Skinner, who was revived
by paramedics a second time
on the way to an area hospital
but is now doing well, credits
Norflees quick actions with
saving his life. His basketball
teammates honored Norflee
with a plaque and fruit basket.
An AED is one of those
things a tool that, under
the right circumstances, with
the right timing, can provide
you with positive results, Ak-
ron Fire Capt. Dale Evans
said. Sometimes thats not
the case.
Evans said Skinner was in
good physical shape, his prob-
lem was recognized early,
Norflee and others at the com-
munity center quickly provid-
ed him with help, and he sur-
vived.
Norflee remembers sitting
in the community-center of-
fice, feeling sorry for herself
before she had to spring into
action to help Skinner.
I was sitting there com-
plaining, recalls Norflee, 32,
who is also a substitute spe-
cial-education teacher for Ak-
ron Public Schools and an as-
sistant boys varsity basket-
ball coach at Buchtel High
School. There was so much go-
ing on.
Do you see that? her co-
worker suddenly asked.
Norflee looked into the gym
fromher office and sawSkinner
slouched over. She dialed 911
and told them to hurry; they
had a possible heart attack.
In the gymnasium, basket-
ball players, spectators and at-
tendees from the Narcotics
Anonymous meeting in the ad-
joining room buzzed around,
with everyone wanting to help.
One person said they needed
to elevate Skinners legs. Some-
one said to grab a chair. Norflee
told them they needed to lay
Skinner flat.
Anurse who is the wife of one
of the players started CPR. Nor-
flees co-worker grabbed the
AED and, together, they ripped
open Skinners shirt. Norflee
paused for a moment, per-
plexed because the AED wasnt
identical to the one she had
been trained on. She then no-
ticed an illustration inside that
showed her what to do.
Skinner let out a noise, ex-
pelling his breath, and Norflee
knew he was gone.
The AED, which had been
reading Skinners rhythm, told
her to push the button. Norflee
told a man touching Skinners
shoulder to back off and then
pushed the button. It delivered
an immediate shock that made
Skinner jump.
It felt like I was shocked,
Norflee said. You go through
the class, but its nothing like
the real deal.
Skinner made a gurgling
sound that told Norflee he was
breathing. He didnt immedi-
ately come to, though, and his
eyes rolled into the back of his
head.
Why isnt it going off again?
someone asked.
When the paramedics rushed
in, Norflee told them, He was
gone for about three. Then
pressed. One shock, an ac-
counting she later realized
didnt quite make sense but was
enough to get the point across.
Norflee worried about Skin-
ner until a firefighter who
made a run to the community
center about 45 minutes later
because of a blown fuse told her
he was in Akron General Med-
ical Centers emergency room,
singing.
Tears of joy came so fast,
she said. It was a relief.
Skinner doesnt remember
singing in the emergency room.
In fact, he doesnt remember
much until he woke up in the
ERwith a sore chest and his sis-
ter, Celeste Hicks, at his side.
Im scared, he told her.
She squeezed his hand, and
he felt better.
Doctors told Skinner he suf-
fered a heart attack brought on
by dehydration and a partially
blocked artery. In the days that
followed, they pumped him
full of fluids, used a cardiac
catheter on him and put in
shunts and a pacemaker.
When Skinner celebrated
his birthday Dec. 7, his friends
told him he was 1 again. You
were gone and had a newbirth-
day, they said.
The experience has given
both Skinner and Norflee a
new outlook.
My faith in the Lord is
strong but not as strong as it
should be, Norflee said.
Complaining. Going on. How
dare I complain!
He showed me something
through you, Norflee said to
Skinner, getting teary as they
sat side by side at the commu-
nity center where she saved
him. For me to embrace what
I have, instead of wondering
why things dont go the way I
want them to go.
Skinner is thankful he had
his heart attack in a place that
had an AED and where some-
one was trained to use it. He
has been trained to use the de-
vice because he volunteers at
House of the Lord, his church,
which has a fitness center. He
now thinks AEDs need to be
available in more places.
I think they should be ev-
erywhere, he said.
Woman uses AED to save mans life
By STEPHANIE WARSMITH
Akron Beacon Journal
MCT PHOTOS
Deanna Dee Norflee used this AED device to save the life of Bart Skinner in Akron, Ohio.
An up-close look at the auto-
matic external defibrillator
Deanna Norflee used to save
Bart Skinner in January. The
episode and others have led
people to focus on placing more
AEDs in public places.
gard, the surgical director of car-
diac transplantation at Massachu-
setts General Hospital in Boston
andoneof thefirst surgeons toper-
formwarmtransplants inEurope.
Thats a testament that those
heartsfunctionquitewell,hesaid.
The device, known as the Organ
Care System, has been commer-
cially available in Europe since
2009.
Worldwide, morethan100warm
transplants have now been per-
formed, all of themwithpositivere-
sults, Hassaneinsaid. IntheUnited
States, 24 patients have received
warm transplants, including
Evans.
To be sure, transplants of hearts
packed in ice are lifesavers: More
than 2,400 such hearts were trans-
planted in the United States last
year, according to data from the
UnitedNetworkforOrganSharing,
the nonprofit organization in Rich-
mond, Va., that oversees the coun-
trys transplant system. Almost 90
percent of recipients survive the
first year after surgery, andcloseto
50 percent live for at least 10 years
withtheir newhearts, accordingto
the National Heart, Lung and
BloodInstitute.
But there are drawbacks. Once a
heart is disconnected from its
blood supply, surgeons cool it to
put the brakes on damage that oc-
curs because cells are deprived of
oxygenandnutrients. Damagestill
occurs in spite of the cooling,
though so much so that after
about sixhours outside a body, the
hearts must bethrownaway.
In addition, surgeons only have
time to use factors such as blood
type, weight, height and gender to
pairupdonorsandrecipients. They
dont have the luxury of running
more sophisticated tests, like they
do for kidney transplants, because
theheart wont toleratethedelay.
Cardiologists and cardiac sur-
geons are hoping the Organ Care
Systemwill givethemmoretimeto
get hearts to the most critical
andbest-matchedpatients. The
technology could also help them
buff up hearts that maybe slight-
ly injured by the effects of brain
damage, which could increase the
numberof availablehearts, saidDr.
TRANSPLANT
Continued from Page 5C
See TRANSPLANT, Page 7C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 7C

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rettes she started smoking
as a junior in high school.
Then, she adopted the kind
of diet her doctor, Geisin-
ger chief cardiologist Dr.
Thomas Isaacson, recom-
mended.
I have chicken, fish, lots
of fruit and vegetables, she
said. I dont eat out as
much, and for a snack, in-
stead of potato chips Ill
have blanched almonds.
She also has her num-
bers checked every few
months, keeping tabs on
her blood pressure, choles-
terol and triglycerides.
Thats one of the most im-
portant practices he recom-
mends, Isaacson said in a
telephone interview.
A number of people may
have risk factors but they
dont know about them.
They may be a little doctor-
averse, so maybe they dont
know their blood pressure
is a little borderline. Maybe
they havent had their blood
sugar checked. You have to be
curious about that.
Most people know that if
they smoke, they should quit,
the doctor said. Likewise, they
know vegetables, whole grains
and lean meats are better than
fatty fried foods.
But many dont think about
the numbers that can be a
symptom of a problem.
Therein lies the challenge,
he said. For 25 to 30 percent
of patients, the first manifes-
tation of heart disease or ves-
sel disease may be a heart at-
tack, and it may be fatal. Some
people dont get a second
crack at this.
Its important for women to
be aware that heart disease is
not just a mans problem,
Isaacson said.
Women have a lifetime risk
that is significant. They may
lag a decade behind men, but
the most common cause of
womens death is in relation to
heart disease.
Women should be aware
that their heart-attack symp-
toms may be different from
the symptoms men often have.
It may be more shortness of
breath or fatigue rather than
chest pain, Isaacson said.
Or, as in Kittricks case, it
may seem like indigestion.
Among the ways to combat
the disease, Isaacson men-
tioned avoiding smoking, ex-
cess alcohol and excess salt,
eating healthful foods, exercis-
ing and avoiding weight gain,
particularly in middle age.
If we got more exercise,
wed really make a dent in this
disease, he said. There are
folks I see that pack on 10
pounds each winter and then
take eight off. A decade later,
theyre 20 pounds heavier.
He also recommends an an-
nual physical examination, so
youll be aware of all your sta-
tistics and be able to work to
change them if necessary.
Know your numbers, he
said.
RISKS
Continued from Page 1C
Bartley Griffith, the director of
heart and lung transplantation at
theUniversityof MarylandinBalti-
more who was involved in a safety
trial of theOrganCareSystem.
Thats reallytheHolyGrail, he
said.
Proof inthepudding?
But first they have totest it head
to head against the conventional
transplant method. They will en-
roll a total of 128 patients at UCLA
andmorethan10other sitesacross
the country. Doctors will assess
howmanypatients survive30days
after the surgery, how much time
they spend in intensive care and
how often they reject their new
hearts. They anticipate finishing
withthetrial bytheendof 2012.
Conditions such as the time the
heart is outside the body and the
types of donors and recipients will
bekept similar. Theprimarydiffer-
ence will be whether a patient gets
a warm or cold heart, and that
wont be known until the moment
the transplant team gets ready to
collect the organ. Ateammember
will open a sealed envelope with a
piece of paper inside indicating
standardof care or OCS.
Happyendings
One year ago, the sheet for An-
drea Ybarra read OCS. She had
beenwaitingfor a heart for about a
year anda half.
The 41-year-old former day-care
owner from Whittier, Calif., went
to the ERin2003 thinking she had
gallstones. She was tired, had lost
her appetite and had pain in her
back and abdomen. Her doctor
sent her to a cardiologist, and car-
diomyopathy, the same condition
Evans had, was diagnosed.
In 2006, surgeons inserted a
pacemaker. But by 2007, the pace-
maker wasnt enough. Ybarra was
so tired and weak she would fall
asleep at the breakfast table. And
multiple times she felt her pace-
maker jolt her heart into beating
again. Whenshewent toUCLAfor
treatment in 2007, doctors also di-
agnosed lupus and told her the au-
toimmune disorder had likely
causedthedamagetoher heart.
Sheneededa heart transplant.
She joined the transplant list in
2008andwastoldthreetimesthere
might be a match for her, only to
havethemfall through.
It was so frustrating. I felt like I
was livingoneggshells, shesaid.
Then nurse practitioner Chris
Eisenring, coordinating the warm-
heart trial at UCLA, suggested she
enroll.
Today, Ybarra walks for 45 min-
utes on her treadmill six times a
week. Theroutinebiopsiesandthe
sonograms are almost behind her.
She and her husband went on a
road trip to Las Vegas and would
like tohave a baby someday. That
will be my biggest accomplish-
ment, shesaid.
Evans is also making strides.
Five weeks after his surgery, he
walkedupahill. Itsbeen3years
since hes beenable to do anything
likethat, saidhis wife, Gail.
Its too early to say whether pa-
tientsdobetterinthelongrunwith
hearts kept warmand beating, but
Evans is convinced.
Fresh is always better than fro-
zen, hesaid.
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PAGE 8C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publi-
cation, your information must
be typed or computer-generat-
ed. Include your childs name,
age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grand-
parents names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
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Dont forget to include a day-
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Send to: Times Leader Birth-
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GUIDELINES
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16)
will be published free of charge
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Mayson Alexander Girton, son of
Chasity and Jason Girton, is
celebrating his sixth birthday
today, Feb. 7. Mayson is a grand-
son of the late Clinton Hashagen
and Rodney Girton, both of
Wapwallopen, and Renee Girton,
Wilkes-Barre. He is a great-
grandson of Clinton and Caroline
Hashagen and Darlene and
William Terry, all of Berwick, and
Joyce and Raymond Girton,
Catawissa.
Mayson A. Girton
Enrique Leonardo Golda, son of
Richard Golda and Lizzette
Santiago-Golda, Plains Township,
is celebrating his ninth birthday
today, Feb. 7. Enrique is a grand-
son of Leonard L. and Mary
Golda, Mountain Top, and Edith
Santiago, Puerto Rico. He has a
brother, Jimmy, 24.
Enrique L. Golda
Lauren Shea Mullery, daughter
of Gerald and Michele Mullery,
Alden, is celebrating her 10th
birthday today, Feb. 7. Lauren is
a granddaughter of Janet Mul-
lery and the late Gerald Mullery
and Gerald and Patricia Mech, all
of Nanticoke. She has a sister,
Leah Marie, 1 1, and two brothers,
Liam Gerald, 6, and Louden
John, 4.
Lauren S. Mullery
Isabella Nero, daughter of Ed-
ward and Rebecca Nero, Wilkes-
Barre Township, is celebrating
her fourth birthday today, Feb. 7.
Isabella is a granddaughter of
Frank Wallace, Sweet Valley;
Betty Wallace, Nipgen, Ohio; and
Carol Fronczkiewicz, Pittston.
Isabella Nero
Cade Everett Norton, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Jarrod Norton, Hunlock
Creek, is celebrating his seventh
birthday today, Feb. 7. Cade is a
grandson of Richard and Linda
Norton, Sweet Valley, and Bill
and Peggy Hale, Blytheville, Ark.
He is a great-grandson of Ruth
Norton, Wilkes-Barre.
Cade E. Norton
Kyra Zabretsky, daughter of
Cindy Zabretsky and the late
Gary Zabretsky, is celebrating
her ninth birthday today, Feb. 7.
Kyra is a granddaughter of Barry
and Judy Lutz, Freeland; Irm-
gard Zabretsky, Larksville; and
the late John Zabretsky. She has
a brother, Adam, 13.
Kyra Zabretsky
PETS OF THE WEEK
Name: Stray
SPCA No: A14582659
Sex: male
Age: unknown
Breed/type: terrier/pit bull mix
About this dog: neutered; brown/
white/brindle; medium
Name: Stray
SPCA No: A14795894
Sex: female
Age: unknown
Breed/type: domestic/shorthair
mix
About this cat: spayed; white/grey
color; small
How to adopt: Call or visit The
SPCA of Luzerne County, 524 E.
Main St., Plains Township. For more
information call 825-4111. Adoption
hours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to
7 p.m. Monday through Friday and
from11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays and
Sundays. Visit the SPCA of Luzerne
County online at http://spcalu-
zernecounty.org.
EXETER: The Cosmopolitan
Seniors will meet at 1 p.m. to-
day in St. Anthonys Center. Vic
Malinowski will preside. Dues
will be collected. Hosts/host-
esses are Frank and Marcella
Fountain, Rose Gunsior, Eva
Naples and Frank Onda.
Fifty-fifty winners were There-
sa Blasavage, Mary Dirhan,
Marcella Fountain, Rosemary
Golinski and Eva Naples. Mau-
reen Gosart and Cheryl Pipher
shared the winnings from the
special bingo game and Eva
Naples won the jackpot game.
Travel coordinator Johanna is
accepting reservations for a trip
to Mount Airy Casino on Feb.
15. Pickups will be in Exeter and
Pittston. Non-members are
welcome on the trip. For more
information, contact Johanna at
655-2720.
FALLS: The Falls Senior
Center is sponsoring a discus-
sion by registered dietitian Lisa
Macdonald 11 a.m.-noon on
Wednesday. Strawberry sundaes
will be served 1 p.m. Friday.
Cost is $1.
A Valentines Day party will
take place 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 14.
New members are being ac-
cepted. Cost is $4 for the year.
NANTICOKE: The Rose
Tucker Center, 128 W. Washing-
ton St., is holding a piano sing-a-
long with Marian and Diana at
11 a.m. Wednesday.
Representatives from Con-
gressman Yudichaks office will
be at the center 9 a.m.-11:30
a.m. on Feb. 27 to help complete
rent and property tax rebate
forms. Appointments are neces-
sary and can be made by calling
the center at 735-1670.
George Rittenhouse will pro-
vide entertainment at a Valen-
tines celebration 1 p.m. Thurs-
day.
Zumba Gold classes will take
place 2-3 p.m. Thursday. Cost is
$2 for members and $3 for non-
members. Another class will be
held 1-2 p.m. Monday.
A special Valentines Day
dinner will take place on Feb.
14.
PITTSTON: The Pittston
Senior Center, 441 N. Main St.,
is holding Zumba Gold classes
on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Cost is $2 for center members
and $3 for non-members. To
register, contact Connie An-
drews, center director, at 655-
5561.
The Hospice of Sacred Heart
is conducting free blood pres-
sure screenings 11 a.m.-noon on
Wednesday. The public is in-
vited.
A Council meeting will take
place 10:30 a.m. Friday. All
council members are urged to
attend.
Valentine Day celebrations
will be held on Feb. 14. A special
dinner will take place at noon
and music for dancing will be
provided by Something Else.
Donation for the dinner is $2.
The party begins at 12:30 p.m.
and the cost is $3. Light refresh-
ments will be served. Reserva-
tions should be made by noon
Monday by calling the center.
Anyone who ordered beef
pasties should pick them up
after 11 a.m. on Thursday.
PLYMOUTH: The Senior
Citizens Friendship Club of St.
Marys will meet 1 p.m. Monday
at the Holy Child School build-
ing, Willow Street. Servers will
be Regina Korba, Helen Karpov-
ich, Joseph Kelly, Lorraine Loft-
us and Midge Malshefski. Valen-
tines Day will be celebrated at
the meeting and members are
reminded to bring Valentines for
exchanging. Bingo will follow
the business session.
The committee members for
the Mom and Dad dinner to be
held on May 14 are Arlene Grit-
sko, Regina Korba, Midge Mal-
shefski, Josephine Medura and
Rosalie Meurer.
Fifty-fifty winners were Cathe-
rine Smith, Rosemary Piston
and Ann Brunick.
A day trip is planned for
March 16 to Mount Haven. Trip
includes two complete meals,
free drinks and four hours of
games and entertainment. An-
other trip is planned for June
17-22 to Nashville, Tenn. Trip
includes five nights lodging, five
breakfasts, a river boat cruise
with entertainment, two din-
ners, Nashville Dinner Theatre,
Grand Ole Opry, a guided tour
of Nashville, Country Music
Hall of Fame, Belle Meade Plan-
tation, souvenir gift, taxes and
gratuities and motor coach
transportation. For reservations,
call Ann at 779-3203.
PLYMOUTH: The Shawnee
Senior Citizens will meet 1 p.m.
Thursday at First Welsh Baptist
Church, West Shawnee and
Girard avenues. Members
should bring a sandwich. Bever-
ages will be provided. The Rev.
Anita J. Ambrose, president,
will preside. Members should
also bring a Valentine thought
to the meeting.
SWOYERSVILLE: Swoyers-
ville Senior Citizens will meet 1
p.m. Wednesday at Holy Trinity
Church hall. New members are
welcome. Social hour will take
place after the meeting. Winners
of the 50-50 fundraiser were
Arlene Kosco, JoAnn Baker, Ann
Wayslo and Liz Zdancewicz.
WYOMING: The Wyoming,
West Wyoming Seniors will
meet 1:30 p.m. today at the St.
Monica meeting center. Frank
Perfinski will conduct the meet-
ing. Refreshments will be served
after the meeting. Servers are
Helen Nocek, Genny Rooney
and Helen Ostroski. Fifty-fifty
winners were Angie Mastruzzo,
Helen Nocek, Elinor Yurek and
Paul Delaney. Bingo jackpot
winner was Helen Nocek.
Valentines Day will be cele-
brated with pizza on the menu
and coffee, tea and cake.
The club meets the first and
third Tuesday of the month at
1:30 p.m. New members are
welcome.
NEWS FOR SENIORS
Thursday
DUPONT: The Greater
Pittston Chapter 1723
of the National Asso-
ciation of Retired and
Active Federal Em-
ployees, 1 p.m. in the
V.F.W. hall. In the
event of inclement
weather the meeting
will be postponed
until March 8. All
federal employees
are invited.
MEETINGS
Hospice of the Sacred Hearts January Lunch and Learn topic
was Acupuncture -- An Old Therapy for New Problems presented
by Steven J. Szydlowski, assistant professor of health adminis-
tration at the University of Scranton, and Antoinette Mansi, board
certified acupuncturist at Inner Harmony Wellness Center. Hospice
of the Sacred Heart Lunch and Learn sessions are held on the first
Thursday of the month at the Hospice of the Sacred Heart Center
for Education, 340 Montage Mountain Road, Moosic. The sessions
are free and open to the public. For reservations, call 706-2400. At
the January lunch, from left: Szydlowski; Mansi; and Dr. Ralph
DeMario, chief medical officer.
Acupuncture topic of Lunch and Learn program
United Methodist Homes Tunkhannock cam-
pus recently held a Christmas party for resi-
dents and their families. More than 115 people
enjoyed dinner, dessert, entertainment and
spending time with loved ones. Residents were
able to send family members home with plates
of homemade cookies that were baked by the
residents before the party. The event was
planned by Terry White, activity director, with
the help of administrator Joe Corey, staff mem-
bers, dieticians, housekeeping and nurses. At
the party, are resident Marian Manning, seated,
and her daughter, Donna Archer, and son, Kevin
Manning.
United Methodist Homes, Tunkhannock,
holds Christmas Party for residents
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 9C
D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I just
read the letter from
a fellow frustrated
night shifter, Work-
ing a 40-Hour Week
at Age 73 (Dec.
20). I have worked
12-hour shifts for
many years to accommodate our fam-
ily life. It is easier for me to be home
in the morning to get the kids to
school and be home when they get off
the bus in the afternoon. I have the
early evening free to get them to their
activities, then go to work later.
I thoroughly agree that the rest
of the world does not understand!
Ive had the strangest requests from
people because Im home during the
day. My solution has been to turn off
our home phone and sleep with my
cellphone on (in case one of the kids
gets sick at school or some other dire
emergency). This year I made a lami-
nated sign for my front door, asking
for peace and quiet. It says, Please
do not ring my doorbell. Night-shift
worker sleeping at this time.
Sleepless in Wisconsin
Dear Sleepless: Thanks for your let-
ter. Your fellow night shifters were
in complete agreement with you. My
newspaper readers comment:
Dear Abby: Theres nothing unusual
about Workings problem. I worked
the graveyard shift for years at differ-
ent jobs in different states, and it was
exactly the same. In my case it was
usually my mother, not my husband,
who kept waking me up. Even worse,
it wasnt unusual for bosses to call
and wake me.
What surprised me was the number
of people who think sleep is optional
rather than necessary. They seemed
to think that they sleep at night be-
cause theres nothing else to do.
Laura in Pollok, Texas
Dear Abby: I sympathize with Work-
ing. I also work a graveyard shift so
I can be home with our newborn and
not have to put him in day care eight
hours a day. Its hard for people to
understand that even though its day-
time for them, its my night! I found
myself running errands, marketing,
etc., because I felt guilty being at
home all day and doing nothing. It
took its toll on me until I got to the
point where I could barely function.
I finally had to get over my issues
about being home during the day and
realize that I was putting in a 40-hour
week just like anyone else. Since I
didnt expect to do my chores at 3
a.m., I would no longer let anyone
expect it of me. I still sleep in shifts
to keep my sons time at day care to
a minimum, but when I sleep, I dont
let anyone interrupt.
Please tell Working not to let
anyone make her feel guilty. Everyone
needs sleep, and she shouldnt have
to justify it to anyone.
Fellow 3rd Shifter in Indianapolis
Dear Abby: I worked nights for years.
My husbands friends thought they
were being funny when theyd call me
at 7 a.m. asking, Hows the bat do-
ing? One night at 3 a.m. I called each
one of them to ask how THEY were
doing. After that, I never received an
early call again.
My husband didnt respect me
either. He wanted me to get up at 7
a.m. to watch our son so he could
play golf. I finally divorced him.
Fully Rested in New Mexico
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
For people who work on the graveyard shift, daytime is their bedtime
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Productivity is linked to being in
tune with your natural rhythms.
Take cues from your body. Your
inclination to re-caffeinate and
push through the lethargy is
unwise and counterproductive.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You
have quite a responsibility today.
You are, after all, the external
expression of existence. And
whether you think about it or
not, how you live will be vitally
important to the universal order.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Sometimes you have to work
hard not to have an edge in your
voice, and the effort is definitely
worthwhile. The way you talk
shows the level of compassion
you have for yourself.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). When
a situation does not measure up
to your expectations, it is easy
to feel disappointed and critical.
Try to get past these emotions,
though, because there is a gold-
en opportunity in the works.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You have
a special talent for interpreting
things in such a way that those
around you can easily face it,
too. It may feel like you have to
tap dance to keep your audience
engaged.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). A special
relationship is strong because
you have faced adversity togeth-
er. In a strange way, the easy and
fun times may be more difficult
to navigate than the hard times.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). If you
stay aware, you can keep a dicey
situation from veering too far
off course. You can bring this
one closer to the way you once
dreamed it would be.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). The
road smoothes out ahead. Its as
though you are the first to hit
the brand-new pavement, and
youre in for an easy ride. Its
about time. Youre way overdue.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Youll give of yourself without
recompense or even thanks.
Theres no accounting for other
peoples manners, but youll
always feel better about yourself
for having made the effort.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
You can access your intuition
through the land of imagination.
Though it is sometimes tricky
to distinguish the difference
between useful information and
fearful fantasies, keep trying.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You
can only push yourself to the
limit if you know where the limit
is. If you dont, its best to hang
back and observe. There is no
benefit to overloading yourself.
Doing so could lead to regret.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You
know there are certain things
a loved one could be doing to
improve. How often should you
speak of it? Not very often if you
want to love, and not dominate,
this person.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Feb. 7).
Youll break out of your routine
and upgrade your lifestyle this
year. You share a psychic con-
nection with a loved one, and
this will be expressed in many
ways. Interruptions in July may
cause you to fly wildly off track
from your professional plan, but
youll return with new insight.
Libra and Gemini people adore
you. Your lucky numbers are: 8,
30, 21, 39 and 18.
C M Y K
PAGE 10C TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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1:00PM, 3:10PM, 5:20PM, 7:30PM, 9:40PM
A DANGEROUS METHOD (DIGITAL) (R)
2:10PM
ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED
(DIGITAL) (G)
11:55PM, 2:20PM, 4:35PM, 6:50PM
ARTIST, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:05PM, 7:35PM, 10:05PM
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2012) (3D) (G)
12:00PM, 2:15PM, 4:30PM, 7:00PM, 9:20PM
BIG MIRACLE (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:20PM, 4:00PM, 7:05PM, 9:45PM
CHRONICLE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:55AM, 2:05PM, 4:15PM, 6:25PM, 8:35PM,
10:45PM
CONTRABAND (DIGITAL) (R)
12:50PM, 3:35PM, 4:55PM, 6:15PM, 7:35PM,
9:00PM, 10:50PM
DESCENDANTS, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
1:45PM, 4:35PM, 7:20PM, 10:30PM
EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:35PM, 3:30PM, 6:55PM, 9:50PM
GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, THE (2011)
(DIGITAL) (R)
3:15PM, 6:45PM, 10:20PM
GREY, THE (2012) (DIGITAL) (R)
1:40PM, 4:40PM, 7:45PM, 10:40PM
HAYWIRE (DIGITAL) (R)
9:15PM
HUGO (3D) (PG)
1:10PM, 4:05PM, 7:00PM, 9:55PM
JOYFUL NOISE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
4:15PM, 10:35PM
MAN ON A LEDGE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM, 2:30PM, 5:00PM, 7:50PM, 10;25PM
MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE GHOST PROTOCOL
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:50AM
ONE FOR THE MONEY (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 2:25PM, 4:45PM, 7:10PM, 9:30PM
RED TAILS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:55PM, 4:25PM, 7:25PM, 10:15PM
SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF
SHADOWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:15PM, 7:15PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (3D) (R)
4:10PM, 6:30PM, 8:45PM, 11:00PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (DIGITAL) (R)
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WOMAN IN BLACK, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Gtterdmmerung LIVE
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The Metropolitan Opera: Ernani LIVE
Saturday, February 25 at 12:55pm only
National Theater Live: The Comedy Of Errors
Thursday, March 1 at 7:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: Manon LIVE
Saturday, April 7 at 12:00pm only
*Chronicle - PG13 - 95 min.
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*The Woman In Black - PG13 - 105 min.
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TV TALK
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 1D
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MARKETPLACE
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE UNDER THE PA
SEWAGE FACILITIES ACT
Nuangola Borough (Borough) is prepar-
ing a Component 3M Sewage Facilities
Planning Module (Module) to address
sewage disposal in several areas of the
Borough. The Module will specifically
address all or portions of areas adjacent
to Williams St, Blytheburn Rd, North End
Rd and Storm St.
On May 13, 2005, the Borough received
approval from the PA Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection (DEP) to implement
its Official Sewage Facilities Plan (Plan) as
prepared by Milnes Engineering Inc. The
Plan proposed the construction of a low-
pressure wastewater collection system to
serve Borough residents. Areas to be
served by the approved wastewater col-
lection system were shown on Milnes
Engineering Drawing No. 5, last revised
March 24, 2005 as contained in the Plan.
Wastewater from the proposed collection
system would be conveyed to the Moun-
taintop Area Joint Sanitary Authority
(MAJSA) for ultimate treatment and dis-
posal.
The Borough proposes to revise its
approved Plan for the four specific areas
of the Borough as listed and described:
1. The previously approved Plan included
the construction of a low-pressure sewer
line along the entire length of Williams St,
plus an additional 1,850 ft. The sewer
main required for the project as currently
specified in the Module will extend only to
the end of Williams St and no distance
beyond. The Module proposes to elimi-
nate the low-pressure sewer line original-
ly planned for the 1,850 ft beyond the end
of Williams St.
2. The previously approved Plan included
construction of a low-pressure sewer line
on only a portion of Blytheburn Rd. This
Module proposes to construct a low-pres-
sure sewer main along the entire length of
Blytheburn Rd from the intersection of
Nuangola and Blytheburn Rds to the
boundary of the Borough with Slocum
Township. This revision is proposed to
accommodate all existing and potential
development within the Borough
along Blytheburn Rd.
3. The previously approved Plan included
the construction of a low-pressure sewer
line traveling north from Fawn Lane to
North End Rd and turning east
toward Nuangola Lake. The original align-
ment would not provide centralized sewer
service to three existing structures that
front North End Rd within the Borough. The
Module proposes to extend a main west-
ward along North End Rd to include the
three remaining structures.
4. The previously approved Plan did not
include the construction of a low-pressure
sewer line on Storm St. The Module pro-
poses the construction of a low-pressure
sewer line on Storm St from the intersec-
tion of Nuangola Rd and Storm St along
the entire length of Storm St terminating at
the Nuangola Borough Recreation Center.
Revisions to the Boroughs Plan, as pro-
posed in the Module, are not expected to
significantly change the anticipated con-
nection fee or end-user rate. The current,
one-time, initial user connection fee of
$2,025 per Equivalent Dwelling Unit (EDU)
and the $69 monthly end-user rate are
based on the best available information
known to the Borough at this time. Financ-
ing of the Boroughs entire wastewater
collection and conveyance system con-
struction project, including the facilities
specified in the Module, is being provided
through a low-interest loan and grant
package from the US Dept of Agriculture -
Rural Development.
A copy of the Module is available for
public review and comment, beginning on
the date of this advertisement and contin-
uing for a period of 30 days at the follow-
ing locations:
Nuangola Borough Municipal Building,
5150 Nuangola Rd, Nuangola, PA 18707.
Rules Garage, 217 Van Avenue,
Nuangola, PA. 18707, M-F 9a-12p & 1p-5p
Kirby Library, 33 Kirby Avenue, Mountain
Top, PA. 18707, M-F 9a-1p & Sat 9a-12p.
Address written comments to Dan
Loughran PE, Quad3 Group Inc, Land Plan-
ning & Utilities, 37 N Washington St, Wilkes
Barre, PA 18701.
Melissa Weber, Borough Secretary
LEGAL NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS/QUALIFICATIONS
HOMEBUYER COUNSELING SERVICES
FOR THE
LUZERNE COUNTY OFFICE OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Luzerne County, through its Office of Community
Development, is soliciting proposals from agencies interested in
providing homebuyer counseling services, for participants in the
Countys homebuyer programs which are carried out with fund-
ing from various sources including the HOME Investment Part-
nerships Program and Housing Trust Fund.
Luzerne County invites agencies to submit a written
Proposal for these services. Formal Request for Proposal Pack-
ets, including the Professional Advice Questionnaire, which is
required for submission of a proposal, may be obtained by con-
tacting the Luzerne County Office of Community Development.
Packets can be picked up at the Office of Community Develop-
ment, or provided to you via mail, fax or electronically. Complet-
ed Proposals must be submitted no later than 10:00 a.m., Febru-
ary 14, 2012. Electronic or faxed submissions will not be accept-
ed.
Request for Proposal Packets may be obtained by
contacting the following:
Luzerne County Office of Community Development
54 West Union Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Phone: (570) 824-7214; (570) 693-3800; (570) 459-1814
LUZERNE COUNTY IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EQUAL
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
BY ORDER OF:
Thomas A. Pribula
Luzerne County Interim Manager
NUANGOLA BOROUGH,
LUZERNE COUNTY, PA
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the
Nuangola Borough Council (the "Council"),
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania (the "Bor-
ough") will hold a special public meeting on
February 13, 2012 at 6pm in the Nuangola
Borough Municipal Building, 5150 Nuango-
la Rd, Nuangola, PA 18707, at which meet-
ing Council will consider the enactment of
a proposed ordinance (the "Ordinance")
authorizing the incurrence of nonelectoral
lease rental debt of the Borough pursuant
to the Local Government Unit Debt Act
(the "Act"). The following summary of the
Ordinance, among other things:
(1) authorizes the incurrence of lease
rental debt in an aggregate principal
amount of $25,000 plus costs including
legal ads, preparation of debt proceed-
ings, borrowing base certificate costs,
and any other associated expenses by
entering into a Guaranty Agreement (the
"Guaranty Agreement") pursuant to which
the Borough will unconditionally guaranty
the full and prompt payment of all principal
and interest on the Promissory Note (the
"Note") to be issued by the Nuangola Bor-
ough Sewer Authority (the Authority") to
the Mountaintop Area Joint Sanitary
Authority to provide funds: (i) to undertake
certain capital improvements to the
Authoritys sewer system; and (ii) to pay all
costs and expenses incident to the
issuance of the Note (together, the "Pro-
ject"); (2) authorizes and directs the prop-
er officers of the Borough to: (a) prepare,
certify and file the debt statement required
by section 8110 of the Pennsylvania Local
Government Unit Debt Act and the Bor-
rowing Base Certificate in connection
therewith and (b) execute, attest and
deliver, as appropriate, the Guaranty
Agreement between the Borough and the
Authority; (3) approves the form of the
Guaranty Agreement; (4) specifies the
maximum amount of the Borough obliga-
tion pursuant to the Guaranty Agreement
and the sources of payment of such guar-
anty obligation; (5) pledges the full faith,
credit and taxing power of the Borough in
support of such debt obligation;
(6) provides for the proper officers of the
Borough to take all other required, neces-
sary or desirable related action in connec-
tion with the Project and/or the Guaranty
Agreement, including, without limitation, to
make any filings with the Pennsylvania
Department of Community and Economic
Development which may be necessary;
(7) provides for the effectiveness of the
Ordinance; (8) provides for the severabil-
ity of provisions of the Ordinance; and
(9) provides for the repeal of all inconsis-
tent ordinances or resolutions or parts of
ordinances or resolutions. A full copy of
the Ordinance will be posted at the Nuan-
gola Borough Municipal Building for public
review.
Melissa Weber, Secretary
LEGAL NOTICE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by Plymouth
Borough at their office, 162 West Shawnee
Avenue, Plymouth, PA 18651, until 7:00 PM
prevailing time on February 14, 2012, at
which time they shall be publicly opened
and read for the construction of:
Coal Creek Streambank Stabiliza-
tion Project, Plymouth Borough,
Luzerne County.
This contract includes, but is not limited to,
furnishing all materials, equipment, sup-
plies, and labor to install approximately
275 linear feet of riprap and remove dep-
osition in Coal Creek adjacent to the Ply-
mouth Armory.
There will be a mandatory prebid
meeting on February 10, 2012 at 9:15
AM at the Plymouth Armory, 747
West Main Street, Plymouth, PA
18651 at which time there will be a
site showing and bid packages will
be distributed.
All envelopes containing bids shall be
clearly marked with the words Coal Creek
Streambank Stabilization Project, Ply-
mouth Borough, Luzerne County and the
words Sealed Bid.
Bids must be submitted on the forms pro-
vided in the bid package and must be sub-
mitted unconditionally.
Pennsylvania Prevailing Wage Rates apply
to this contract. The successful bidder is
required to comply with the Contract Com-
pliance Regulations of the Pennsylvania
Human Relations Commission, 16 PA Code
Chapter 49 and with all Federal, State, and
local regulations prohibiting discrimination
in hiring and employment.
Award of this contract, if it is awarded, will
be to the lowest responsible and respon-
sive bidder, but the Conservation District
reserves the unqualified right to reject any
and all bids and to waive any informalities.
Frank Coughlin, President
Plymouth Borough
162 West Shawnee Avenue
Plymouth, PA 18651
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Wednesday Feb. 8 Special
.35 cent Wings
In House Only. Minimum purchase of a dozen.
Wednesday-Sunday Open at 4 pm
Home of the Original
O-Bar Pizza
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
110 Lost
LOST CAT, gold with
striped tail, female
name Juliette front
paws declawed,
green eyes, red
heart collar with
contact info.
REWARD. Duryea
area. 570-457-4547
or 570-656-2777
LOST. Beloved,
large male cat.
White with black
spots. Red & yell-
ow collar with name
tag. Answers to
Scruffy. 1/31/12
near Chestnut St.
Swoyersville.
REWARD!
570-332-1075
YELLOW LAB
Lost in the
Larksville area.
Answers to Zack.
No collar.
570-814-0653
110 Lost
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
120 Found
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
CAT FOUND; by
Mohegan Sun,
Plains. Large male.
Call to describe.
570-881-1555
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Letters Testamen-
tary in the Estate of
Ursula A. Burke,
deceased, who
died November 1,
2011, late of the
Borough of West
Pittston, Luzerne
County, PA, having
been granted, all
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to
Theresa Schwartz,
Executrix, c/o
William F. Roberts,
Esquire
Burke Vullo Reilly
Roberts
1460 Wyoming
Avenue
Forty Fort, PA
18704-4237
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LEGAL NOTICE
Luzerne County
Council will hold a
work session at
6:01 pm Tuesday,
February 7, 2012, in
the Luzerne County
Emergency Man-
agement Agency
Building, 185 Water
Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA to dis-
cuss general pur-
poses items includ-
ing authorities,
boards, commis-
sions, auditing
schedules, and
office management
issues.
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Active couple
longs to be
blessed with your
newborn to cher-
ish and educate in
our loving home.
EXPENSES PAID
Please call
Kim & Chris
888-942-9899
For a hallmark
moment!
Genettis
Valentines
Chocolate
Decandence
Dinner &
Dance,
February 10th!
bridezella.net
CARD READER
40 years
experience
Appointments Sat-
urday & Sunday
Call Mary
570-417-0864
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly,
814-237-7900
SINGING VALENTINES
Feb. 14th
Call 570-709-3716
W-B BARBERSHOP
HARMONY SOCIETY
150 Special Notices
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
WORK WANTED
Experienced in
homecare. I will
work in your home
taking care of your
loved one. Person-
al care, meal
preparation & light
housekeeping pro-
vided. References,
background check
also provided.
Salary negotiable.
570-836-9726 or
cell 570-594-4165
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY SHOWS
Evita,
Mamma Mia,
Jesus Christ
Superstar,
Sister Act,
War Horse,
Book of
Mormon,
Jersey Boys,
Wicked,
Phantom of the
Opera
Other Desert
Cities
Tickets & Bus
1-800-432-8069
SUNDAY IN
PHILADELPHIA
MARCH 11, 2012
Brunch @
The Waterworks,
a National Historic
Landmark
Van Gogh Exhibit
@ Philadelphia
Museum of Art
For more details
call
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
380 Travel
CRUISE of a
LIFETIME!
CELEBRITY CRUISE
LINES Newest Ship
SILHOUETTE
12 night
Caribbean
Cruise
from NJ -
no airfare
needed!
ONLY
$1329/PP, TWIN
includes all taxes &
fees
March 29 -
April 10, 2012
Subject to Availability
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRiP
(288-8747)
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK `11 125CC
Auto, key start, with
reverse & remote
control. $700. OBO
570-674-2920
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,695 takes it
away.
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
POLARIS`03
330 MAGNUM
Shaft ride system.
True 4x4. Mossy
oak camo. Cover
included. $3,000
negotiable. Call
570-477-3129
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
YAMAHA `07
RHINO 450.
GREEN, 6 ft. snow
plow, winch, mud
bottommounts,
moose utility push
tube, windshield,
hard top, gauges,
side mirrors, doors,
80 hours run time.
Like new. $6,999.
570-477-2342
409 Autos under
$5000
00 VOLKSWAGEN GTI
2 door hatchback,
1.8 turbo, 5 speed
transmission, AC
power steering and
windows, moon
roof, new brakes,
tires, timing belt,
water pump and
battery. Black on
black. 116,000 miles
$4,500
570-823-3114
DODGE `86 RAM VAN
98,000 miles. Good
running condition.
$1,500
(570) 287-8766
FORD `95 F150
4x4. 6 cylinder.
Automatic. 8 ft.
modified flat bed.
90k miles. Runs
great. $4,900
(570) 675-5046
Call after 6:00 p.m.
LINCOLN `88 MARK VII
Approx. 132,000
miles. To date I have
done repairs & pre-
ventative mainte-
nance. In the
amount of approx.
$4,500, Not includ-
ing tires. There is
approx. 20 Sq. In. of
surface rust on
entire car. I would
be happy to
describe any or all
repairs. All repair
done by certified
garage.
FINAL REDUCTION
$3,200
570-282-2579
409 Autos under
$5000
SUZUKI 06
SWIFT RENO
4 cylinder. Automat-
ic. 4 door. $4,800
(570) 709-5677
(570) 819-3140
VW `87 GOLF
Excellent runner
with constant serv-
icing & necessary
preventative main-
tenance. Repair
invoices available.
Approx 98,131
miles. Good condi-
tion, new inspec-
tion. $2,300. Call
570-282-2579
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6
Cylinder engine
Auto with slapstick.
Navigation system.
57k miles. Black
with Camel Leather
interior. Heated
Seats. Sun Roof,
Excellent condition.
Satellite Radio, Fully
loaded. $18,000.
570-814-2501
ACURA 06 TSX
Leather.
Moonroof.
$9,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
AUDI `96 QUATTRO
A6 station wagon.
143k miles. 3rd row
seating. $2,800 or
best offer. Call
570-861-0202
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
CADILLAC 00 DTS
Tan, satellite
radio, leather,
moon roof, loaded
excellent
condition. 137k
miles. $6000.
570-814-2809
CADILLAC 06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 5,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell
REDUCED!
$39,500 FIRM
570-299-9370
CHEVY `97 ASTROVAN
Beautiful, 4 door.
Power steering &
brakes. 8 cylinder.
Excellent condition.
$3,000. Negotiable.
570-762-3504
GEO `93 PRIZM
91,000 miles. Looks
& runs like new.
$2,300 or best
offer, please call
570-702-6023
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 50k miles.
$16,995 or trade.
(570) 639-5329
CHEVY 77 CORVETTE
Red & red, all
original. No hits,
restoration. Rides
and looks new.
Exceptionally clean.
A/c, pb, ps, pw, 51K
$14,900 OBO
570-563-5056
CHEVY`10 CAMARO
SS2. Fully load, V8,
jewel red with white
stripes on hood &
trunk, list price is
$34,500, Selling for
$29,900. Call
570-406-1974
CHRYSLER `06 300
4 door sedan in per-
fect condition. Full
service records. All
luxury options and
features. 25.5 MPG.
$12,800. Call
570-371-1615
CHRYSLER 04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $5900.
570-991-5558
CHRYSLER 08 SEBRING
Leather. Heated
seats. DVD Player.
$10,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
HONDA 04
Civic LX Sedan
PRICE REDUCTION
Fully loaded, gas
stingy 4 cylinder,
1.7 liter engine, well
maintained, very
good condition,
driven less than
10.1 k miles per
year. $7995
570-855-0095
HONDA 08 ACCORD
15K miles. Auto.
Excellent condition!
$15,999
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LEXUS `01 ES 300
80,000 miles,
excellent condi-
tion, all options.
Recently serv-
iced. New tires.
$9,300.
570-388-6669
Travel
380
NORTHEAST PA TOP JOBS
The following companies are hiring:
Del Balso Ford
Diamond Manufacturing Company
Pulverman
PAGE 2D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD FEBRUARY 29
Harrys U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITOS
&
GINOS
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD, AWD, silver,
grey leather
06 VW PASSAT 3.6
silver, black
leather, sunroof,
66k miles
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
06 DODGE STRATUS
SXT, red
05 CHRYSLER 300C
TOURING, black,
gray, leather
05 DODGE NEON SXT,
red, 4 cyl, auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
burgundy, tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
MAXX, white, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL,
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 SAAB 9-3, silver,
auto, sunroof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
01 VW JETTA GLS,
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
00 PLYMOUTH NEON
purple, 4 door,
auto
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS, black
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 KIA SPORTAGE
black, 4 cylinder
auto, 2WD
07 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
LS blue (AWD)
07 Chrysler Aspen
LTD, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT, blue, 3rd seat
4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT, blue
grey leather, 7
pax mini van
06 PONTIAC TURRANT
black/black
leather, sunroof,
AWD
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
AWD, blue auto, V6
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4 dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat,
4x4
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
05 FORD F150 XLT,
extra cab, truck,
black, V8, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, burgundy,
auto (AWD)
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, sil-
ver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO RT
red, 2 tone
leather imterior,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
pax mini van
02 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE, Sage, sun
roof, autop, 4x4
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
reg. cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 FORD RANGER XLT
X-CAB, red, auto,
V6, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT XLT, gold,
sunroof, 2 door,
4x4
01 F150 SUPERCREW
XLT, green, 4 door,
V8, 4x4 truck
00 GMC SIERRA SLE,
extra cab, pewter
silver, V8, 4x4,
truck
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS
black, auto,
2 door AWD
98 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SE, silver, V6, 4x4
96 CHEVY BLAZER,
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
HYUNDAI 04 ELANTRA
Only 52K miles,
cruise, power win-
dows & locks.
$8,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
412 Autos for Sale
11 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA 3950
miles. Factory War-
ranty. New Condi-
tion. $17,699
10 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT 32K. Silver-
Black. Power slides.
Factory warranty.
$16,799
09 JEEP LIBERY
LIMITED Power sun-
roof. Only 18K. Fac-
tory Warranty.
$19,499
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$11,699
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. Factory War-
ranty. $11,999
08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42K. 5 speed. AWD.
Factory warranty.
$12,799
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$11,299
05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner. Just
traded. 65K.
$12,799
06 FORD FREESTAR
Rear air, 62k
$8199
05 SUZUKI VERONA
LX Auto. 64K. Fac-
tory warranty.
$4,999
01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,599
99 JEEP LARADO
LTD Leather. 75K
$4,699
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI 06
ELANTRA
Tan, 4 door,
clean title, 4
cylinder, auto,
115k miles.
Power windows,
& keyless entry,
CD player,
cruise, central
console heated
power mirrors.
$3900
570-991-5558
LINCOLN 05
TOWN CAR
39K miles. Looks &
runs perfect!
$13,500
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
LINCOLN 06
Town Car Limited
Fully loaded.
50,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$14,900.
(570) 814-4926
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCURY 2008
GRAND MARQUIS
23,000 original
miles, all power,
leather interior.
NADA book value
$17,975. Priced for
quick sale to settle
estate. $15,950, or
best offer. Car is in
mint condition.
570-735-4760
570-954-1257
Line up a place to live
in classified!
VOLKSWAGEN 00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
412 Autos for Sale
NISSAN `08 XTERRA
Grey, Mint condition.
35K miles. New, all-
season tires. Sirius
radio. 2 sets of
mats, including
cargo mats.
$18,400. Call
570-822-3494 or
570-498-0977
OLDSMOBILE `97
CUTLASS SUPREME
Museum kept, never
driven, last Cutlass
off the GM line. Crim-
son red with black
leather interior. Every
available option in-
cluding sunroof. Per-
fect condition. 300
original miles.
$21,900 or best offer.
Call 570-650-0278
PONTIAC `04 VIBE
White. New manual
transmission &
clutch. Front wheel
drive. 165k highway
miles. Great on gas.
Good condition,
runs well. $3,000 or
best offer
570-331-4777
PONTIAC 08 VIBE
Low miles. AWD.
$12,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
TOYOTA 04 CELICA
GT
112K miles. Blue, 5
speed. Air, power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car
drives and has
current PA inspec-
tion. Slight rust on
corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
TOYOTA 09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$12,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN
11 JETTA
24K miles. Like
New! Auto. Leather.
$15,999
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
VOLVO `95 940
STATION WAGON
Looks and runs like
new. Sun roof, CD
loader, all power.
98,000 miles,
$2,950. OBO
570-702-6023
VOLVO 850 95
WAGON
Runs good, air,
automatic, fair
shape. $1,800.
347-693-4156
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `77 COUPE
70,000 original
miles. Leather inte-
rior. Excellent condi-
tion. $2,500. Call
570-282-4272 or
570-877-2385
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES 76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
FORD 28 MODEL A
Sport Coupe.
Rumble Seat.
Professionally
Restored. Ford Blue
with tan canvas
top. $15,225
570-339-1552
after 5:00pm
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$1,300 or
best offer
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 89 2500
SCOTTSDALE
Pickup Truck with
insulated refrigerat-
ed box, cooling unit.
5 speed, rebuilt 8
cylinder. $2,500.
Box only an option.
570-333-4827
FORD `90 TRUCK
17 box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
GMC 98 SIERRA 3500
4WD Stake Side,
350 V8, Auto.
75,000 miles on
current engine. 12'
wood bed, body,
tires, interior good.
Excellent running
condition. New
generator, starter,
battery. Just tuned
and inspected.
$6,900.
Call 570-656-1080
439 Motorcycles
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
NIGHTTRAIN
New rear tire. Very
good condition. 23K
miles. $8,500. Call
570-510-1429
HARLEY
DAVIDSON 01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HARLEY DAVIDSON
03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition -
garage kept! Gold-
en Anniversary - sil-
ver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON 80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
HONDA 84
XL200R
8,000 original miles,
excellent condition.
$1,000.
570-379-3713
MOTO GUZZI `03
1,100 cc. 1,900
miles. Full dress.
Shaft driven. Garage
kept. Excellent condi-
tion. $6000. Health
Problems. Call
570-654-7863
POLARIS 00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
FOREST RIVER
SURVEYOR 234T 10
Sleeps eight, two
queen beds, tinted
windows, full bath,
fridge, microwave,
gas oven, sofa bed,
electric heater. A/C,
one slide out,
smoke free, only
3,000 miles.
$14,995.
570-868-6426
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25 travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22 rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 98,400 miles.
$5,500 or best offer
570-823-8196
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03
SILVERADO
4x4. Extra clean.
Local new truck
trade! $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05
SILVERADO
2WD. Extra cab.
Highway miles.
Like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
To place your
ad call...829-7130
CHEVY 10
EQUINOX LT
Moonroof. Alloys.
1 Owner. $18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY 99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 99
SILVERADO 4X4
Auto. V8. Bargain
price! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE 05 RAM 1500
Quad Cab SLT,
alloys & CD play-
er. $16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE 07 CALIBER
R/T. AWD. Alloys.
$14,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 06 ESCAPE XLT
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new. $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Very clean.
$10,750. Call
570-474-6028
HONDA 08 CRV
AWD. Auto. 34K
miles. Extra Sharp!
$18,995
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
HONDA 09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI 06
SANTE FE LTD
Leather. Moon-
roof. One owner.
$11,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
JEEP 02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder 4 WD, air
conditioning power
windows, door
locks, cruise, dual
air bags, tilt wheel,
AM/FM/CD. keyless
remote. 130k miles.
$5400.
570-954-3390
JEEP 04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
4x4. Auto. 6 cylin-
der. $8,995
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
JEEP 06 WRANGLER
Only 29K miles!
$15,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP 07 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4WD & Alloys.
$14,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 98 CHEROKEE
SPORT
2 door. 4x4. 6
cylinder. Auto.
Like new! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
MERCURY 03
MOUNTAINEER
LUXURY EDITION
Red & silver, One
owner, garage kept,
well maintained.
Loaded with too
many options to list!
68,000 miles.
Asking $11,200.
570-239-8389
NISSAN 09 ROGUE SL
Leather. Moon-
roof. Alloys.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
RANGE ROVER
07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
SUBARU `03 BAJA
Sport Utility 4 door
pickup. 68K. AWD. 4
cylinder. 2.5 Litre
engine. 165hp. Bed-
liner & cover. Pre-
mium Sound.
$10,700. Call
570-474-9321 or
570-690-4877
SUZUKI `03 XL-7
85K. 4x4. Auto.
Nice, clean interior.
Runs good. New
battery & brakes. All
power. CD. $6,800
570-762-8034
570-696-5444
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TOYOTA 02 TACOMA
4WD. SR5. TRD.
V-6. $10,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 06 4 RUNNER
Moonroof. Alloys.
CD Player.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TOYOTA 09 RAV 4
Only 13K miles!
Remote Starter.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ASSISTANT PROPERTY
MANAGER
Position available in
Edwardsville multi-
family housing com-
munity. This is a full
time position, M-F
8:00AM to 4:30PM.
Applicants should
possess proven
management expe-
rience. Subsidized
housing experience
helpful. Must be
dependable, well-
organized, detailed
orientated, capable
of working inde-
pendently, & have
the ability to per-
form multiple tasks.
Computer experi-
ence required.
Medical & vacation
benefits available.
Please send
resume and salary
requirements to
9 Beverly Drive,
Edwardsville, PA
18704 or email
eagleridge01@
comcast.net
EOE
DRS ASSISTANT/
SECRETARY
Seeking an ener-
getic, motivated,
goal-oriented indi-
vidual for immediate
position in a busy,
natural healthcare
setting. People and
computer skills a
MUST. Interested
parties can fax
resumes to:
570-477-3572
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
SAFE-T-ZONE, INC.
TRAFFIC CONTROL-
FLAGGING COMPANY
100 N. Wilkes-Barre
Blvd., Suite 106
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
P: 570-829-1180
We are now hiring
for the upcoming
season starting
March 1st for
CERTIFIED
FLAGGERS. Hours
Monday-Wednes-
day, 9am- 2pm
522 Education/
Training
CHILD CARE
Forty Fort Child
Care Center is now
hiring ASSISTANT
PRE-K TEACHER.
Full Time & Benefits.
PART TIME AIDE.
College students
encouraged to
apply. Email resumes
to: bloomearlyed@
yahoo.com
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Experienced
Delivery Driver
Must know Wilkes-
Barre Area well.
Experienced
Saute Cook
Please apply at:
Franks Pizzeria
198 S Main St
Wilkes-Barre
570 822-2168
After 2
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
COMMERCIAL
APPLICATOR
For turf fertilization
program at a land-
scape company.
Must be experi-
enced. State certi-
fication a plus, but
will train the right
individual.
Apply by mailing
resume to:
Green Valley
Landscaping, Inc.
52 Reese St.,
Plains, PA
18702-1823
Or by email to:
greenvalleyland
@comcast.net
EOE
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DATA/ PHONE /SOUND
Our Client is hiring
experienced techni-
cians to install
phones, fiber optics,
data and sound sys-
tems. Customers
include hospitals,
schools, churches
and businesses.
Must interpret blue-
prints, troubleshoot
wiring and read
schematics. Will use
hand tools, laptop,
and climb ladders.
Full time 8am-
4:30pm. Must have
clean driving record.
Contact Harvis
570-542-5330 with
questions or send
resume to:
jobs.harvis@
gmail.com
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
EQUIPMENT DEPOT IN
ALLENTOWN IS HIRING
We are currently
looking for an
experienced &
dependable
Field Service
Technician
for the Hazleton &
Wilkes-Barre area.
If you have your
own tools, experi-
ence with IC and
electrical equip-
ment, the ability to
work with little to no
supervision, great
customer service
and communication
skills.
Please apply at
www.eqdepot.com
You must have a
High School Diplo-
ma or GED, valid dri-
vers license & good
computer skills.
EQUIPMENT DEPOT IS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
www.EQDepot.com
HV HVAC/R AC/R
WWW.RITE-TEMP.COM
Visit our website
for job postings.
536 IT/Software
Development
IT SPECIALIST
WNEP-TV in Moosic,
PA has an opening
for an IT specialist
with knowledge of
IP/Network based
systems, routers,
scripting, etc.
We offer a competi-
tive salary & dynam-
ic work environ-
ment.
See details on
our website:
wnep.com
EOE
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HOUSEKEEPER
General cleaning,
laundry & babysit-
ting. Experience a
plus. Non-smoker.
Must have car &
references. Dallas
Area. Replies to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2925
15 N. Main St,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 3D
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
554 Production/
Operations
548 Medical/Health
468 Auto Parts
566 Sales/Business
Development
554 Production/
Operations
548 Medical/Health
468 Auto Parts
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
Dynamically growing Sheet Metal &
Assembly Manufacturer has immediate
multiple openings on all three shifts
for the following positions:
Welding
Press Brake
Spot Welding
Assembly
General Laborer
Looking for Skilled Machine Workers
Excellent wages & benefits
MANUFACTURING
FULL TIME
Apply in Person At:
1170 Lower Demunds Road
Dallas, PA 18612
A Drug-Free Workplace
CNAs
Certified Nurse Assistants
Do you enjoy helping others?
Would you like a career in healthcare?
We are looking for
Full & Part Time 3-11 & 11-7
CNAs to provide quality care
For our residents
All Shifts Available!
Call 877-339-6999 x1
Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Apply in person 395 Middle Road
Nanticoke
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm Happy Trails!
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
OFFICE CLEANER
WANTED- PART TIME
7.5 hours/week,
Monday- Wednes-
day and Friday any-
time after 8pm for
2.5 hours/night.
Berwick area.
$9.25/hour to start.
General cleaning of
offices.
Apply online at: www.
sovereigncs.com
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL-A
Waste hauling to
landfill. Call Brian at
Harvis 542-5330
for application or
forward resume to:
wrrc.jobs@gmail.com
DRIVERS
Student School Van
Drivers wanted.
Call Jim at
570-589-9181
or Rick at
570-582-1457.
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LOOKING TO GROW
DRIVERS WANTED!
CDL Class A
Regional and
OTR Routes
Home daily
Benefit package
includes:
paid holiday and
vacation; health,
vision, and dental
coverage.
Candidates must
be 23 years of
age with at least
2 years tractor
trailer experience.
Drivers paid by
percentage.
Applications can
be filled out online
at www.cds
transportation.com
or emailed to
jmantik@cds
transportation.com
or you can apply
in person at
CDS
Transportation
Jerilyn Mantik
One Passan Drive
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-654-6738
VALET DRIVER
Full time & Part time
Monday-Friday
8-4:30
570-855-9593
548 Medical/Health
EXPERIENCED HOME
HEALTH RN
Full/Part time cover-
ing Luzerne & Lack-
awanna counties.
Also currently hiring
CNAs & HHAs. Call
Jessica at 570-451-
3050 for an immedi-
ate interview. EOE
Village at
Greenbriar
Assisted
Living
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES - PART TIME
All Shifts
PART TIME COOK
APPLY WITHIN:
4252 Memorial
Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANT
Excellent starting
rate. Flexible
hours. Good work-
ing environment.
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains/Pittston area!
Excellent opportuni-
ty! Send resume to:
PO Box 153
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
RN SUPERVISOR
Full Time 3pm-11pm
LPN
Part Time 3pm-11pm
CNA
Part Time 11pm-7am
CNAS
Per Diem All Shifts
LPNS
Per Diem All Shifts
Apply in person to:
MOUNTAIN TOP
SENIOR CARE AND
REHABILITATION
CENTER
185 S. MOUNTAIN
BLVD.
MOUNTAIN TOP, PA.
18707
(570) 474-6377
551 Other
JANITOR/CLEANING
CREW
10-12 hrs per week
Days are flexible
BACK-ROOM STOCK
CLERK
10-12 hrs per week
Tue & Fri 7am-12pm
DELI CLERK
15 -20 hrs per week
Nights & weekends
a must.
No calls, apply in
person.
PLYMOUTH
HOMETOWN MARKET
500 W. MAIN ST.
PLYMOUTH, PA.
18651
551 Other
HOT JOBS
Customer Service,
Telemarketing,
Help Desk,
Desktop Engineers,
Sr Manager of
Deployment Svcs,
Forklift, Warehouse,
Picking/Packing,
Carpenters&Helpers
Warehouse Director,
Marketing Analyst,
Business Developer,
Machine Operators,
CNC Programmers,
General Labors &
Welders
Top $ & Benefits
Email Resume to:
Corey.Rupp@
expresspros.com
or 570.208.7000
554 Production/
Operations
MANUFACTURING
POSITION
A well-established
local manufacturer
is looking for full
time 2nd shift
employees. Hours
are 2-10PM. Must
have valid drivers
license. A compre-
hensive benefit
package, which
includes 401K.
Applications can be
obtained at:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
TOOLMAKER
Full time 2nd shift
position. Ability to
use all shop tools
and machines,
experience in set-
up and operating
CNC equipment a
plus. Job requires
working to close
tolerances and from
prints.
Excellent salary and
benefits package.
Submit resume to:
MICHAEL HOLCOMB,
DIAMOND
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY,
P. O. BOX 4174
WYOMING, PA
18644
USM
AEROSTRUCTURES
CORP HAS IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS FOR:
CNC PROGRAMMER
MINIMUM 5+ YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Experience with
mastercam
software is a must!
Degree is preferred
but not required.
send resume via
email: r.delvalle@
usmaero.net
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
*INDEPENDENT SALES
REPRESENTATIVE*
A local, highly rep-
utable company is
looking for an Inde-
pendent Sales Rep-
resentative for the
Dallas/Wilkes-Barre
area. Applicants
must possess
excellent customer
service and com-
munication skills.
Previous experi-
ence in advertising
sales a plus. Part
time & Full time
opportunities exist.
PLEASE CALL
570-579-4300
OR EMAIL FRED@
LOOKATOURMENU.COM
LADIES CLOTHING
PRICER
$8.00/hour to start.
Monday-Friday
dayshift. Must have
knowledge of latest
styles and upcom-
ing trends. Apply at:
Community Family
Services
102 Martz Manor,
Plymouth
SALES OPPORTUNITY
DelBaso Ford is now
accepting applica-
tions for Sales Posi-
tions. We are look-
ing for an energetic,
self-motivated indi-
vidual to join our
award winning
organization.
Apply in person to:
249 Market Street
Kingston
Email: PatandDans
@aol.com or
Call 570-288-4501
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
LIQUOR LICENSE
FOR SALE. Luzerne
County. $23,000.
570-574-7363
MOSS COLLECTOR
who owns/or has
access to large
tract (s), private
woodlands. Must
I.D. moss & eco-
harvest in bulk, dry
& deliver to Hones-
dale. 570-253-4704
610 Business
Opportunities
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
COIN SET United
mint Presidential $1
set with proof set, 4
coins each set $15.
Belt buckle US with
eagle + 2 rifles.
Tiffany Studio NY
BC235 $15. Wall
clock with spindles,
gold design on
glass, 13 x28, excel-
lent working $80.
570-574-0271
COINS. 3-V nickels
1894-V, 1909-V,
1911-V $60.
570-287-4135
DIE CAST Hess
3003 mini patrol $8.
01 mini racer trans-
port $8. & 04 mini
tanker $8. Sunoco
96 tow truck with
plow $10. Mobil 95
tow truck $10. Ertle
92 True value dia-
mond tanker bank
$10. Exxon humble
tanker 2nd edition
$10. & tanker $10.
Racing champion
Citgo #21 Elliot
Sadler $10. Racing
Champion STP
Richard Petty $5.
matchbox trans-
porter Bill Elliot $10.
570-639-1653
PIANO Livingston
upright player piano,
pump style with
approximate 35
music rolls. Ground
level removal. $125.
570-479-2322
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
FREEZER/upright
17 cu ft $375.
570-825-5133
RANGE kenmore
gas like brand new
$175. 570-793-0811.
WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore Elite.
White. FRONT
LOAD. Like new.
Electric dryer.
Storage drawer
on bottom
of each.
$800 for both
570-261-5120
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
CAR SEAT, for baby,
in good condition.
$15. 570-823-2267
726 Clothing
COAT Christian Dior,
camel, size 8, hardly
worn $65.
570-825-5440
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
SHORTS 8 pair of
young mens Ameri-
can Eagle Cargo
shorts, various col-
ors, size 32 & 33.
nice condition. $7.
5 pair young mens
basketball shorts,
Nike & Addias S&M
nice condition. $5.
each. 696-3528
SUITS 3 mens, 42
reg pants 36x29,
good condition $15.
New wool coat 42
reg new $15. 6 pair
mens dress slacks
36x29 $5. each.
570-824-5460
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
PC HP P4 with DVD
burner, software,
keyboard, flat moni-
tor $175. LAPTOP -
Gateware P4 with
dvd burner & soft-
ware. $195. DIGITAL
CAMERA hp 7.2
megapixel photos-
mart with 3x zoom,
charger & memory
card $59. 283-2552
732 Exercise
Equipment
ELLIPTICAL Proform
500 L E like new,
includes a compati-
ble music port for
iPod, built-in
speakers, a Cool
Aire Workout Fan,
12 built-in workouts.
$300. 788-4090
EVERLAST heavy
bag. excellent con-
dition. $80.
570-474-0753
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BAKERS RACK
green metal with 2
wicker baskets for
storage. Excellent
condition, asking
$75. Large living
room lamps (2)
brass base with
cream colored
shade, brand new
asking $30 each or
$50 for pair.
570-239-6011.
BEDROOM SET 5
piece, oak, like new
$550. 822-5460
BEDROOM SET
queen cherry sleigh
bed, 2 dressers,
complete 2 night
stands $900.
570-477-6011
BEDROOM SET: 4
piece. White. Good
condition. $100. Call
570-735-3489
BRAND NEW
P-TOP QUEEN
MATTRESS SET!!
Still in bags! $150!!
MUST SELL!!
Call Steve @
280-9628!!
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
KITCHEN TABLE
solid oak kitchen
$325. Craftsman
yard cart still in box
$55. 5 pc kitchen
table $125.
570-825-5133
LAMPS (2) parlor
stand up, grey metal
& black. $25 each.
570-740-1246
LAMPS brass, solid
brass base with
cream shade. paid
$80 each asking
$50 for pair.
570-474-0753
LOVE SEAT, gray,
good condition $80.
570-822-3410
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
VANITY/makeup
with chair, 40lx
30h, Bombay Fur-
niture Co., dark
wood, good condi-
tion $40. Double
door module OSulli-
van 2lx25 1/2w,
good condition 2
pieces, medium
color $10. each.
570-868-5066
750 Jewelry
ENGAGEMENT
RING 1/2ct. diamond
beautiful twisted
rope design in 14kt.
Yellow gold setting
with 1/2 ct. oval dia-
mond stone, size 7.
has appraisal for
$2200. Sell $850
570-883-0412
750 Jewelry
VALENTINES DAY
is just around the
corner. Are you
looking for that
special gift for the
man or women in
your life or just a
friend? We have
gold, gold filled,
silver, rings,
necklaces,
watches, trinkets
for both men &
women so why not
come in & see us?
OPEN ON
VALENTINES
DAY!
Visit us as 134 Rt.
11, Larksville or call
570-855-7197
Bring this ad &
we will give you
an extra 10% off
your purchase
of $50 or more.
756 Medical
Equipment
BATHTUB TRANS-
FER BENCH by
Drive Medical.Max
350 lbs., new, never
used. $50.824-7015
POWER CHAIR
Jazzy Select,
$500. WALKER with
wheels $45.
570-829-2411
REASSURE full rise
protective under-
wear 3 packs of 14
underwear for men
or women size x-
large 58-68 waist
/hip all for $15.
570-735 6638
758 Miscellaneous
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
6 cab $15. Gong
Show movie DVD
$10. Large frame-
less mirror 36X42
$40. 5 storm win-
dows $15. 740-1246
DRAFTING TABLE
Hamilton-Economy
wood & steel, excel-
lent condition, Foot-
stool, stool & old
drafting tools includ-
ed $150.
570-854-9739
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
RECORDS LPs,
78s, 45s, 60s, 70s,
80s & 90s. $1.
each. Religious
rosary, handmade
$5. 570-829-2411
REVERE WARE,
clean, shiny & very
good condition. 16
pieces all $10. each.
CORELLE Butterfly
gold, clean & excel-
lent condition, 111
pieces, .30cents to
41. each. Details
570-639-1653
RIMS: Honda 4 pair
15 will fit any
model Accord,
Civic, &Del-Sol.
Brand new. Asking
$200. 570-239-6011
SNOW BLOWER,
MTD gas powered,
runs good $60.
Craftsman 6.5 hp
woodchipper $275.
Snap-On 3/4drive
torque wrench with
case $325. Tailgate
95-04 Chevy S-10
pickup no rust $75.
Edelbrock aluminum
4bbl intake manifold
aluminum valve cov-
ers also aluminum
air cleaner fits small
block Chevy all for
$150 after 3pm
570-655-3197
TIRES. 4 matching
Firestone Firehawk
LTP235/75R15 M/S
with rims. From Toy-
ota 84 truck
Approximately 90%
tread. $160 for all.
570-239-7089
between 8-5.
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19 Toshiba con-
vertor & antenna
$35. Call Bill
570-825-8256
TV 21 Zenith with
remote FREE.
570-714-4410
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 32 Panasonic
works great. $40. or
make offer.
call 570-388-6603
TV Sanyo 32
square, about 5
years old, analog
ports in front,
remote included.
DVD player Toshiba
with remote & ana-
log cables, 3 years
old. Both excellent
condition, no dam-
age. Both items
together $150/
OBO. 570-262-7075
TV Sony Trinitron,
36 HD ready, flat
front, tube. Very
good cond. $30.
855-9221
784 Tools
SNOWTHROWER,
Snapper, 2 stage
with electric start.
works good. $250.
570-388-2137
786 Toys & Games
SHUFFLEBOARD
TABLE. 43x72,
wood, heavy.
Accessories includ-
ed. You disassem-
ble. $100 OBO. 570-
675-8459
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED
Pre 1975. Call 856-
571-3618 or email
trebor_crane@yahoo
.com to let me know
what you have. Top
prices paid and
I PAY CASH!
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
PAYING TOP DOLLAR
for Your Gold,
Silver, Scrap Jew-
elry, Sterling Flat-
ware, Diamonds,
Old High School
Rings, Foreign &
American Paper
Money & Coins.
WE WILL BEAT
PRICES!
We Buy Tin and
Iron Toys, Vintage
Coke Machines,
Vintage Brass,
Cash Registers,
Old Costume
Jewelry, Slot
Machines, Lionel
Trains & Antique
Firearms.
IF YOU THINK ITS
OLD BRING IT IN,
WE WILL GIVE
YOU A PRICE.
COME SEE US AT
134 RTE. 11,
Larksville
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Feb. 3: $1,734.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT FREE - Spayed,
front de-claw, shots
up to date. 8 year
old tortoise shell
calico. Very loving &
devoted to adult
companion (s). Pre-
vious owner passed
away. Does not like
other animals.
570-885-4962.
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
CATS: 1 tiger & 1
black, free to a
good home, 2
years old, fully
trained. 570-200-
5977 call/text.
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
DOG free to good
home Pomeranian
11 1/2 months old,
male, free cage.
570-779-1093
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PAGE 4D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
551 Other
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
522 Education/
Training
551 Other
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
522 Education/
Training
551 Other
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Mericle Construction, Inc. seeks a full time
experienced crawler drill operator. Applicant
shall have minimum 5 years site work experi-
ence and be knowledgeable with an Ingersoll
Rand ECM-720, ECM-660 & Atlas Copco F9
drill rig. Applicant will also be expected to
assist with blast hole layout & operate other
equipment as needed.
Salary commensurate with experience for
this local, year-round career opportunity with
full benefit package.
DRILL
OPERATOR
Submit resume or application to:
Mericle Construction, Inc.
100 Baltimore Dr., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
or via Email: hr@mericle.com or
download application at www.mericle.com
Multi-Plastics
Extrusions
Multi-Plastics Extrusions, a leader in the plastics extrusions field,
has several great opportunities for qualified individuals to
become a part of its expanding Maintenance Team.
The following positions are currently available:
Maintenance Mechanic / Electrician
Qualified individuals must have and be able to perform the following
duties:
- A working knowledge of electrical and mechanical equipment
preferably associated with plastic sheet extrusion.
- Safely perform a wide range of duties, relating to installation,
troubleshooting, repair, unscheduled maintenance and preven-
tive maintenance of plastic extrusion equipment with minimal
supervision.
- Locate and diagnose failures, replace defective components and
maintain facility related systems and equipment.
- Conduct troubleshooting of complex equipment and systems.
Evaluate system performance and recommend improvements to
maintenance program and system design.
Applicants should have a Trade School Certificate and 4 years expe-
rience in a maintenance manufacturing environment.
Maintenance Intern
Qualified individuals will be responsible for the following duties:
- General mechanical installation of equipment related to the
sheet extrusion facility under the direction and guidance of expe-
rienced maintenance personnel.
- General maintenance of the facilities and grounds as directed by
the Maintenance Supervisor.
Applicants must be familiar with working in a manufacturing environ-
ment, be able to communicate effectively, and work safely in a fast-
paced environment.
Multi-Plastics Extrusions provides a safe working environment,
excellent compensation opportunities, and a competitive benefits
package including medical, dental, vision, and 401k.
Qualified applicants can fax or e-mail their resumes to:
Multi-Plastics Extrusions
600 Dietrich Avenue
Hazleton, PA 18201
Fax: 570-450-1684
E-mail: resume@multi-plastics.com
Production / Operations
Full Time Position With Benefits
Recondition and test business telephones.
Good eyesight, hearing and attention to
detail necessary.
Should be self-motivated and team player.
Email resume to:
nepajob@gmail.com
Earn Extra Cash
For Just A Few
Hours A Day.
Deliver
To nd a route near you and start
earning extra cash, call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Hazleton
(MOTOR ROUTE)
$650 Monthly Prot + Tips
39 daily papers / 51 Sunday papers
East Broad Street, Franklin Street, Chruch Street
Hunlock Creek/Sweet Valley
(MOTOR ROUTE)
$1200 Monthly Prot + Tips
166 daily papers / 217 Sunday papers
Hazleton/Treskow
$400 Monthly Prot + Tips
22 daily / 38 Sunday
Bernard Avenue, York Town Drive, Samuels Avenue
Forty Fort
$600 Monthly Prot + Tips
131 daily / 154 Sunday
Dilley Street, East Pettebone Street,
West Pettebone Street, Slocum Street,
Virinia Terrace, Welles Street
Lain/Miners Mills
$660 Monthly Prot + Tips
139 daily / 150 Sunday
Baltimore Drive, Briar Creek Road,
Pocono Trailer Ct., Wildower Drive,
East Main Street, Scott Street, East Thomas Street
Available routes:
( No Col l ect i ons)
JOIN A WINNING TEAM
Customer Service Supervisor
Vector Security, Inc this regions most respected
name in the security alarm industry is expanding
its Customer Service Team. If you thrive on
helping people and if you want to make a differ-
ence at work, then we are the work place that you
are looking for!
We offer full time positions with an exceptional
benefit package:
Our qualifications for joining this winning team
include good oral and written communication
skills, above average computer skills, answering
escalated customer calls. Qualified candidates
MUST be flexible and have prior supervisory
experience in a call center environment. Bi-lin-
gual in Spanish a plus. A complete background
check and drug screen is required.
Send cover letter and resume to:
HR Manager
Vector Security
23 Casey Avenue; Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Fax: 970-6232
Email: wbjobs@vectorsecurity.com
EOE
Competitive Wages
Medical and Dental
Prescription Plan
Paid Training
Disability
Tuition Reimbursement
401K with Company Matching
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
www.dallassd.com
Head Coach
Boys Volleyball
Candidates must possess strong interpersonal and
communication skills. Develop and implement a
district-wide philosophy of the teaching of the
game of volleyball at all levels of the program.
Year-round work on developing the program is a
must. Experience coaching on the varsity level is
preferred.
For clearance information and application
process, visit www.dallassd.com > Employment
page. Mail application packet to:
Mr. Frank Galicki, Superintendent,
Dallas School District,
PO Box 2000, Dallas, PA 18612
Complete application packets, including letter of
interest, district application, references, letters of
recommendation, current Act 34, 151 and 114
clearances, must be received by
DEADLINE: February 13, 2012
815 Dogs
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPS
ACA registered with
Pedigrees. Vet
checked, wormed.
1st shots. $600
Ready NOW!
570-336-6162
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
Chihuahua, Labs &
Shitzus.
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
BALL PYTHON 4,
tank, stand &
accessories includ-
ed $100. please
call (570) 883-7426
SLIDER TURTLES 2
red earS, 7 & 5 in.
Tank included. In
need of new home.
570-899-6026
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
ASHLEY-
REDUCED
Delightfully pleas-
ant. This home has
been totally remod-
eled, a great buy
for your money.
New modern
kitchen with all
appliances, living
room and dining
room have new
hardwood floors.
Nice size 3 bed-
rooms. 1 car
garage. Be sure to
see these values.
MLS 11-2890
$65,000
Call Theresa
Eileen R. Melone
Real estate
570-821-7022
AVOCA
30 Costello Circle
Fine Line construc-
tion. 4 bedroom 2.5
bath Colonial. Great
floor plan, master
bedroom, walk in
closet. 2 car
garage, fenced in
yard. 2 driveways,
above ground pool
For additional info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3162
$248,500
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
906 Homes for Sale
BACK MOUNTAIN
1215 Mountain Rd.
Well maintained
ranch home set on
2 acres with apple
trees on property.
This home offers 3
bedrooms, sunroom
& enclosed porch.
Lower level with
brick fireplace. 2
car garage.
$172,500
MLS# 11-2436
Call Geri
570-696-0888
BACK MOUNTAIN
133 Frangorma Dr
Bright & open floor
plan. 6 year old 2
story. 9' ceiling 1st
floor. Custom
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Family Room
with 14' ceiling &
fireplace. Conve-
nient Back Mt. loca-
tion. MLS# 12-127
$344,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search featured
homes in Tunkhan-
nock. $275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-310-1552
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear
Creek Blvd
Well maintained
custom built 2 story
nestled on 2 private
acres with circular
driveway - Large
kitchen with center
island, master bed-
room with 2 walk-in
closets, family room
with fireplace, cus-
tom built wine cellar.
A MUST SEE!
MLS#11-4136
$299,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DALLAS
1360 Lower
Demunds Rd.
A grand entrance
leads you to this
stunning Craftsman
style home on 11+
acres complete with
pond, stream &
rolling meadows.
This dramatic home
is in pristine condi-
tion. The 2 story
great room with
stone fireplace &
warm wood walls is
one of the focal
points of this home.
Offers modern
kitchen/baths, for-
mal dining room &
family room.
Recently built 3 car
garage with guest
quarters above is a
plus. Youll spend
many hours on the
large wrap around
porch this Fall,
Spring & Summer
overlooking your
estate. Rarely does
a home like this
come on the mar-
ket. MLS# 11-1741.
$499,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
DALLAS
138 White Birch Ln
Charming two story
on nice lot features,
living room, dining
room with hard-
woods, modern Oak
kitchen, first floor
family room, 4 large
bedrooms, 2 full & 2
half baths. Deck
overlooking level
rear yard. 2 car
garage. Gas heat,
Central air. (11-3115)
$310,000
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
211 Hillside One
Enjoy the comforts
& amenities of living
in a beautifully
maintained town-
house, 3/4 Bed-
rooms, family room
with fireplace out to
deck. Bright & airy
kitchen, finished
lower level, Tennis,
Golf & Swimming
are yours to enjoy
& relax. Mainte-
nance free living.
PRICE REDUCED!
$199,000
MLS# 10-1221
Call Geri
570-696-0888
DALLAS
3 bedroom brick
Cape Cod, with 2
baths, on a corner
lot near
Dallas Schools,
with easy access
to shopping.
MLS# 12-12
$125,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
620 Meadows
Enjoy the comforts
& amenities of living
at Newberry Estate
- tennis, golf &
swimming are yours
to enjoy & relax.
Spacious condo at a
great price. Possi-
bilities for 3rd bed-
room and bath on
lower level. Pets
welcome at Mead-
ows. MLS#12-18
$ 149,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
8 Lackawanna Ave
Central Location. 4-
5 bedroom bi-level.
Gas heat. 2 baths.
Oversized 2 car
garage. Corner lot.
MLS 11-4372
$140,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Charming 2 bed-
room Cape Cod in
Franklin Township.
L-shaped living
room with hard-
wood floors, eat in
kitchen & private
driveway.
$119,900
MLS#11-3255
Call Joe moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
Four bedroom
Colonial with hard-
wood floors in for-
mal dining and living
room. Modern eat
in kitchen, finished
basement with 24
x 30 recreation
room. Deck, hot tub
and ceiling fans.
MLS#11-4504
$229,900
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
NEW PRICE!
56 Wyoming Ave
Well maintained 4
bed, 2 bath home
located on large .85
acre lot. Features
open floor plan,
heated 3 season
room with hot tub,
1st floor laundry, 2
car garage and
much more. 11-3641
Motivated Seller!
$179,500
Call Jim Banos
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
Two bedroom
condo, 2nd floor.
Living/dining room
combination. 1,200
square feet of easy
living. Two bal-
conies, one car
garage nearby.
Security system,
cedar closet, use of
in ground pool.
$109,000
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
PRICE
REDUCED
Charming 4 bed-
room, 3 bath
home situated on
1 1/4 acre on a
private setting.
Close to schools
and shopping. Liv-
ing room with
beautiful stone
fireplace and built
ins. Hardwood
floors throughout.
Master suite on
1st floor. Kitchen
has cherry cabi-
nets with tile
floors. Screened
porch. Detached
2 car garage.
$335,000
For appointment
570-690-0752
DALLAS
Newberry Estates
Condo with archi-
tect designed interi-
or on 3 floors.
Large, well equipped
tiled kitchen with
separate breakfast
room, den with fire-
place-brick & gran-
ite hearth. Open floor
plan in living/dining
area. 3 or 4 bed-
rooms, 3.5 baths.
Lower level has den
or 4th bedroom with
family room & bath.
Recently sided;
attached 2-car
garage, walk-out
lower level, decks
on 1st & 2nd floor;
pets accepted
(must be approved
by condo associa-
tion). Country Club
amenities included
& private pool for
Meadows residents.
MLS 12-203
$269,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath2 story
home with
garage and
driveway.
Newer kitchen
and bath. For
more info and
phot os visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DURYEA
314 Edward St
Wonderful neigh-
borhood, 4 bed-
room, 10 year old
home has it all!.
Extra room on first
floor, great for
mother in law suite
or rec room. Mod-
ern oak kitchen,
living room, central
air, in ground pool,
fenced yard, att-
ached 2 car garage.
Great home! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3732. $239,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
youre looking for a
Ranch, dont miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
Cute 2 story, 2 bed-
room 1 bath home.
$15,000
570-780-0324
570-947-3575
DURYEA
REDUCED
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$315,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
192 Hillside Ave
Nice income prop-
erty conveniently
located. Property
has many upgrades
including all new
replacement win-
dows, very well
maintained. All units
occupied, separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit:www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3283. $89,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
EDWARDSVILLE
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen & replace-
ment windows
installed.
MLS11-560.
$52,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY FEB., 12TH
1:00 PM TO 2:30
263 Lawrence St
Recently updated,
this 4 bedroom
home offers modern
kitchen with Oak
cabinets, 2 baths,
deck with a beautiful
view of the Valley,
fenced in yard and
finished lower level.
All appliances
included. A must
see. MLS #11-4434
$ 92,000
Call Christina @
(570) 714-9235
EXETER
1021 Wyoming Ave
2 unit duplex, 2nd
floor tenant occu-
pied, 1st floor unoc-
cupied, great rental
potential. Separate
entrances to units,
one gas furnace,
new electrical with
separate meters for
each unit. The 1st
floor apartment
when rented out
generated $550 per
month. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4247. $52,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 5D
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 6pm
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
44 Orchard St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath single,
modern kitchen
with appliances,
sunroom, hard-
wood floors on
1st and 2nd
floor. Gas heat,
large yard, OSP.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1866
$137,999
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
EXETER
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$123,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
EXETER
Nice size four
bedroom home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$92,900
MLS# 11-1977
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HANOVER
Great multi-family
home. Fully rented
double block offers
large updated
rooms, 3 bedrooms
each side. Nice
location. MLS 11-
4390 $129,900
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
Modern 3 bedroom.
1 1/2 bath. Driveway.
Gas heat. Lease. No
pets. No smoking.
$750 + utilities. Call
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
3 Bedroom 1.5 bath
ranch with new win-
dows hardwood
floors finished base-
ment 2 car garage
and a finished base-
ment. MLS 11-3610
$154,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
HANOVER TWP.
27 Spring St
Great home. Great
location. Great con-
dition. Great Price.
MLS#11-4370
$54,900
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. COnvenient
location. To settle
estate. Reduced to
$34,900
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645.
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or office/
playrooms.
Attached 2 car
garage connected
by a 9x20 breeze-
way which could be
a great entertaining
area! Above ground
pool, gas fireplace,
gas heat, newer
roof and All Dri
system installed in
basement. MLS #11-
626. $119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TWP.
95 Pulaski St.
Large home on nice
sized lot. Newer
windows, walk up
attic. 3 bedrooms,
nice room sizes,
walk out basement.
Great price you
could move right in.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-4554
$39,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Double block with
both sides having
nice secluded yards
and decks. Close to
area schools. Wood
floors just redone on
owners side. Won-
derful opportunity to
live in one side and
rent the other side
to help pay your
mortgage!
MLS#11-4537
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-322-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
HANOVER TWP.
Fantastic view from
the deck and patio
of this 4 bedroom,
2.5 bath vinyl sided
2 story home. Four
years young with so
many extras. A
dream home!
MLS# 11-2429
$299,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
REDUCED TO
$39,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HANOVER
Multi-family. large 3
unit building, beauti-
fully updated apart-
ments. Two 3 bed-
room apartments &
one efficiency
apartment. Great
location also offers
street parking. This
is a must see.
$139,900. MLS 11-
4389. Call/text for
Details Donna Cain
570-947-3824
HANOVER TWP.
* NEW LISTING! *
3-story home with 4
car garage. Hard-
wood floors, sun
parlor with magnifi-
cent leaded glass
windows, 4 bed-
rooms, eat-in
kitchen with pantry,
formal dining room,
gas heat.
MLS #11-4133
$84,500
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP
2 Owen Street
This 2 story, 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
home is in the
desired location of
Jenkins Township.
Sellers were in
process of updating
the home so a little
TLC can go a long
way. Nice yard.
Motivated sellers.
MLS 11-2191
$89,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise Drive
PRICED TO SELL!
This 4 bedroom has
2 car garage with
extra driveway,
central air, veranda
over garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and wet
bar. Sunroom
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
JENKINS TWP.
21 Spring St.
2 or 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home. Large
fenced yard with
shed, 50x200 lot. 3
off street
parking spaces.
By Owner
$99,900
570-825-9867
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
JENKINS TWP.
4 Orchard St.
3 bedroom starter
home with 1 bath on
quiet street.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-254
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space
throughout, enjoy
the privacy of deck
& patio with fenced
yard. MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
Kingston
3 bedroom bi-level
with two modern,
full baths & one 3/4
bath. Living room
with fireplace and
skylights, built in
china cabinets in
dining room. Lower
level family room
with fireplace and
wet bar. Large
foyer with fireplace.
MLS#11-3064
$289,500
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
58 S. Welles Ave
Large charmer had
been extensively
renovated in the last
few years. Tons of
closets, walk-up
attic & a lower level
bonus recreation
room. Great loca-
tion, just a short
walk to Kirby Park.
MLS 11-3386
$129,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
KINGSTON
68 Bennett St
Great duplex on
nice street. Many
upgrades including
modern kitchens
and baths, plus ceil-
ing fans. Both units
occupied,separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3284. $74,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
KINGSTON
806 Nandy Drive
Unique 3 bedroom
home perfect for
entertaining! Living
room with fireplace
and skylights. Din-
ing room with built-
in china cabinets.
Lower level family
room with fireplace
and wetbar. Private
rear yard within-
ground pool and
multiple decks.
MLS#11-3064
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
A Classy Move-in
Ready 5 bed-
room, with recent
updates including
flooring, bathroom,
recessed lighting &
many new widows.
Woodburner on
brick hearth, eat in
kitchen, formal
dining room. Good
room sizes, fenced
yard, patio, private
driveway, walking
distance to park,
shopping, public
transportation,
restaurants, etc.
MLS #11-4283
$132,900.
Call Pat today @
CENTURY 21 SMITH
HOURIGAN GROUP
570-287-1196
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
Large double, great
older home with all
modern updates.
Pantry, kitchen, liv-
ing room, formal
dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
Collect $1300 rent
from other side.
$195,000
570-288-4203
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Use your income
tax rebate for a
downpayment on
this great home
with modern
kitchen with granite
counters, 2 large
bedrooms,
attached garage,
full basement could
be finished, sun
porch overlooks
great semi private
yard. A great house
in a great location!
Come see it!
. For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$119,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
This charming 3
story has plenty of
potential and is
within 1 block of
Wyoming Ave. Put
in your own finish-
ing touches. Priced
to sell! MLS 12-48
$ 34,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
KINGSTON TWP
573 carverton Rd
Cape Cod with
approx. 3,284 sq. ft.
Living room with
stone fireplace, din-
ing room with sky-
light & stone floor,
semi modern
kitchen with break-
fast area, family
room with fireplace
& vaulted ceiling
master on 1st floor
with master bath, 3
other bedrooms, 2
full baths. Central
air. $725,000.
MLS 11-4056
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
Well maintained one
owner home locat-
ed near schools &
shopping. Home
features 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
eat-in kitchen, living
room, dining room &
foyer, with ductless
air conditioning on
the first floor. 2-car
detached garage
and basement
ready to be finished.
All appliances are
included along with
the first floor laun-
dry. MLS#11-97
$129,000
Everett Davis
(570) 417-8733
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
RARE OPPORTUNITY!
This one you cant
match for overall
charm, utilization
and value. The
beautifully carpeted,
gas fireplace living
room makes you
want to sit down
and relax. The din-
ing room opens to a
Florida room with a
gas fireplace. There
is a modern kitchen
and 2 modern bath-
rooms. Three spa-
cious bedrooms on
the second floor
with a walkup attic.
Completely finished
basement with wet
bar! The home fea-
tures many
upgrades including
windows, roof, land-
scaping and drive-
way. Also a one car
detached garage
and gazebo. Great
Kingston location
with low taxes and
located near school
and shopping.
MLS#11-4552
$172,900
Everett Davis
(570) 417-8733
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
24 Fordham Road
Lovely cedar shingle
sided home on large
corner lot in a great
development. 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 baths, 1st
floor family room, fin-
ished lower level.
Hardwood floors
throughout, huge liv-
ing room & family
room. 1st floor laun-
dry room & office,
gas heat, nice deck,
above ground pool, 2
car garage. 11-3497
$295,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
Sunday
February 5th
12pm to 2pm
13 Fordham Road
Totally remodeled
custom brick ranch
in Oakwood Park.
This home features
an open floor plan
with hardwood
floors, 2 fireplaces,
kitchen, formal living
& dining rooms,
family room, 4 bed-
rooms, 4 baths,
office with private
entrance, laundry
room on first floor,
tons of closets and
storage areas,
walk-up attic, great
finished basement
with fireplace, built-
in grill, in-ground
pool, cabana with
half bath, an over-
sized 2-car garage
& a security system.
Renovations include
new: windows, gas
furnace, central air,
electrical service,
hardwood floors,
Berber carpeting,
freshly painted,
updated bathrooms
& much, much,
more. Laflin Road to
Fordham Road, on
right. $399,700
Call Donna
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
LAKE NUANGOLA
Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
LARKSVILLE
10 E. Second St.
Property in nice
neighborhood.
Includes 4 room
apartment over
garage.
MLS 12-253
$79,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
EXT 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in
move in condi-
tion with updat-
ed kitchen and
baths. Nice yard
with shed and
potential off
street parking.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
LUZERNE
459 Bennett St.
Very nice 5 bed-
room, 2 story home
in nice area of
Luzerne. Off street
parking for 4 cars.
1st floor master
bedroom & laundry.
Replacement win-
dows on 2nd floor.
5 year young full
bath. Modern
kitchen w/breakfast
bar, oak cabinets.
Basement always
DRY! All measure-
ments approximate
MLS11-3745
$122,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
MOOSIC
15 EMERSON DRIVE
GLENMAURA
Beautiful brick-
faced 4 bedroom
Colonial. Spacious,
open floor plan. Tile
floors, fireplace,
two car garage.
MLS# 12-295
$350,000
Call Stacey Lauer
570-262-1158
MOSCOW
331 Gudz Road
Private country
living, with easy
access to inter-
state. Relax and
enjoy this comfort-
able A-Frame
home. Jacuzzi,
large deck & gor-
geous pond. Great
for entertaining
inside and out. For
more photos and
info visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3285
$249,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
MOUNTAIN TOP
33 Valley View Drive
3 Bedroom, 1.5
Bath, 2 car garage,
new roof & hot
water heater, above
ground heated pool,
finished basement.
$210,000
Contact Melissa at
570-430-8263
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$192,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
MOTIVATED SELLER
Raised ranch on
corner lot. Spacious
two car garage.
Modern kitchen &
bath, tile floors.
Energy efficient
Ceramic Heat.
MLS#11-2500
$174,900
Call Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
MOUNTAINTOP
VACANT LAND
333 OAKMONT LANE
1.15 acre, level lot,
#254, on
cul-de-sac, in
Laurel Lakes.
Underground elec-
tric, phone & cable.
Ready for your new
home in 2012!
MLS# 11-4465
$39,900
Call Christine Kane
570-714-9231
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Needs work, but
columns, moldings,
and leaded glass
windows are intact.
MLS #12-133
$42,000
CALL CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
182 Robert Street
Nice single or
duplex. Gas heat.
Detached garage.
This home is high
and dry, and avail-
able for immediate
occupancy. Call
Jim for details.
Affordable @
$104,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
414 Grove Street E
Remodeled 2 story
with new oil furnace,
windows, electric
kitchen, bath, door,
flooring, paint. OSP.
Seller will pay 1st
year property tax.
MLS#11-2760
$85,500
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
NANTICOKE
East Noble Street
Nice two family on
the east side. Gas
heat. Detached 2
car garage. Afford-
able @ $69,500.
Call Jim for details
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E. CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
NEWPORT TWP.
Five bedroom
Contemporary has
a vaulted ceiling in
living room with
fireplace.
Hardwood floors in
dining & living
rooms. 1st floor
master bedroom
with walk in closet.
Lower level family
room. Deck,
garage, separate
laundry.
$257,500
MLS#12-170
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
NOXEN
PRICED TO SELL -
Brick ranch with
large living room, 3
bedrooms, sun
room, deck, full
basement, sheds
and garage on 0.54
acres in Noxen.
$135,000.
Jeannie Brady
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
PITTSON
NEW PRICE
8 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms & bath, eat-in
kitchen, formal din-
ing room, new win-
dows, gas heat.
MLS # 11-4369
$74,500
Call Donna
570-613-9080
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PAGE 6D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$82,000
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
A lot of house for
the money. Corner
home with lots of
space. 9 rooms, 2
1/2 baths, a bonus
room of 42 x 24.
This home is conve-
niently located near
major highways, air-
port and shopping.
Two car detached
garage and nice
yard.
$75,500
MLS# 10-4350
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes From
$275,000-$595,000
(570) 474-5574
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON TWP
FOR SALE: $257,500
LUXURY TOWNHOME
New construction:
3 bedroom, 2.5
bath, large entry
with cathedral
ceiling, upstairs
laundry. Oak
kitchen cabinetry,
granite counters
& stainless steel
whirlpool appli-
ances. Open floor
plan is great for
entertaining.
Upgrades include
hardwood floors &
gas fireplace. Two
walk-in closets &
master suite with
private bath fea-
tures cherry/
granite double
vanity, jetted tub.
Attached garage,
full basement, a
great location;
minutes to I-81 &
Turnpike off 315,
7.5 miles north of
Mohegan Sun.
READY FOR OCCUPANCY
Call Susan at
877-442-8439
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
BY OWNER
459 Broad St.
3 bedroom 1 bath
attractive home in
great location,
hardwood floors
100x144 lot
asking $109,900
570.970.0650
jtdproperties.com
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$164,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$59,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own cabin
in the woods.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
2 bedroom, 2.5
bath. Luxury 1,950
sq ft end unit
Townhome in
sought after River
Ridge. Gas heat,
A/C, Hardwood &
wall to wall. Mar-
ble tile master bath
with jetted tub &
separate shower.
$189,500
Call 570-285-5119
PLAINS
41 Bank Street
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
situated on a large
lot on a quiet street
with off street park-
ing. Move-in condi-
tion. Don't miss this
one! MLS #11-4055
REDUCED!
$64,500
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
46-48 Helen St
Well maintained
double block on
quiet street, great
nei ghbor hood.
Perfect home for
you with one side
paying most of
your mortgage, or
would make a
good investment,
with separate utili-
ties & great rents.
Vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl alu-
minum siding, walk
up large attic from
one side, lower
front & rear porch-
es, with two rear
upper enclosed
porches. $119,900
Call Ronnie
570-262-4838
PLAINS
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$144,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
PLAINS
REDUCED REDUCED
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$34,900 $34,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
74 Mack Street
Modern 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 baths with a 1
car garage and
fenced yard. Combi-
nation living room/
dinning room with
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
Corian counter tops
and tiled back-
splash. Modern tiled
bath. First floor
bonus family rooms.
New carpeting
throughout. Finished
lower level with 1/2
bath. Shed included.
MLS 11-4241
Reduced $109,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fenced in
yard. 3-4 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. Fin-
ished lower level,
office and
laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$99,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
PLYMOUTH
Recently remodeled
single family home
with 1st & 2nd floor
baths, modern
kitchen, large family
room with hard-
wood floors.
$70,000
MLS # 10-4618
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
PRICE REDUCED
$425,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
4 Genoa Lane
There is much
attention to detail in
this magnificent 2
story, 4 bedroom, 2
full bath all brick
home on double
corner lot. Large
family room with
brick fireplace, all
oak kitchen with
breakfast area,
master suite, solid
oak staircase to
name a few.
MLS #11-3268
$525,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-07770
SHAVERTOWN
Enjoy the quiet life in
this spacious 3 bed-
room home on dou-
ble lot. Features
hardwood floor in
dining room, cov-
ered patio, over-
sized 2 car garage,
family room with
fireplace & finished,
walk out basement
with another fire-
place. MLS# 11-1873
$160,000
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
Signature Properties
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained
raised ranch in
Midway Manor.
Good size level yard
with shed. Large
sunr oom/ l aundr y
addition. Lower
level family room
with wood stove.
MLS #11-4178
$163,700
Call
Christrine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SHAVERTOWN
If youre looking for
country living with
peace and quiet and
beautiful mountain
views, this is the
home for you! Only
minutes from town,
featuring large eat-
in kitchen, formal
dining room & living
room, all with hard-
wood floors. There
are three bedrooms
and a laundry in
addition to two full
baths. Master bath
skylight. Gas heat.
Central Air. $300 lot
rent/month and that
includes water,
sewer and garbage
removal.
MLS#10-4421
$65,000
EVERETT DAVIS
417-8733
SHAVERTOWN
* NEW LISTING! *
Great space in this
2-story coveted
Dallas neighbor-
hood! Lots of oak on
1st floor, door, mold-
ings, kitchen,
beams; finished
basement, 3-sea-
son room, bonus
room on 2nd floor
with computer nook.
4 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, 2 half baths,
office on 1st floor,
dual heat/air units.
MLS#11-4064
$349,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
SHICKSHINNY
1128 Bethel Hill Rd
A dollhouse in his-
toric Patterson
Grove Campground
with country charm.
Many recent
updates. Cute as
can be. Patterson
Grove on web
www.patterson
grove.com
11-4376
$27,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
SHICKSHINNY
408 Cragle Hill Rd.
This is a very well
kept Ranch home
on 6 acres, central
air, rear patio and 1
car garage. This is
a 3 parcel listing.
MLS 11-4273
$157,900
Jackie Roman
570-288-0770
Ext. 39
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber St.
Nice Ranch home,
great neighbor-
hood.
MLS 11-3365
$109,000
Call David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber Street
Nice ranch home!
Great neighbor-
hood. MLS#11-3365
$109,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
SWOYERSVILLE
20 Maple Drive
An immaculate 4
bedroom split level
situated on a .37
acre manicured lot
in a quiet neighbor-
hood. Features
include a Florida
room with wet bar &
breakfast area, spa-
cious eat-in kitchen
with sliders to deck/
patio, formal living
room, dining room,
family room, central
a/c, & 2 car garage.
Many amenities.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #11-1374
$ 229,900
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
SWOYERSVILLE
51-53 Milbre St
Nice home. A tenant
would help pay the
mortgage or use as
an investment prop-
erty or convert to a
single family. Great
location, worth your
consideration. Full
attic, walk out base-
ment by bilco doors.
Bathrooms are on
the first floor.
MLS 12-298
$99,500
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
SWOYERSVILLE
60 Watkins St
Home features 4
bedrooms, a mas-
ter bedroom on 1st
floor with large walk
in closet, ceiling
fans, screened
porch, sunroom and
workshop. New 200
amp service, interi-
or paint & laundry
area in basement.
MLS#12-128
$105,000
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
New Listing!
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
home on double lot.
One car garage,
two 3 season
porches, security
system & attic just
insulated.
MLS #12-31
$90,000.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SWOYERSVILLE
NEW PRICE
$196,500
Luxurious End Townhouse
3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, Cathedral
ceilings, hardwood
floors, gas heat,
Central Air, master
bath with whirlpool
tub & shower, lovely
landscaped fenced
yard, 1 car garage.
Great Location.
MLS#11-3533
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
SWOYERSVILLE
OUT OF FLOOD
ZONE
Estate. Nice brick
front ranch home on
a corner lot. 1 car
attached garage,
circle driveway,
central air. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath
with 2 showers, Full
basement with
brand new water
proofing system
that includes a war-
ranty. Great loca-
tion. MLS 11-2127
$108,500
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
SWOYERSVILLE
Meticulous two-
story home with
double lot and 2-car
garage. Eat-in
kitchen with laundry
area; first floor tiled
full bath, nicely car-
peted living/dining
rooms; three bed-
rooms on second
floor, gas heat,
recently roofed,
great starter home
for you. Move in and
enjoy not paying
rent. MLS#11-3400
REDUCED TO
$99,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
TRUCKSVILLE
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 bath
double wide in nice
neighborhood.
Many updates.
Landscaped &
fenced yard with
pool, large deck &
koi pond! $99,700
MLS#11-2253
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
W. NANTICOKE
71 George Ave.
Nice house with
lots of potential.
Priced right. Great
for handy young
couple. Close to
just about every-
thing. Out of
flood zone.
MLS 12-195
$76,000
Call Roger Nenni
EXT 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
611 Dennison St.,
High & Dry! Lovely
three bedroom, two
bath bi-level offers
plenty of closet
space, tiled kitchen
& lower level floors,
security system and
very economical
gas heat. Lower
level has family
room, laundry area
and office or fourth
bedroom. This
home was NOT
FLOODED! MLS#12-8
$144,500
Karen Bernardi
283-9100 x31
WANAMIE
950 Center St.
Unique property.
Well maintained - 2
story 10 year old set
on 3.56 acres. Pri-
vacy galore, pole
barn 30x56 heated
for storage of
equipment, cars or
boats. A must see
property. GEO Ther-
mal Heating Sys-
tem.Only 10 minutes
from interstate 81 &
15 minutes to turn-
pike. MLS#11-3617
$249,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldnt
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$64,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST HAZLETON
100 Warren St
16,000 sq. ft. com-
mercial building with
warehouse / offices.
Great location. 1
block west of Route
93. Approximately 3
miles from 80/81
intersection. Many
possibilities for this
property storage
lockers; flea market;
game/ entertain-
ment center; laun-
dromat; auto
garage. $119,000
Call Karen at
Century 21 Select
Group - Hazleton
570-582-4938
WEST PITTSTON
220 Linden St.
Large 2 story home
with 3 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths.
Detached garage,
inground pool.
Home needs work
on the first floor,
2nd is in very good
condition. Kitchen
cabinets ready to
be reinstalled. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-78
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
313 Race St.
This home needs
someone to rebuild
the former finished
basement and 1st
floor. Being sold as
is. 2nd floor is
move in ready.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-255
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED
18 Atlantic Ave.
Large 2 story home
with 2 baths,
attached garage.
Being sold as-is.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4475
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WEST WYOMING
550 Johnson St.
Nicely landscaped
corner lot sur-
rounds this brick
front Colonial in
desirable neighbor-
hood. This home
features a spacious
eat in kitchen, 4
bedrooms, 4 baths
including Master
bedroom with mas-
ter bath. 1st floor
laundry and finished
lower level. Enjoy
entertaining under
the covered patio
with hot tub, rear
deck for BBQs and
an above ground
pool. Economical
gas heat only $1224
per yr. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-157
$254,860
Call Michele
Reap
570-905-2336
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
FRONT VIEW
REAR VIEW
BEAUTIFUL BRICK,
SLATE, MARBLE & WOOD
HOUSE. MUST BE SEEN
TO BE APPRECIATED.
2 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. Great kit-
chen with new
stainless steel app-
liances & custom
cabinets with center
island. Dining room
with stone fireplace
& marble floor.
Hardwood floors in
living room, which
also has stone walls
& eight arched win-
dows. Hand carved
wooden staircase
leads to Master
Bedroom Suite with
large closet & large
second bedroom &
bath. Middle level
with custom pool
room. Lower level
has 1/2 bath, bar &
built in stone & glass
hutches. Two new
self-feed rice coal
stoves keep heating
bills to less than
$400 a year! New
roof with lifetime
guarantee, privacy
fence, and 12
above ground pool
with composite
deck. New 2 story,
1 car garage, & a
long driveway for
plenty of parking.
$199,000, firm.
Showings will be
held weekends for
prequalified buyers
only, please.
Call 570-233-7235
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
Why pay rent when
you can own this 1/2
double? 3 bed-
rooms. Eat in
kitchen. New roof
installed 12/11.
$49,900
MLS# 10-2780
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WEST WYOMING
WHY PAY RENT?
Nice half double
with eat in kitchen,
nice yard, shed and
off street parking.
$49,900
MLS # 11-1910
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WHITE HAVEN
28 S. Woodhaven Dr
Beautiful 4 bedroom
home. Peaceful sur-
roundings. Lake
view. 11-1253.
$179,000
Darcy J. Gollhardt,
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
WILKES-BARRE
$42,900
272 Stanton Street
7 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, eat-in kit-
chen, 1 1/2 baths.
Laundry room with
washer & dryer, eat
in kitchen includes
refrigerator, stove,
& dishwasher, built
in A/C unit, fenced in
yard, security sys-
tem. MLS #11-4532
GO TO THE TOP...
CALL JANE KOPP
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with newer
laminate floors,
vaulted ceiling, 2
large bedrooms.
Finished lower level
with 1/2 bath and
laundry room. Large
family room built in
garage, and wood
pellet stove. No
sign, alarm system.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3290
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
1400 North
Washington St
Nice 2 story in need
of some TLC with
low taxes, near the
casino. Roof is 5
years young. Newer
water heater
(installed '09),
replacement win-
dows throughout,
100 AMP electric,
tiled bath, wall-to-
wall carpeting entire
1st floor. $49,900.
11-4455.
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
260 Brown Street
Move right into this
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath in very good
condition with mod-
ern kitchen and
bathrooms and a 3
season sunroom off
of the kitchen.
MLS 11-4244
$64,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
298 Lehigh Street
Lovely 2 story with
new roof, furnace,
water heater, new
cabinets and appli-
ances. Whole house
newly insulated.
Nice deck and
fenced-in yard. Call
Chris at 570-885-
0900 for additional
info or to tour.
MLS 11-4505
$82,000
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
Just on the market
this 2 story offers a
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
1st floor laundry
plus 2/3 bedrooms
On 2nd floor.
Affordably priced at
$ 27,900.00
MLS 12-50
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
WILKES-BARRE
Large, stately brick
home in Historic Dis-
trict. Large eat-in
kitchen, dining room
2 fireplaces, 5 full
baths & 2 half baths.
Huge master with
office. Large 3rd
floor bedroom. 2
story attic. Custom
woodwork & hard-
wood floors. Leaded
glass, large closets
with built-ins. Needs
some updates. With
large income apt.
with separate
entrance.
Call for
appointment.
ASKING $300,000
Call 570-706-5917
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 7D
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Lot 39 Mayock St.
9' ceilings through-
out 1st floor, granite
countertops in
kitchen. Very bright.
1st floor master
bedroom & bath.
Not yet assessed.
End unit. Modular
construction.
MLS #10-3180
$179,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
WILKES-BARRE
Nice 3 bedroom, 1
bath home, with 3
season porch and
detached 1 car
garage. Good
starter home in
well established
neighborhood.
Family owned for
many years.
MLS#11-4464
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
WILKES-BARRE
Nice home, great
price. 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, wood floors,
off street parking,
Approx 1312sq ft.
Currently rented out
for $550 monthly,
no lease. Keep it as
an investment or
make this your new
home. MLS 11-3207
$46,000
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
32 Wilson St
No need for flood or
mine subsidence
insurance. 2 story, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
home in a safe,
quiet neighborhood.
Aluminum siding.
Corner, 105x50 lot.
Fenced in yard.
Appraised at
$57,000. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-826-1458
for appointment
WILKES-BARRE
South
3 bedroom, 2 story,
with brick & stucco
siding. Beautiful
hardwood floors.
Semi-modern
kitchen. Finished
basement with fire-
place. Covered
back porch. Priced
to sell. $79,900.
MLS 11-2987
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
WILKES-BARRE
Well maintained 2
story home with a
finished lower level
and a gas fireplace.
New carpets and a
walk-up attic, great
for storage.
$65,000
MLS# 11-4529
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Want to live in the
city? Look at this
home! Well kept and
clean two-story in
this desirable Wilkes
Barre neighbor-
hood. Hardwood
flooring, great size,
eat-in oak kitchen
with all appliances &
first floor laundry.
Open floor plan on
first floor with living/
dining area. Modern
baths & three large
bedrooms. Plus
bonus twin bunk
beds built-in. Well
insulated-gas heat,
fenced yard, off-
street parking.
MLS#11-2659
REDUCED TO
$79,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Nice home located
on a quiet street. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath
well kept & ready
for new owner. MLS
12-73. $55,000.
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Come take a look at
this value. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. Sit
back & relax on the
rear deck of your
new home. MLS 12-
75. $42,500. Call/
text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Price reduced to
$43,000, below mar-
ket value! Modern
kitchen & bath,
enclosed rear patio.
Nice, clean and well
maintained; family
room can be con-
verted to a 3rd bed-
room. Just move
right in! MLS#11-3652
$43,000
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Cozy (2) unit home
with parking for (3)
vehicles. Enclosed
rear fenced-in yard,
shed, washer &
dryer, refrigerator
included. Nice clean
units! Home can be
converted back to a
single family home.
MLS#11-4047
$49,900
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
WYOMING
1702 W. Eighth St.
1 story Ranch with
100x200 lot, paved
driveway, new
energy star
replacement win-
dows. Excellent
starter home. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2912
NEW PRICE
$84, 500
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
WYOMING
40 Fifth st
Very nice 2 family,
one side move in
the other rented
separate utilities, 6
rooms each side
plus 1/2 bath
upstairs each side.
Wonderful neigh-
borhood plus short
walking distance to
Wyoming Avenue.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4027. $124,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
906 Homes for Sale
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Marys St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
EDWARDSVILLE
89-91 Hillside Ave.
Out of the flood
plain this double
has potential.
Newer roof & some
windows have been
replaced. Property
includes a large
extra lot. Square ft.
approximate.
MLS 11-3463
$67,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
89-91 Hillside St.
Out of the flood
plain, this double
has potential.
Newer roof and
some windows
have been
replaced. Property
includes a large
extra lot.
MLS 11-3463
$87,000
Call Roger Nenni
Ext. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
5770-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
FORTY FORT
1012 Wyoming Ave.
SUPER LOCATION
Needs work. Priced
to sell. Great for
your small business
or offices. Very high
traffic count. Prop-
erty is being sold IN
AS IS CONDITION.
Inspections for buy-
ers information only.
Property needs
rehab.
MLS 11-4267
$84,900
Roger Nenni
570-288-0770
Ext. 32
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
JENKINS TWP.
1334 Main St.
1 story, 2,600
sq. ft. commePr-
cial building,
masonry con-
struction with
offices and
warehousing.
Central air,
alarm system
and parking.
Great for con-
tractors or
anyone with
office/storage
needs. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3156
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
KINGSTON
584 Wyoming Ave.
M MOTIV OTIVA ATED TED S SELLER ELLER! !
Three large offices
along with a recep-
tion area with built-
in secretarial/para-
legal work stations;
a large conference
room with built-in
bookshelves, kitch-
enette and bath-
room. Lower level
has 7 offices, 2
bathrooms, plenty
of storage. HIGHLY
visible location,
off-street park-
ing. Why rent
office space?
Use part of building
& rent space- share
expenses and build
equity. MLS#11-995
REDUCED TO
$399,000
Judy Rice
570-714-9230
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
KINGSTON
64-66 Dorrance St.
3 units, off street
parking with some
updated Carpets
and paint. $1500/
month income from
long time tenants.
W/d hookups on
site. MLS 11-3517
$109,900
Call Jay A.
Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
NANTICOKE
414 Front St.
Move right into this
modern office build-
ing featuring 4
offices, receptionist
office, large confer-
ence room, modern
kitchen, storage
room, full base-
ment, central air,
handicap access. 2
car garage and 5
additional off street
parking spaces.
This property is also
available for lease.
Lease price is
$675/mo + $675
security deposit.
Tenant pays all
utilities. Sells for
$89,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
5 Mountains
Realty
42 N. Main St.
Shickshinny, PA
570-542-2141
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
NANTICOKE
423 E. Church
St.
Great 2 family in
move in condi-
tion on both
sides, Separate
utilities, 6
rooms each. 3
car detached
garage in super
neighborhood.
Walking dis-
tance to col-
lege. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1608
$123,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
NANTICOKE
PENDING
406-408 Front St.
4,400 SF commer-
cial building with
storefront and living
space on the 2nd
floor. This building
can be used for
commercial appli-
cations or convert it
into a double block.
Property being sold
AS IS.
MLS 11-4271
$40,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
PITTSTON
166 Vine St.
Nice three family
home in good loca-
tion, fully occupied.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-220
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
Rear 49 James St.
Two 2 bedroom
apartments, fully
rented with sepa-
rate utilities on a
quiet street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-219
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
SALE OR LEASE
PRICE REDUCED
Modern office build-
ing, parking for 12
cars. Will remodel
to suit tenant.
$1800/mo or pur-
chase for
$449,000
MLS 11-751
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
GARAGE
Swoyersville
Four-bay garage
with attached 725SF
office, also large
garage now used for
storage. Presently
being used as auto
sales, repair and
storage. Property
has security fence
and exterior lighting.
One acre lot. MLS #
10-2413 $215,000
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WEST WYOMING
379-381 Sixth St.
Perfect first home
for you with one
side paying most of
your mortgage.
Would also make a
nice investment
with all separate
utilities and nice
rents. Large fenced
yard, priced to sell.
Dont wait too long.
Call today to
schedule a tour.
MLS 11-1453
REDUCED!!
$84,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSS REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
WILKES-BARRE
35 Tannery St
Two properties in
one! House comes
with additional a
joining lot (approx
40 x 75) with poten-
tial to build or park
10-15 cars. Would
make great profes-
sional space. New
roof in 2010.
$49,900. 11-4379.
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$169,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
38 Wedgewood Dr.
Laurelbrook Estates
Lot featuring 3.22
acres with great
privacy on cul-de-
sac. Has been perc
tested and has
underground utili-
ties. 4 miles to PA
Turnpike entrance.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-114
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
COURTDALE
175x130 sloping lot
with some trees.
Public sewer, water,
gas. $9,500. To set-
tle Estate. 570-287-
5775 or 332-1048
DALLAS
$135,000
SPECTACULAR
WATER VIEW!
2 acres overlooking
Huntsville
Reservoir. Building
site cleared but
much of woodlands
preserved. Perc &
site prep done.
MLS # 11-2550.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
912 Lots & Acreage
HARDING
Mt. Zion Road
One acre lot just
before Oberdorfer
Road. Great place
to build your
dream home
MLS 11-3521
$29,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JACKSON TWP
1 acre with well,
septic and driveway
in place. Asking
$42,000. Make rea-
sonable offer.
DEREMER REALTY
570-477-1149
LAFLIN
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
BUILD YOUR
DREAM HOME
on one of the last
available lots in
desirable Laflin.
Convenient location
near highways, air-
port, casino &
shopping.
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 11-3411
$34,900
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes From
$275,000-$595,000
(570) 474-5574
SHAVERTOWN LAND
Harford Ave.
4 buildable residen-
tial lots for sale indi-
vidually or take all
4! Buyer to confirm
water and sewer
with zoning officer.
Directions: R. on
E. Franklin, R. on
Lawn to L. on
Harford.
$22,500 per lot
Mark Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY
ASHLEY PARK
Double wide home.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths. 3 season
deck & carport,
new appliances,
many upgrades,
near Rts 81, 309 &
Hanover Industrial
Park $54,500.
Serious Calls Only.
(570) 826-0887
PITTSTON TWP.
95 Redman
2 bedroom. Vinyl
siding, shingled
roof. Clean. NEEDS
NO WORK. Minutes
from I81 & Turnpike.
Excellent Condition.
$19,900.
570-851-6128 or
610-767-9456
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
74 W. Hartford St
2 bedroom. 2nd
floor. Fridge, stove,
washer/dryer
included. Wall to
wall carpet. No
pets. Security, appli-
cation fee + utilities.
$550/month.
570-479-2559
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
Available Now
1st floor, 2 bedroom.
Off street parking.
Washer dryer
hookup. Appliances.
Bus stop at the
door. Water Includ-
ed.$575 + utilities &
security. No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
Available Now
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. Off street
parking. Washer
dryer hookup. Appli-
ances. Bus stop at
the door. Water
Included.$575 + util-
ities & security. No
pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
We Care about the
place you call home,
& we want you to
care about it too!!
2 & 3 bedrooms,
reserved parking.
Short block to bus
stop. $650 & 725
rent includes heat/
water/sewer &
trash. Application,
references, back-
ground check,
smoke free, pet
free, lease + securi-
ty. Call Terry
570-824-1022
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, first
floor, large modern
eat in kitchen with
appliances, bath,
carpeting, ample
parking, $495.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
Modern 1st floor, 1
bedroom with all
appliances. Off
street parking. No
pets. $550 per
month + utilities.
570-639-1462
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DUMORE
Two bedroom 1
bathroom apart-
ment on Apple St.
$600/month + utili-
ties. Available 1/15.
(570) 815-5334
DUPONT
Totally renovated 6
room apartment with
balcony. Partially fur-
nished. Brand new
fridge / electric
range & electric
washer/ dryer. along
with new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient windows. 2
bedroom + large
attic loft bedroom,
1.5 bath, partially fin-
ished basement.
Lots of closet space.
Easy access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking. $750 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-762-8265
DURYEA
1 bedroom apart-
ment + den in con-
verted school. 10 ft.
ceilings, open plan
Living Room, Dining
area & modern
Kitchen, all appli-
ances, mini-blinds,
neutral colors, hard-
wood floors, laun-
dry, off-street park-
ing. $675. Call
570-451-1982
EDWARDSVILLE
2 bedroom with
basement for stor-
age. Private ent-
rance with rear
yard. All new appli-
ances included.
Washer/dryer, sew-
er included. Pets
considered. $425/
month + 1 month
security.
Call 570-606-7884
between 9am &
9pm or Call
570-256-7837
before 9am &
after 9pm
EXETER
2 bedroom, modern
kitchen and bath,
Includes OSP
stove, fridge, heat,
water, sewer.
No Pets. $650.
570-693-1294
FORTY FORT
1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS
Very nice, clean,
great neighbor-
hood, hardwood
floors, a/c, washer
/dryer with newer
appliances, stor-
age, 1st/last/securi-
ty with one year
lease. References
required. $650-
$695 + utilities.
Water/sewer by
owner, no pets,
non-smoking.
Call 202-997-9185
for appointment
FORTY FORT
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
gas heat, nice
kitchen & bath, new
flooring, optional
garage. Wash-
er/dryer included
$ 6 8 5 / m o n t h .
Call after 6 p.m.
570-220-6533
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
Available March 1
2nd floor, spacious,
well maintained, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, in
convenient nice
neighborhood.
Large living/dining
area, large eat in
kitchen with w/d
hookup. Front
porch, screened
back porch. Great
closet/storage
space,w/w carpet-
ing, central air, off
street parking.
$900/month plus
utilities. Call 570-
510-4778 from
9am-5pm for an
appointment.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
FORTY FORT
WYOMING
AVE
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient, first
floor, appli-
ances, laundry,
parking.
STAFFED PRO-
F E S S I O N A L
MANAGEMENT
NO PETS/
S M O K I N G
$465 + UTILI-
TIES/2 YEARS.
288-1422
HANOVER TWP.
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, cherry
hardwood floors,
stainless appli-
ances, European
tile kitchen & bath.
Parking, A/C, cathe-
dral ceilings, fire-
place, balcony
$790/month.
Call 570-650-0278
HUDSON
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hook-
up, full basement,
no pets. $625/mon-
th, water & sewer
paid, security.
570-829-5378
JENKINS TWP.
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room. All utilities
included. Refrigera-
tor & stove. No
pets. Available
now. $600 month.
Call
570-362-0942
KINGSTON
1 bedroom. Avail-
able now. $425 +
security & electric.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
1st floor. Large 2
bedroom. Remod-
eled. Stove refriger-
ator. Washer/ dryer
hookup. $675 Heat
included. Call
570-814-0843 or
570-696-3090
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, wall to wall,
refrigerator & stove,
heat & hot water.
Off-street parking.
No pets. No smok-
ing. $550/month, +
security & refer-
ences .
570-288-3119
KINGSTON
705 Nandy Drive
Modern, clean 2
bedroom, all appli-
ances, central air,
& off-street parking,
No pets / Non-
Smoking $660/
month + utilities
570-696-3915
KINGSTON
Awsome 2 bedroom
apartments! New
appliances, wash-
er/dryer on site,
garage parking, no
pets. 2nd floor -
$925 & 1st floor -
$1,075. Heat, water,
& sewer included.
Call 570-417-2049
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
3 bedrooms, pantry
w/eat in kitchen. All
appliances. 2.5
baths, separate tub
showers. No pets
or smoking.
$1500/mo plus
security & utilities.
Call 570-288-4203
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted, security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $715.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled, 3
bedroom 1/2 double
with carpet, paint,
1.5 bath, washer/
dryer hook up, gas
heat, $700 + utilities.
Call 570-814-0843
or 570-696-3090
KINGSTON
SPACIOUS 1/2 DOUBLES
3 bedrooms, back
yard. Separate utili-
ties. No pets. Back-
ground & security.
$750/month.
570-242-8380
KINGSTON
Spacious 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, porch,
off street parking.
Heat & water
included. New
fridge & stove. Pet
Friendly. $550 +
security. Call
570-287-5282
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
$725, with discount.
All new hardwood
floors and tile. New
cabinets/bathroom.
Dishwasher, garb-
age disposal. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up.
Off street parking.
Facebook us at
BOVO Rentals
570-328-9984
MCADOO
Newly constructed
1 & 2 bedroom 2nd
floor apartments.
Modern kitchen:
stainless steel
appliances, granite
countertops. Pri-
vate laundry. Off
street parking. No
pets. Includes heat,
water, garbage &
sewer. References
& security deposit
required. $850
Call (570) 929-2843
for appointment
MOOSIC
4 rooms. 2nd floor.
Heat, water &
sewer included.
$695 + security &
references. Call
570-457-7854
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 bedroom with full
kitchen. Remodeled
recently, first floor,
ample parking. Hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
On Rt 309 - close
to all amenities! No
pets. Non smoking.
$560/month + secu-
rity & references.
570-239-3827
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, off street
parking. No pets.
$470/month,
heat, water, & hot
water incl.
570-855-3958 leave
message.
NANTICOKE
603 HANOVER ST
2nd floor, 1
bedroom. No pets.
$500 + security,
utilities & lease.
Photos available.
570-542-5330
NANTICOKE
East State Street
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. Mod-
ern kitchen & bath-
rooms. All appli-
ances. Ample stor-
age. Some utilities
included. $475 &
$585 per month.
Call (570) 239-2741
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
apartment.
221 Pine St.
$520/month, sewer
& garbage included,
security deposit
required. Call
610-393-7884
NANTICOKE
Ready Immediately!
Spacious 2nd floor
non smoking, 2
bedroom. W/w car-
peting, all appli-
ances incl. w/d.
Electric heat. Tons
of storage, off
street parking. Yard
and porch.
$480/mo, 1 month
security, refer-
ences. Water and
sewage incl. tenant
pays other utilities
570-650-3358
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bathroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, pets
negotiable. $525/
month, water and
sewer paid,
security and lease
required. Call after
4pm. 570-237-6277
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 2 sec-
ond floor. Includes
fridge, range,
sewer, trash, wash-
er & dryer hook up.
$575 + security
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
3 room, wall to wall
carpet, appliances
washer/dryer hook-
up, includes all utili-
ties except electric.
No pets
$500/month +
security
Call 570-655-1606
PITTSTON
South Main Street
5 rooms, 2nd floor,
includes heat, stove
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook-
up, sewer, front &
back porches,
fenced yard & pri-
vate parking. Lawn
maintained. No
Pets. $675/month
570-654-2257
PLAINS
1st floor. Modern 2
bedroom. Kitchen
with appliances. All
new carpet. Conve-
nient location. No
smoking. No pets.
$550 + utilities.
570-714-9234
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer/dry-
er hookup, with
stove & refrigerator.
No pets. Refer-
ences required.
$500/month + sec-
urity + heat & lights.
570-779-4903
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 8D TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
Each apartment features:
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NOW LEASING!
Leasing Office located at:
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T. (o/O 28/.9998 | TTO. (8OO o4o.1888 /O4O
*income restrictions apply
For seniors age 62+ or disabled according to social security guidelines
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
A Place To
Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
for Move In
Specials.
570-288-9019
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedroom, private
setting with pond.
1.5 baths. Ultra
modern kitchen
with appliances,
dishwasher &
microwave includ-
ed. Plenty of closet
& storage. Wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Private drive.
$1,100/month.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Security deposit
required.
Call 570-760-2362
SWOYERSVILLE
New 1 bedroom, 1st
floor. Quiet area.
All appliances
included, coin-op
laundry. Off street
parking. No pets.
$430. Water/sewer
included. Security &
references. Call
570-239-7770
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom luxury
apartment. Living
room, kitchen. Cen-
tral Air. Off Street
parking. All appli-
ances included.
570-430-3095
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 2nd
floor. $500
plus utilities
570-299-5471
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room kitchen, living
room, bath, and
attic storage.
Refrigerator and
stove provided.
Heat, water, and
sewer included.
Quiet neighbor-
hood, out of flood
zone. No pets.
$540/month
lease, 1st., security
deposit, and refer-
ences required.
570-466-1545
WEST PITTSTON
HIGH AND DRY
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment, 2nd floor.
Recently renovated.
Sewer & appliances
included. Off street
parking. Security.
No pets.
$500/month +
utilities & gas heat.
570-586-0417
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room apartment.
All appliances.
Washer/ dryer. Off
street parking. No
pets. $525 + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
570-954-2972
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST WYOMING
429 West 8th Street
New 2 bedroom
with off street park-
ing, private patio,
washer/dryer, stove
included. No pets.
$575/mos + security
Sewer & garbage
included other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
/SOUTH
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking. Heat
included. $525/
month, + security.
Call 570-718-0331
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
1.5 bedroom, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove
provided, no pets, .
Heat & water paid.
$560/month + secu-
rity deposit.
Call 570-829-1598
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
1.5 bedrooms,
newly renovated
building. Washer &
dryer available.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
460 Scott Street
2 units. Fridge &
stove included.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. No pets. Securi-
ty, application fee +
utilities.
1 bedroom 1st floor,
$450.
1 bedroom 3rd
floor, $400.
570-479-2559
WILKES-BARRE
A spotless living
room, dining room,
kitchen, 2 bedroom,
bath, yard, base-
ment, off street
parking. Irving
Place. $430 + utili-
ties. 570-266-5336
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio & 1 bed-
room apts. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors electronically
locked. Studio -
$450. 1 bedroom -
$550. Water &
sewer paid. One
month/security de-
posit. Call
570-793-6377 or
570-208-9301 after
9:00 a.m. to sched-
ule an appointment.
Or email
shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
BOWMAN STREET
2 bedrooms
$725 Month
per month.
All utilities
included
Call Ken
@ 570-706-6145
to schedule a
viewing.
Line up a place to live
in classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom,
duplex. Stove, hook-
ups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking
$475 + utilities.
Call 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
CROSS VALLEY
ACCESS
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient
1 bedroom,
appliances,
laundry, park-
ing. STAFFED
PROFESSIONAL
MANAGEMENT.
NO PETS/
SMOKING/$465
+ UTILITIES.
2 YEARS.
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
Modern, 1st floor
apartment. 2 bed-
room, 1.5 baths, off-
street parking. No
pets, no smokers.
Security & credit/
background check
required. $550/
month + utilities.
570-881-4078
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
813 N Washington
Street
2nd floor. 1 bed-
room, wall to wall
carpet, new paint &
flooring, eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances, laundry facil-
ities, enclosed
porch. Heat, hot
water and cable
included. $520 +
electric & security.
No pets.
Call 570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
PARSONS
2nd floor, 3 rooms +
laundry room.
No pets.
$380 + utilities.
570-824-1082
WILKES-BARRE
Short Term OK!
Studio near Wilkes.
Furniture available.
Lease till June or
August. $450. All
utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
1 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, laundry room.
$800. All appliances
& utilities except
electric included.
Call 570-574-3065
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH WELLES ST.
Available February
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. New paint &
carpet, enclosed
porch. Heat, hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
$625 + security.
Section 8 Welcome.
570-589-9767
WILKES-BARRE
TWO BEDROOM UNIT
For lease, available
immediately, 1 bath-
room, refrigerator &
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, 2nd floor.
$500 per month +
utilities, references,
security & back-
ground check
570-735-4074
Leave message
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
single family
6 bedroom
large half double
HANOVER
2 bedroom
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom
large, water
included
PITTSTON
Large 1
bedroom water
included
KINGSTON
3 Bedroom Half
Double
LUZERNE
2 bedroom
water included
OLD FORGE
2 bedroom
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
by General Hospital
3 bedroom. All reno-
vated. 1,200 sf.
Parking space.
$730/month + utili-
ties, negotiable. Call
Agnes
347-495-4566
570-793-9449
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Quiet neighborhood.
Apartment near
Mohegan Sun, Mall
& Arena. 1 bed-
room, living room,
kitchen & bath.
Recently remod-
eled. New Stove,
washer, dryer &
fridge. included.
Heat, hot water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Off
street parking. $600
/mo. + security. Ref-
erences, credit &
background checks
required.
Call 570-861-2264
WYOMING
1 bedroom 2nd floor
at $675/month. Off
street parking. Non
smoking. No pets.
Bonus walk up attic
with tons of stor-
age. Heat, water,
garbage, sewer
included. 1 month
security, credit
check & references.
1 year lease.
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
WYOMING
Completely refur-
bished, 2nd floor, 2
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove, no
pets. $600/month,
1 month security.
Heat & hot water
included.
570-693-2254 or
570-262-3003
WYOMING
Large 2 bedroom,
1st floor, lease,
security, section 8
accepted. Handicap
accessible, $695 +
electric. All other
utilities included.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
WYOMING
Updated 1 bedroom.
New Wall to wall
carpet. Appliances
furnished. Coin op
laundry. $550. Heat,
water & sewer
included. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
FREE HIGH SPEED FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET! INTERNET!
Why pay extra for
internet? Our new
leases include a
FREE FREE high speed
connection!
Affordable mod-
ern office space
at the Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include
internet, heat,
central air, utili-
ties, trash
removal, and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Parking
available at the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
3800 SF, will divide
Office / Retail
Call 570-829-1206
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
EXETER
OFFICE/
STOREFRONT
1079 WYOMING AVE.,
available immedi-
ately, utilities pro-
vided. $300/month
with security
deposit. Call
570-693-2804
for an appointment
LUZERNE
125 Main Street
Office or Retail
Space available
with over 2,000 sq.
ft. plus attached
garage. High
traffic area. $650/
month + utilities.
Call 570-331-3600
OFFICE OR STORE
NANTICOKE
1280 sq ft. 3 phase
power, central air
conditioning. Handi-
cap accessible rest
room. All utilities by
tenant. Garbage
included. $900 per
month for a 5 year
lease.
570-735-5064.
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE SPACE
PLAINS
Total space 30,000
sf. Build to suit. Per-
fect for Doctors
suite, day care, etc.
High visibility. Lots of
parking. Rent starting
$10/sf. MLS 11-4200
Call Nancy or Holly
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON
Main St. 1350 sq. ft.
building. Formerly
an appliance store.
$750/mo.
570-654-1243
PLAINS
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
1,500 SQ.FT.
1350 River Road
Excellent location
for small business
or office. Will re-
model to suit tenant.
Call 570-760-3714
or 570-237-5664
RETAIL BUILDING
WILKES-BARRE TWP
12,000 sf. Route
309. Exit 165 off I81.
570-823-1719
315 PLAZA
1750 sf former
Physician Office.
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WILKES-BARRE
GREAT BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
1,500 square foot
available for rent.
Restaurant with
some equipment.
Excellent street vis-
ibility at the Hazle &
Park Triangle. Also,
Middle East Bakery
for sale or rent.
call Pete for details
at 570-301-8200
WILKES-BARRE
RETAIL LEASE
Available
Immediately.
High traffic volume
& great visibility on
Wilkes-Barre Blvd.
1900 sq. ft., in
Wilkes Plaza, with
plenty of parking.
$2,000 / monthly.
Call Terry Eckert
LEWITH &FREEMAN
570-760-6007
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains Twp.
WAREHOUSE
Laird St. Complex,
Will divide for multi-
ple tenants. Rea-
sonable rates. Easy
Interstate access.
Lease 132,500
sq.ft., 12 loading
docks, 30 ft ceilings,
sprinkler, acres of
parking. Offices
Available
570-655-9732
ext. 312
WYOMING
72 x 200 VACANT
COMMERCIAL LOT
233 Wyoming Ave,
Rt. 11 (1/4 mile from
proposed Walmart)
For Sale or lease.
$96,000.
570-388-6669
947 Garages
PLAINS
1 1/2 car garage.
$125 month
570-714-9234
WEST PITTSTON
4 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9x11. $55/
month. No electric.
Call 570-357-1138
950 Half Doubles
ALDEN / NANTICOKE
3 Bedrooms. Gas
Heat. Hookups.
Parking. Large yard.
No Pets. $519 + utili-
ties Security $300
570-824-8786
ASHLEY
2 bedroom apart-
ment, Careys
Patch, completely
remodeled. Appli-
ances included with
washer & dryer.
Full yard &
off street parking.
No smoking. $650.
Call Will at
570-417-5186
EXETER
Recently remodeled
4-5 bedroom half
double with large
rooms. Off street
parking. Yard. $800
+ utilities. Call
570-299-7103
FORTY FORT
3 bedroom, excel-
lent condition, great
location. Off street
parking. Storage
basement. Washer/
dryer included.
$650 + utilities.
By application.
570-954-0505
HANOVER TWP.
221 Boland Ave
1 bedroom.
$325+utilities
Call Mark at
(570) 899-2835
(917) 345-9060
HANOVER TWP.
$650/month, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, living
dining room & eat
in kitchen. Appli-
ances, washer/dry-
er hook up. Off
street parking. Wat-
er, sewer & recy-
clables included.
Security, references
& credit check. No
pets. 570-824-3223
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, new wall to
wall carpeting,
freshly painted, par-
tial A/C, gas heat,
large fenced in
yard, walking dis-
tance to Kingston
Corners. All appli-
ances, off-street
parking, no pets.
$675/month, plus
utilities, & 2 months
security.
Application &
references.
Call 570-639-4907
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
LARKSVILLE
3 bedrooms, all
appliances, gas
heat. Includes sew-
er & garbage. Off-
street parking, no
pets. $625/month +
utilities, 1st, last &
security.
NO SECTION 8
570-762-7650
MINERS MILLS
Section W-B. 3 bed-
room, 1 bath. No
pets. $215 per week
(all utilities included)
References, Lease
& Security deposit
(570) 881-7864
PLAINS
NEW LUXURY
DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities
include: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Stacked
washer/dryer. All
new tile bath. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
A/C. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
Must See!
$850 + utilities,
lease & security. NO
PETS. Call for
appointment.
570-793-6294
WANAMIE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, $575/
month, plus utilities.
Section 8 OK
Call 610-393-7884
950 Half Doubles
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom, living
room, dining room
kitchen. Totally
remodeled. 1st floor.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. $575/month +
security.
570-299-7103
WILKES-BARRE/PARSONS
Spacious. Newly
remodeled. 1300 sf.
3 bedroom. Off
street parking.
Stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer. No
pets. $650/month +
utilities & security
570-474-9248
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Nice 3 bedroom
half double. 1,400
sf. $695 + utilities.
Pets considered.
No CEO.
Section 8 welcome.
570-899-8173
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Nice 3 bedroom
with eat in kitchen &
walk up attic. Walk-
ing distance to
school & parks.
$700/month + utili-
ties & 1 month secu-
rity. (570) 793-9449
WYOMING
Newly remodeled 3
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove provid-
ed, no pets, w/w
carpeting, $800/
month, plus utilities,
& $1,000 security
deposit.
Call 570-693-2804
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
LAKE COMMUNITY
4 bedroom. 1.5
bath. 2 car garage.
Beautiful wooded 2
acre lot. Fenced
back yard. Full
basement. Attic for
storage. Washer,
dryer, fridge &
freezer. Large deck.
$1,200/month + utili-
ties (water &
garbage paid). No
cats. References &
credit check
required.
570-262-0571 John
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR
Well maintained
ranch style condo
features living room
with cathedral ceil-
ing, oak kitchen,
dining room with
vaulted ceiling, 2
bedrooms and 2 3/4
baths, master bed-
room with walk in
closet. HOA fees
included. $1,000 per
month + utilities.
MLS#11-4063.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
DORRANCE TWP.
STAIRVILLE ROAD
4 bedrooms, 1.5
bathrooms, en-
closed front porch.
Stove, washer /
dryer hook-up, off-
street parking, pos-
itively no pets.
$1,000/per month, +
utilities, & 1 month
security, + 1/2 month
fuel security. Refer-
ences & credit
check required. 2.5
miles from I-81.
(570) 868-3633
after 2:00 p.m.
DRUMS
SAND SPRINGS
Golf Community
Luxurious 1900 sq.
feet Townhouse.
Modern kitchen, 3
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, 1 stall
garage. 3 minutes
to interstates 81 &
80. $1400 + utilities.
Call 570-582-4575
HARVEYS LAKE
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, large living
room, dining room
family room,
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer /
dryer hookup.
New w/w carpet &
freshly painted.
Large yard &
screened porch.
Water, sewer,
garbage & snow
plowing included.
No pets. Non
smoking. Security
deposit, refer-
ences & credit
check required.
$1,100/per month
+ utilities.
570-709-6678
HUDSON/PLAINS
Single 2 bedroom.
Gas Heat. $675/
month + utilities.
Section 8 accepted.
570-825-5451
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
HUDSON/PLAINS
Single 2 bedroom.
Gas Heat. $675/
month + utilities.
Section 8 accepted.
570-825-5451
953Houses for Rent
KINGSTON
A spotless 4 bed-
room, 1 bath cape
on Dawes Ave;
Fenced yard, base-
ment, Off-street
parking. $685 + utili-
ties. Call
570-266-5336
LARKSVILLE
2 bedroom, living
room, kitchen and
bath. Great view!
Section 8 wel-
come. Utilities by
tenant $650/mo
plus security
Call 570-814-8299
0r 570-779-0918
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
NANTICOKE
RENTAL-SINGLE
FAMILY HOME
202 East Union St.,
Very spacious single
family home for
rent. 3/4 bedrooms,
kitchen with break-
fast room, dining
room, living room,
3-season porch.
Range, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer
& dryer provided.
Note: there is no
yard and garage is
for owners use
only. No pets of any
kind. No smoking.
Applicant to provide
proof of income and
is responsible for
cost of credit check.
MLS#12-357 $600
per month plus
security deposit.
Tenant is responsi-
ble for all utilities
except sewer.
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
Walter Belchick
696-2600 ext. 301
PITTSTON
Beautiful ranch
home with
attached garage.
3 bedroom 1.5
baths All new tile,
hardwood floors,
granite counters,
paint & carpets.
Closest house
rental to new that
you will find. We
handle all property
maintenance. No
Pets. $1,100 per
month. Utilities Not
Included Call
570-237-0425
PLAINS Miners Mills
double with 3
bedrooms, & 1 bath.
Security deposit
required. No pets.
Utilities by tenant.
$600/month
Call Dave Gula
570-696-5435
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
SWOYERSVILLE
Renovated 2 bed-
room mobile home
with central air, new
carpeting, modern
kitchen with all
appliances, nice
neighborhood,
fenced yard and off
street parking. No
pets. Security &
lease. $495 + all util-
ities. 570-690-3086
WEST PITTSTON
2 bed, 2 bath ranch
with new kitchen &
beautiful river view.
Appliances included
$1,200/mos + utili-
ties. MLS# 11-4275
570-696-3801
Call Margy
570-696-0891
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
WILKES-BARRE
Large 1 family
house, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, large living
& dining rooms, ex-
tra room, eat-in-kit-
chen, finished attic.
Backyard & drive-
way. Washer/ dryer
hookup. $750/
month + utilities, 1
month security.
Call 609-356-8416
WILKES-BARRE
Two 3 Bedrooms
$675-$625
One 2 bedroom
$585.
Plus all utilities
References & secu-
rity. No pets.
570-766-1881
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
SUMMIT PLACE
3 bedroom town-
house, behind VA
Hospital. All new
everything. Kitchen
appliances, parking.
$850 + utilities. Call
Joe 570-592-1606
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Available March/April
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LE EEE DER.
timesleader.com
*2008 Pulse Research
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
What
DoYou
HaveTo
Sell
Today?
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 PAGE 9D
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Porches, decks
& steps
All types of residen-
tial remodeling.
Kitchens & baths.
Specializing in Win-
dows & Vinyl Siding.
Solar light tunnels.
30 years experi-
ence. BBB. PA025042
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-287-1982
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 332-7023
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
See Us At
The
Home
Show
March
2, 3 & 4th
at the
Kingston
Armory
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
1030 Carpet
Cleaning
Alan & Lindas
Carpet and/or
Chair Cleaning
2 FOR $39
570-826-7035
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1132 Handyman
Services
COMPLETE
MAINTENANCE
Roofing, siding,
plumbing, electric,
drywall, painting,
rough and finished
carpentry, lawn
service and more.
Residential
& Commercial
570-852-9281
RUSSELLS
Property & Lawn
Mai ntenance
LICENSED & INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
All types of interior
and exterior home
& business repairs
570-406-3339
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Mikes $5-Up
Removal of Wood,
Trash and Debris.
Same Day Service.
570-826-1883
VERY CHEAP
JUNK REMOVAL!
Licensed,
Insured & Bonded.
Will beat any price,
guaranteed! Free
Estimates. Over
10,000 served.
570-693-3932
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance
products/life insur-
ance/estate plan-
ning. Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www
nepalong
termcare.com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding,
Hazard tree
removal, Grading,
Drainage, Lot clear-
ing, Snow plowing,
Stone/Soil delivery.
Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
Land for sale?
Place an ad
and SELL
570-829-7130
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
AWESOME INTERIORS
Quality Interior &
Exterior Painting.
Owner Present
on Every Job.
Satisfaction Guar-
anteed.
36 Years Exp.
570-885-3614
FREE ESTIMATES
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Prices starting at
$100/room.
570-762-6889
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
1252 Roofing &
Siding
GIVENS
CONSTRUCTION
New roofs and
repairs. Shingles,
rubber, slate, metal
roofs, terracotta,
and many others.
Licensed and Ins.
Free estimates
570-239-8534
PA 010925
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW
PLOWING
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
DRIVEWAYS
SIDEWALKS
SALTING
VITO & GINOS
570-574-1275
1297 Tree Care
TOPS TREE
SERVICE, LLC
Total Tree Work.
Free Estimates,
Fully Insured.
570-520-4073
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
EVEN WHEN
YOURE OUT
OF THE OFFICE.
DRIVE SALES
92% of consumers search online
before doing business with
a company.
*
Online business solutions from Impressions Media Digital
gives buyers 24/7 access to learn about your business.
POWER YOUR PROFILE. GROW YOUR PROFITS.
CALL ERICA AT 570.970.7201 OR VISIT IMPRESSIONSMEDIADIGITAL.COM
*Source: Internet Retailer
PLACE
YOUR
OWN
CLASSIFIED
AD
ONLINE!
ITS FAST AND EASY!
PLUS, YOUR AD WILL
RUN FREE FOR ITEMS
PRICED UNDER $1000.
GO TO CLASSIFIED ADS
AND CLICK ON
PLACE YOUR AD.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings,
Merchandise, Pets & Animals, Real
Estate and Garage Sales.
Customize the way your ad looks
and then nd it in the next days
edition of The Times Leader, in our
weekly newspapers and online at
timesleader.com.
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
*Your ad will appear in the next days paper if placed online
before 4 p.m. Mon. through Thurs. Place on Friday before
1 p.m. for Saturdays paper and before 4 p.m.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings, gg
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
Findthe
perfect
friend.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL LL NL NNL N YONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LLLE LE LEEEE LE LE LLE LEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
Well run
your ad in
the classified
section until
your vehicle
is sold.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NL L NNNNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLE LLLLE LLE LE LE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
F U N N I E S TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA