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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 1

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi INTRODUCTION Traditional zoning was developed during a time when factories and many commercial uses were noisy, smelly, and/or hazardous to the public. To protect public health and residential property values, early zoning focused on separating different uses and buffering them from each other to minimize nuisances. Today, much commercial development is environmentally benign, and there are often advantages to locating different uses in close proximity. Thus many communities are turning to mixed use, which generally refers to a deliberate mix of housing, civic uses, and commercial uses, including retail, restaurants, and offices. Although mixed use is especially applicable near public transportation, it has advantages for other areas as well. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study and understand the parameters governing mixed land use. To study the history of mixed use and zoning in Delhi. To critically analyze the mixed use regulations as per MPD 2021. To analyze the problems, importance and impact of mixed land use in Delhi.

METHODOLOGY Investigation Collection of data on land use pattern of Delhi and other relevant data on examples of traditional mixed use. Analysis Analysis of the data collected and what all more is required Identification of benefits and drawbacks of mixed land use. Synthesis Synthesis based on analysis. Interventions based on entire study

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

MIXED USE
CHAPTER 2

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi DEFINITION ULI defined mixed use in 1976 as requiring three elements: "three or more significant revenue producing uses; significant functional and physical integration; and development in conformance to a coherent plan." Wikipedia defines mixed-use development as the use of a building, set of buildings, or neighborhood for more than one purpose. Steve Suprenant of HDR Architecture defined mixed use development as An appropriate combination of multiple uses, inside a single structure or place within a neighbourhood, where a variety of different living activities (live, work, shop and play) are in close proximity (walking distance) to most residents. As per 2006 Conference on Mixed-Use Development; hosted by ICSC, NAIOP, BOMA, ARDA and NMHC, A mixed-use development is a real estate project with planned integration of some combination of retail, office, residential, hotel, recreation or other functions. It is pedestrian-oriented and contains elements of a live-work-play environment. It maximizes space usage, has amenities and architectural expression and tends to mitigate traffic and sprawl. A mixed use development is defined in the Mixed Use Guide as One that contains both residential and non-residential uses. It may be of any scale, from a single building to an entire precinct or area. The dissimilar uses of a mixed use development may be arranged either vertically or horizontally, or as a combination of the two. 1 TYPES OF MIXED USE Mixed use can be achieved by combining various activities either horizontally or vertically. Vertical Mixed-use A single structure with the elevated floors used for residential or office use and a portion of the ground floor for retail/commercial or service use.
Figure 1 Vertical Mixed land use

Horizontal Mixed-use - Attached

A single structure, which provides retail/commercial or service use in the portion fronting the public or private street with attached residential or office use behind this.
Figure 2 Horizontal Mixed land use- Attached type

Mixed use development in town centres, North Shore City

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

Horizontal Mixed-use - Detached.

Two or more structures on one site which provide retail/commercial or service use in the structure (s) fronting the public or private street, and residential or office use in separate structure (s) behind or to the side.
Figure 3 Horizontal Mixed land use- Detached type

REPRESENTATIVE EXAMPLES OF MIXED LAND USE

Figure 4

Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 4, 5, 6 Examples of Mixed land use

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi HISTORY OF MIXED LAND USE 2 Mostly all the human settlements developed as mixed use. Walking was the main way to move people and goods which was sometimes assisted by animals because of this density was high. Generally buildings were not divided into different functions, neighbourhoods contained diversity of uses. The ground floor of buildings was often devoted to some sort of commercial or productive use, with living space upstairs. Pre-industrial cities were mixed as a matter of course (Morris 1994). This historical mixed-used pattern of development declined during industrialisation in favour of large-scale separation of manufacturing and residences in single-function buildings. This period saw massive migration which led to the need of dwelling units. Thus began a separating out of land uses that previously had occurred in the same spaces. Other than this certain factories produced pollution. In 1916, zoning regulations came into being that not only limited building heights but also called for separation of uses. This was largely meant to keep people from living next to polluted industrial areas. This separation, however, was extended to commercial uses as well. This type of zoning was widely adopted by municipal zoning codes. Through the early 20th century, the expansion of large-scale retail and large-scale office uses in city centres often forced alternative uses out because they drove up land values. Thus a combination of technologies (eg, street car, elevator) and cultural behaviour (eg, growing middle class looking for quiet seclusion) enabled and supported separating land uses. With the advent of mass transit systems, but especially the private automobile and cheap oil, the ability to create dispersed, low-density cities where people could live very long distances from their workplaces, shopping centres and entertainment districts began in earnest. However, it has been the post-second World War dominance of the automobile and the decline in all other modes of urban transportation that has seen the extremes of these trends come to pass. By the post-WWII period, most Western cities had large areas of segregated uses: enclaves of housing; zones of commercial uses; pods of office developments. Governments supported the philosophy of separate development of areas for industry by financing industrial parks and estates. Incentives to industry to relocate, usually to areas of segregated industrial activity, were seen as a way of enhancing national competitiveness and economic growth. Many North American cities were preoccupied through the 1970s and 1980s with fighting off mega- malls, and trying to save declining central cities from losing population and business. Mixed use zoning became a popular strategy in many Canadian cities in the 1980s as a way to trying to correct the problems associated with single-use zoning. New growth areas were zoned for mixed use. Easing zoning rules, increasingly perceived to slow down markets, became government policy during the recessionary 1980s. Despite flexible rules that allowed mixing, though, the market was slow to respond to opportunities for mixed use.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed-use_development Encouraging mixed use in practice by Jill Grant, 2004, page 2-7 http://www.communityplanningpays.com/Mixed_Use_Public_Private.pdf

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi The 1980s and early 1990s did not prove supportive of mixing, at least in some Canadian cities. Environmental and economic concerns continued to develop and gain media attention through the 1980s. By the end of the decade, two movements seemed to offer strategies to respond: both saw mixed use as part of the solution to urban problems. The healthy cities movement proved quite influential in Europe and in Canada. An international movement for sustainable development gained steam with the publication of the Brundtland Report (WCED 1987) Both these movements supported mixed use as a strategy. Mixed use could contribute to community health by reducing the need for car transportation and enhancing local self sufficiency. Strategies that might reduce energy consumption could also be defined as sustainable. Both movements also tended to see growth as potentially problematic. While healthy communities and sustainable development enjoyed a brief flourish of support from national governments, continued fiscal conservatism in the late 20th century eventually brought the demand for growth back onto the agenda. Public resistance to growth continued through the 1990s as urban residents experienced increasing traffic gridlock, endless sprawl, and escalating house prices. Upper levels of government, though, have traditionally been concerned with promoting not controlling economic growth. The 1990s brought new trade arrangements, like the North American Free Trade Agreement. Thus even as planners and governments supported many of the strategies promoted through the healthy communities and sustainable development movements, they looked for ways to tie the approaches to a model of growth that could ensure economic gain. Smart growth appeared in the US by the late 1990s as a new synthesis for planning. This theory suggested that growth is possible and can be good. Smart growth employed many of the strategies promoted in the sustainable development and healthy communities movements, although it focussed less on reducing overall consumption than on finding physical and policy solutions to improve the outcomes of growth. Mixed use survived as a principle of smart growth. The social responsibility implicit in the healthy communities movement, and the environmental responsibility central to the concept of sustainable development, were downplayed as economic vibrancy rose to a place of greater prominence in the new model. To a considerable extent, the new paradigm appropriated the rhetoric and responses of these earlier movements, but put growth back into the equation. Between 1990s 2000s; mixed use emerged as a key component of smart growth, TOD, TND and sustainable development.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi APPROACH TO MIXED USE 3 Grant (2002) identifies three kinds of mixing of uses: a) increasing intensity of land uses - eg, mixing housing types b) increasing diversity of uses - eg, mixing commercial with residential c) integrating formerly segregated uses - eg, allowing light industry in residential areas Where do we see these types of mix occurring? a) Type a mix intensification is happening in many cities, especially in redevelopment projects, but also in the suburbs of cities like Toronto (Bourne 2001; Isin and Tomalty 1993). Planners often encourage a mix of housing types on a finer scale than appeared in suburban development in the immediate post war period. Today it is not uncommon to find semi-detached or row houses near detached homes, even in new suburbs. Some municipalities are revising regulations to allow accessory units in suburban zones. Escalating land costs contribute to driving market demand for smaller lots and finer grained mixing of housing types in high growth areas. b) Type b mix diversification is common in projects that represent large scale redevelopments, such as waterfront zones or entertainment districts. Greyfield conversion projects like Santana Row in San Jose CA include upscale shops and housing. Urban villages are appearing in upscale high- growth areas where there is a demand for urban living or where residents have resources to spend on high-end consumer goods; Poundbury and Greenwich Millennium Village in the UK offer good examples. This tends to be a small, but economically important, part of the market. c) Type c mix integration is less common. Some municipalities facilitate the integration of special needs housing, such as group homes, by easing zoning regulations to allow such uses as-of-right. Home businesses are increasingly allowed by local governments. Most uses that have been intentionally limited in the city - such as industry, adult entertainment, urban agriculture, and other locally- unwanted land uses (LULUs) - are not easily integrated. While a wide range of uses occurs often in Asian cities, the range of uses deemed compatible in Western cities is quite narrow. MULTI USE VS. MIXED USE
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Multi-use centres are those containing a distinct retail component with other, complementary uses found on fringe properties. These could include freestanding office, hotel, self-storage and, occasionally, high-density residential developments

Encouraging mixed use in practice by Jill Grant, 2004, page 9

http://www.kircherresearch.com/Lifestyle-2.pdf - page 2 Page 8

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Mixed-use developments differentiate themselves from multi-use projects by integrating different uses within the same structure. For example, a typical mixed-use project could include upscale retailers on the ground floor and office as well as, or in addition to, residential uses on top of the retail podium. They must attract a critical mass of people during the day and night. Residential or office uses could comprise more than one floor, and may either be condominiums or rental properties. Unsightly seas of parking that characterize enclosed malls are replaced by structured parking or heavily landscaped and screened surface parking. In fact, architectural elements may extend to structured parking, thus seamlessly integrating various uses and minimizing the distance between shopping and parking BENEFITS OF MIXED LAND USE Activates urban areas during more hours of the day Increases housing options for diverse household type Reduces auto dependence Increases travel options and reduces travel time Creates a local sense of place

DRAWBACKS AND ISSUES OF MIXED LAND USE Economic success requires that all the different uses remain in business. Construction cost is more Mix of Housing Walk ability Transit Access Density Parking Traffic congestion Environment & Open Space

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

CASE STUDY, DELHI


CHAPTER 3

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi HISTORY OF LAND USE IN DELHI 5 A mixed land-use pattern, with a combination of residential use and economic activities, is generally acknowledged as a typical feature of traditional Indian cities that has partly persisted in the post-independence period (Brush, 1962). Mixed land-use was equally found in Shahjahanabad during the Mughal period (16381803) (Navqi, 1986; Blake, 1986). This pattern is still prevailing in the Old City of Delhi, which combines extremely high population densities and a remarkable concentration of commercial and small-scale industrial activities (Mehra, 1979). The association of residential use with commercial and small-scale manufacturing activities is also observed in the urbanized villages, and in informal types of settlements: in the unauthorized colonies of the urban periphery, as well as to some extent in the squatter settlements. The first indicated vehicular oriented planning was of Lutyens Delhi in 1920's. The coming of industry too necessitated the removal of noxious industries from predominantly residential neighborhood. Most of the planners were educated abroad and were very much influenced by the planning concepts prevalent there. Therefore the 1962 master plan was based on having identified zones for different landuses. The construction of New Delhi introduced a radical discontinuity in the spatial organization of the entire city. The planning and building of the new town had been placed under the responsibility of two British architect- planners: Edwin Luytens and Herbert Baker. It was a pattern of urbanization based on deliberate segregation between Old Delhi and New Delhi, designed by the British planners. Hence, on the one hand stands the compact indigenous town, the walled city of Shahjahanabad founded by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in 1638, with its intricate web of narrow streets and densely packed buildings. On the other hand, separated from the former by a large strip of land cleared and landscaped, lies the new colonial town, the spread garden city with its geometric plan, its large roads and vast dimensions. This opposition between Old Delhi and New Delhi lingered on after the Independence of the country in 1947. It remains till today as an evident element of differentiation in the urban landscape as well as the socio-spatial organization of the capital. The pattern of residential segregation could be interpreted as a reproduction of the residential pattern established by the British colonial administration in their planning of New Delhi, which reflected the civil service hierarchy, with upper-level employees segregated from lower-level employees, and the British separated from the Indians (Evenson, 1989, p. 150). The most significant element of this socio-spatial hierarchy was the distance between the place of residence and the seat of power (the Vice regal Palace, converted into the Rashtrapati Bhawanthe Presidential Palacein the postIndependence capital). From another viewpoint, the spatial organisation of housing
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Socio-spatial differentiation and residential segregation in Delhi: a question of scale, by Veronique Dupont, page 157-162, http://delhi-architecture.weebly.com/delhi-city-in-conflict.html

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi estates built for government employees after Independence can be read as a revival of the traditional pattern of spatial and residential segregation based on caste origin, and applied here to the rank and status in the administrative service. The construction of New Delhi introduced a marked functional division of the urban space. The main function assigned to New Delhi was administrative and political, including residential quarters for government employees, whereas industrial function was not envisaged for the new town. Today, the Indian capital city is a polynuclear metropolis, with several district business centres and commercial complexes, in addition to Connaught Place, the Central Business District inherited from the British colonial period, and which was built at the junction of New Delhi and the old city. The administrative functions remain dominant in New Delhi. The southern sector (beyond New Delhi and excluding the south-eastern fringe) accommodates mainly residential areas, but also several flourishing commercial complexes and a major business district (Nehru Place) as well as an institutional area. The main industrial zones are, on the other hand, located in the western and northwestern sectors, with in addition an important planned industrial estate in the south-east (Okhla) and another notable industrial zone in the north-east (Shadhara). However, an important point to underline is that, in contemporary Delhi, the economic activities remain scattered all over the urban area, including industrial production. These industrial activities take place not only in large planned industrial estates, but also in small-scale units found in the old urban core as well as in the urbanized villages or in the many unauthorized colonies in the urban periphery. As shown in another article examining the present spatial organization of Delhi (Dupont and Mitra, 1995, based on the 1991 census data), the three main economic functions of the capital (administrative, commercial and industrial) have generated a contrasting pattern of residential distribution for the workers employed in corresponding economic sectors, with a clear division between the south and north of the urban agglomeration. Workers employed in the community, social and personal services tend to be concentrated in New Delhi and the southern urban extensions, where most of the government employees housing estates have been built. Conversely, workers engaged in trade and commerce are strongly over-represented in the northern half; some major residential concentration of traders and businessmen correspond to the location of rehabilitation camps for refugees from Pakistan. As for workers employed in manufacturing industries, they tend to reside near the main industrial areas, with important concentrations in the northern part of the city but also in the south-east. This North/South opposition was already instituted by the British rulers when they established themselves south of the old Indian city. Within the colonial New Delhi, the class separation also followed a North/South hierarchy, with the most prestigious lots south of the great monumental axis and the low- and middle-income groups mostly housed on the north, or wrong side of Rajpath. After Independence, the south continued as a magnet for middle- and upper-class residence, as well as providing sites for prestigious governmental and educational institutions. District commercial centres

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi containing offices, shops, theatres, and luxury hotels also came to characterize the southern edge of the city (Evenson, 1989, p. 189). Land use plans for Delhi 6

Figure 7 Land use plan-1962, Delhi

Figure 8 MPD proposals 1981, Delhi

Figure 9 Land use plan-2001, Delhi

Figure 10 Land use plan-2021, Delhi


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www.dda.org.in

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi LANDUSE AND ZONING AS PER MPD 2021 One of the aspect of zoning enumerated in the development code for the city consists of the division of the city into various Use Zones and Use Premises which determine the land use policy in the city. A use zone is an area for any of the specified land use categories. A use premise means one of the many sub divisions of a use zone, designated in an approved layout plan, for a specific use. Land use of premise has to be determined on the basis of an approved layout plan, which has to be consistent with the land ownership and the approval of the building plans. The MPD 2021 divides the city into the following use zones: 1. Residential a. Residential Area b. Foreign Mission 2. Commercial a. Retail shopping, General Business and Commerce, District Centre, Community Centre, Non Hierarchical Commercial Centre. b. Wholesale, warehousing, cold storage and oil depot c. Hotels 3. Industry a. Manufacturing, service and repair industry 4. Ridge/Regional Park 5. Recreational a. City park, district park, community park b. Historical monuments 6. Transportation a. Airport b. Terminal/ depot- Rail/ MRTS/ Bus/ Truck c. Circulation- Rail/ MRTS/ Road 7. Utility a. Water (treatment plant etc.) b. Sewerage (treatment plan etc.) c. Electricity (power house, sub-station etc.) d. Solid waste (sanitary landfill etc.) e. Drain 8. Government a. President Estate and Parliament House b. Govt. office/ Courts c. Govt. land (use undetermined) 9. Public and Semi-public Facilities a. Hospital, education and research university/ university centre, college, socio-cultural complex, police headquarter, police lines, fire stations, disaster management centres, religious, burial ground/ cremation. b. Transmission site/ centre c. Sports facilities/ complex/ stadium 2010-11 Page 14

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 10. Green belt and water body a. Plant nursery b. Green belt c. River and water body

Figure 11 Land use plan 2021, Delhi

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi MIXED USE OF LAND If we consider Delhi, it is divided into different zones and as per the master plan different areas have been identified for mixed use in different zones. These zones include following: Zone A & part C (Walled City), Zone-A (Other than Walled City), Zone B, Zone C, Zone D, Zone E, , Zone F, Zone G, Zone H. Different streets identifed in different zones are as in Annexure 1 MIXED USE REGULATIONS The policy acknowledges the need Figure 12 Map showing different zones of Delhi for permitting use of land for purposes other than that for which it was originally envisaged and lays down the conditions under which this may be applied in different situations. The general procedure to be followed for implementation of the said policy, and mitigating measures to be taken to counter the effect of such non-intended use in such areas are also described.
1.1 GOVERNING PRINCIPLES FOR MIXED USE

i. Mixed use for the purposes of this Chapter means the provision for non-residential activity in residential premises. ii. The policy aims to balance the socio-economic need for such activity and the environmental impact of the said activity in residential areas. iii. Mixed use allows access to commercial activities in the proximity of the residences and reduces the need for commuting across zones in the city. However at the same time, it needs to be regulated in order to manage and mitigate the associated adverse impact related to congestion, increased traffic and increased pressure on civic amenities. iv. The over-riding principles for permitting mixed use are the need to acknowledge and make adequate provision for meeting community needs, mitigating environmental impact and providing for safe and convenient circulation and parking. v. Mixed-use shall not be permitted in the Lutyens Bungalow Zone, Civil Lines, Government housing,institutional and staff housing of public and private agencies and buildings/precincts listed by the Heritage Conservation Committee.
1.2. MIXED USE IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS:

1.2.1. Differentiated approach: i) The need for a differentiated approach to mixed use policy arises from the fact that Delhi, being the countrys capital and an important centre of economic activity has a large 2010-11 Page 16

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi diversity in the typology of residential areas. Apart from the planned residential colonies built as part of Lutyens Delhi as well as through the process of planned development undertaken by the Delhi Development Authority, there are authorized residential areas in the Walled City, Special areas and urban villages. Other planned areas include resettlement colonies and pre-Delhi Development Act colonies, including post-partition rehabilitation colonies. There are also regularized-unauthorized colonies; unauthorized colonies as well as slums and jhuggi jhonpri clusters in various parts of Delhi. ii) Moreover, the extent of non-residential activity seen as being necessary or desirable by the residents themselves varies from area to area based on the socio-economic status of the residents as well as the past pattern of development in that area. While certain colonies may need non-residential activity as an integral part of their livelihood, some others may wish to preserve the residential character of their colonies and neighborhood. iii) Hence it is proposed to follow a differentiated approach in the application of the mixed use policy in Delhi. The differentiated approach would be based on categorization of colonies from A to G as adopted by MCD for Unit Area method of property tax assessment. 1.2.2. Types of mixed use Subject to the provisions of this notification, the following three broad types of mixed use shall be permissible, in residential premises: i) Commercial activity in the form of retail shops as per conditions given in para 1.6 in plots abutting notified mixed use streets. ii) Other activity broadly in the nature of Public and Semi-Public facilities listed in para 1.7.1 and as per conditions specified in para 1.7, in plots abutting roads of minimum ROW prescribed in para 1.3.2. iii) Professional activity as per conditions specified in para 1.8.
1.3 IDENTIFICATION OF MIXED USE AREAS IN EXISTING URBAN AREAS AND URBANIZABLE AREAS:

The identification of mixed use areas / streets in both the urbanized/urban as well as urbanizable areas of Delhi would be as follows: 1.3.1. In already urbanized /urban areas, mixed use shall be permissible in the following areas: i. On all streets/ stretches already notified by the competent authority under MPD 2001 and indicated in Annexure 1: ii. Residential areas and Streets/ stretches earlier declared as commercial areas/ streets or where commercial use was allowed in MPD 1962 shall continue such use at least to the extent as permissible in MPD 1962. iii. Commercial activity existing from prior to 1962 in residential areas, subject to documentary proof thereof. iv. Identification and Notification of mixed use streets in future, shall be based on the criteria given in para 1.3.2 and as per procedure prescribed in para 1.3.3, and given wide publicity by the local bodies concerned. 2010-11 Page 17

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 1.3.2. The extent of mixed use permissible in various categories of colonies is further clarified as follows: 1. In colonies falling in categories A and B: No commercial activities will be permissible in the colonies of A & B categories except the following: Professional activity, subject to conditions given in para 1.8. Mixed use and Commercial activity up to one plot depth, in plots abutting Master Plan roads that are notified as mixed use streets, and Commercial streets respectively, since such roads are not internal to the colonies (provided that the request of the RWA concerned shall not be necessary for notifying the Master Plan Roads abutting the colonies, as mixed use streets or Commercial Streets). Other activity restricted to Guest Houses, Nursing Homes and Pre-primary Schools, as defined in para 1.7.1, subject to conditions contained in para 1.7, in plots abutting roads of minimum 18m ROW in regular plotted development, since these activities are in the nature of Public and Semi-Public facilities. New Banks and Fitness Centres will not be permissible with effect from the date of this notification. Banks and Fitness Centres, which already exist, in accordance with notifications issued in this regard under Master Plan for Delhi 2001, from time to time, and are on plots abutting roads of minimum 18m ROW, on the date of notification, shall, however, remain permissible. Retail shops in terms of para 1.6. on such mixed use streets with a minimum 18 m ROW, within the colony, in regular residential plotted development, as are notified in terms of para 1.3.3, if there is a specific request of the RWA concerned, in terms of para 1.10.
Note: Commercial activity on mixed use streets, within A & B category colonies, earlier notified under MPD 2001 shall cease with immediate effect (other than in plots abutting Master Plan roads).

2. In colonies falling in categories C and D: Mixed use in the form of Retail shops shall continue to be permissible as per conditions in para 1.6, in plots abutting notified mixed use streets listed in Annexure I. Other activity in terms of para 1.7 shall be permissible in plots abutting roads of minimum 18 m ROW in regular plotted development, 13.5 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 9m ROW in Walled City, Regularized-Unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Special areas, and Urban Villages, subject to conditions in para 1.7. Notification of mixed use streets in future, of minimum 18 m ROW in regular residential plotted development, 13.5 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 9 m ROW in Regularized-unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Walled city, Special Area and urban villages in terms of para 1.3.3 shall be subject to consultation with RWAs concerned in terms of para 1.10. Mixed use shall be permissible in Pedestrianised Shopping streets as per para 1.3.3. Professional activities shall be permissible as per conditions laid down in para 1.8.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 3. In colonies falling in categories E, F and G: Retail shops shall continue to be permissible as per conditions in para 1.6., in plots abutting notified mixed use streets listed in Annexure I. Other activity in terms of para 1.7 shall continue to be permissible in plots abutting roads of minimum 13.5 m ROW in regular plotted development, 9 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 6m ROW in Walled City, Regularized-Unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Special areas, and urban Villages subject to conditions in para 1.7. Professional activities shall be permissible subject to conditions in para 1.8. Notification of mixed use streets in future, of minimum 13.5 m ROW in regular residential plotted development, 9 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 6 m ROW in Regularized-Unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, walled City, Special Area and urban villages shall be in terms of para 1.3.3. Mixed use shall be permissible in Pedestrianised Shopping streets as per para 1.3.3. 4. Group housing in all categories of colonies: Only professional activity shall be permissible. Retail shops specifically provided for in the lay out plan of group housing would be permissible. 5. In respect of colonies falling in NDMC area Excluding Lutyens Bungalow Zone, Government housing, institutional and staff housing of public and private agencies and buildings/precincts listed by the Heritage Conservation Committee), existing mixed use streets / stretches will be notified by NDMC. Future notification of mixed use streets/ stretches will be done on a field level survey to assess the community needs, environmental impact and traffic circulation/ adequate parking and in consultation with Residents Welfare Associations concerned.
Chart 1 Permissible activities S.No 1 Colony name A and B Permissible activity Professional activity Commercial activity upto one plot depth Other activities restricted to guest houses, nursing homes and pre-primary school Retail shops Retail shops Other activities Mixed use in Pedestrianised Shopping streets Professional activities Regulation

In plots abutting roads of minimum 18m ROW

C and D

E, F and G

Retail shops Other activity Professional activities

In plots abutting roads of minimum 18m ROW in regular plotted development. 13.5 ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 9m ROW in Walled City, RegularizedUnauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Special areas, and Urban Villages in plots abutting roads of minimum 13.5 m ROW in regular plotted development, 9 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 6m

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi


ROW in Walled City, RegularizedUnauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Special areas, and urban Villages Group housing Only professional activity in all categories shall be permissible. Retail of colonies shops specifically provided for in the lay out plan of group housing would be permissible Note: Streets of less than 9 m (or 6 m in E, F & G category colonies) ROW in RegularisedUnauthorised colonies, resettlement colonies, urban villages, Special Area and Walled City, if notified for mixed use, shall be declared as Pedestrian Shopping Streets (PSS) and will not be open to motorized transport Chart 2 Non-Permissible activities S.No 1 2 Colony name A and B Non- Permissible activity Regulation New banks, fitness centre, wellness centre In respect of Not applicable to Lutyens colonies falling Bungalow Zone, in NDMC area Government housing, institutional and staff housing of public and private agencies and buildings/precincts listed by the Heritage Conservation Committee 4

1.3.3. Notification of mixed use streets in urban areas in future: i). The minimum ROW for identification of a street or stretch of road as mixed use street would be as follows: In A&B Colonies: 18m ROW in regular plotted development, if there is a specific request of the RWA concerned. In C&D colonies: 18 m ROW in regular residential plotted development, 13.5 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 9 m ROW in Regularised- Unauthorised colonies, resettlement colonies, Walled City, Special area and urban villages; in consultation with RWA concerned. In E,F&G Colonies: 13.5 m ROW in regular plotted development, 9 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 6m ROW in Walled City, Regularized- Unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Special areas, and Urban Villages. ii) Streets of less than 9 m (or 6 m in E, F & G category colonies) ROW in RegularisedUnauthorised colonies, resettlement colonies, urban villages, Special Area and Walled City, if notified for mixed use, shall be declared as Pedestrian Shopping Streets (PSS) and will not be open to motorized transport.

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Note: a) Request of the RWA concerned or consultation with RWAs concerned, shall not be necessary for notifying the Master Plan Roads abutting the colonies as mixed use streets, since such roads are not internal to the colonies. (b) Specific request of or consultation with RWA concerned shall be governed by para 1.10

iii) For the notification of mixed use streets, local bodies shall be required to carry out within a reasonable time of the Notification coming into force, and with due expedition, a survey of all streets of the above-mentioned width+, if not already done, with a view to identifying stretches of such streets as mixed use streets. iv) The field survey shall assess the extent of existing nonresidential use on the street, the stretch of the street to be notified, the additional requirement of civic amenities and the provision for traffic circulation and parking. v) The notification shall be issued by the local body/ Authority, with the approval of the Competent Authority under the relevant Act, immediately after the field survey is completed. 1.3.4. Notification of mixed use streets in urbanizable areas in future: In new urbanizable areas, mixed use shall be permissible in the following areas: i) In newly developed residential areas, mixed use as specified above shall be permitted only on residential plots abutting 18 m. ROW roads. ii) In villages that are declared as urban and get integrated into the process of development, mixed use shall be permissible in areas/ stretches identified in the local area plan/ lay out plan prepared for such integration. iii) The layout plan in such new areas shall earmark such stretches/ plots and notify them under the Mixed Use Policy at the time of grant of permission for layout plan in the case of private development and at the time of disposal by allotment or auction in the case of areas developed by DDA.
1.4 GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS GOVERNING MIXED USE:

In terms of the conditions prescribed for different categories of colonies, in para 1.3.2, and provided that the plot abuts a notified mixed use street (in the case of retail shops) or a road of prescribed minimum ROW (in the case of other mixed use activities), mixed use shall be permitted, subject to the following general terms and conditions: In residential plotted development: (i) Where there is only one dwelling unit in a residential plot, only one type of mixed use (i.e., retail shop as per para 1.6 OR professional activity OR one of the other activities listed in para 1.7) shall be permissible in that unit. (ii) Where there are more than one dwelling units in a residential plot, each of the dwelling units will be permitted to have only type of mixed use activity (either retail shop as per para 1.6, OR professional activity OR any one of the other activities listed in para 1.7)

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi In group housing: In group housing, only professional activity is permissible. Retail shops shall be permissible if specifically provided for in the lay out plan of group housing. Other terms and conditions: (i) No encroachment shall be permitted on the streets or public land. (ii) Development control norms as applicable for the particular residential use will continue to be applicable, even if the plot/ dwelling unit is put to mixed use. (iii) If the notified street is a Master Plan Road, and if a service road is available or provided for by local bodies, then, the mixed use premises should be approached from such service road and not directly from the main carriageway, (iv) In plotted development, front setback should not have boundary wall, so that it can be used for additional parking. (v) Parking @ 2.0 ECS per 100 sqm shall be provided within the premises. Where this is not available, cost of development of parking, shall be payable by the plot allottee/ owner to the local body concerned. This condition shall apply even if residential premises are used only for professional activity. (vi) Common parking areas would be earmarked on notified mixed use streets taking into account the additional load on traffic and parking consequent upon notification of the street under Mixed Use Policy. If no parking space is available, land/ plot on the said street may be made available by Traders association, wherever possible, or acquired for construction of parking facilities, preferably, multi level parking. Development of such parking facilities shall be done by either the traders Association or by local bodies and may include public-private partnership as a model for implementation.
1.5 PERMISSIBLE AND NON-PERMISSIBLE USES:

Any trade or activity involving any kind of obnoxious, hazardous, inflammable, noncompatible and polluting substance or process shall not be permitted.
1.6 RETAIL SHOPS

1.6.1 Retail shops shall be permitted on plots abutting streets notified for mixed use only on the ground floor and up to the maximum permissible ground floor coverage. 1.6.2 The following activities shall not be allowed under Mixed Use: a) Retail shops of building materials (timber, timber products (excluding furniture), marble1, iron and steel, (gravel, cement and sand)2), firewood, coal and any fire hazardous and other bulky materials. b) Repair shops of automobiles repair and workshop, tyre resoling and re-treading, and battery charging. c) Storage, go-down and warehousing. d) Junk shop e) Liquor shop 2010-11 Page 22

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi f) Printing, dyeing and varnishing g) Any other activity that may be notified from time to time by Government.
Note: 1. Will not include business of finished marble products where cutting and polishing activity of marble is not undertaken. 2 Retail shops of gravel, sand and cement shall be permissible in residential plots of at least 50 sqm, in notified mixed use streets in E , F, and G category colonies , provided that the material is kept entirely within the plot premises. 3 The repair shops and workshops in case of automobiles shall not be prohibited on plots abutting mixed use streets or commercial streets of right of way (ROW) of 30 m or more

1.6.3. The small shops of maximum 20 sqm. area, trading in or dealing with the following items/activities, may be allowed on ground floor only, in residential premises, including in A and B category colonies: 1) Vegetables / fruits / flowers 2) Bakery items/Confectionary items; 3) Kirana/General store; 4) Dairy product; 5) Stationery/Books/Gifts/Book binding; 6) Photostat/Fax/STD/PCO; 7) Cyber caf/Call phone booths; 8) LPG booking office/Showroom without LPG cylinders; 9) Atta Chakki; 10) Meat/Poultry and Fish shop; 11) Pan shop; 12) Barber shop/Hair dressing saloon/Beauty parlour; 13) Laundry/Dry cleaning/ironing; 14) Sweet shop/Tea stall without sitting arrangement; 15) Chemist shop/Clinic/Dispensary/Pathology lab; 16) Optical shop; 17) Tailoring shop; 18) Electrical/Electronic repair shop; and 19) Photo studio; 20) Cable TV/DTH Operation; 21) Hosiery/Readymade Garments/Cloth shop; 22) ATM 23) Cycle Repair Shop 24) Ration shop & Kerosene Shop under PDS.
1.7 OTHER ACTIVITY

1.7.1 Subject to the general conditions given in para 1.4 and additional conditions given in para 1.7.3, the following public and semi-public activities shall also be permitted in the 2010-11 Page 23

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi residential plots abutting roads of minimum ROW prescribed in 1.7.2, whether or not the road is notifiedas mixed use street: a) b) c) d) e) f) Pre-primary school (including Nursery/Montessori School, Crche.) Nursing home (including clinic, dispensary, pathology lab and diagnostic centre) Guest house (including lodging houses) irrespective of number of rooms. Bank Fitness Centre (including Gymnasium, yoga/ meditation centre) Coaching center /tuition centres other than those imparting structured course leading directly to the award a degree of diploma or conducting classes such a regular school.

1.7.2. The minimum ROW of a street or stretch of road on which the above-mentioned other activities are permissible is as follows: In A&B Colonies*: 18m ROW in regular plotted development;

Note *Banks and fitness centres shall however, not be permissible, except those already operating on the date of this notification.

In C&D colonies: 18 m ROW in regular residential plotted development, 13.5 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 9 m ROW in Regularized- Unauthourised colonies, resettlement colonies, Walled City, special area and urban villages; and in Pedestrianised Shopping Streets. In E,F &G Colonies: 13.5 m ROW in regular plotted development, 9 m ROW in rehabilitation colonies and 6m ROW in Walled City, Regularised- Unauthourised colonies, resettlement colonies, Special areas, and urban Villages and in Pedestrianised Shopping Streets. 1.7.3. The above mentioned public and semi-public activities shall be subject to the following additional conditions in addition to general conditions prescribed in preceding paras: (i) Subject to the specific conditions mentioned in succeeding paras, the minimum size** of the plot on which these activities shall be permissible, on streets of prescribed minimum ROW, shall be 200 sqm in regular plotted development, 75 sqm in rehabilitation colonies, regularized-unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Walled City, special area & urban villages. However, the minimum plot size shall be 50 sqm for clinic, dispensaries and pathology labs running in these colonies and also in E, F and G Category colonies. (ii) Banks shall be permissible on 2/3rd of FAR subject to 600 sqm, while Guest House and Nursing Homes will be permissible up to 3/4th of the floor area.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi (iii) However, Nursing Homes operating in plots abutting Master Plan roads and Zonal Plan roads shall be permissible up to 100% of built up area and the limits on the size of the plot would not apply. (iv) Guest Houses operating in plots abutting streets of prescribed minimum ROW in Special Area and in plots abutting Master Plan roads and Zonal Plan roads shall be permissible up to 100% of built up area and the limits on the size of the plot shall not apply. (v) Pre-primary school and fitness centre (other than those on plots abutting Commercial streets) shall be restricted only to the ground floor up to the permissible ground coverage. (vi) The above mentioned activities shall also be subject to any other specific terms and conditions, as may be prescribed in the relevant Statutes/ Acts applicable to them. (vii) It shall be the responsibility of the plot allottee/ owner to make arrangements for parking so that the parking does not encroach/ spill over on public land. Note: **Variation of + 5% in plot size may be disregarded. 1.7.4. Banquet hall shall be permissible only in industrial areas and commercial areas and not in the residential use zone. Development control norms in respect of Ground coverage, FAR, height and basement shall be applicable as per Master Plan Norms for the specific land use for that premises.
1.8. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

Subject to the general terms and conditions specified in para 1.4, professional activity is permissible in plotted development and group housing under the following specific conditions: i. Professional activity shall be permitted if carried out by the resident him/her self. ii. Professional activities shall mean those activities involving services based on professional skills namely Doctor, Lawyer, Architect, and Chartered Accountant. iii. In group housing, and plotted development with multiple dwelling units, professional activity shall be permitted on any floor subject to maximum of 50% of the permissible or sanctioned FAR, whichever is less, of each dwelling unit iv. In the case of plotted development with single dwelling unit, professional activity shall be permissible on any one floor only, but restricted to less than 50% of the permissible or sanctioned FAR, whichever is less on that plot.
1.9 REGISTRATION OF MIXED USE PREMISES AND PAYMENT OF CHARGES:

i. In respect of a residential premises already under mixed use or intended to be put to mixed use, the owner/allottee/ resident of the plot/ dwelling unit, in case of plotted development and dwelling unit in the case of group housing, shall be required to declare such mixed-use by filling up a form in this respect and depositing it with the local body concerned and pay onetime registration charges at rates to be notified with the approval of the Central Government.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi ii. The premises under mixed use shall also be liable for payment of mixed-use charges every year to the local body concerned, at the rates notified with the approval of Central Government, for the period during which the property is put to mixed use. Such payment will be made by the property owner/ allottee voluntarily before 30th June of every year in respect of the previous assessment year (April- March). iii. No modification to the building for using residential premises for non-residential activities, under the mixed use policy, shall be permitted unless the allottee/ owner has obtained sanction of revised building plans and has paid necessary fees or charges. iv. The local body concerned shall be responsible for the conduct of test check of properties under mixed use, whether registered with it or not. v. In addition to other penal action available under the relevant Act, properties found to be under mixed use, without registration or in violation of the terms of this notification shall be liable to pay, to the local body, a penalty amounting to 10 times the annual conversion charges for mixed use.
1.10 CONSULTATION WITH RWAs:

i. The Resident Welfare Association (RWA) shall be a body registered before 21.7.2006, under any Statute, such as Societies Registration Act. ii. Consultation with the RWA concerned for the purposes of declaring mixed use streets shall be done by the local bodies concerned. iii. Genuine efforts for meaningful consultations with RWAs shall be made by the local bodies. Such efforts may include wide publicity to the proposed consultations, maintenance of record of consultation and providing access to those records to RWA concerned and public. iv. Consultation with the RWA concerned shall be limited to identification of mixed use streets, and not for grant of permission in individual cases. However RWAs shall have a right to be heard in cases of complaints of public nuisance and non-permissible uses.
1.11 UNDER WHAT CONDITIONS MIXED USE CAN BE DENIED/ WITHDRAWN/ RESTRICTED:

1.11.1. Permission or registration for mixed use can be cancelled or suspended by the concerned local body in case of violation of any of the conditions under which such mixed use is permissible/ permitted. 1.11.2. The following non-residential activities, not covered under the mixed use policy, shall be permissible in residential areas under the following conditions: (i) Schools operating in residential premises in the Residential use zones shall continue till 18th May 2007. The local body concerned may allow the schools to continue thereafter, subject to necessary changes being made in the use-premises/ lay-out plan, by the local body, within its competence, in terms of Sub clause 8 (2) A of the Master Plan for Delhi 2010-11 Page 26

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 2001 (Page 152 -153 under S.O. 606 (E) in the Gazette of India Extraordinary dated 1.8.1990), and for this purpose the schools shall be required to apply to the local body concerned. (ii) In addition, Coaching centres and similar educational institutions, running in residential premises, shall be allowed to continue till the end of the current academic year or till 18st May 2007, whichever is earlier.
1.12 COMMERCIAL STREETS AND AREAS:

1.12.1. The following streets/ stretches of streets or areas may be notified as Commercial Streets or Commercial areas by the local authority: (a) where more than 70% of the plots abutting roads of ROW exceeding 24m, in a stretch of at least 300m, in regular plotted development are under commercial use, on (provided that no street in colonies in A and B categories shall be notified as commercial street). (b) where more than 70% of the properties abutting roads of less width than 24m ROW, in a stretch of at least 100m, in rehabilitation colonies, Regularized-Unauthorized colonies, resettlement colonies, Walled City, Special Area and urban Villages and local commercial streets declared under MPD 1962 as per para 1.3.1; and (c) In E, F and G category colonies, where, [If] 80% of residential plots are under mixed use, or if there are 300 shops, within a contiguous area of 1 hectare. 1.12.2. Identification of such streets/ stretches is to be done on the basis of field survey to be conducted by the local body within a reasonable period of time and with due expedition of the date of this notification coming into force. 1.12.3. After identification is done, notification of commercial stretches/ streets by the local body/ authority with the approval of the Competent Authority would necessitate compliance to the following terms and conditions: i) Preparation of revised lay-out plan/ Scheme for such areas/ streets with the approval of the local body/ Authority; ii) The lay-out plan/ Scheme for such areas/ streets should indicate adequate provision for circulation, parking, open spaces and other planning norms; iii) Common parking areas would be earmarked taking into account the additional load on traffic and parking consequent upon notification of the street as commercial area/ street. If no parking space is available, land/ plot on the said street/ area may be made available by Traders association, wherever possible, or acquired for construction of parking facilities, preferably, multi level parking. Development of such parking facilities may be done by either the traders Association or by local bodies and may include publicprivate partnership as a model for implementation. iv) On notification of a Commercial street/ area under this clause, such streets/ areas shall be considered as non hierarchical commercial centres as mentioned in Development Code in Master Plan 2001. The plot owners / allottees on these commercial streets/ areas shall have to pay Special conversion charges at rates approved by the Central 2010-11 Page 27

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Government, in respect of the built up area used for commercial purpose, provided that such built up area shall not exceed the residential development control norms applicable to the plot. This is only a one-time facility for plot allottees/ owners in such Commercial areas/ streets and shall not be construed as relaxation of the development control norms in future. v). Any other condition that may be prescribed by Government from time to time.
1.13 Conversion charges

Annual mixed use charges The premises under mixed use shall be subject to levy of Annual Mixed use charges for the period upto which the premises remain / likely to remain under mixed use. The Annual Mixed Use charges for the financial year 2006-07 and 2007-08 for different categories of colonies shall be Chart 3 as under:
Annual conversion charges, MCD and NDMC area

For MCD areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional activities For NDMC areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional activities

Rates in Rs per sqm. built up area A&B C&D E, F & G 767 383 192 511 256 128 192 96 48

Rates in Rs per sqm. built up area 1534 766 384

One time mixed use charges The owner / allottee / resident / user of the premises shall have option to make one time payment of mixed use charges, which shall be as follows.
Chart 4 One time conversion charges, MCD and NDMC area

For MCD areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional For NDMC areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional activities

Rates in Rs per sqm. built up area A&B C&D 6136 4088 3064 2048 1536 1024

E,F&G 1536 768 384

Rates in Rs per sqm. built up area 12272 6128 3072

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi The annual mixed use charges for mixed land street / commercial streets / areas shall be the same. One time charges for development of parking The owner / allottee / resident / user of the plot / dwelling unit under the mixed land use shall also be liable to pay one time charges for development of parking and such rate for one ECS per 50 Sq. mtr. of plot area shall be as under :For MCD area
S.No 1 2 3 Colony A & B category of colonies C & D category of colonies E, F & G category of colonies Rates Rs. 2,10,500/Rs.1,49,750/Rs.66,500/Chart 5 One time parking charges, MCD area

For NDMC area Rs. 2,10,500/- for one ECS per 50 sq. m of plot area.
PENALTY

For the mixed use existing from 2006-07 or before 2006-07 The payment of annual mixed-use charges shall be made by the owner/allottee/resident/user of the premises to the local authority voluntarily before 30 th June of every year in respect of the previous assessment year or part thereof, in proportion to that part. For the 2006-07, 1/4th of the annual mixed use charges were to be paid on or before 30.6.2007 and the balance 3/4th were to be paid on or before 30.9.2007. Delay in payment of development charges for parking or mixed use charges of the relevant financial year shall be compoundable on payment of interest at 8% p.a. The property found under mixed use without declaration or registration or in violation of the relevant provisions of the MPD-2021 and these regulations, shall be liable for penal action under the relevant Act by the local body concerned and also a penalty amounting to 10 times the annual conversion charges for mixed use shall be imposed. Penalty, charges fixed for extra construction S.No. 1 2 3 Colony A and B C and D E, F and G Rate in Rs per sqm. for new construction beyond FAR 3500 1400 700 (for plots larger than 50 490 ( for plots upto 50 sqm) sqm)
Chart 6 Penalty charges for extra construction

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

Figure 13 Zone F Map showing mixed use streets

This map shows all the streets of zone-F in which mixed use is permitted. The complete list can be taken from Annexure-3. The case that I have considered in my study mainly includes the following stretches- Africa Avenue, Lajpat Nagar (ring road), stretch from Kailash Colony to Nehru Place and Captain Gaur marg. In most of the areas where mixed use has been permitted, misuse of the regulations is done. As of Africa Avenue, there are mostly guest houses, showrooms and retail. Nehru place stretch and Captain Gaur Marg mainly have a series of hotels. Lajpat Nagar, ring rod stretch is mainly having retails outlets along with some hotels. Banquet halls are also present ion these areas. As per the norms for more than one dwelling units, each dwelling unit is permitted to have one type of mixed use activity i.e to say if there are three floors then each floor will have different activity. This is what creates problem. In most of the cases people have opted for the most feasible and economic activity and thus most of the areas are having either guest houses or hotels as these are not governed by the dwelling unit regulation. Other than this for guest houses 100 % of built up area is allowed. This is leading to encroachment on the service lanes or streets, which are generally used for parking. Not only hotels and guest houses, other activity that is generally economical and is prevalent is workshop, which are generally opened as workshop and then gradually converted into showrooms which in turn leads to traffic problems. Retail is also practiced but to a lesser extent because it is restricted on dwelling unit basis.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Images showing different activities being practiced on mixed use streets

Figure 14 Showroom/ lodge

Figure 15 Guest house

Figure 16 Retail

Figure 17 Showroom/ guest house Figure 20 Retail/ Hotel

Figure 18 Lodge

Figure 19 Hotel

Figure 21 Retail Figure 22 Retail

Figure 23 Mixed use street

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

IMPACTS/ ISSUES
CHAPTER 4

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi The importance of mixed use lies in the fact that it reduces the commuting distance and creates a self sufficient environment within a locality. But if we consider case of Delhi especially my study area then this basic fundamental of mixed use is missing. The reason is that only certain types of activities are practiced in the area leading to a number of issues. Thus there are many environmental and socio-economic impacts of mixed use. Thus the major issues/ impacts are as under: CONCEPT OF MIXED USE: The major impact is on the concept of mixed use that is been effected. In most of the stretches as studied similar type of activity or activities are repeated along the stretch, leading to its failure. The area that should have been self sufficient because of different activities within its vicinity is becoming almost monotonous with similar activities going on over there. This is because people have the tendency to opt for the most economical type of activity. The activity that leads to a handsome income includes retail, guest house, banquet hall, showrooms, hotels etc. The major activity that is prevalent is guest house. This is somewhat dependent on conversion charges. Both these activities are under- other activity category of mixed use regulation. Now, If we consider a 100 sqm area, then annual charges for different types of uses in different areas are as under: For MCD areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 2 3 Retail Shops Other Activities Professional activities Rates in Rs for 100 sqm. built up area A&B C&D E, F & G 76,700 38,300 19,200 51,100 25,600 12,800 19,200 9,600 4,800

For NDMC areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional activities

Rates in Rs for 100 sqm. built up area 1,53,400 76,600 38,400

If we consider a 100 sqm area, then one time mixed use charges for different types of uses in different areas are as under: For MCD areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional Rates in Rs for 100 sqm. built up area A&B C&D E,F&G 6,13,600 4,08,800 1,53,600 3,06,400 2,04,800 76,800 1,53,600 1,02,400 38,400

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi For NDMC areas S.No. Type of mixed use 1 Retail Shops 2 Other Activities 3 Professional activities

Rates in Rs for 100 sqm. built up area 12,27,200 6,12,800 3,07,200

This shows that the charges for professional activities are minimum, for other activities its almost double of professional activity and for retail shops its almost four times of the professional activity. Thus for any area, the most preferred activity would have been professional one. But professional activity means service based on professional skills, thus for a person who does not belong to any of those professional skills the most preferred activity is the second one i.e to say other activity. Now the other activity includes school, nursing home, banks, guest houses, fitness centre, coaching centre and banquet hall. Among these guest houses and banquet hall are the most return generating activities. Thus they are practiced more. The favourable condition for guest house is that 100% built up area is permitted for it. The conversion charges are responsible for less retail activities, except in certain areas. The amount charged for retail activity is just double compared to other activity. SERVICES: Another impact of the kind of practice of mixed use prevailing in Delhi is on services. Services or public utilities are the basic requirement of any area. Mixed use has increased the load on the existing services. If we consider any new area to be planned as mixed use then its feasible as we will plan the services likewise but for an existing area like Delhi, if we declare any area as mixed use then more expenditure is required to be done such that the networks can be made feasible for mixed use. But if we look at the present scenario most of the areas that were declared under mixed use are using the same services and hardly any changes are done. These services include- water supply, sewage and electricity. If we consider the case where there were three houses and now in place of those three dwelling units, there is either a guest house or hotel or any other activity which is in any case including more number of users than the earlier ones that were there when the street was residential. Thus the consumption of water and electricity will increase. This increase in demand will lead to increase in supply for which expenditure on the relative infrastructure is required which is exactly not happening. This can lead to chaos. Along with this load on sewerage system will increase and it will be more than for which it has been planned and because of this system needs redesigning and if it is not done then it can lead to unhygienic conditions. Thus it is directly affecting the supply chain. Now the question is what will happen if the supply chain is broken or gets broken somehow? Then who will pay for the loss, owner or the authority. The loss will have to be paid by the residents of the area only as they will suffer because of it.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi OVERCROWDING: Another major issue is of overcrowding. As we know that different permissible uses for any mixed use street are dependent on ROW of the street, if we talk about the network, then the streets are generally not widened after declaring them as mixed use streets and with increase in the number of users automatically the area becomes more crowded. Now this mixed use leads to increase in number of vehicles to certain extent but as road widening does not takes place by declaring the street as mixed use street thus it leads to traffic congestion. In the areas where guest houses are, the parking is done on the street, thus reducing the width of the road. As per the regulations parking needs to be made as per standards but it is shown while taking approval but not implemented on site. This is because no check is done after the approval from planning department has been taken. The showrooms are more problematic areas as parking is required by them most of the times and they are actually responsible for creating traffic problems. Other than this the streets are already planned streets and entry to any area is restricted. This is also a factor that is responsible for overcrowding of the streets. Thus the increase in parking demand, restricted axes, stagnant width of the road, leads to the overcrowding. POLLUTION: As per mixed use policy, with the provision of mixed use in an area pollution can be reduced but if we consider the surveys then they are different from these. As per Air quality monitoring, emission inventory and source apportionment study for Indian cities, December 2010, conducted by CPCB, the concentration of pollutants in mixed use area has increased which is exactly opposite to what is mentioned in the policy for mixed use as per MPD 2021. Noise is a major problem for mixed use streets. Due to provision of mixed use, the area that was earlier residential gets converted into either commercial or professional or in some other activity. Because of this the area becomes noisy as compared to that when it was only residential due to change of activity. Thus proper buffers should have been provided to reduce the ill-effects caused by the change but as such instead of planting trees (that too in some areas, as land) nothing has been done. LAND VALUE: Generally with the effect of mixed use, the land value of an area increases as the area that was residential earlier can be used for other activities as well, but the manner in which mixed use is practiced can lead to degradation of land value as land value is also dependent on the services provided in an area and if the services are not taken into consideration with the change then it can lead to their shortage and thus can degrade the land value.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

INTERVENTIONS
CHAPTER 5

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi The planning and execution department should work in co-ordination. The planning/ registration department should ensure that similar activities are not repeated on particular stretch so that mixed use can be achieved. The execution department should keep a check on that whatever was proposed is executed and nothing else. The regulations on which different activities are allowed are based on ROW of the streets and they are generally not related with each other. There is also no regulation on the limit of any activity in a particular area that leads to repetition of economically feasible activities on a stretch. Thus there should be a control or regulation on the amount of any activity that is allowed in an area or it should be done on the basis of activity regulation on area basis that is to say for a particular area or length of the street, the number of any retail/ professional or other activity should be limited. It is natural that everybody will look for the most economically feasible option for their dwelling unit, thus certain more options such as hospitals, schools; etc could be included in the list so as to have a variety of activities along with economic growth of the owners in a particular stretch. Other alternative can be limiting the number and years for particular activities and then after the completion of time, rotation of the activities can be done, such that all the users of the particular stretch are benefitted in some or the other way as it is not at all feasible that only certain users gain profit. It can either be done on a lottery/ draw basis or randomly with certain condition that activity that was existing in a particular dwelling unit cannot be repeated. The conversion charges should be used to provide proper utility in the area. If required they can be increased. The charges are general for the type of activities especially retail. If possible they should be made more specific. It should be done in such a way that the activities that are less income earning should be having less charges and vice versa. Other than this the activity whose percentage needs to be increased on any particular stretch should have less conversion charge compared to others. Focus on redesigning of services should be done so as to save the society from chaos and unhygienic condition. These services are the basic requirements and it should be framed as per the modification done. Parking should be built as per norms. Adequate check should be done whether parking has been made as per norm or not. If possible alternative provision for parking should be done near mixed use street before declaring it as mixed use street. This can help in reducing the parking problem. If possible alternate axes should be provided such that it reduces the congestion problem. If not then atleast vehicular and pedestrian movement needs to be segregated. Necessary measures should be taken to reduce pollution. As for noise pollution, barriers or buffers either physical or landscape should be provided so as to reduce it. Page 37

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Most of the existing mixed use streets are becoming commercial thus restrictions should be applied before they completely become commercial. There were earlier examples also that were made commercial from mixed use as Ring Road (NDSE I & II), Bhisham Pitamah Marg (Defence Colony), Kalkaji Main Road between Block G & H and E & F, Road between Govind Puri & Govind Puri Extn.

The way mixed use has been implemented is leading to urban decay of the city. Mixed use facility is allowed so that the society is benefitted, but the way in which it is going is leading towards a question that-for whom is this mixed use? Is it for the benefit of the authorities who are collecting amount in the name of conversion charge and the facility provided is almost nil or is it for the benefit of individuals, who got an opportunity to make money by starting different activities. To my mind, mixed use should be for the benefit of the society and this is what it has been planned for. All this happens because there is a lack of co-ordination between different authorities that are responsible for planning and execution. Misuse of the mixed land use policy is leading to all the problems. Thus the regulations need to be modified so as to receive proper benefit from the mixed use areas. Delhi has been a combination of mixed use areas as well as segregated uses. Thus careful redevelopment of the areas in which mixed use has been allowed needs to be done. Along with this user friendly guidelines needs to be formulated for these areas. The concept of mixed use has been successful in many areas of the World and can be of great help for Delhi as well if implemented with care. Proper infrastructure development so as to support mixed use development is required and the misuse of the regulations that is taking place needs to be checked.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

REFERENCES

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi AUTHORITIES

Master Plan Delhi 2021 Delhi development authority Municipal corporation of Delhi
WEBSITES AND BOOKS

www.dda.org.in www.mcdonline.gov.in www.delhi-masterplan.com http://mpd2021.blogspot.com/ http://www.wikipedia.org/ http://www.icsc.org/srch/lib/Mixed-use_Definition.pdf http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed-use_development http://www.communityplanningpays.com/Mixed_Use_Public_Privat e.pdf http://www.kircherresearch.com/Lifestyle-2.pdf - page 2 http://delhi-architecture.weebly.com/delhi-city-in-conflict.html http://www.theteamwork.com/articles/2016-1503-categoriesresidential-colonies-properties-delhi.html Mixed use development in town centres, North Shore City Encouraging mixed use in practice by Jill Grant, 2004, page 2-7, 9 Socio-spatial differentiation and residential segregation in Delhi: a question of scale, by Veronique Dupont, page 157-162, Urban Geography-A global perspective by Michael Pacione, Second edition, 2005

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

ANNEXUES

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

ANNEXURE 1- MIXED USE STREETS IN DIFFERENT ZONES


Zone A & part C (Walled City) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Chandni Chowk road ( 100 ft R/W) Netaji Subhash Marg (80 ft. R/W) Ansari Road (60 ft. R/W) Khari Baoli (80 ft. R/W) Naya Bazar Road (80 ft. R/W) Shardanand Marg (80 ft. R/W) Ajmeri Gate Bazar (60 ft. R/W) Church Mission Road (60 ft. R/W) S.P.M. Marg (120 ft. R/W) H.C Sen Road (100 ft. R/W) Ajmeri Gate Road Bazar Sita Ram, Gali Kucha Pati Ram, Gali Arya Samaj, Gali Kali Masjid, Gali Katra Anikhan. Bazar Dilli Darwaza Netaji Subhash Marg, Sir Syed Ahmad Marg, Gali Kuncha Chalan, Gali Pataudi House, Gali Kala Mehal. Gali Churiwalan Chawri Bazar, Bazar Matia Mahal, Sita Ram Bazar, Gali Pandit Prem Narainh Ajmeri Gate Road, Fasil Road, Gali Shah Tara, Gali Kucha Pandit, Gali Sahaganj Farashkhana Road, Lal Kuan Bazar. Farash Khana Road, Samosa Wali Gali, Fasil Road, Naya Bans Road, Bazar Khari Baoli, Katra Dariyan Road, Gali Batashawali, Gali Kucha Nawab. Netaji Subhash Marg, Dayanand Road, Ansari Road Katra Bariyan Road, Lal Kuan Road, Gali Ballimaran, Gali Kashim Jaan, Chawri Bazar, Nai Sarak, Chandni Chowk. Nai Sarak, Chandni Chowk Esplanade Road, Dariba Kalan Bazar Gulian, Chawri Bazar, Chatta Shahji, Gali Khajoor, Gali Katra Kushal Rai, Gali Anar Wali, Kinari Bazar, Maliwara Road. Chandni Chowk, Katra neel, Church Mission Road, Katra Natwar Area. H.C. Sen Road, Chandni Chowk Bara Bazar Road.

20. 21. 22.

Zone-A (Other than Walled City): Name of the Street Stretch 1. Rani Jhansi Road (Azad From crossing with Gaushalla Road to Filmistan (on Market Chowk to Filmistan) East side).

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 2. Qutab Road (Singhara Chowk From junction near Sr. Sec. School Sadar Bazar to to Pul Mithai) Pul Mithai and Western side of the road. 3. Sadar Thana Road Sadar Thana to Phoota Road 4. Idgah Road Singhara Chowk to crossing with Sadar Thana Road (On North side of the Road) 5. Azad Market Road Azad Market Road to Pul Mithai 6. Chamelian Road From crossing with Rani Jhansi Road to junction with Maharaja Agarsain Marg. 7. Maharaja Agarsain Marg From junction with Rani Jhansi road to crossing with Qutab road (Sadar Bazar). 8. Main Phaharganj Road From junction with Chemsford Road to Ram Krishna Ashram. 9. Desh Bandhu Gupta Road Paharganj Police Station crossing to opposite Shiela Cinema. 10.Rajguru Road (Guruwala Junction with Desh Bandhu Gupta Road to junction Road) with Main Bazar Pahar Ganj Road. 11.Nehru Bazar Road From junction with Punchkuin road to junction with main Paharganj Bazar Road

Zone B Name of the Street 1. Desh Bandhu Gupta Road Stretch From X-ing with Faiz Road to the X-ing with proposed 30 mt. Road (road No. 4 in the layout plan). 2. Bank Street From X-ing with Faiz Road to X-ing with Ram Krishan Marg. 3. Hardhyan Singh Road -do4. Arya Samaj road From X-ing with Faiz road to X-ing with proposed 30 mt. Wide road (Road No. 4 in the layout plan). 5. Padam Singh Road From X-ing with Satbravan Girls School Road to Xing with Gurdwara Road. 6. New Rohtak Road (South From X-ing with Faiz Road to junction with Joshi Side) Road. 7. Road No. 4 (proposed 30 mt. From X-ing with D.B. Gupta to junction with Wide road)(East side) Padam Singh Road. 8. New Pusa Road From junction with D.B. Gupta Road to junction with Tank Road. 9. Ram Krishan Dass Marg From junction with D.B. Gupta Road to junction with Road No. 31 of the layout plan. 10.Vishnu Mandir Marg From junction with D.B. Gupta Road No. 31 of the layout plan. 11. Saraswati Marg From junction with D.B. Gupta Road to junction 2010-11 Page 43

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi with Arya Samaj Road. 12. Ajmal Khan Road From junction with Tank Road to junction with Pusa Lane. 13. Gurdwara Road From junction with D.B. Gupta Road to junction with Padam Singh Marg. 14. Laxmi Dawar Marg From junction with Arya Samaj road to junction with Pusa Lane. 15. Abdul Aziz Road From junction with Bank Street to junction with Arya Samaj Road. 16. Krishna Dass Marg From junction with D.B.Gupta road to junction with Arya Samaj Road. 17. Satbharavn Arya Girls From junction with Arya Samaj Road to junction School Marg (West Side) with Pusa Lane. 18. Joshi Road From junction with New Rohtak Road to junction with D.B. Gupta Road. 19. Abdul Rehman Road From junction with D.B. Gupta Road to junction with Arya Samaj Road. 20. Hahi Baksh Marg -do21. Faiz road (West Side) -do-

Zone C: S.No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Total Name of road Roshanara Road G.T.Road (Part) Shakti Marg (Nagia Park round about) Satyawati Road Mandella Road Kohlapur Road Malkaganj road Length in Km, 1.00 2.18 0.32 0.15 0.06 0.06 0.88 4.08km

Zone D: i) Category I a. Bungalow areas b. Jor Bagh c. Chanakyapuri/Malcha Marg. d. Sunder Nagar e. Hazrat Nizamuddin (East and West) f. Jangpura Extension 2010-11 Page 44

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi g. Government Colonies h. Villages located in the Ridge Area. ii) Category II a. Temple road, Bhogal b. Shahi Hospital Raod, Bhogal c. Central Road, Bhogal d. Masjid road, Bhogal e. Gurdwara Road, Lajpat Nagar IV f. New Delhi South Extension Part I Service Road, along Ring Road g. Main Road (24m wide) between Block O & K, Lajpat Nagar-II) h. Central Market and Lajpat Nagar-II i. Alankar Cinema Road/Pushpa Market road (Lajpat Nagar) j. Bisham Pitamah Road (Defence Colony) k. In addition, shop plots forming part of an approved layout of the Competent Authority.

Zone - E: S.No 1. 2. 3. 4. Name of the road/Street Main Road Gandhi Nagar Main Vikas Marg Vijay Chowk Road Nagar Main Road). Patparganj Road Stretch Identified From Marginal Bund to Jheel Bus Terminal. From Marginal Bund to Patparganj Road. (Laxmi From Vikas Marg to Patparganj Road

5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 2010-11

From Jheel Bus terminal to Madhudban Railway Crossing excluding the GHBS and Rehabilitation colonies. Road No. 57 From G.T. Railway Line to Parvan Road excluding CGHS and facility Centres. Bhola Nath Nagar Road From Road No. 57 to Babu Ram School. Mandir Marg Road From Raghunath Mandir to Road No. 57 Road No. 35A From Vikas Marg to Mother Dairy excluding bridge area and Mother Dairy Plant. 60 ft. wide road From Teliwara to Babu Ram School. Proposed Master Plan road No. From Road No. 66 to Ghonda Chowk. 67 in Maujpur area. Loni Road From G.T. Road to Road No. 68. G.T. Road From Rahu Cinema to Loni Road. Road No.66 From G.T,. Road to Road No. 68 on Western side only. Brahmpuri Main Road From Ghonda Chowk to New Seelampur Page 45

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Market Road. Yamuna Vihar Road From Ghonda Chowk to DTC Depot.. 60 ft. wide road Balbir Nagar From Eastern Yamuna Canal to G.T.Road (Babur Pur Road). 100 Ft. Road No. 68 From Eastern Yamuna Canal upto Railway level crossing. Wazirabad Road From Marginal Bund upto Yamuna Vihar Scheme (On South side only).

15. 16. 17. 18.

Zone F: a) b) c) d) e) New Delhi South Ext. Part-II (Portion fronting on Ring Road). Kalkaji Main Road (between Block G & H and E &F). Malviya Nagar (Main Market Road). Road between Govindpuri and Govindpuri Extension. Shop-plots, forming part of an approved layout plan of the competent authority.

Zone G a) Main Najafgarh Road from Laxman Sylvania, New Moti Nagar Chowk to Outer Ring Road Crossing i.e. Ganesh Nagar. b) Between Kirti Nagar Maya Puri Chowk to Kirti Nagar Patel Nagar Chowk. c) Lajwanti Garden Chowk to Nangal Raya. d) Subhash Nagar to Din Dayal Upadhyaya Hospital. e) Tilak Nagar Chowk to Nagal Raya Fly over i.e. Jail Road. f) H-Block, Bali Nagar Najafgarh Road to B-Block, Bali Nagar.

Zone H S.No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Name of Road Road No. 43, Rani Bagh Main Bazar, Rishi Nagar Main Bazar (Road Rani Bagh) Main Road, Raja Park Main Road, Shastri Nagar Main Road, Tri Nagar Road No. 41, Rohini R.O.W. 200 ft. 50 ft,. 50 ft. 100 ft. 200 ft. 50% 45 mt. Remarks 90% being used as commercial. Fully commercial. -do80% being used as Commercial. 90% being used as commercial. 80% being used as commercial.

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

ANNEXURE 2- LIST OF PRE-1962 BUILT UP RESIDENTIAL AND REHABILITATION COLONIES


S.No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 2010-11 Colony name Aliganj Andha Mughal Balbir nagar Bharat Nagar B,K,Dutt colony Dilshad garden Gandhi Nagar Geeta colony Gulabi bagh Inderpuri Jangpura- A Jangpura-B Jangpura Extn. Jawahar Nagar Kalkaji Kamla Nagar Karol Bagh Kingway Camp Kirti Nagar Kishan Ganj Kishan Nagar Lajpat Nagar- I to IV Malka Ganj Malviya Nagar Mansarovar garden Model Basti Model Town Moti Nagar Multan Nagar Nanakpura Nicholson Marg New Rajinder Nagar Old Rajinder Nagar Outram Liines Patel Nagar (E) Patel Nagar (W) Patel Nagar (S) Pratap Nagar Prem Nagar Punjabi Bagh Rajouri Garden Rana Pratap Bagh Ramesh Nagar Ram Nagar Category E E G E F F E F E E D F D D C D D E D E E C F C D E D E D D D D D D F F F F E C D D D E Page 47

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Rohtas Nagar Roop Nagar Sarai Rohilla Shahdara Shakti Nagar Sheikh Sarai Shivaji Park Subhash Nagar Tilak Nagar Timak Pur Tihar- I & II Vinoba Puri Vijay Nagar G D E G D D F F E D G D D

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ANNEXURE 3- LIST OF COMMERCIAL STREETS, MIXED USE STREETS, PEDESTRIAN SHOPPING STREETS (ZONE F)
A. List of Mixed Use Streets MoUD, Govt. of India on 07.09.2006. i) New Delhi South Extn. Part-II (Portion fronting Ring Road) ii) Kalkaji Main Road (Between Block G & H and E & F) iii) Malviya Nagar (Main Market Road) iv) Road between Govindpuri and Govindpuri Extension. v) Shop-plots, forming part of an approved layout plan of the Competent Authority. B. Commercial Streets Notified vide corrigendum issued on 14.09.2006 by GNCTD. S.No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5 6 7 8 Name of Road/ street Kalka Devi Marg, Kalkaji Stretch of road from to Capt. Gour Marg to Sapna Red Light Main Road Garhi Raja Dhir Sen Marg to Kalka Devi Marg Main Road Kalka ji CGHS to Outer Ring Road Internal road Satya Niketan H. No. 93 to 141 (both side road) Benito Jaurez Marg (South From H. No. 18 to H. No. 299 campus road Satya Niketan) (one side) Internal road Satya Niketan H. No. 214 to H. No. 231 (Both side) Dheer Singh Marg 234-A to 18 Sant Nagar 60 wide Road Gautam Aurobindo Marg (Yusuf Nagar Sarai Mkt.) to SFS flat Gulmohar Enclave (both side) Dheer Singh Marg 234 to 252 Sant Nagar Maharishi Daya Nand Hostel Road Savitri Nagar to Marg, Malviya Nagar DDA flat Shivalik Road R.O.W. 24. 9 to 15 18.00 9.0 24 9 18 18

9 10

24 24

Mixed Use Streets S.No. Name of Road/ street 1. Raja Shir Sen marg 2. 3. 4. 5 6 2010-11 E.P.D.P. Road Road from EPDP (CR Park) Chitranjan Park/Kalka Ji Chitranjan Park/Kalka Ji Road in Kalka ji

Stretch of road from to Capt. Gour Marg to Kallu Mohalla E.P.D.P Road E.P.D.P. Road to CGHS From K-17 to Ravi Dass Marg K-13B to Ravi Dass Marg From F-17 to F-26 Kalka ji

R.O.W. 24 24 13.5 18 18 13.5 Page 49

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Road in Kalka ji Road in Kalka ji Road in Kalka ji Ring Road Peripheral Road Malviya Nagar Khirki Approach Road at Malviya Nagar Geetanjali Road From Arya Samaj Mandir to A476 Double Storey Qrs. From M-7 to Ravi Dass Marg A-120D/S to E.P.D.P Road E-1 to E-27 Defence Colony From F-Block round about to Cremation Ground Maharishi Daya Nand Marg to M.C. School, Khirki Front of Shivalik A & B Blocks & Malviya Nagar, Begumpur From Lala Lajpat Raj Marg to Raja Dheer Sen Marg 234 to 287 252 to 220 H. No. 201 to Gurudwara 13.5 13.5 13.5 63 13.5 18 24

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24

East of Kailash between E & F Block Sant Nagar Internal Road Sant Nagar Internal Road 30 Wide Road, Gautam Nagar 30 Wide Road, Gautam South Cafe to Sudershan Road Nagar Internal road Satya Niketan From H. No. 147 to H. No. 282 (Both side) 60 wide Raod Gautam Gautam Nagar Culvert to Nagar boundary of National Chest institute (one side) Road connecting PVR road Road connecting PVR road & & Mandir Marg Mandir Marg Africa Avenue Marg A-2/1, Safdarjung Enclave to Harsukh Marg Lala Lajpat Rai Marg A-53, Kailash Colony to Blue Bells Public School Malviya Nagar (Main Entire stretch market road)

24 9 9 9 9 9 18

24 45 30 18

C. Commercial Streets notified on 15.09.2006 by GNCTD S.No. 1. 2. Name of Road/ street D-Block NDSE Part II Okhla Road (Maulana Mohd. Ali Road) Stretch of road from to H. No. D-8 to D-15 NDSE-II Mathura Road to Okhla Canal R.O.W. 63.84 30.00

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 3. 4. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2010-11 Jagdmba Road, Tughlakabad Road No. 13 to Gali No. 32 Extn. Road No. 13, Tughlakabad TA-95/01 to TA-326 Pkt-8 Extn Gali No. 24, Tughlakabad House No. RZ-2001 to RZExtn. 503 Road in Dakshin Puri H. No. 1/1 to 1/470 Dakshin Puri Kallu Mohalla Road Amrit Kallu Mohalla Road Puri Main Badarpur Market Main Badarpur Market Badarpur Internal Road Mochi Gaon From H. No. 15. to peripheral Road, Mochi Gaon 20 wide road at Village Hauz Khas Village Main Hauz Khas Market Road 20 wide road Yusuf Sarai 80 wide road to Safdarjung Hospital Boundary Internal Road Munirka H. No. 92/1 to 111B Village Kalka Das Marg Mehrauli Senior Secondary School Qutub to Andheria More Hauz Rani Village along From H. No. 268 to Pump parks road House Peripheral road to Basant H. No. 80/4 to 81 & 76 to 89 Village 40 Wide Main Internal Village entrance to IIT Village Road of Jia Sarai boundary wall Canara Bank Street, H.No. 62/6 to Outer Ring Munirka Village Road Zamroodpur Village 87-A to 78-A Nandi Vithi Marg at Madhur Milan Banquet Hall Zamroodpur to 87/3, Jamroodpur Harsukh Marg B-7, Safdarjuung Enclave to Arjun Nagar Nallah Madangir Village Road From Dispensary to Arya Samaj Park Internal Road/Dakshin Puri From Gali No. 5 DDA flat to Gali No. 42, DDA flat, Madangir Internal road 30 Dakshin Nirankari Bhawan Block no. Puri 10 to Dakshinpuri Road Internal road 30 Dakshin Drbal Nath Mandir to Pulia 9.00 24.00 6.00 13.50 9.00 9.00 9 to 13.5 6 6 6 6 to 16 9 9 12.5 12.5 13.5 24 24 9 9 9 9 Page 51

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Puri Nelson Mandela Road B-Block Road Dakshin Puri Shiv Shakti Market Road Madangir Central Market Road, Madangir Road between F & G I Block, Madangir Outer Ring Road Munirika Village Aurobindo Marg Aurobindo Marg Adhchini Village 521 Bus Stand Road Gurudwara Road Chandrawal Road, Dakshinpuri Dakshinpuri Road (Balmiki Marg) Virat Cinema Road (Raja Ram Marg) Mehrauli-Mahipalpur Road at DSIDC H. No. E-249 to B-249 Munirka From Indira Virat Auto Market to C Block Mkt. Bhumia Chowk, Madangir to Gurdwara T-point virat road Sweet Palace Madangir to Shivanand Vidyalaya In front of Shiv Shakti Madangir to B/W of DDA flat H. No. M-37 to Nelson Mandela Marg Ansari Nagar to Red Light of Kaushalya Park NCERT boundary to M.C. Primary School Adhchini From D-Block, Dakshinpuri to J-Block, Dakshinpuri B-1, Madangir to Nallah Road, Madangir Mahila Mangal A Block Dakshinpuri to M.B. Road From Pushpa Bhawan to M.B. Road T-Point of Virat Cinema to Road No. 13 a) Mahipalpur Chowk to Road Mata Chowk b) Masoodpur Village stretch

25 26 27

30 9 9

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

30 45 45 60 45-60 18 18 24 24 24 60

Mixed use streets S.No. Name of Road/ street 1. Ring Road Lajpat Nagar-IV 2. 3. 4. 5 Main Road (Zakir Nagar) Masih Garh Sukhdev Vihar Road Okhla Bazar Road Okhla Bazar Road Okhla

Stretch of road from to H.No. 1 to 2 Batla House to NFC ABlock Masih Garh Church to Sukhdev Vihar Road Okhla Nehar to Tikona Park Batla House to Juice Corner

R.O.W. 63.84 10.64 9 7.6 6

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Outer Ring Road from EPDP Road to Petrol Pump Gali No. 12 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 19 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 22 Tughlakabad Extn Tehkhand Village Road Mathura Road Internal Road Laxmi Market Munirika Village Old M.B. Road Lado Sarai Outer Ring Road from EPDP Road to Petrol Pump H.No. RZ-9/73 to 9/43 Sub Station to RZ-353 House No. RZ-338 to RZ- 378 House No. 107 to T-74 Sarita Vihar to Badarpur Border H. No. 62/6 to A-91 64 6 6 6 18 45 6 10 9 18

16 17 18 19 20 21

Anuvarat Marg to M.B. Road Chirag Delhi Peripheral road From H. No. 553 to Chirag Delhi Nallah Hostel Road, Sheikh Sarai From Maharishi Daya Nand Savitri Nagar Marg to Flat no. 1, Sheikh Sarai Ph-I Maharishi Daya Nand Marg From Outer Ring Road to Outer Malviya Nagar Ring Road Chirag Delhi Main Road From H. no. 553 to Outer Ring Road Africa Avenue Marg A-2/1, Safdarjung Enclave to Jhandu Singh Marg Road from Block No. 3 to From Nallah to Block No. 7 Park Block No. 7 Dakshinpuri Dr. Ambedkar Marg Pushpa Bhawan to M.B. Road Khanpur Dr. Ambedkar Marg From Gurudwara to DDA Complex

24 24 45 18 45 9 to 13.5

Pedestrian shopping streets S.No. Name of Road/ street Stretch of road from to 1. Madhyay Marg Tughlaka House No. RZ-169/1 to RZBad Extn 465/138 Tugalakabad Extn. 2. 3. 4. Gali No. 1 Tughlakabad H. No. TA-20 to RZ-177/1 Extn. Gali No. 2 Tughlakabad H. No. TA-11 to TA-30/2 Extn. Gali No. 3 Tughlakabad H. No. RZ-1/45D to TA-44/3 Extn.

R.O.W. 5 4 4 4

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Gali No. 4 Tughlakabad Extn. Gali No. 5 Tughlakabad Extn. Gali No. 6 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 8/9 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 10 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 11 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 13 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 21 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 23 Tughlakabad Extn Gali No. 25 Tughlakabad Extn Road in Dakshin Puri Road in Dakshin Puri Road in Dakshin Puri Road in Dakshin Puri Main Road Harkesh Nagar Ready made wali gali Mehrauli Doodh Wali Gali Mehrauli Internal Road Village Shahpur Jat Village H. No. RZ-1/5 to RZ-1/25 H. No. RZ-21/5 to 160/5 H. No. RZ-16D to RZ-35A/6 H. No. RZ-63 to RZ-64 H. No. RZ-80F to rZ-93/10 H. No. RZ-9/20 to RZ-11 H. No. RZ-306 to RZ-4128 H. No. RZ-379 to 2540 H No. RZ-1069 to RZ-401 H. No. RZ-1912 to Masjid 4 5 5 6 6 5 5 5.5 5.5 5.5 5 4.5 5 5 13.5 2 3 4.5 5 5 5 5

H. No. 14/41 to 14/50 H. No.1/20 to 1/450 H. No. 1/469 to 1/449 H. No. 14/467 to 15/496 H. No. G-1 to H-84 Kalka Dass Marg to Pawan Footwear Kalka Dass Marg to A.K. Vaid Munirka Babulal Chowk to 205-A/1 M.C. Primary School to Peripheral Road Pubjabi Mohalla to Nandi Vithi Marg Campa Cola factory (Phrni Road ) to old M.B. Road Hanuman Temple (Phirni Road ) to old M.B. Road

Zamroodpur Village Bank Wali Gali, Lado Sarai Chatri Kuan Wali Gali, Lado Sarai

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Notified Mixed use Streets being declared as Commercial Streets S.No. Name of Road/ street Stretch of road from to 1. Ring Road (NDSE I & II) AIIMS Xing to Xing of Defence Colony 2. 3. 4. Bhisham Pitamah Marg.(Defence Colony) Kalkaji Main Road between Block G & H and E & F Road between Govind Puri & Govind Puri Extn. Sewa Ngr. Rly. Xing to Ring Road Xing Road between Block G & H and E & F Kalkaji Entire Stretch

R.O.W. 63

30 24 24

D Commercial Streets notified on 12.04.2007 by GNCTD S.No. 1. 2. 3. 4. Name of Road/ street Malviya Nagar Masjid Moth Village Internal Road Partap Market, Munirka Village Internal Road Baba Gangnath Market to Outer Ring Road, Munirka Village Old Post Office Road Ward1 Mehrauli Stretch of road from to Block No. 90/36-B to 90/60 Lila Ram Market H. No. 205-E/1 to 92-H H. No. 211-C to Outer Ring Road R.O.W. 13.5 12 9 9

Shiv Mandir Subzi Mandi to Kalka Dass Marg Mehruali

Mixed use Streets S.No. Name of Road/ street 1. Batla House Jamia Co.Op. Road 2. Ramesh Market, Garhi Village 3. Sant Nagar Mkt. lane 4. Nehru Mkt. Badarpur 5 Gidwani Marg Lajpat Nagar-IV 6 Main Road Dividing Amar Colony and Daya Nand Colony from the back of Ring Road Banglow upto Sapna Crossing 7 Gurudwara Road at Malviya Nagar 2010-11

Stretch of road from to H. No. A-8, H. no. F-12 H. No. 198/53., 198/15-C H. No. 430/4, 327 Mathura Road NTPC wall Nalla Block No. 7 ODS Cap. Gaur Marg Sapna Crossing Back of Ring road Old Double storey Lajpat Nagar-IV

R.O.W. 13.5 6 9 9 10.5 18

Nil Block 24-A to H15/1 to E2/16 (Malviya Nagar)

13.5

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 8 Gautam Nagar Gate No. 4 to 5 internal Road abutting property no. H-66 Gautam Nagar Munirka H. No. F-205 to H. No. 138/11 13.5

9 10

11

12 13 14

Internal Road Village Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg at Mother dairy to BSES office Village Katwaria Sarai (One Katwaria Sarai Side only) Subhash Camp Road Block No. 7, Dakshinpuri Extn. to P.S. Ambedkar Nagar Road behind ITI at Malviya Block No. 90/36 to Nil 75 Nagar Malviya Nagar Guru Gobind Singh Marg From Batra Medicos to Malviya Nagar Round about (Bus Terminals) Desu Road at Mehrauli Pyau to Bhagwati Hospital

7 30

13.5 15 6.5

Pedestrian shopping Streets S.No. Name of Road/ street 1. Bharat Nagar 2. Bharat Nagar 3. Saria Julliana app. 4. Gali No. 1 Tughlkabad Extn. TA Block 5 Gali No. 2, Tughlkabad Extn. TA Block 6 Gali No. 3 Tughlakabad Extn. TA Block 7 Gali No. 4, Tughlkabad Extn. 8 Gali No. 17, Tughlkabad Extn.

Stretch of road from to H. No. I-A to H. No. 81/1- A H. No. 85-C to H. No. 74 H. No. -2/21 to H. No. 2/10 RD-13, TA-93/01 to 198/1 RD-13, TA-112 to TA-174/3 RD-13, TA-105 to TA-202

R.O.W. 4.5-6 4.5-6 4.5-6 5 5 5.5

RD-13, TA-126 to TA-235 306/17 to 190B/17

5 5

Mixed use Streets S.No. Name of Road/ street Stretch of road from to 1. Sarai Julliana app. Zakir H. No. 2/1 to H. N. 79 Bagh 2. Internal Road at Arjun H. No. 14A to 80 Nagar 3. Internal Road at Arjun H. No. 104 to 113F Nagar 2010-11

R.O.W. 4.5-6 5 5

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi 4. 5 Internal Road at Arjun 49B to 185 Nagar Internal Road at Mehrauli Kalka Dass Marg to Bhai Mati Dass Co-operative Thrift and Credit Society Ltd. Approach Road to ward 2 & Desu Road to House No. Ward 3 at Mehrauli 128/2 (Shiv Mahalaxmi Store) Hauz Khas Village Internal H. No. 9A to 24/1 Road of Hauz Khas Hauz Khas Village Internal H. No. 12-B to 24/1 Road of Hauz Khas Northern side Internal Road, Gautam Street No. 4 Gurjar Dairy Nagar (Gautam Nagar) Internal Road Munirka H. No. 205-A/1 to 249-F Village Internal Road Munirka H. No. 249-G to 249-E Village (Upto Nelson Mandela Marg) Internal Road Baba H. No. 92-E/1 to H. No. 109 Gangnath Market (Munirka Village) Chatri Wali Gali Mini Subzi Mandi Road to Kalka Market at Mehrauli Dass Marg 4.5 5.5

4.5

7 8 9 10 11

4.5 2 4.5 4 4

12

13

2.9

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

ANNEXURE 4- CATEGORIES OF RESIDENTIAL COLONIES IN DELHI


(Sourcehttp://www.theteamwork.com/articles/2016-1503-categories-residential-coloniesproperties-delhi.html)

Category A Anand Niketan Basant Lok DDA Complex Bhikaji Cama Place Friends Colony Friends Colony East Friends Colony West Kalindi Colony Lodi Road Industrial Area Maharani Bagh Nehru Place New Friends Colony Panchshila Park Rajendra Place Shanti Niketan Sunder Nagar Vasant Vihar Category B Anand Lok Andrews Ganj Defence Colony Greater Kailash-I Greater Kailash-II Greater Kailash-III Greater Kailash-IV Green Park Gulmohar Park Hamdard Nagar Hauz Khas Maurice Nagar Neeti Bagh Nizamuddin East Pamposh Enclave Panchsheel Park Safdarjang Enclave Sarvapriya Vihar Sarvodaya Enclave 2010-11 Page 58

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Category C Alaknanda Chittaranjan Park Civil Lines East of Kailash East Patel Nagar Jhandewalan Area Kailash Hill Kalkaji Lajpat Nagar-I Lajpat Nagar-II Lajpat Nagar-III Lajpat Nagar-IV Malviya Nagar Masjid Moth DDA Flats Munirka DDA Flats Nizamuddin West Panchsheel Extension Punjabi Bagh Som Vihar Vasant Kunj Category D Anand Vihar Daryaganj Dwarka East End Apartments Gagan Vihar Hudson Line Indraprastha Extension Janakpuri Jangpura-A Jangpura Extension Jasola Vihar Karol Bagh Kirti Nagar Mayur Vihar New Rajinder Nagar Old Rajinder Nagar Rajouri Garden

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi Category E Chandni Chowk East End Enclave Gagan Vihar Extension Hauz Qazi Jama Masjid Kashmere Gate Khirki Extension Madhuban Enclave Mahavir Nagar Moti Nagar Pahar Ganj Pandav Nagar Rohini Sarai Rihilla Category F Anand Parbat Arjun Nagar Daya Basti Dilshad Colony Dishad Garden BR Amdedkar Colony Ganesh Nagar Govindpuri Hari Nagar Jangpura-B Madhu Vihar Majnu Ka Tila Mukheree Park Extension Nand Nagri Uttam Nagar Zakir Nagar (Okhla) Category G Ambedkar Nagar (Jahangirpuri) Amdedkar Nagar (East Delhi) Amber Vihar Dabri Extension Dakshinpuri Dashrath Puri Hari Nagar Extension Vivek Vihar Phase-I Tagore Garden Category H Sultanpur Majra 2010-11 Page 60

Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi

ANNEXURE 5- PERMISSION OF SELECTED USE PREMISES IN USE ZONES RD, C1, C2, M, PS
S.No RD 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Use premises RD Residential Residential plot - Plotted Housing Residential plot - Group Housing Residence - cum - Work Plot Foreign mission Hostel / Old age home Guest House, Boarding and Lodging House Dharamshala and its equivalent Community Hall / Barat Ghar Night Shelter Community / Recreational Hall, Library, Reading Room, Society Office, Crche and Day Care Centre Commercial Local Level (Convenience / Local shopping centre) Cinema / Multiplexes Service markets / Informal Bazaars Wholesale Trade Storage, godown and warehousing, cold storage & Ice factory, gas godown. Recreational Recreational (Park, Play grounds, Swimming Pool)/ Sports Complex/ Stadium/Amusement parks/ Recreational Clubs etc. Industry Industrial plot, flatted group industry Service centre & Service industry Transportation Circulation (Road network with street furniture, Bus terminal, MRTS stations, Parking etc. Bus depot & Workshop Government Local / Government maintenance Offices Offices of utility services providing agencies Public and semi public facilities Hospital (upto 100 beds) Primary Health Centre/Family Welfare Centre/ Maternity Home/dispensary etc. Nursing Home/poly clinic/clinic/clinical laboratory etc Dispensary for pet and animals P P P P P P P P P P C1 P** P P P P P P P P P Use zone C2 M NP NP NP NP P P NP NP P P NP NP NP NP P NP NP NP P P

PS NP P NP NP P P P P P P

C 1 2 3 4 5

P NP P NP NP

P P P P NP

P P P P P

P P* P NP P

P NP NP NP NP

M 1 2 T 1 2 G 1 2 PS 1 2 3 4

NP NP

NP P

NP P

P P

NP NP

P NP

P NP

P NP

P P

P NP

P P

P P

P P

P P

P P

P P P P

P P P P

NP NP NP P

NP P P* P

P P P P

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Importance and impacts of mixed land use in Delhi


5 6 7 Primary school / Middle school School for Mentally / Physically Challenged Technical Training centre (ITI / Polytechnic/Vocational/ Training Institute/ Management institute/Teacher Training Institute, etc.) Facilities - Bus terminal, taxi stand, milk / vegetable booths, religious premises, vending booth, petrol / CNG filling pump, recreational club, police post, police station, fire station, post office, & telegraph office and telephone exchange. P P P NP NP P NP NP NP NP NP NP P P P

P : Permitted P*: Permitted only in Commercial Centres NP: Not PermittedP**: Special permission as per Mixed use / Special Area Regulations

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