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CONTENTS

The History of the Company Unit 1. Unit 2. Unit 3. Unit 4. Unit 6. Unit 9. Unit 10. Unit 12. Unit 13. Unit 15. Unit 17. Unit 19. Unit 21. Unit 23. New Markets Are Vital A Visit to the Factory An Emergency in the Sales Office Trouble with a Special Order Appointing the New Advertising Manager Productivity A Work Study Survey The Pension Fund Meeting A Labour Dispute Risk of a Takeover Dealing with an Important New Market The New Board of Directors Auditing the Accounts Debtors Insurance

p.5 p.11 p.18 p.25 p.33 p.41 p.49 p.57 p.65 p.75 p.83 p.90 p.99 p.107 p.114

Whos Who in the Company


Harper, Ambrose - Board of Directors Chairman Grant, Wingate - late Managing Director, Hector Grants father Grant, Hector - present Managing Director the executive director in charge of the day-to-day running of the company Wiles, Pete - Production Manager executive in charge of production of goods in the factory; son of Mr. Grants sister - Hector Grants nephew, later Director Martin, John - Sales Manager executive in charge of promoting sales of the firms goods Corby, Elizabeth - Hector Grants efficient secretary Fielding, Ted - Works Manager Buckhurst, William - Company Secretary, F.C.A. (a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants) Thorn, Christopher - Management Trainee. Mr. Roberts - Representative of Brown & Johnson, Insurance Adjusters Mr. Baker - Chief Clerk in the General Office Fenella - inexperienced shorthand typist Jane - secretary of Peter Wiles Mr. Windsmore - applicant for a job of an advertising manager Harvey, Joanna - Advertising Manager Mr. Scott - representative of Smith-Weston Consultants Ltd. Ian Hampden, Ian - Personnel Manager Green, Jack - Shop steward Smith - an operative Mr. Brewer - Bank Manager Mr. Wentworth - the owner of the rival company (mattress-makers) Mr. Brent - Chief Auditor Donald Kennet - a clerk M.Shuttleworth - Sales Representative
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The History of the Company


Phrase list Practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations; quote the sentences in which they are used in the text. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. Managing Director Production Manager Sales Manager To be in ones fifties To be semi-retired To attend the board meetings To put the business on its feet To capture a contract to supply somebody with something Happy coincidence To turn something into success or failure To give somebody a higher command To land ones contract To catch fire in a government department To destroy a number of irreplaceable documents To manufacture items of office equipment Filing cabinets To list in the catalogue To run a business To join the company To be adventurous To treble ones business To increase profitability and competitiveness To have experts on the staff To hire expert advice from outside consultants and bureaux To be aware of the more sophisticated techniques Electronic data processing
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Task 1 Exercise 1 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: Exercise 2 Match the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. 1. Operational Research (O.R.) 2. Discounted Cash Flow (D.C.F.) 3. Project Evaluation and Review Technique (P.E.R.T.) 4. budgetary control A () ; B ; C , D 5. corporate planning ; E 1. B
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() - -

2.

3.

4.

5.

Task 2 Exercise 1 You are going to listen to the introduction to the course. Before you listen to the abstract look at these statements. After you have listened to the abstract determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why.

1. The company of Harper & Grant Ltd. was started forty-two years ago by Ambrose Harper and Hector Grant. 2. Ambrose Harpers son Hector is the present Managing Director. He is in his fifties (aged between forty and fifty). 3. Though the Chairman of the company, Ambrose Harper, is old and semi-retired, he still attends the board meetings and keeps an eye on the business. 4. At the beginning of its activity Harper & Grant Ltd. produced wastepaper baskets made of cane or straw. 5. Wingate Grant managed to put the business on its feet when he captured a big contract to supply government offices with steel wastepaper bins. 6. Mr. Grant Senior used to tell the story that once a cane wastepaper basket had caught fire in his office and a number of irreplaceable documents were destroyed by the fire. After that he decided to make steel wastepaper bins for offices. 7. Nowadays Harper & Grant Ltd. manufacture different items of office equipment: not only desks, chairs, cupboards, filing cabinets but also smaller objects, such as filing trays, stapling machines and so on. All in all there are fifty-six various items listed in their catalogue.

Exercise 2 Listen to the introduction to the course. Fill in the spaces in the sentences below with the words actually used. The firm has a history of . Hector Grant firmly believes that he knows the best way . However, his nephew Peter Wiles (son of Mr. Grants sister), six years ago and is , and John Martin, years ago to be , are more adventurous. They want over the next few years and are certain that, with and increased , they can achieve this. Modernising a business and is a complicated affair. It requires a which is aware of such aids and tools of efficiency as , O.R. ( ), D.C.F. ( ), budgetary control, , P.E.R.T. ( and ), automation, etc. Exercise 3 Listen to the introduction to the course. All the remarks are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the abstract. Use the grid below. A On the other hand, it is important that members of a firms management are aware of the more sophisticated techniques they might call on to solve particular problems. B C But Harper & Grant Ltd., like their rivals, must get right up-to-date and enlarge their business. A small business cannot possibly afford to have on its staff experts in every modern management technique. D Inevitably while this changeover from the old way to the new is taking place, there are often difficulties and conflict. E It usually hires expert advice from outside consultants and bureaux. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Exercise 4 Listen to the introduction once again. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What are the present business activities of Ambrose Harper and Hector Grant? (to start the company; to be in ones fifties; to be semi-retired; to attend the board meetings; to keep an eye on the business) 2. How did Mr. Grant Senior manage to put the business on its feet? (to start by making steel wastepaper bins for offices; a basket made of cane or straw; likelihood of fire; to capture a big contract; to supply government offices) 3. Why is it possible to draw a parallel between Wingate Grant and Napoleon? (happy coincidence; to turn something into success or failure; to give somebody a higher command; to land a contract, to catch fire; to destroy a number of irreplaceable documents) 4. What are the different ideas of the ways to run business among the officials in Harper & Grant Ltd.? (slow but steady growth; to know the best way to run a business; to join the company; to be appointed Sales Manager; to be adventurous; to treble business; to achieve something with modern business techniques; to increase exports) 5. What are the aids and tools of making business efficient? (to modernise a business; to increase profitability and competitiveness; to be a complicated affair; to be aware of aids and tools of efficiency; electronic data processing; Operational Research; Discounted Cash Flow; budgetary control; corporate planning; Project Evaluation and Review Technique) 6. What are the peculiarities of running a small business? (to have experts on the staff; to hire expert advice from outside consultants and bureaux; to be aware of sophisticated techniques; to solve particular problems; to get right up-to-date; to enlarge business; to be outpaced by somebody)
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Exercise 5 Match the terms on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. board meeting catalogue chairman Electronic Data Processing (E.D.P.) filing cabinets A drawers or cupboards for storing records (letters, memos, etc.), usually filed in alphabetical order B the method of analysing and recording business information by means of computer C a meeting of the Board of Directors, group of organisers in control of a business D executive in charge of promoting sales of the firms goods E the top executive of a company, concerned with policy and long-range aspects. He presides at or chairs board meetings; hence his name. the executive director in charge of the day-to-day running of a company

6. 7. 8. 9.

rival Sales Manager staff Managing Director

G a group of persons working together H executive in charge of production of goods I a person who competes with another for a prize, a reward, success, etc. a list of goods for sale, often illustrated 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

10. Production Manager J 1. 2. 3.

Exercise 6 Be ready to give a story line of the company. Use the word combinations mentioned above. Cover the following points: 1. The founders of the company. 2. The beginning of the company. 3. The products of Harper & Grant Ltd. 4. The plans of the management team. 5. Modernising a business. 6. A small business and its problems.
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Unit 1

New Markets Are Vital

Phrase list Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. income per capita to keep up with something to convince somebody to do something / in something to back somebody up to be a waste of time and money for very little profit the scheme to do something the expense is worth something an attempt to break into the market (to open up a new market) the Board of Trade to be liable for duty shipping facilities to be trans-shipped via Rotterdam red tape to be involved in getting an import licence to sort out an import licence to have (to make) a field survey preliminary desk research to work up a demand for goods on balance to want the expense of doing something to do something in the home (foreign) market to live on old markets to have a different way of looking at things to feel strongly about something to be forward-looking / to have an old-fashioned outlook to cool somebodys temper to be bound to do something to get fed up with something to accept the resignation a reservation for a first-class flight
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PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Listen to the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What kind of decision does Hector Grant have to make? (the Managing Director; to allow somebody to do something; John Martin; the Sales Manager; to go on an expensive fact-finding tour of a country; Africa; Abraca) 2. What was the matter that John Martin was discussing with Peter Wiles? (the Production Manager; The Times newspaper; the recent discovery of oil; in Abraca; to find out; to export to; the capital city, Djemsa; a lot of new government offices; to be built; to open up a new market) 3. Is Hector Grant positive about opening up a new market in Africa? (H.G.; ones staff; to use ones initials; to remember a disastrous attempt; to export to a country in South America; to lose a lot of money; to be inclined to be cautious, a bit worried about; the difficulties involved and the expense) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: , - ( ) - ( -) - - ,
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- -

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear John Martin, the Sales Manager, talking to Peter Wiles, the Production Manager, about opening up a new market in Abraca. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. John Martin is impressed by the information from the article in The Times which says that income per capita is rising fast in Abraca. 2. Peter Wiles always follows the events in all newly independent countries. 3. John thinks that due to the recent discovery of oil in Abraca a lot of new offices in its capital, Djemsa, will apparently be built. 4. The Sales Manager is sure that Harper & Grant Ltd. must export more. He considers Abraca, in particular its capital, to be a good market for their furniture and office equipment. 5. The Production Manager is positive about breaking into the new export markets because he believes that they are crazy not to look for more foreign business. 6. The Managing Director is against a new export market as he supposes its all a big waste of time and money for very little profit.

Exercise 2 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Hector Grant and John Martin. Fill in the spaces in the sentences below with the words actually used. Grant: John: Grant: Ah, John, this scheme of yours to Abraca. Oh, I am glad. Yes, its all very well to say , but worth it? Look what
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happened over . John: Grant: John: Grant: That was because we at the time and we . But we cant let that one failure stop us from . You say .Well, lets have some figures. What ? Who ? What about ? There are , but assure me that our office equipment . What about ? It seems there are , and a lot of goods via Rotterdam. And then there is all that involved in . John: Grant: John: Well, if I find in Abraca to act we can get him . Have you considered within the country? Ill have to find out, but we might be able to sell . Maybe we should have to find out exactly how . Grant: John: are too expensive. Oh, I dont agree, Mr. Grant. As you see from , Abraca is . I am convinced that we can for our goods there. Exercise 3 Act as an interpreter.

Peter:

Good morning John. Where were you yesterday afternoon? I tried to contact you all over the place.

: Peter: :

, . Oh? What happened? , .

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Peter:

Oh, no! I thought hed be bound to agree. Id have said that particular market was wide open.

. , .

Peter: :

Did he accept your resignation? . , .

Exercise 4 Listen to the following conversation between Hector Grant and John Martin. All the remarks are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the unit. Supply the remarks with the names of their authors. Use the grid below. A B Lets say we have a different way of looking at things. Perhaps I am. But as our opinions differ so much about the future of the firm, perhaps Id better go somewhere a little more forward-looking. Im sorry, H.G. C D Im sorry Mr. Grant, but I do feel strongly about this. If this is really your policy, then I must think about leaving the firm. Im sorry, John. On balance, I dont think its quite the right time for this probe. I dont want the expense of sending you out there. Youve got plenty to do in the home market. E F You are being very foolish, John. But surely we ought to go ahead now. Why wait and let somebody else get there first? We cant live on our old markets for ever! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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Exercise 5 Match the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. to open up a A new market income capita Board Trade delivery dates tariff duty import licence per B of C D Dates on which a firm promises to deliver goods. If the goods do not arrive on time the firm has failed to meet the delivery dates. Permission given by a government to bring goods into a country. Unnecessary formalities. So called from the tape used by lawyers to tie up legal documents. Different ways of getting the goods to the buyers. This may be direct to government departments, to retailers or through wholesalers. A government tax levied, put, on goods entering a country. Average income, money earned, per head of the population. (market research). An investigation during which information is collected in the field by means of interviews. A report is then prepared on possible demand: type of consumer, buyer; methods of selling; number of rivals; what sort of packaging is preferred, etc., in any country or area where a company wishes to begin trading. A desk survey would be done in the office by using all statistical information available. An import tax charged or levied by the importing country. Develop a new market, start one up. (Market: an area where goods can be sold). A British Government Department which deals with trade and commerce. One who acts for a person or business. In this case it means a resident in a foreign country who acts for, or represents, several companies abroad. He works for a commission, that is, a payment of a percentage on the value of goods coming into a country.
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2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7.

E F G

8. 9. 10. 11.

agent channels of distribution field survey red tape

H I J K

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING
A Say how John Martin answered the major questions put by H.G. Make use of the word combinations in brackets. 1. What are the difficulties of breaking into the Abracan market? (red tape involved; to get an import licence / to sort out the import licence; to find an agent) 2. Who are the likely competitors of Harper & Grant Ltd. in Abraca? (to let somebody get somewhere first; to live on old markets) 3. What about tariffs? (tariffs on products; the Board of Trade; to be liable for duty) 4. What about shipping facilities? (direct sailings; to be trans-shiped via Rotterdam) 5. What channels of distribution are needed within the country? (to sell direct to somebody; to have a field survey; to make a preliminary desk research) B Why do you think Hector Grant decided to send John Martin to Abraca? Answer this question as if you were a) Hector Grant b) Peter Wiles

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Unit 2
Phrase list

A Visit to the Factory

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to have somebody on the phone to make somebodys fortune to take somebody / to see round the factory to get (to fix) an appointment an office block the administrative department the Sales department the Accounts department the Personnel department the Market Research department the warehouse to store (the items of) equipment to keep a stock of the faster-moving items to meet (urgent orders) from the stock Works Manager to come in different sizes (about steel sheets and bars) to be unloaded on to the delivery bank a spot welder to install a conveyor belt to double (treble) output assembly shop to compare favourably with something (about prices) to furnish the office to depend on the line to supply from the stock requirement(s) artificial fertilisers to give a quotation delivery charges to be somebodys deadline to honour a date
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PRE-LISTENING
Task I Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What is the purpose of Mr. Duncans telephone call to Harper & Grant? (to get a telephone call from somebody; to have an introduction from a mutual acquaintance; to stay in London for a few days; to telephone to fix an appointment to see somebody) 2. What is Mr. Duncans reaction to the suggestion of a later date of his appointment with Mr. Grant? (to be very busy; to suggest a later date; to be rather short-tempered; to expect to have an appointment whenever somebody wants one; to see over the factory; to see how some of the office furniture is made) 3. What proves that Elizabeth is a very good secretary? (to have a good secretarys sixth sense; to be a valuable customer; to fix an appointment for somebody) 4. How did it happen that Elizabeth showed Mr. Duncan round the factory? (to tell somebody about the appointment; to suggest that somebody should do something; to show the customer round the factory) 5. Why was Mr. Grant reluctant to see G. Duncan? (the mutual acquaintance; to be a great talker; to waste a lot of time and then buy very little; to be the same; to warn somebody to interrupt the interview after a short time; to do something with the excuse) 6. What was the reason of Mr. Grants sudden change of attitude towards Mr. Duncan? (to indicate that someone wishes to do something; to place a large order for office furniture for ones new office block; to complete construction in Scotland; to be interested in escaping from ones visitor; to know ones boss very well; to be surprised by something)
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Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: - / - - / () - / LISTENING Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Elizabeth and Hector Grant. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. Mr. Macpherson recommended a Mr. George Duncan from Glasgow to come to see Elizabeth Corby. 2. In Mr. Grants opinion it is doubtful that any friend of Mr. Duncans will make the companys fortune. 3. Mr. Duncan said he would like Mr. Grant to take him round the factory. 4. H.G. thought that J. Macpherson would take up the whole day and then order one chair. 5. Elizabeth suggested that she could take a new customer round the factory. 6. H.G. said that he would see Mr. Duncan first and then Elizabeth would take him round the factory. 7. H.G. asked his secretary to interrupt his interview with G. Duncan after fifty minutes. 8. H.G. asked his secretary to remind him that he had another appointment.
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Exercise 2 Listen to the following conversation between George Duncan and Mr. Fielding. Look at their remarks given below at random. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the name of their authors. A ... B ... C ... D ... Ill take you to the assembly shop This is one of our three workshops. This is the delivery bay here. Oh, really. The steel sheets and bars come in, as you see, in different sizes and are unloaded on to the delivery bank here. We buy them in from a steelworks in Wales. This machine here is a spot welder, and this is the new conveyor belt which we had installed last year. We doubled our output in this department as a result. Oh, yes. 2. 3. 4. 5.

E ... 1.

Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Elizabeth Corby and George Duncan. Fill in the spaces in the sentences below with the words actually used. Elizabeth: Good afternoon, Mr. Duncan, Im , .Would you like ? Duncan: Yes, I would . Elizabeth: Now this is our . We have all the departments here: , , Personnel, and so on. Duncan: What opposite us? Elizabeth: Thats the warehouse, where are stored. We try and keep so the urgent orders can be met . Duncan: If I ordered a desk today, how long would it be before ? Elizabeth: I think perhaps , Mr. Fielding. Youll meet him over .Well go there now.

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Exercise 4 Act as an interpreter. Grant: Now Mr. Duncan, what can I do for you? I understand that youre friend of Jock Macphersons. : , - . , . Grant: Grant: I think we make the best. We have a wide range of prices, Mr. Duncan. Here is our catalogue. We think our prices compare favourably with anything on the market today. : , , ? Grant: It would largely depend on the line you chose. ? Grant: If you could give me some idea of your requirements, Mr. Duncan, I might be able to help you. Unfortunately, I have someone coming to see me shortly and I : , . . - . . . . . , , . Grant: Grant: Grant: How many offices are there? Twenty eight offices. Oh, I see. Well, how much time can you give us? Id like to send a man up to Glasgow to get details. I never like promising a date until I know we can honour it. : . : . : , . : ? . a

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Exercise 5 Match the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. office block Administrative departments Personnel Department Market Research stock line quotation delivery charges A To increase production, make it twice what it was before B Price of goods and delivery conditions, offered before a sale, quoted C Office buildings D Details, measurements, etc., of goods required or offered for sale E Cost of delivering goods from factory to buyer The department which deals with employees to double ones output F

G The goods are available for dispatch H Offices where the business side of a firm (sales, advertising, etc.) is carried out I Products made by a firm. Often used to mean a series or type of goods. (E.g. a new design for an office desk would be referred to as the new line.

10. deadline 11. specifications 12. in stock 13. out of stock

Last possible moment when an event, e.g. delivery of goods, may take place

K The investigation of present and future market requirements L There are no more goods for sale until the factory produces (or delivers) further supplies. M Goods ready for sale

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

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POST-LISTENING A Sum up everything you came to know from the unit about Elizabeth Corby George Duncan Jock Macpherson H.G.s appointment with a Mr. George Duncan Mr.Duncans visit round the factory the information on the company performance H.G. supplied George Duncan with the reason why H.G. changed his opinion about George Duncan B Make Company Profile * of Harper & Grant Ltd. G.P. Duncan &Co.

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Unit 3
Phrase list

An Emergency in the Sales Office

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to be due back from somewhere to do shorthand to set letters out to sort the letter and to stamp it with todays date an in/ out tray to take action stationery letterheads the file under Bills of Lading Hold on! the hold-up a consigned vessel date of clearance to get on to forwarding agents to be on the list the invoiced sales order intake for the month to be cleared to dial the number direct to handle business to check up with a bank to rate somebody as sound to agree a commission (to pay by) sight draft irrevocable letter of credit bills of lading long-term assessment
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PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets.

1. What unpleasant surprise is waiting for J. Martin after his trip to Abraca? (to be due back from the trip; a pile of work; to be an efficient secretary; to cope with the emergency by doing something; the Chief clerk, the General Office; to lend a shorthand-typist) 2. What does the General Office deal with? (to be a very busy place; to handle printing and duplicating; to open letters and send them round to the appropriate offices; to collect all the outgoing letters; to frank letters; to post letters; an addressing machine; to print addresses on envelopes; to fold the letters, to seal the envelopes) 3. What is the mail, handled by Harper & Grant Ltd., used for? (to be used for advertising and publicity; to address order acknowledgements; to send delivery notes; monthly statements f account) 4. Who did Mr. Baker spare from his department? (the Chief Clerk; to do something reluctantly; to be inexperienced but willing; to find the stationery; to give a few helpful hints; to leave somebody to his/her fate) 5. What bigger emergency does Mr. Martin have to cope with? (to fail to arrive somewhere; to ring somebody in a panic; to be responsible for something; to see that something is done; to be delivered by a certain date; to use forwarding agents; to clear the goods through customs; to transport the goods; to go wrong somewhere along the line) 6. What do Mr. Martin and Mr. Grant discuss when John reports to H.G. on his trip to Abraca? (to need attention; to discuss the chances of opening up a new market; to use somebody as an agent; to pay the money for the goods; to transfer the money)
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7. What method of payment does Mr. Grant choose? (an irrevocable letter of credit; to be sent by a bank to an exporter; to inform somebody that payment for goods is at the bank; to prove that the goods have left the country; to show a copy of a bill of lading; the signature of the captain; to be loaded on to the ship; to be paid to the exporter; send a letter of credit to the exporter's bank; a promise to pay as soon as the exporter has shown proof that he has sent the goods) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: / / ! - , - , / ,

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LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Elizabeth Corby and Mr. Baker. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. 2. Elizabeth Corby turned to Mr. Baker for help because they got a bit of a crisis on in Mr. Grant's office. Mr. Martin was due back from Abraca that morning, but Sally Langly telephoned to say that she got flu, and thats why he would need someone to help him . 3. 4. Sally asked Mr. Baker to spare a girl from his department because the other two girls in the Sales Office couldnt do shorthand. Fenellas shorthand was reasonable, she set her letters out well, but Mr. Baker didnt think she was the world's fastest worker and didnt expect she would manage. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. That day's post was sorted and stamped the date in the General Office. Elizabeth Corby showed Fenella the in tray with all the letters and memos which had come in while Mr. Martin had been away. Elizabeth wrote a note with each letter to show whether she had taken any action or not. Sally kept all the stationery (letterheads, envelopes, flimsy, and so on) in the separate drawer. Elizabeths office is not far from Sallys office, down the corridor. 10. Fenella denies it'll be fun to have a change. 11. Sally made Fenella sure the work at the Sales Office was rather different from the work in the General Office.

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Exercise 2 Listen how later that morning Mr. Martin dealt with a telephone call. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. John Martin: Fenella: John: Hello. What? Desks? Oh, Mr.Van Eyck ... Yes... But they days ago. Yes, of course they were ... wait, I'll give you . Fenella, quick! Yes, Mr. Martin. See if you can find of the for the thirty M-type sent to . They'll be in the outer in the file under . Hello ... hold on ... we're trying to find it. I'm sorry about this, Mr. Van Eyck, I can't understand . Is this it, Mr. Martin? Yes, that's it. Here we are, Mr. Van Eyck, yes, Kelpie, London Docks, 12th September. You should have them by now. I'll get on to and call you back. O.K. Good-bye. Fenella! Get me the Globe - Mr. Alan Smith. The number's by the phone. Something has happened to our for Rotterdam. Our agent promised would get on Friday. When you've got him, ring through to Mr. Best, , and ask him to bring up and for the month. Be as quick as you can. (An hour later) Hello, oh, Mr. Smith. Any luck? What! Oh, no. Left . Why weren't ? Well, surely responsible. Look, I'll try and cleared. O.K. I'll ring you back. Fenella! Get me Mr. Van Eyck . Oh, Mr. Martin, how to Holland? You can direct, it's on I.S.D. * Oh, heavens! It's already. I've got through, I'll have to go and . I shan't be long.

Fenella: John:

John:

Fenella: John:

Exercise 3 Act as an interpreter. Grant: Come in, John. Well, you seem to have covered a lot of ground in Abraca. What about an agent? John Martin: , (). , . Grant: What's his financial position?

International Subscriber Dialing 29

John: Grant: John: Grant: John:

Grant:

, , () . Did you agree a commission if we decide to employ him? . , . How are we going to arrange payment from Abraca? I'm against sight draft. , . . , . Well, I'd like a more detailed report from you on paper, plus your long-term assessment.

Exercise 4 Listen to the following conversation between John Martin and Fenella. Look at their remarks given below at random. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the name of their authors. A ... Oh, Fenella! Dont weep all over my letters, theyre so nicely set out. You can easily correct the spelling mistakes. Do cheer up. Im sorry. I expect Im a bit tired too. Its been a hectic day for both of us. Yes, of course. I shouldnt be able to manage without you. Look. I really am sorry. I shouldnt have expected so much from you. Youve done splendidly. I know pass me my brief case. I bought this ash-tray in the souk in Djemsa. Would you like it? Fenella, these letters are full of spelling mistakes. Oh, yes, Mr. Martin. Thank you ever so much and can I work for you tomorrow if Sally is still away? Oh, Mr. Martin, I did try to do my best. Honestly I did. Oh, dear! 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

B ... C ...

D ... E ... F G 1.

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Exercise 5 Match each of the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. forwarding agent A A form giving relevant information about freight, goods, being shipped. They are made out in sets of two or three copies. One copy is signed by the captain of, or agent for, a ship to acknowledge that the goods have been placed on board a ship. An experienced guess at what the sales or expenditure, etc., will be in the future A note to help memory; or a short note of instructions or information for internal office use To consider a person honest: in this case sound financially, i.e. having a good reputation with his bank manager To get goods through customs. Clearing agent: one who supervises and helps goods through customs, paying duties, etc. A Bill of Exchange attached to shipping documents. The goods are only released to the buyer when he pays the amount on his bill. The exporter does not receive the money so quickly because it is paid in the buyers country. Anything which checks progress A firm responsible for transporting and delivering goods which are being exported. A forwarding agent is sometimes called a clearing agent. Someone importing speaks of a clearing agent and someone exporting uses the term a forwarding agent. This document means that the buyer cannot change his mind if he decides that he does not want the goods. Date the goods left docks Between place of dispatch and place of arrival
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2. 3. 4.

to clear irrevocable letter of credit Bill of Lading (B/L)

B C D

5.

date of clearance

6.

memo (memorandum)

7. 8.

to rate someone as sound sight draft

G H

9.

long-term assessment I

10. along the line 11. a hold-up

J K

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING
Sum up everything you came to know from the unit. 1. Suppose you are the Chief Clerk in the General Office. Brief the audience of the activities you are responsible for. 2. Recount the situation when Elisabeth Corby gives a few helpful hints to Fenella in John Martins office. Report the situation as if you were Fenella. Prove that you will be able to manage. 3. At the end of this hectic day John had cleared up some of his work, but poor Fenella was nearly at her wits' end. Explain why she still wanted to work for John Martin while Sally was away. 4. Act on behalf of Mr. Van Eyck and state the reason for his telephone call to Harper & Grant Ltd. 5. Report to H. Grant as if you were John Martin and say who was responsible for the hold up with the thirty M-type desks. 6. Act out the dialogue between: a) John Martin and Peter Wiles in which John informs Peter of prospective activities in Abraca b) John Martin and Mr. Best, the Sales Clerk about the emergency in the Sales Office after the mess has been cleared.

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Unit 4
Phrase list

Trouble with a Special Order

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. the delivery delay (on the console control desks) steel sheets to be a special order a penalty clause to stand to do something overdue delivery the Buying Department the production line to handle something to be a dreadful nuisance to meet the delivery date to claim compensation (for failure to deliver on time) to offset the penalty clause plastic coated sheets the time limit (in the contract) to be ordered against a special job to be wanted for stock to honour the delivery (contract) annealing oven to be on the line to put somebody in a mess to be due to deliver something by some date to share the extra cost of doing something to have half the items ready ex works to try somebody on the public address to involve rescheduling production line to pay double time
33

PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets.

1. What are Peter Wiles plans for the day in question? (to be the Production Manager; to have a very hectic day; to dictate a report into a dictating machine; to type something back later) 2. Why is John Martin very worried when he comes into Peter's office? (to receive a memo from the Production Department; a delay in delivery; special plastic coated steel sheets) 3. What are these sheets wanted for? (an important order; to form part of a console for a computerised control system; to sit and be responsible for the production; a large fully-automatic chemical plant) 4. What will happen if Harper & Grant fail to deliver the sheets on time? (to get the order; to promise to deliver something before a certain date; to fail to deliver on time; to lose money; a penalty clause in the contract) 5. Who is guilty in the delay? (to need steel sheets which are covered with plastic; plastic coating; to be finished in a heat-treatment oven; an annealing oven; to supply the sheets; to be able to deliver; to promise the date; to honour the contract with somebody) 6. Will Harper & Grant Ltd. lose money in this case? (to have a penalty clause; the contract with the suppliers; to lose money; to do something about something pretty quickly)

34

Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: () - (-)

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Peter Wiles and John Martin. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. 2. 3. Peter Wiles decided not to borrow John Martins tape recorder because he came to his office in person and dictated a long report to Jane. The reason why Peter asked John to spare him a second was a memo Peter sent him about the delivery delay on the console control desks. Peter thinks that everything has gone wrong with the steel sheets, which they need for the desks from new suppliers. These suppliers have got some trouble or other. They say theyll be a bit late with delivery. It's a very important contract because those console control desks are a special order and are wanted for one of the big computer companies. The new suppliers promised delivery on Thursday week. What is worse there's a penalty clause in the contract with the computer
35

4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

company and Harper & Grant Ltd stand to lose ten per cent of their price for each day of overdue delivery. Sales people have to accept penalty clauses, otherwise they don't get the contracts. Peter only heard about the delay yesterday because they kept the production line clear to handle the special sheets. If Harper & Grant don't meet their delivery date it wont cost them a lot of money because they can claim compensation from the steel suppliers for failure to deliver on time and that will offset the penalty clause.

Exercise 2 A. Listen to the following remarks of Peters. All the sentences are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the recording. Use the grid below. A Those sheets are urgent. B Mr. Morgan. C Those plastic coated sheets - Mid Wales Steel Company are the suppliers, aren't they? D If you like, I'll speak to Morgan myself. E What? You didn't know? F Yes, phone me back, will you. G Hello, Jones. H Well, does that mean there was no time limit in the contract? I Who do you deal with there? J Yes, they're wanted for a special order. K Can you find out why there's this hold-up on delivery?

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10. 11.

B. Produce the dialogue in full, invent the remarks and questions put by Jones in reply to Peter Wiles words.

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Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the recording which shows how the situation progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. John: Does that mean we can't if they fail on time? Peter: It looks like it. Jones is now. He didn't know they were being ordered . He thought they were . John: Just our luck! Jane: Mr. Jones for you , Mr. Wiles.

Peter: Hello. What did ? Oh, no! Well, if that's true, why did Mid Wales of thirty days? They must have known they . Why did they at all? Yes. O.K. Morgan , is he? Yes. I'd like to hear . Thanks, Jones. (He puts the receiver down) John: What's the delay? Peter: Deliveries because annealing ovens . (Telephone rings) Ah, that may be now. Jane: Mr. Morgan of the Mid Wales Steel Company .

Peter: Hello. Good morning, Mr. Morgan. Yes, has been telling me. Well, you've put us in . Those sheets of yours are . We're due the finished console desks , and now you say there's When did break down? Yes. Well, , what can you do ? It's too late for this job now. What? Well, if , that will help. Yes, I think we'd be prepared the extra cost of by road. Yes. Goodbye. Exercise 4 Act as an interpreter. John: What does he say?
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Peter: , (-) . . , . ! , ! Jane: Yes, Mr. Wiles.

Peter: . Jane: Yes, Mr. Wiles.

John: What about the other half? Peter: , . , , , , . , ? John: I'll get on to them and find out. Peter: , ? Jane: I'm trying to get him; he's not answering his phone.

Peter: , . . Jane: He's on the line now, Mr. Wiles.

Peter: , . . ? , , , , , , ? . , . , , , . . , ? . .. .

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Exercise 5 Match each of the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. Production Manager A Ready to leave the factory 2. 3. 4. penalty clause to honour the contract overdue B C D Work which is in addition to the normal weekly working hours To have the goods ready by the agreed time A paragraph in a contract allowing the buyer to deduct a percentage of the price as a penalty for late delivery 5. Buying Department E The man in charge of production. He is responsible for coordinating all the factors such as the stock levels, deployment of labour and use of machinery so that the goods will be produced when required and at minimum cost. 6. to meet a delivery date F Employees are paid double their normal wage for working at certain times, e.g. on Sundays 7. 8. 9. 10. compensation ex works double time production line G H I J The process through which the raw materials pass to make a finished product. Not received on the date promised To do just what the contract specifies despite unforeseen difficulties The department responsible for buying in all materials, such as paint, components, stationery, fuel, parts, tools, etc., required by the company 11. overtime K Money or goods given to offset a loss caused through failure to fulfill an obligation
39

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING
1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) the subject of the memo sent by Peter Wiles to John Martin b) the penalty clauses and why people engaged in sales accept them c) the reason for the hold-up in delivery 2. Speak as if you were Peter Wiles and say whether you found the way to offset the penalty clause and the absence of the time limit in the contract was companys luck. 3. Recount the situation as if you were John Martin. Explain why Peter Wiles needed a telephone conversation with Mr. Morgan and how he managed to settle the problem. 4. Suppose you are Mr. Morgan. Recount the situation with plastic coated sheets for Harper & Grant Ltd. 5. Render the situation as if you were Mr. Fielding.

6. Act out a) the two successive telephone conversations between Peter Wiles and Mr. Jones b) a telephone conversation between Peter Wiles and Mr. Morgan c) a telephone conversation between Peter Wiles and Mr. Fielding

40

Unit 6
Phrase list

Appointing the New Advertising Manager

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to advertise / to deal with advertising to undertake to do something to liaise with the agency to supervise the campaign to check proofs to cope with public relations work (the) public at large to appoint a manager to relieve somebody of something to be ultimately responsible to somebody for something situations vacant column to invite applications for a job to have the right qualifications for the post to interview the selected applicant from the short list an applicant for a job a letter of application to handle the accounts to brief somebody to be an account executive to join a training scheme run by somebody to stay with a company (a firm, etc.) to discuss the layout to have the right kind of experience the executive to be go-ahead to be high on the list to persuade / to convince somebody to look up (about the firm)
41

PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. How would you describe the system of advertising used in Harper & Grant Ltd.? (the Factory Extension Meeting; to be a growing company; to deal with advertising; to employ an Advertising Agency; to design the advertisements; to place the advertisements in newspapers or magazines) 2. For what reason do many firms employ advertising agencies to handle advertising? (to undertake to handle something on behalf of somebody; to employ specialists in the field; to buy space in newspapers, or time on radio and television; to do a far more professional job than somebody; to have a limited experience; to employ an advertising manager; to liaise with the agency) 3. Can John Martin cope with advertising without any help? (to be too busy on the sales side; to be able to handle the work involved; to supervise an advertising campaign; to check proofs; to use the media; to suit the company's interests) 4. Who is in charge of public relations work in the company? (to cope with the public relations work; to involve contacts with the public at large; to give information about the company and its products) 5. In what way were the spheres of responsibility concerning advertising rearranged in Harper & Grant Ltd? (to appoint an advertising manager; to relieve somebody of the work; to be ultimately responsible to somebody for something; to be branch of some
42

Department; to be interested in public relations; to be responsible to somebody for something) 6. How did the company invite and select applicants for the job of the advertising manager? (to insert an advertisement in the situations vnt column; to give details of the appointment; to invite applications for the job; to go through the applications; to have the right qualifications for the post; to interview the selected applicants from the short list; the final interview) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: . - (); (); ; () () - - (/) () () , , - ; ; ,
43

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between John Martin and the first applicant for the job. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. Lately Harper & Grant Ltd. haven't been too pleased with the results of a firm of advertising agents which handles their account and they are thinking of giving their account to another agency. 2. 3. 4. John Martin admitted that they plan to increase advertising quite considerably. The new advertising manager will be responsible to Mr. Grant for all advertising and to John Martin for public relations. The new ad man would be responsible for getting leaflets, brochures and catalogues designed while Hector Grant would brief the advertising agency on the kind of advertising campaign he wants. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Harper & Grant Ltd. advertise only in the national Press. John Martin doesn't think television is a suitable medium for his firm because it's much too expensive. Only in the chairs produced by Harper & Grant Ltd. the back is properly supported, and a person feels full of energy. John Martin doesnt have to tell Mr. Windsmore that Harper & Grant Ltd. are not planning to go into television. Mr. Windsmore has been doing a lot of television work lately and it interests him enormously. 10. The job of an advertising manager in Harper & Grant Ltd. is hardly the right job for Mr. Windsmore.

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Exercise 2 Listen to the following conversation between John and Sally. All the remarks are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the name of their authors. Use the grid below. A Here's her letter. B C E F Where's her letter of application? I can't find it. Has she had any experience? I wonder why I picked her out for an interview? Sally, who's next? What! Really? There weren't any women applicants. Oh, yes. Well, well. Whats she like, Sally? D Miss.

G Yes. It's J. P. Harvey. The 'J' is for Joanna. H Thanks. Yes, she signs the letter J. P. Harvey. H'm, let's see. Did I make a mistake? I can't think a woman would be likely to have the right qualifications ... I J L There are two more. The rest are coming tomorrow. one is a woman. Miss or Mrs.? Why not, Mr. Martin? The letter says that she's been an account executive for a year ...

K I'll show her in, Mr. Martin, and then you can decide.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the recording which shows how the situation progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case.
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John: Joanna John:

How did you begin , Miss Harvey? I run by the Palmer & Vincent Agency and stayed with them for That was before your present agency? became .

Harvey: . Joanna: Thats right. And Ive worked with them for . . Last year I John: What exactly is your work at the moment? visualiser, the copywriter, . I with the clients, and, sometimes, have to do the work of the specialists when , as there is usually is. John: You seem to have had . I think you'd do the work well, but ... well, all the executives are men and r Joanna: And I industry was so go-ahead and modern! Exercise 4 Act as an interpreter. John: : John: (Later) : John: : , ! , ? ! ? I didnt, Peter. She persuaded him herself. He saw the two best candidates, and the girl got the job. ! . , .
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Joanna: Well, I handle quite . I plan . , co-ordinate the work of the

I don't mind telling you you're quite high on my list, but ... ? No. I was going to say ... If only I can convince our Managing Director. I'll do my best.

Exercise 5 Match the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. to advertise advertisements A B A person who is in charge of a firms campaign to make itself known to the public Everything which concerns the contact a firm makes with the general public or with individuals who may promote their business in some way Someone who applies for something, usually a job A person in an advertising agency who looks after the affairs of one particular firm or client (called an account) To make known the goods or services you provide Someone whose job is to invent or visualise an idea for a good advertisement When offering a new job, most firms select from the total number of applicants a small number who they think have the best qualifications on paper. Their names are put on a short list and they are subsequently interviewed. The publicity material When anything is to be printed it is customary for the printer to prepare a specimen copy first so that his client may examine it for possible errors. This copy is called a proof. The whole plan of advertising for a particular product, usually planned a year in advance The arrangement of material in an advertisement, i.e. where the photograph, or drawing, is put in relation to the words or copy
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3. 4.

advertising manager advertising campaign

C D

5. 6. 7.

public relations applicant short list

E F G

8. 9.

layout visualiser

H I

10. an account executive 11. to check proofs

J K

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING
1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) the system of advertising used at Harper & Grant Ltd.; b) John Martins steps taken when he realised that he needed an expert to supervise an advertising campaign, to check proofs, to make sure that the company used the appropriate media; c) the work of an advertising manager entails; d) Mr. Windsmores views on advertising; e) Joanna Harveys skills in advertising. 2. Recount the situation as if you were John Martin. Say who was the highest on your list and why. How did you react upon the news that the next applicant is a woman? 3. Suppose you are Peter Whiles. What makes you think that your firm is looking up? 4. Render the situation as if you were Joanna Harvey. 5. Act out a conversation between a) John Martin and Hector Grant about the necessity of employing an advertising manager and rearranging the sphere of responsibilities in advertising and public relations b) Peter Wiles and John Martin after the appointment of a new advertising manager.

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Unit 9
Phrase list

Productivity A Work Study Survey

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to engage consultants work study technique (review) to improve efficiency and output to be keen to do something to suggest improvements and ways of stepping up to formulate piece rates and incentive bonus schemes O. & M. (Organisation and Method) to run something from top to bottom to do something with a view to doing something to do something in conjunction with something to do something under the scheme to do sample study / survey * a soluble problem an incentive payments scheme to do something as a spur to productivity group bonus scheme to agree to piece rates to change with the times to have a hand in something corporate planning operational research critical path analysis to cause delay and confusion to be to hand to bargain for something
*

survey sample 49

PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets.

1. Why does Hector Grant intend to undertake a work study survey? (to be worried about productivity; to engage consultants; to be a specialist in work study techniques; to improve efficiency and output) 2. Why do top managers prefer to employ outside consultants? (to be keen to do something; to improve efficiency; to be a specialist in the field; to be experienced in particular techniques; to study work systematically; to suggest improvements and ways of stepping up productivity) 3. In what way do the techniques applied to the study of office systems and paperwork differ from those used in assessing manual work? (to apply to manual work; to find out the most efficient way of doing something before doing something; the formulation of ie rates or incentive bonus O. & M. (Organisation schemes; the study of office systems and paperwork;

and Methods); to be applied to routine office jobs; invoice typing) 4. Why did Mr. Scott appear in Harper& Grant Ltd.? (to call in a firm; to be present at a meeting; to call a meeting; to explain the service to the executives; production methods on the factory floor; to improve something; to consider something; a check on efficiency; to run from the top to the bottom of the firm)

50

Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: ( ) - - , - ( ) ( ) - () -, (, ) ( ) - () - - , , ()

51

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Mr. Scott and the managers in Hector Grants office. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. 2. Hector Grant invited Peter Wiles, John Martin and Ian Hampden to his office to discuss productivity and ways to improve it. Mr. Scott, from Smith-Weston Consultants thought that Harper & Grant Ltd. ought to have Q. & M. and work study review and came along to tell them what his firm could do if they decided to have a productivity study made in the company. 3. Hector Grant was sure he didn't need to tell his subordinates what improved productivity involved because they were often employed as outside consultants by other firms. 4. Improved productivity means analysing jobs throughout a firm with a view to reorganising them in order to decrease time and expenditure and increase efficiency and production. 5. Smith-Weston Consultants proposed starting work study in the factory in conjunction with a scheme under which the employees could share some of the benefits of improvement. 6. Peter thought that some operators might go as slow as they can so that the investigators would allow them more time for the job, which could interfere with the investigation. 7. The investigators do not intend to do a sample study in a selected area of the works, because it would not demonstrate how they thought productivity could be increased as a result of their proposed activities. 8. 9. Hector Grant doubts that workers dislike investigators telling them they aren't doing the job in the most efficient way. If operators know they will be paid more as a result of increased productivity they will want to co-operate. 10. Mr. Scott suggested putting everyone on group rates as a spur to productivity.
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Exercise 2 Listen to the following extract from the recording which shows how the situation progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. John: Well, I'm amazed! I really am. What on earth the old man? You'd have thought he would be to consider a thing like or . I gather there was a major battle years ago to get him to agree even in the few areas now. Peter: Yes, he's suddenly decided to change . I think our may have had a hand in it! Joanna is always talking about things like , operational research, and so on. John: That's just what . Peter: Yes, but you know, the story's not finished yet. I don't think H.G. has quite realised of all this. John: What do you mean? Peter: You wait and see. Some of never know where to stop. Exercise 3 Listen to the following conversation between John and Sally. All the remarks are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the name of their authors. Use the grid below. A Oh, what's that? B C Management! Surely that's not necessary? Well? survey. I think we should like you to go ahead and do the full review. E In our experience its as vital as it is in any other department. Perhaps more vital. Just as a matter of interest, would you mind if I gave you the results of some research I did myself, while waiting for you this morning. F G Er there is one other point weve not yet mentioned. We havent yet done anything on the management side.
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D So, Mr. Scott, this seems very satisfactory. I'm very interested in this sample

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Exercise 4 Act as an interpreter. : 10 . - .

, . . , , . . - , , . Grant: Well, really! Do your methods usually include listening to private conversations through open doors? : . . , , , . Grant: I see. Well, thank you very much, Mr. Scott, for your report, and I look forward to studying it carefully. But as to ... : , ( ) ? Grant: I hadn't bargained for that, you know. I shall have to think about it. Hm, yes,I don't quite like the idea of being told how to run my own business, but ... well, I'll let you know, Mr. Scott. Good morning.

54

Exercise 5 Match the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. productivity A the detailed study of manual, or semi-manual, work, so that non-essential work can be eliminated and operations carried out with maximum efficiency 2. 3. work study B a bonus plan. An incentive is offered to encourage employees to work harder, and more efficiently. Critical Path C Analysis (C.P.A.) 4. consultants D someone who examines something in detail, (an employee of the firm of consultants who investigates the different jobs done by different workers) method of planning the undertaking of a complex project in a logical way, by analysing the project into its component parts, and recording them on a diagram which is then used for planning and controlling the activities which carry the project to completion 5. 6. 7. 8. operator a sample study investigator A survey G H E F to pay a workman according to the work done, not by the time taken to do it here, another word for a worker, particularly someone who operates a machine the rate at which goods are produced professional business experts who, for a fee, advise clients on aspects of their business. (In this case the firm are specialists in Organisation and Methods) 9. incentive payments scheme 10. 11. to pay piece rates a bonus scheme K J I a plan for giving extra money to workers in certain circumstances. In this case they will receive a bonus if their production rises. an analysis covering all aspects of a subject. It can apply to the actual work of investigation or the final written report. an investigation of a specimen, a part of something which shows what the whole is like
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1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING 1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a. Why is John Martin amazed to see the group of consultants in the firm? b. What made H.G. call in a firm, who are consultants in work study techniques ? c. What can Mr. Scott and his consultants do for Harper & Grant Ltd.? d. e. In what way does Advertising Manager have a hand in inviting consultants? What were the steps H.G. hadnt bargained for and why do these steps make him annoyed?

2. Recount the situation as if you were John Martin. Say what you think your firm needs as far as management is concerned. 3. Suppose you are Peter Wiles. What makes you think that workers might dislike investigators and interfere with their work? 4. Render the situation as if you were Joanna Harvey. 5. Act out a conversation between a. Peter Wiles and Hector Grant about the results of the work study survey and the necessity of changes in the firm; b. Peter Wiles and John Martin after the departure of the consultants

56

Unit 10
Phrase list

The Pension Fund Meeting

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. a compulsory scheme to sack somebody/ to be sacked syn. to dismiss There is no call for ... the Pension Fund Trustees Meeting to come up to save somebody from redundancy a pension scheme to pay contributions into the pension fund a period of employment to qualify for a pension to be entitled to the (full) pension to be due to retire the articles of the pension fund to be impeccable to do something for the sake of something to agree the accounts at a rough guess to be compensated out of something to make something up to the proper amount to make full use of something/somebody to take over (a takeover) to hold percentage to streamline the company to persuade somebody to see reason to use ones ingenuity in doing something
57

PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What do we call a pension? Is it a compulsory scheme? (to pay money to an employee; to retire on reaching a certain age; a compulsory scheme; to pay a fixed amount every week; to pay a larger amount; on retirement; to get the state pension; to operate ones own pension scheme) 2. In what way do the companies arrange their own pension schemes? (to give the employees money to retire on; to be governed by a trust-deed; to be separate from the company; to be appointed; to hold meetings regularly; to approve money for pensions; to examine the fund accounts) 3. Is it the same in Harper & Grant Ltd.? (to pay a certain amount of ones wages into the fund; to invest money; to increase the value of money; a period of employment; to qualify for a pension) 4. What does Mr. Grant want to do as a result of the productivity drive? (to close down unprofitable departments; the redundant workers; to be absorbed into other departments; to be a craftsman in the old style; to be a carpenter able to do fine hand carving; to be hardly ever required) 5. What does Ian Hampden, the Personnel Manager, think about Mr. Grants intentions? (to get rid of someone; to make somebody change his mind; to be determined on something; to streamline the company; to make the company more profitable and competitive; to find out; to suggest a way of persuading somebody to see reason) 6. What circumstances did Peter recall when he discussed the situation with Ian before the meeting? (to be due to be held shortly; to be approved; to have to leave the firm; to look after somebody; to become an invalid; to rejoin the company; according to the articles of the trust; to leave the firm for a time; to work a certain number of years; to qualify for the full pension)

58

7. What do the articles of the trust read? (to complete the time; to have some years to go; to be sacked, or fired; to be given a full pension; to have an extremely bad effect on everybody; to be with the firm) 8. In what way does Peter contribute to Ians decision to save B. Hardiman from redundancy? (to suggest something cunningly; to make up the difference; to pay the money to make up the pension to the full amount; to interrupt employment; to be shrewd enough; the lesser of the two evils; to let somebody stay; the proper retirement age) 9. In what way can Ambrose Harpers illness effect the future of the firm? (to be an elderly man; to own half the shares in the company; to be bought by a rival firm; to want to take over; to change the present set-up) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: , - , - - - - - - - - - - .
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LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Ian Hampden and Peter Wiles. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements. After you have listened to the tape determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. Bob Hardiman's been with the firm since it started, and he's the only real craftsman they've got. 2. Ian Hampden disagrees with H.G. that there's no call for elaborate handcarving on desks those days; he is sure they need hand-carved desks. 3. Peter assumes that the only chance to save the old man from redundancy may occur at the Pension Fund Trustees' Meeting, because his name's bound to come up if he's being dismissed; his pension will have to be approved. 4. Ian doubts that Bob Hardiman can be saved from redundancy because the two of them are against H.G., Ambrose Harper and Mr. Buckhurst, company secretary. 5. Ambrose Harper has a very soft heart and the pension scheme itself was his idea. He will agree with H.G. and Mr. Buckhurst when he comes to the Pension Fund Meeting. 6. Hardiman left the firm for a while about two years ago because he had to look after his father. He came back to Harper & Grant Ltd. five months ago, when his father died. 7. He left all the contributions he had paid into the pension fund in the fund and still qualifies for a pension. 8. There is nothing to worry about because Bob Hardiman is entitled to the full pension according to the articles of the pension fund.

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Exercise 2 Listen to the following extract from the recording which shows how the situation progressed at the Pension Fund Meeting. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. Grant: Well, gentlemen, this isn't going very long. You've seen Mr. Buckhurst's . They're impeccable as usual. So it's only a question of approving them of the record. Right. Do you all ? Good. Well, that's all. I presume there's no ? Ian: Well, there is one thing more, H.G. The question , the case of . to that, won't you? Ian: Peter: I don't think it's quite that. There seems to be , H.G. You see, Hardiman left us , as you know. Grant: I know very well he did. I've just said so. Peter: Quite so. But I felt I should look up of . Ian, of course, is already aware of this. It seems that if of employment is interrupted six months a further period has to be worked before the employee a full pension. If Hardiman continues with us until he's , that is, in three years' time, there is, of course, . He will be . But as things stand at present he would get, at only about of his pension. And we that situation with such an old employee. It would no good at all. He will, naturally, have out of the company's funds to make up to . Grant: But that's preposterous! Peter: Peter: But it does seem to be to do. That would require , of course. Grant: We'll just have . Grant: Oh dear! Grant: That's . He gets , less three years, or whatever it is. You'll see

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Exercise 3 Listen to the following conversation between H.G., Peter and Ian. All the remarks are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the names of their authors. A Well, you win. We keep Hardiman on for three more years. But, Peter, I shall expect you to use your undoubted ingenuity in making full use of him. B No, that would be a very dangerous precedent. No, no. I won't consider that. Ian, this is your scheme, I'm sure. C Of course, sir. D You don't think we could pay the remaining pension out of the company's profits? E Mine, H.G.? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Exercise 4 Act as an interpreter. Ian: Well done, Peter. : . . - . Ian: What's that? : ? . - , . Ian: Wouldn't Grant take over as Chairman? : , , . Ian: What percentage does he hold? : , 50%. 50%, . Ian: What'll happen to Ambrose Harper's shares? : , . .
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Ian: :

She wouldn't be able to sell them, would she? , . ? , , , .

Exercise 5 Match the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. pension A management of money or property for someone; organization which supervises the financial affairs 2. pension scheme B to become entitled to a pension, to have fulfilled the necessary conditions, and to have the right to receive a pension in this case weekly or monthly payments into the Trust Fund by employer and employee one of many equal parts into which a companys capital is divided to receive some asset, usually money, to balance some loss account into which money is paid for some purpose unnecessary (about an employees job), leading to dismissal, premature retirement or transfer to another department annual income which an employee receives during retirement basic salary without commission or extra payment for special work, overtime, etc. legally registered rules of the Trust, which deal with the qualifications for membership and a full pension the money is paid by the company and the employee into a fund during the latters working life, so that the employee can receive a continuing income from the fund, after he has retired from the company
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3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

fund a trust

C D

articles (of the E Pension Fund Trust) contribution to qualify for a pension to be compensated share F G

8. 9.

H I J K

10. redundant 11. a deed

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING 1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) Why ought Bob Hardiman to be saved from redundancy? b) Does Bob Hardiman qualify for a pension and is he entitled to the full one? c) What is H.G.s point of view concerning Bob Hardimans pension? d) What do the articles of the pension fund read? 2. Recount the situation as if you were Bob Hardiman. 3. Suppose you are Peter Wiles. Why are you so upset about Ambrose Harpers health? 4. Render the situation as if you were Ian Hampden. 5. Analyse the situation in Harper & Grant Ltd. as if you were a likely competitor willing to take over the company. 6. Act out a conversation which could have taken place in this situation between a. Peter Wiles and Bob Hardiman; b. Hector Grant and William Buckhurst; c. Peter Wiles and John Martin; d. a TV commentator on social issues and Bob Hardiman; e. Ambrose Harper, Peter Wiles and Ian Hampden.

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Unit 12
Phrase list

A Labour Dispute

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to have a closed shop office staff clerical union to pay a subscription to collect union dues (on the premises) shop steward medical schemes legal aid to introduce a profit-sharing scheme to take a cut in wages to clock in Trying to cheat the system is a very serious offence. to dismiss staff / a case of dismissal the employees welfare straightforward affair to get ones pay docked to punch the card for some time to affect the issue to pay overtime (time and a half) to have smth (a walk-out) on ones hands to bring something up to press a wage claim
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PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets.

1. Do Harper & Grant make it a condition of employment that a worker must belong to a certain trade union? What does that mean? (to have a closed shop; to be members of one or other of the unions; toolmakers; skilled machiners (machinists); sheet-metal workers; assembly-shop workers; fitters; electricians; office staff; to belong to a clerical union) 2. What does being a member of a trade union mean? (to pay a subscription; to pay a sum of money regularly to the particular union; to be referred to as union dues; to look after union's affairs; a shop steward; to be elected by the workers on the shop floor) 3. What are the responsibilities of a shop steward? (to be at the day-to-day level of representation between a company and a union; to represent the workers in a particular shop, or department; to be recognised by the management; to serve as a channel of communication both ways; to be allowed to collect union dues on the premises; to hold meetings in the factory or office block; to do something with the permission of the management) 4. In what way do the trade unions use their funds? (to obtain the best possible working conditions for the members; to organise medical schemes; insurance and legal aid; to use (part of their) funds; the money collected from the members; to pay a weekly sum of money to the members; to be out on official strike)

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5. What is called an official strike? (to be recognised by the union; strike pay; to be compared with the workers' normal wages; to draw a pay; a wild cat strike) 6. Do management and unions always cooperate? (the relationship between management and unions; to be ambitious; to get personal power; to have a grievance; to make somebody angry or annoyed; to create trouble in the works; to help put pressure on the management; in connection with something; a claim for a general wage increase; to be underpaid; to be reluctant; to increase wages; to be forced to do something; to introduce a profit-sharing scheme; to share directly in the results of harder work or better organization) 7. What difficulties and problems do good employee-management relations present? (to be prepared to take a cut in wages; to have a bad year; to solve problems; to have good relations with the employees; to be a comparatively small 'family' firm) 8. In what way do the management regulate the going-on activities? (to clock in; to punch a mark on the worker's time card; to correspond with something; to cheat the system; to be a very serious offence; to consult somebody about something; an operative; to ignore the rules) 9. What does the work of a Personnel Manager entail? (the chief responsibilities; to employ and dismiss staff; to look after somebody / something; to improve the employees' welfare and conditions of work)

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Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: () ( ) ( ) , , ( ) ( ) , ,

LISTENING
Exercise 1 Listen to the following conversation between Ted Fielding and Ian Hampden. All the remarks are mixed up. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the names of their authors. A Have you spoken to the man who was late? B Oh dear, what's it all about, Ted?

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C E F

Mr. Hampden, we've got trouble in the press room this morning. But the point is the man was clocked in at eight o'clock. Symes, who stands by the time clock, swears he saw nothing irregular. But that's a straightforward affair. He simply gets his pay docked. That's why we have a clocking-in system.

D Not yet. I thought I'd have a word with you first.

G Is Symes reliable? H One of the press operatives arrived an hour and a half late. I Yes, he is. That's why we chose him for the job.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Exercise 2 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Ian Hampden and Smith. Fill in the spaces in the sentences below with the words actually used. Ian: Smith: Ian: Smith: Ian: Smith: Ian: Smith: Ian: Smith: Ah, Smith. Come in, will you. Please sit down. I understand your card eight o'clock this morning and that you arrived . That's right. You mean you knew was punched by someone else ? Yes. I suppose you know we for this? What is that you are asking services . No, I'm not asking that. Then . I cleaned last night out of . Well, that doesn't . I for it, shouldn't I?

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Ian: Smith: Ian: Smith: Ian:

But surely... Overtime? If I want - time and a half, that's , isn't it? But this is . It has nothing to do . Have you discussed this ? There's . If I work an hour I take from my day's work. Well, I'm not going to argue about . As I see it, you've . Naturally an hour and a half win your pay this week. And I must warn you that if it will be .

Smith: Ian:

Just you try . You'll have on your hands. I'm sorry, but those are . If you must ; you know that .

Exercise 3 Listen to the unit again and determine whether these statements are true (T) or false (F). Explain why. 1. Ian Hampden suspects that one of the shop stewards is driving workers to confrontation with the management and discusses the situation with the shops manager. 2. 3. 4. 5. Ted Fielding is so much better at handling labour disputes than Ian that he decides to talk to the shop steward himself. Jack Green's always trying to make trouble in the works. He 's been busy agitating in connection with the latest wage claim. Smith explained away his behaviour and said that he cleaned Mr. Wiles' car last night out of works' time. The private arrangement between Peter Wiles and Smith reads: if Smith works an hour on Peters car he takes an hour and a half from his day's work. 6. Smith threatened Ian Hampden that he would have a walk out on his hands if he tried dismissing Smith.
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7. 8. 9. 10.

If Smith had complained to Peter Wiles about being underpaid Peter would have paid him a bit more, or taken the car to the garage. The labour dispute has been engineered by the District Organiser of the National Workers' Union because he wanted to negotiate a wage claim. Ian thinks there should be some system of profit sharing and is sure that the labour dispute in question is a direct result of ill-feeling in the works. H.G. has always been enthusiastic about profit sharing and is going to bring it up at the Management Committee Meeting.

Exercise 4 Act as an interpreter. Jack Green: I really don't see much point in this meeting, Mr. Hampden. As I said to you this morning, we're going to ask the Union to press a wage claim. And unless you have some concrete proposals to make about a wage increase, I don't think we have anything to say to each other. : , . , , . . , ? Jack Green: : They'll think the same as I do. We don't want talk, we want figures. , . , , . , .

Jack Green: :

Are you suggesting ...? , , .


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Jack Green: :

I don't like that accusation, Mr. Hampden. , . , . , , . ? ?

Jack Green: : Jack Green: :

I did. He told me about this car business. ? I don't follow you. , , - ? , , .

Jack Green: :

Of course, not. ? , , , ?

Jack Green: :

I ... er ... , , . , , . . , ? , .

Jack Green: :

I think ... er ... your ... er ... profit-sharing proposals do perhaps alter the situation. Yes, I'll ... er ... speak to Smith. . , , ? .

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Exercise 5 Match each of the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Fill in the grid below. 1. clocking in A slang expression used for an unofficial strike, which takes place without union approval, i.e. it is organized by the employees themselves 2. 3. 4. to strike wild cat strike trade union B C D extra hours over and above the ordinary working day: working late at night, on Saturdays and Sundays, etc. to lose some of ones wages: a portion of the wages normally payable is deducted and is not paid. usual pay for working overtime is the ordinary pay per hour, plus half as much again. For certain extra hours the pay can be time and a quarter, or double time. 5. 6. to get pay docked E wage claim F paid employee of a union who looks after the interests of members in a certain area. On arrival an employee takes his card out of the rack and puts it in the time clock, which registers the correct time on it. On leaving he takes his card out of the rack and again puts it in the time clock. 7. 8. 9. overtime time and a half profit-sharing scheme 10. District Organiser J G H I slang term for the actual leaving by employees of their place of work in protest, usually the start of a strike. refusal to go on working in order to get more pay, or shorter hours, or improved conditions, or as a protest in industry a demand for higher wages (money paid to workers, usually weekly) organization whose main functions are to protect the interests of its members and secure the best possible wages and conditions of work for them 11. walk out K a system of allowing employees to share in profits by arranging for them to buy shares in the company, or by issuing a bonus scheme, etc.

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1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

POST-LISTENING
1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) What are the main functions of the trade union? b) What is the reason for trouble in he press room? c) What are the grounds for Smiths wage claim? d) Why does I. Hampden feel that the system of profit sharing should be introduced in the firm? e) How has I. Hampden managed to make J. Green approve the profit-sharing proposals? 2. Recount the situation as if you were Jack Green, say whether you are in favour of the profit sharing scheme suggested by Ian Hampden. 3. Suppose you are Ted Fielding. Do you approve of the way Ian settled the problem? 4. Speak as if you were Ian Hampden and brief the audience on the chief responsibilities of a Personnel Manager. Is engagement and dismissal of employees his only function? 5. Suppose you are Symes, an employee who stands by the time clock. Brief a trainee on the following matters: a) what an employee has to do with his time card when he arrives or leaves his place of work; b) what an employee should expect to happen to his pay if he arrived late at work. 6. Suppose you are the District Organiser of the National Workers Union. Say a) what responsibilities of a shop steward are; b) if a worker belongs to the union, to whom he pays subscription or union dues; c) if an employee works late, what extra money he could claim. 7. Act out a) an imaginary conversation between Ian Hampden and Peter Wiles after Ians talk with Jack Green; b) an imaginary talk between Jack Green and Smith after Greens talk with Ian Hampden.
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Unit13

Risk of a Takeover

Phrase list Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. private company Memorandum of Association authorised capital to carry a vote ( about shares ) to have a controlling interest to be in a position to take over somebody/something a fully owned subsidiary to outvote somebody personal loan the rate of interest to ask for security to hold the deeds of somebody building society to repay a proportion of the loan to somebody plus interest to agree to a second mortgage (the mortgage with ...) to raise a mortgage on somebodys property to give (to advance) an unsecured loan to have the lions share with fifty per cent the solicitor to form a trust to raise a loan the total share capital to see somebody at short notice an overdraft to provide (an adequate) security to have somebodys record of business as a guarantee to have a straight loan to pay two per cent above the bank rate to get a holding equal to something
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PRE-LISTENING
Task 1 Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What do we call a private company? (to be a private company; to be formed by two or more people; to sign a Memorandum of Association; to state something; to agree to take a certain number of shares; to follow the signature; to take shares in the company; members, or shareholders) 2. Why does Harper & Grant Ltd. belong to private companies? (to found the company; to be started originally by somebody; the authorised capital of the company; to grow; to be worth a certain sum; to carry a vote at a shareholders' meeting) 3. What can the death of Ambrose Harper lead to? (to cause a crisis in the firm; to manufacture mattresses for beds; to own ten per cent of Harper & Grant shares; to be a personal friend of somebody; to have an opportunity of buying some of the shares formerly belonging to Harper) 4. Why does the opportunity of buying the shares formerly belonging to Harper by outsiders threaten the existence of Harper & Grant Ltd.? (to own shares; to stop somebody getting shares; to do something for fear of upsetting the voting power at shareholders' meetings; to own fifty-one per cent of the shares; to have a controlling interest; to be in a very good position to take over the firm completely; to make a firm a fully owned subsidiary) 5. Do the management of Harper & Grant Ltd. welcome the possibility of a take over? (to be jealous of somebody; to own too many of the shares; to raise a loan; to arrange something with the bank; to lend money; to borrow money; to pay interest on money; to buy enough of the shares; to outvote somebody; to be a personal loan; to be a short-term loan; to pay back the money; the rate of interest)
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6. How did H.G. manage to raise a loan? (to ask for security; to hold the deeds of Grant's house; a building society; to buy the property; to repay a proportion of the loan, plus interest; to agree to a second mortgage; to pay back the loan within the time limit; to pay up the first mortgage; the holder of the second mortgage; to give an unsecured loan; to be without any security or guarantee; to get the money back) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: : , (% ) , , () , ; ;
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( ) , - () 2% - ( ) ( )

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Hector Grant and Peter Wiles. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements, which you will mark T (True) or F (False) after you have listened to the tape. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Harper & Grant Ltd. is on the verge of the biggest crisis in the history of the firm, but it has nothing to do with Ambrose Harper's death. The shares of the company are distributed so that Peter Wiless mother and Hector Grant own the lion's share with fifty per cent. The mattress-makers over the road, Wentworth and Company have ten per cent of the shares. Ambrose Harper has left two thousand of his two thousand five hundred shares to form a trust. Ambrose Harper has left five hundred thousand pounds to his sister. H.G. spoke to Caroline after the solicitor had finished reading Ambrose's will, and she told him she'd had a very generous offer for the shares. H. G. is sure that only Wentworth, who wanted to get in Harper & Grant for a long time, knew Caroline was Ambrose's only remaining relative. Caroline can sell her shares without offering them first to the other shareholders because Harper & Grant are a private company. Some of the present managers of Harper & Grant Ltd. had to sell their shares and Wentworth easily got a further interest in the company. Peter Wiles is always in the red because he lives in a great way * . H.G. and his colleagues have to raise a loan and buy enough of the shares to keep the controlling interest. The total share capital had a market value of about five hundred thousand dollars when Ambrose Harper died. If H.G. bought two hundred and fifty shares that would be about twenty-five thousand pounds.
*

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Exercise 2 Act as an interpreter. Grant: Good morning, Mr. Brewer. Good of you to see me at such short notice. : , , - , . ? Grant: I want a loan ... or an overdraft ... right away. Twenty-five thousand. : . 25 ? , . Grant: Not for me. You know how well the firm is doing. : , , , , . Grant: Really, Mr. Brewer, this is rather unnecessary, isn't it? You have our record, my record, of business as your guarantee. You know me well enough to advance me an unsecured loan, surely. : , , , , . Grant: Oh? Well, what are you going to do about it? I can tell you one thing. If there's any question of not getting a loan, I'll consider taking my account, and that of the company, elsewhere. : , , - . , , , . , , ? . ? Grant: It is. : . , . , 20 ? Grant: Thirty. The mortgage is with the Albion Building Society. : . , - ... , . Grant: How would you arrange the credit?
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: , , , 2%- , 9%. , , , . Grant: Well, you work all that out. I accept your advice. All I want is the money, and I want it quickly. Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the recording, which shows how the situation progressed after H.G.s visit to the bank. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. Grant: What did I tell you, Peter! After all that I've got . The Bank Manager wasn't going to risk . Well, we're saved. Wentworth can't get to mine or . Aren't you pleased? Peter: Grant: Peter: Grant: Peter: Of course I'm pleased ... but, you know, Mr. Brewer was not at all of . How do you know? I went to see him . He told me he was what he called . What did you say? Oh, I talked a bit about banks play to expand. How depended a great deal and business sense - you know the sort of thing. Grant: Peter: I don't see that would make. One of these days I'll give you on how to deal . It was one of I learnt after .

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Exercise 4 Match the terms on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Five of the phrases have more than one explanation. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. share interest building society an overdraft authorized capital Memorandum of Association short-term loan the rate of interest second mortgage a. b. c. d. e. f. g. percentage charge for borrowing money a charge made (per cent per annum) on money lent the document stating the name of the company; if it is limited or not; the registered address; the amount of share capital and how this is divided into shares amount of a cheque which is more than the money in the account on which it is drawn one of equal parts into which a firms capital is divided further mortgage on a property which is already mortgaged amount of capital in the form of shares which a company is allowed to issue, as stated in the memorandum of association payment made by a borrower for the use of money as a percentage of the capital borrowed an organisation of contributors who save money, invest in it, in return for interest, so that capital can be loaned to those wishing to buy a house has to be repaid within a few weeks a lawyer who gives advice, and speaks on behalf of his clients in the lower courts what you buy if you invest money in a company

8. 9.

h. i.

10. solicitor

j. k. l.

m. money lent on the condition that it will be paid back before, or by, a certain date in the near future n. the acceptance of a loan with a property as a security which has already been mortgaged, but hasnt been paid yet in full the amount of money which a company or person can withdraw from a bank account with the banks permission, and which is more than there is in the account
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o.

1. e,

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

POST-LISTENING
1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) What is a private company? In what way does it apply to Harper & Grant Ltd.? b) Why did the death of Ambrose Harper cause a crisis in the firm? c) What is Alfred Wentworths ambition? d) What for does H.G. want to raise a loan? e) Is the bank manager positive about H.G.s application for a loan? Why? f) How did H.G. manage to raise a loan? g) In what way are the shares of the company distributed? What changes are under way? 2. Recount the situation as if you were Mr. Brewer. What rules do bank managers stick to when granting loans? 3. Suppose you are Alfred Wentworth. What does Ambrose Harpers death mean to you? What are you going to do? 4. Act out a. the announcement of the will with a solicitor, Caroline, Hector Grant and Peter Wiles taking part b. an imaginary conversation between Hector Grant and Caroline c. an imaginary talk between Peter Wiles and Mr. Brewer in the bank d. an imaginary talk between Mr. Brewer and the President of his bank e. an imaginary talk between Peter Wiles and John Martin

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Unit 15

Dealing with an Important New Market

Phrase list Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. quarterly breakdown of overheads expenditure against budget to place the order with somebody to have the production capacity to do something to meet the delivery dates to put something at somebodys disposal to incur expenses pro forma invoice to apply to the National Bank for foreign exchange a reduction on the unit price per desk c.i.f. (f.o.b.) a single order a package deal the budgeted turnover marginal cost the recovery on something merchandise an original letter of inquiry irrevocable letter of credit, confirmed on a London bank to quote in local currency to be conditional on something (the rate of exchange)
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PRE-LISTENING
Task I Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. Is the situation with the new export market in Abraca encouraging? (to open up a new export market; to have orders from Abraca; to have a look at the quarterly breakdown of overheads; to detail actual expenditure against budget; the amount spent on travelling and entertainment) 2. Why did John Martin keep quiet about an enquiry from the Abracan government? (to have an enquiry from the government; to give a quotation; to supply office furniture for government buildings; to place the order with somebody; to be one of the largest orders the firm has ever received; to wait until the order was definite) 3. Did John undertake anything in anticipation of the order? (to check something with somebody; to have the production capacity; to meet the quoted delivery dates; to propose to visit England to see the factory) 4. What does the inquiry from the Abracan Ministry of Public Works read? (to see the factory; to negotiate the order; to be suitably entertained; to book a hotel for somebody; to put a car at ones disposal; a curious reference; 'special requirements'; to be astonished; to discover something) Task2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: - -
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() , () -

, , -

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Hector Grant and John Martin. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements, which you will mark T (True) or F (False) after you have listened to the tape. 1. 2. Hector Grant is discouraged to find out that they haven't had a single order out of John Martins visit to Abraca. John Martin is optimistic about the Abracan market because a very large order has already been made - office furniture and equipment for two entire government departments. 3. 4. John has already sent pro forma invoices to Abraca so that the Ministry of Works can apply to the National Bank for foreign exchange. In their order the Abracan Ministry of Works want a reduction on a unit price per desk for a larger quantity than Harper & Grant Ltd. originally quoted for the price to be f.o.b. Djemsa. 5. 6. If Harper & Grant accept the requirements of the Abracan Ministry of Works it would be the largest single order in the history of the country. Harper & Grant hardly have the capacity to produce the order also it'd be in addition to the budgeted turnover for the year, so there will be no recovery on marginal cost. 7. The terms of payment are conditional on the rate of exchange which prevails on the date of Harper & Grants quotation not fluctuating more than three per
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cent either way. Exercise 2 Act as an interpreter. : . . , . , , , , , . , . Hector Grant: A representative of our Ministry of Works will be coming to London obliged if you would book him accommodation ... glad to visit your factory and view the merchandise ... special requirements ... Here what's this about 'special requirements'? What do they mean by that? : . . -. Grant: I don't much like the sound of that. What do they mean by 'special requirements'? I suppose we'll soon find out. What's the method of payment? : , . , , , . , , - . , , , . Grant: Hmm! Is Peter happy about delivery dates? : , . . Grant: Well, you'll arrange some sort of meeting for us all then? Have you booked their representative into a hotel? : . , . Grant: All right. But you'd better find out more about the special requirements. It may be some condition we can't fulfil.
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Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Grant and John, which shows how the situation progressed after Mr. Mahawi, the government representative, arrived and was entertained royally. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. Grant: A mahogany desk with , secret drawer ! Leather top? Oh, really, John, what does he think we are? Our business is massproduced ! John: I said we'd . It's for the . They are prepared . It would be additional to . Grant: Don't be ridiculous. We've dropped of line from . That was part of . John: Couldn't make it?

Grant: That ? John: Yes. He's of the old school. Look at he made . You said at the time we introduced , during , that redundant Well, here's he can be on, and he'd be delighted to do it. He'd produce a magnificent , it'd be the envy of all and a splendid advertisement for us. Grant: Well, you have committed us to it, so we must , I suppose.

Exercise 4 Match the terms on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Five of the phrases have more than one explanation. Fill in the grid below.

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1. 2.

overheads c.i.f.

a. b.

overhead expenses incurred in running a business costs of the day-to-day running of a business or of part of a business, i.e. any cost, other than the cost of the goods offered for sale asking for information price at which one currency is exchanged for another plan of income or expenditure for an exact period of time every quarter or three months analysis of statistics or figures this price includes all costs to a named port of shipment free alongside ship - the buyer pays for loading, onward shipment and insurance a sample list of goods supplied, with prices and charges sent to a potential buyer so that he can see clearly what total costs will be a contract for the sale or buying of goods at a special allin price, where any condition is contingent on all the others being accepted the agreement to pay a certain sum of money that cannot be changed or revoked the price of the goods includes all the charges (shipping, insurance, forwarding) until the goods reach the port a fixed relation or proportion in value between the money used in different countries

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

f.o.b. budget letter of inquiry

c. d. e.

rate of exchange f. irrevocable letter of credit quarterly breakdown pro forma invoice package deal g.

8.

h.

9.

i.

10.

j. k. l.

m. the cost of the goods includes all charges up to the time when the goods are put on board the ship; after that, the charges must be met by the buyer n. o. in accounting, estimate of future needs calculated for a definite period this price covers cost, insurance and freight to a named port of destination in the buyers country
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1. a,

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

POST-LISTENING
1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) the advantages and disadvantages of the order under discussion for Harper & Grant Ltd.; b) the requirements of the supplier as to the method of payment; c) the special requirements of a buyer and the way the supplier managed to meet them; d) measures taken in order to guard against a loss owing to currency fluctuations. 2. Recount the situation as if you were Hector Grant. Account for your choice of the terms of payment and delivery and the reason why you agreed to a lower price. 3. Suppose you are Mr. Mahawi, the government representative. You are making arrangements to order goods from Harper & Grant Ltd. Speak about the particulars of the quotation, the terms of payment and delivery. 4. Act out a) a conversation between Mr. Mahawi and John Martin. Discuss the quotation, terms of payment and delivery. Try to bargain. b) an imaginary talk between Mr. Mahawi and his Minister after the visit to Harper & Grant Ltd.

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Unit 17
Phrase list

The New Board of Directors

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to upset the balance of power to postpone the possibility (of a takeover) to be over-weighed with somebody / something to be tempted away by somebody budgetary control to introduce monthly accounting by cost centres to draw up quarterly accounts to sound somebody out to have everything ones own way to balance somebodys power to put something forward the Rules of Association the qualification holding to put somebody in the picture to offer somebody a directorship to be a counter to somebody to draft (suitable) minutes about proposals to table recommendations (on budgetary control) to give an outline of something to do the accounts to reduce personnel

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PRE-LISTENING
Task I Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What changes occurred in the structure of the capital of Harper & Grant Ltd. after Hector Grant postponed the possibility of a takeover? (to buy two hundred and fifty more shares in the company; the remaining two hundred and fifty shares; the rather dynamic owner of a neighbouring mattress factory; to own a large proportion of the shares; be asked to join the Board) 2. In what way did the death of the Chairman, Ambrose Harper, upset the balance of power on the Board of Directors of Harper & Grant Ltd.? (to become the next Chairman; the present members of the Board; Chairman and Managing Director; to be invited by the Board to become a director; to attend Board meetings; to leave somebody to act for somebody; the Company Secretary) 3. Why does Peter think it is high time John Martin was made a director? (to have a very successful year; to increase sales by almost forty per cent in the two years; to join the firm; to be an added support for himself; to be overweighed with somebody; to have an up-to-date outlook on business; to be tempted away by somebody; to make it worth somebodys while to stay) 4. What changes in financial control does William Buckhurst initiate? (to discuss budgetary control; to attended a course on something; trading position more accurately and more often than at present) 5. How does William Buckhurst explain the necessity of monthly accounts? (to be the forward plan; to spend, to make and to sell during a specific period; a record of what has actually been bought, sold and spent; to be drawn up every three months in a financial year; to discover the profits and losses more often to keep a firmer control; modern management) to introduce monthly accounting by cost centres; to have information about the company's

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Task2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: - - - - LISTENING Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between Peter Wiles and John Martin. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements, which you will mark T (True) or F (False) after you have listened to the tape. - - () - - ( ) -

1. John Martin didnt deny that Harper's death had caused a big change in the control of Harper & Grant Ltd. 2. Hector Grant is a strong personality and Harper couldn't have everything his own way while he was Chairman; Peter wanted to balance H.G.s power a bit by having John on the Board.
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3. John Martin was asked to join the Board now that he owned more shares. 4. Peter Wiles had a chance to get John elected, because H.G. wanted to strengthen his position in case A.Wentworth tried to make things go his way. 5. The Rules of Association drawn up by H.G. state that the qualification holding is only two shares. 6. As a director Peter held only two shares while his mother nine hundred and ninety-eight.

Exercise 2 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Grant, Buckhurst and Peter, which shows how the situation progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case.

Grant: William Buckhurst: Grant:

What's the next item , William? We've got of Alfred Wentworth, of Wentworth & Company. He ought to join the Board. It's unfortunate, but he now owns that his election is inevitable. Don't put that , William!

Peter:

I would like to propose that , John Martin, should also be asked . In the time he has been here he has and done much . I think if he was made his advice would be invaluable.

Grant: Peter:

Well, perhaps next year I... Be careful. H.G. You don't want . There must be a lot of companies who'd be him . We can't afford .

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Grant: Buckhurst: Grant:

What do you think, William? It might be a good idea the support , H.G. Very well. As the character is changing so completely, this is probably ... . John would be to Wentworth. If everyone agrees...

Peter: Buckhurst: Grant: Buckhurst: Exercise 3

Yes. Agreed. William, will you draft about these then? Yes, I will.

Act as an interpreter. Grant: Now the next item on the agenda is to consider a report with

recommendations tabled by you, William, on budgetary control. Perhaps you'd like to give us an outline of your proposals. : , , , , . Grant: At present the accounts are done every quarter. : , . , . , . Grant: Well, if sales go down, we reduce stocks, which means cutting down purchases and, if necessary, we reduce personnel.

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: , - , . - , , - , , , .. . Grant: What do you propose? : - . Grant: What does all this mean? : , , . . . , . , , . Grant: Will you let us have more details about this budgetary control, exactly how it would operate and so on? : . Grant: Now let's get on. The next item on the agenda is a recommendation that we buy two lorries for the Transport Department ...

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Exercise 4 Match the terms on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Five of the phrases have more than one explanation. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. budgetary control cost centers a. b. regulation of the company that to qualify as a director a certain number of shares must be owned details of all the financial transactions relating to one individual supplier, customer, asset, liability, or type of expense or receipt supplies a business can be divided into these for the purpose of collecting information on income and expenditure to cut down staff to make a first rough plan of the document to diminish the number of persons collectively employed in any institution, company, office, etc. a person legally responsible for giving information to the Board of Trade, for seeing that the companys accounts are correctly kept and for keeping the minute book, which is a record of all the companys meetings, often an accountant these are the basis for budgeting: each department is thus made responsible for its own financial planning and accountable for its actual performance getting control of a business, management, etc. to put on record that a certain subject should be discussed at a future meeting detailed record of a companys financial affaires

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

to draft qualification holding to table takeover the accounts of a business to reduce personnel

c. d. e. f. g. h.

9.

company secretary

i.

10. stocks

j. k. l.

m. to write a report, letter, minutes of a meeting, in rough form for final approval n. o. buying a controlling interest in a business by buying more than 50% of its shares a close watch over a companys performance, comparing it with budgeted performance and taking corrective action where necessary
96

1. o

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

POST-LISTENING 1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) How could Ambrose Harpers importance in the company be defined? b) What are the advantages of J.Martins membership in the Board? c) What do the Rules of Association drawn up by Harper and H.G.s father state? d) What are the reasons for Wentworth to be invited to join the board? e) Prove that John Martin would be a useful counter to Wentworth. 2. Recount the situation as if you were Hector Grant. 3. Suppose you are Alfred Wentworth, are you satisfied with the situation in Harper & Grant Ltd. and the number of its shares you own? What do you plan for the future? 4. Give a lecture on the structure of the share capital in Harper & Grant Ltd. before and after Ambrose Harpers death. (See Illustration 1 below) 5. Answer the following questions as if you were William Buckhurst: a) Why should the accounts be done every month in your opinion? b) What are the disadvantages of doing accounts every quarter? c) What is the essence of breaking down the activity of the company into cost centres? 6. Act out: a) a conversation between Peter Wiles and John Martin. Discuss the pro and contra of the introduction of monthly accounting by cost centres; b) a talk between Hector Grant and William Buckhurst before the Board meeting about the changes in the board that are to be made.
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Illustration 1

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Unit 19

Auditing the Accounts

Phrase list Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to approve the accounts to ensure that somebody is reporting correctly to be in private practice to be exempt from having to publish the accounts Profit Statement (a Trading and Profit and Loss Account) Balance Sheet Directors Report to deduct overhead charges depreciation on plant and buildings the capital employed issued share capital retained earnings fixed assets trade investments compilation of net current assets less liabilities The totals must agree. current liability stock valuation to go into things to be listed as goods paid for to find no/the record of payment to buy something on a sale or return basis to make out cheques to somebody to total up the value of the cheques to pay in the staff members cheques to draw out an equivalent sum of cash with the cheque a withdrawal on the bank statement a paying-in voucher for the date to be a fiddle to query the figure to draw somebodys pay in advance
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PRE-LISTENING
Task I Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. What is the main task of the auditors? (to approve the accounts of a limited company; to act on behalf of the shareholders; to ensure that the directors are reporting correctly; the state of affairs of the company; to judge whether the directors are managing the company efficiently; to judge for themselves) 2. Why has H.G. changed the firm auditing the firms accounts? (to audit the accounts of Harper & Grant; to be in private practice as an accountant; to be appointed; a privately owned limited company; to be exempt from something; to publish accounts; to have the accounts audited by independent auditors; to be connected with the company) 3. What is W. Buckhurst responsible for? (to be Company Secretary; to be responsible for something; the period in question; to be ready for checking; to make a bad impression; the accounts department; to supply immediately any information wanted by the auditors) 4. Which three documents are in the focus of the auditors attention? (to be satisfied; the Profit Statement; the Balance Sheet; the Directors' Report; a Trading and Profit and Loss Account; to arrive at the profit for the year; to start with net sales or income; to deduct the cost of materials, work and overhead charges; to leave a trading surplus; depreciation on plant and buildings; auditors' fees; administration and selling costs; to produce the net profit or loss; a summarised statement; the amount of funds employed in the business; to derive the funds from some sources) 5. What does the Balance Sheet show? (to list the capital employed; the issued share capital plus reserves and retained earnings; the total cost of fixed assets; trade investments; a breakdown of net current assets; cash and stocks, plus what the firm is owed by its customers, less its liabilities; to be shown as a trade investment; a current liability; an item in the compilation of net current assets)
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6. Why is stock valuation a mixed blessing? (to prepare accounts; to put a value on all goods in the hands of the company; to check against the suppliers' invoices; the value of commodities; to fluctuate; a company's stock; work in progress; finished stock; the volume of all stock is changing daily, if not hourly; to be taken at cost price or market price, whichever is the lower) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: ( / ) () () , ( ) ,
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- , ( , ) .

( ) ()

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between William Buckhurst and Mr. Brent. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements, which you will mark T (True) or F (False) after you have listened to the tape. 1. Having spent three hours at the books in Harper & Grant Ltd., the chief auditor asked the chief accountant to go into two small things so that Hector Grant could try and get the information straight away. 2. The chief auditor started with the stock valuation and was puzzled by the figure for paint: it was listed as goods paid for, but he could find no record of payment. 3. 4. Harper & Grant always buy paint on a sale or return basis and pay for it each quarter as we use it so Mr. Buckhurst presented a cheque for the total amount. The chief accountant admitted his fault for the anomaly in stock valuation because it was him who accepted the figure in the Stock Department and they had forgotten the sale or return arrangement and put the paint in the wrong column. 5. 6. 7. 8. Another anomaly was the cheques made out to members of the staff. Clerks in the accounts department often cash cheques for staff as a service, the cheques are made out to the company by the individuals. The chief accountant totals up the value of the cheques, comes to the cashier for a company cheque for the same sum, and then goes to the bank. The staff members' cheques are paid in and an equivalent sum of cash is drawn out with the company cheque when the representative of the company goes to the bank. 9. 10. According to the paying-in vouchers the amount paid in is less than the amount drawn out but the bank statement didnt reflect it, which surprised Mr. Brent. There was the difference of fifteen pounds between the amount paid-in and drawn out of the company.
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Exercise 2 Act as an interpreter. : , Donald Kennet: You wanted to see me, Mr. Buckhurst? : , . . . , . Kennet: Oh, yes. I certainly will if I can, sir. : , ? Kennet: Yes, Mr. Buckhurst. : , , ? Kennet: Er ... I was away for my holidays in the summer. I think that was the only time I didn't go. : , , ? , , . Kennet: What occasion do you mean? What are you referring to? : , , . , ? Kennet: Er ... I'm sure I don't know why the amounts should be different. They should be exactly the same. Can I look at the bank statements? : . . Kennet: Thank you. : . , . Kennet: Yes ... but I don't understand : , , , , . , - , ?

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Kennet: Look, I'm sorry, Mr. Buckhurst. I can explain it. I really was going to pay it back later. You see I ... my mother was ill and ... : , ? . . . Kennet: I didn't mean to steal it. I was going to pay it back. I intended to pay it back. I didn't mean to be dishonest, really I didn't Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Buckhurst and Brent, which shows how the situation progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. Buckhurst: I've found out the difference in those two amounts. Brent: Oh? who always goes . I'm very upset . Brent: I wonder what he'll have to say . (Later.) Buckhurst: Well, Mr. Brent, when you'll be finished? Brent: Oh, I think I by the end of the month. But now I've seen the extent , I'll bring in two to help me. Buckhurst: No more problems ? Brent: Brent: No, I don't think so. It all seems to be . Oh dear! Poor fellow. You'll have , I suppose. , apart from this. Brent: Well, I'm sorry to have been of such . even .
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Buckhurst: I'm afraid it was . It can only have been Donald Kennet,

Buckhurst: Yes. I'm just going now. He's waiting ... .

Buckhurst: Thanks. By the way, that clerk . Buckhurst: Yes, we . It's a pity. He and he's been satisfactory

Buckhurst: We're very glad you did . You have probably saved from an

Exercise 4 Match the terms on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Five of the phrases have more than one explanation. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. 3. auditor shareholders Profit Statement 4. 5. 6. 7. Balance Sheet assets liabilities dividend d. e. f. g. a. b. c. things which belong to company or person, and which have a value money owed by a company, a debt a statement of the companys position on a certain date, which shows the assets and the liabilities and the capital on that date written document from a bank showing the balance of an account those who own shares in a company individuals who invest their money in a company hope to receive these regularly pieces of paper supplied by the bank in duplicate for the purpose of recording the exact amount of cash and cheques paid into a customers account 8. 9. valuation h. part of a companys profits paid to shareholders a summary of all the income and expense accounts at the end of the accounting period 10. paying-in vouchers j. a statement of the financial position of a company or trader or partnership at a particular time, such as the end of the financial year, showing the companys assets and liabilities k. a qualified accountant who is called in on behalf of the members of a limited company to examine and report upon the accounts of the company l. n. o. liabilities plus owners equity a person or firm or partnership which examines the books and financial records of a company the name for everything that a company owes
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bank statement i.

m. estimate of how much something is worth

1. k,

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

POST-LISTENING
1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a) What does the work of W. Buckhurst entail? b) Why is stock valuation one of the most difficult jobs? c) What for are the cheques made out to members of the staff in Harper & Grant Ltd.? In what way are they cashed? d) What is the reason for the anomaly in the bank statement? e) What was wrong with the withdrawals on the bank statement? 2. 3. 4. Recount the situation as if you were Mr. Brent. Sum up the anomalies found in stock valuation and in the cheques made out to members of the staff. Suppose you are Donald Kennet. Do you find it fair to dismiss you? Give a lecture on auditing the accounts of a limited company. Illustrate it with the situation in Harper & Grant Ltd. 5. Act out a) a conversation between Brent and Buckhurst. contra of stock valuation; b) an imaginary talk between Buckhurst and Kennet after the dismissal; Discuss the pro and

c) a conversation between Brent and Buckhurst. Discuss the anomaly with


the withdrawal on the bank statement.

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Unit 21
Phrase list

Debtors

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to chase up bad debts Retail / wholesale business to do business on a cash basis / on credit to defer payment the amount (total) due on a particular transaction to receive long/short credit to offer an inducement to somebody to become insolvent debt collector to be a good credit risk to write to the bank for a reference to get a drive on to get payment on one or two of outstanding accounts retailer overdue accounts to default to put a professional debt collector on to collect debts to bring in a third party to use legal pressure the salary scheme to pay a basic salary supplemented by a commission on sales a graded salary based on sales quotas to make an estimate on something (probable volume of sales) to keep up to the quota / to surpass the quota
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PRE-LISTENING
Task I Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets.

1. On what basis is business usually done? (retail business; wholesale business ; to do business on a cash basis; to do business on credit; to collect debts; to chase up bad debts; money which has been owed to the firm for a long time) 2. On what terms does H & G Ltd. do business? (to give credit; to defer payment; an individual sale; to send an invoice to the customer; a list of the goods delivered; the amount due on a particular transaction; to be sent an account; to show the total amount due) 3. In what way are due payments stipulated? (to receive long credit from the suppliers; to give short credit to the customers; to be fairly common; to offer an inducement to customers; to pay earlier than somebody needs; to offer a discount; to pay slightly less; to pay within ten days of the date of invoice) 4. Do debtors always pay back? Why? What happens if not? What can be done to overdue accounts? (the debtor cannot pay; to get the money; to supply the firm with goods; to become insolvent; to run the firm; to be dishonest; accounts not paid in time; overdue accounts; a sales representative; to collect the money; to make enquiries; to employ a professional debt collector) 5. Why do companies try to avoid being bad payers? (to get a reputation for being a bad payer; to get supplies on credit; to give information about the financial situation of a company; to judge something; to be a good credit risk; to suggest that a supplier writes to their bank for a reference)
108

Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: - (-) , - () ( ) , ,

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between W. Buckhurst and Ch. Thorn. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements, which you will mark T (True) or F (False) after you have listened to the tape. 1. Harper & Grant Ltd. give credit only for thirty days. 2. Doing business on retail basis Harper & Grant mean that payment may be deferred until the end of the month following that in which the goods were delivered.
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3. Bush & Green, the retailer, has owed Harper & Grant Ltd. seven thousand pounds for office furniture for over nine months. 4. Mr. Buckhurst states that the firm send out the accounts at the end of every month. 5. The chief accountant decides he will get the sales representative in the southwest, Mr. Shuttleworth on to the debt of Bush & Green because its time they did something drastic about this lot. 6. Christopher Thorn heard that Mr. Shuttleworth was going to a different region but it was only a rumour. 7. Harper & Grant Ltd. can put a professional debt collector on to collect some of the debts but W. Buckhurst is against that until they've done everything they can do themselves to get the money. 8. Christopher Thorn had sent a couple of rather strong letters to Bush & Green and there was a reply from the firm saying they had gone bankrupt. Exercise 2 Act as an interpreter. : , , - . ? Shuttleworth: Yes, I have, Mr. Buckhurst. He's just told me about my new area. He told me to come and see you about the new salary scheme. : ? Shuttleworth: Not really. : , , . . Shuttleworth: What really interests me is whether I shall earn more money or less! : , , . , , , . , - , , . , .
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Shuttleworth: I see. : , . - ? Shuttleworth: Oh, I'm very pleased. I think it's about time I had a new area. Exercise 3 Listen to the following extract from the conversation between Buckhurst and Shuttleworth, which shows how the situation progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case. Buckhurst: You did very well about that matter of . We didn't even know that had moved. How did you find out ? Shuttleworth: Oh, an amazing bit of luck, really. I Bush & Green in several shops near . There's a cafe at that address now. I suspected the people who , because they acted strangely when I asked them with any letters that came for . The chap hesitated quite a long time before he said that he sent them all back to . I was sure he was lying. Buckhurst: What was the bit of luck? who owns the bookshop . While I was talking to him I noticed was open, and inside I could see what looked very like one of . He said he'd bought it in Wilminster, that's a little near by. Well, I took the and I telephoned . He checked that it was one of we'd supplied to . Then I got to give me . He'd bought the cabinet who called themselves Windel & Riddel. Windel & Riddel indeed! Huh! Buckhurst: What did you ? You realise, of course, that Bush & Green might have first to this firm? Shuttleworth: I didn't think so. I was sure it was operating under a different name. Buckhurst: Did you go and ? Shuttleworth: I certainly did. And I presented to them.They pretended they
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Shuttleworth: Well, I thought I'd try , and I got into conversation

didn't it. But then came in, and he . I'd from him originally. He went at once to write out , and he asked me about it. What do you think we ? Buckhurst: Well, we've got , but there are probably a lot of who have been done in the same way. I think it's our duty to . And, Shuttleworth, we must take in the future before we on credit. Exercise 4 Match the terms on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Five of the phrases have more than one explanation. Fill in the grid below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. retail business wholesale business to defer payment long credit short credit insolvent debt collector basic salary a. b. c. d. e. f. g. i. j. bills need not be paid for a certain period of time a professional who collects debts on a commission basis salary without commission money owed which will never be paid back sale of small quantities of goods to ordinary customers trade between manufacturer and supplier or retailer terms allowing the borrower a long time to pay to put off paying until later bills must be paid very soon after receipt of goods buying goods from manufacturers and selling in large quantities (in bulk) to traders who then sell in smaller quantities to the general public k. l. trade between supplier and customer salary without extra payment for special work, overtime, etc. m. to postpone payment n. o. without sufficient funds to continue doing business money which has been owed to a firm, or a person, for a long time

outstanding accounts h.

10. bad debt

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1. , k

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

POST-LISTENING 1. Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group.
Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. a. What is the usual term of payment for creditors in Harper and Grant Ltd.? b. Can the payment be deferred? c. How often does the firm send out the accounts? d. Are there any ways to collect bad debts? e. Why to bring in a third party, or to use legal pressure is a sure way to lose a customer? f. In what way will the salary scheme be changed for sales reps.? g. In what way was the bad debt of Bush & Green chased up? 2. Give a brief outline of the situation as if you were a. William Buckhurst; b. Christopher Thorn; c. Mr. Shuttleworth; d. Representative of Bush & Green. 3. Act out the dialogues between a. Christopher Thorn and William Buckhhurst about the necessity of chasing up the outstanding debts; b. W. Buckhurst and Mr. Shuttleworth about the new salary scheme; c. Hector Grant and William Buckhurst about debtors and the activities of sales representatives.

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Unit 23

Insurance

Listen to the tape and practise the pronunciation of the following words and word combinations, quote the sentences in which they are used in the unit. Consult a dictionary and translate them into Russian. to be hi-jacked to insure oneself against loss or damage to ones property insurance broker a syndicate of underwriters to arrange a blanket insurance a comprehensive policy to make a statement at the end of an accounting period to pay the premium as a percentage of the total value of all goods handled to employ a firm of adjusters to assess or value the loss or damage the full insured value of the goods or property to take into account the depreciated value to be a write-off Act of God = insurance on a contingency basis the injured party to take out a policy to put in a claim to meet the claim to be tipped off to be covered by a blanket insurance policy to salvage the lot to be liable to violate the regulations
Notes: insurer insurant life insurance insurance against all risks

- , - , , - -
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PRE-LISTENING
Task I Consider the introduction to the unit. Answer the following questions and be ready to give a story line. Use the word combinations in brackets. 1. How can a firm insure itself against loss or damage to its property? (to take out an insurance policy; to insure the goods or property against something; to arrange insurance with a syndicate of underwriters; to cover everything; a comprehensive policy; blanket insurance) 2. What is the mechanism of insuring the goods? (to make a statement at the end of an accounting period; to do something once a month or once a quarter; the total value of all goods handled; to pay the premium; to pay something as a percentage of the total value of goods) 3. What is mentioned about Harper & Grants insurers? (a syndicate of Lloyds underwriters; to be a huge insurance organisation; insurers; to work independently; to be grouped in syndicates) 4. What are adjusters? In what way does their work differ from that of underwriters? (to employ a firm of adjusters; to assess or value the loss or damage; the full insured value of the goods or property; to take into account; the depreciated value) 5. Is the hi-jacked load of Harper & Grant Ltd. covered by any insurance policy? (to be a write-off; to be a total wreck; to be impossible to repair; to concern somebody; to hire vehicles; to replace the load; to be wanted urgently) 6. Is it possible to insure the goods or property against anything that could happen? (to be an all-risks policy; to insure the goods or property against almost anything that could happen; to put in some exceptions; outbreak of war; Act of God; to be considered a normal risk)

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7. What are the steps of taking out an insurance policy? (to take place; the injured party; to put in a claim to the insurance company; to agree to pay; to meet the claim; to take out a policy; to put in a claim; to agree to meet the claim) Task 2 Give the English equivalents for the following word combinations: - ( ) , , (, ) / / , ( ), - -, , , ( )

LISTENING
Exercise 1 You are going to hear a talk between W. Buckhurst and Peter Wiles. Before you listen to the conversation look at these statements, which you will mark T (True) or F (False) after you have listened to the tape.
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1.

The gang had been tipped off that a lorry belonging to Andersons would be coming through the way with a valuable load of office furniture.

2.

A hi-jacker must have thought Andersons' driver was lying for some reason that he had a load of office desks and filing cabinets.

3.

The driver was taken to a farm a long way from the main road and held there for seven weeks before the gang released him. Then he had to walk six miles before he found a policeman.

4.

Nobody knows what the robbers did with the lorry and how it became a total wreck.

5.

The insurance of the load is very simple and there was no need to inform the insurance brokers when the theft was reported because all goods delivered for Harper & Grant Ltd. within the United Kingdom are covered by a blanket insurance policy.

6.

Lloyds underwrote the policy, i.e. Harper & Grant Ltd. are insured with a syndicate of Lloyds underwriters.

7.

Someone from a syndicate of Lloyds underwriters will go up to inspect the damaged goods to give an opinion about their value.

8.

The main problem in this situation is that Harper & Grants insurers seem to think the desks and chairs may not be too badly damaged.

9.

William Buckhurst thinks someone from the firm ought to go up and give the managers an opinion of the damage.

10.

Peter would like to go up there himself and have a look in spite of the fact that it's miles from a main road, right up in the Moorland Valley. Also there isnt much to do at the office at the moment and he can go.

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Exercise 2 Listen to the following conversation between Christopher Thorn and Mr. Roberts. Look at their remarks given below at random. Put them in the order they appear in the Unit. Supply the remarks with the names of their authors. Fill in the grid below. A May I ask who you are and what your business is up here? B C Ah, how do you do. My name is Thorn, I work for Harper & Grant. Good morning. Nice morning for a country drive, isn't it? Oh, what a mess that lorry's in. D Oh, yes, your firm is making the claim. E My name is Roberts. I represent Brown & Johnson, Insurance Adjusters. I've been asked to investigate the damage to the load which this lorry was carrying. F Well, I might ask you the same question.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Exercise 3 Listen again and see how the conversation between Christopher Thorn and Mr. Roberts progressed. Try to complete the gaps, using no more than three words in each case.

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Christopher Thorn: Mr. Roberts:

Well, let's . I was warned that might have jammed.

I don't think are too badly damaged. I think it to salvage the lot. These dents could knocked out, and these desks .

Christopher: Thorn:

Oh, I don't think , Mr. Roberts. Look , it's . We'd never be able . And . Look at them! They must have been for some time. They to be stripped down and .

Mr. Roberts: Christopher Thorn: Mr. Roberts:

H'm, well, I think I might recommend ... . Hello! What's this ? I should think it used on the windscreen; it's come unstuck and ... What does it say? Drivers it is a serious offence , as agreed with the General Workers' Union, to in this vehicle to any person not of Andersons Transport Company. You realise ?

Christopher Thorn: Mr. Roberts: Christopher Thorn: Mr. Roberts:

Sorry, no, I don't.

Didn't the driver that he to this man ? Yes, I believe he did. But I don't see ...

I think will find, Mr. Thorn, that Andersons, , should be held responsible to their customers' goods in transit if is caused on the part . Of course, it will depend your firm has , but I don't think need be liable at all.

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Exercise 4 Match each of the phrases on the left with an appropriate explanation on the right. Five of the phrases have more than one explanation. Fill in the grid below. 1. insurance a. agreement that in return for regular small payments, a company will pay compensation for loss, damage, injury, death 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. insurance claim insurance premium depreciation underwriters adjusters all-risks policy d. e. f. g. b. c. independent firm who asses the damage to property person who calculates losses for an insurance company policy which covers all possible normal dangers with the exception of war, Act of God, etc. person who is insured by an insurance company rate payable for an insurance policy system of protection against loss in which a number of individuals agree to pay certain sums for a guarantee that they will be compensated for any specified loss by fire, accident, death, etc. 8. 9. policy holder take out a policy h. i. person or agent who underwrites insurance reduction in value, writing down the capital value of an asset over a period of time in a companys accounts 10. premium j. k. l. sign the contract for an insurance and start paying the premiums insurance which covers all risks asking an insurance company to pay compensation for damage m. people who take the risks of insurance; if there are no claims they make a profit; if there are a large number of claims , they make a loss. n. o. decrease of value of property through wear, deterioration or going out of use payment made by the insured person to the users
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1. A,

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

POST-LISTENING
Consider the following points. Share your ideas with a partner or a small group. Be prepared to explain your answers to the class. 1. Explain why and how hi-jackers stole office-furniture. 2. Suppose you are a police officer. Recount the case of hi-jacking. 3. Andersons have just been on to W. Buckhurst. Now he briefs Peter Wiles about the situation. 4. Report the situation as if you were the driver of the hi-jacked lorry. 5. Recount the situation as if you were a hi-jacker. 6. Act on behalf of Peter Wiles and report the situation to Hector Grant. 7. Make a presentation Mr. Roberts could have delivered about the case in question. Explain why the insurers were not liable in the case of the damaged cargo. 8. Report on your visit to Moorland Valley as if you were Christopher Thorn, focus your attention on the difference in opinion between Christopher Thorn and Mr. Roberts on the value of damage to the equipment. 9. Act out the dialogue between a. Peter Wiles and William Buckhurst b. Peter Wiles and Christopher Thorn before his trip to Moorland Valley c. Christopher Thorn and Mr. Roberts d. Peter Wiles and Christopher Thorn after his trip to Moorland Valley

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