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COURSE SYLLABUS (DRAFT as of 2-13-12) COURSE TITLE: LOCATION: DATES: TIME: CMSI 295 Summer Autism Institute DoubleTree

Hotel, South Burlington, VT June 25 - 29, 2012 8:15 am - 5:30 pm Patricia A. Prelock, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

COURSE COORDINATOR: OFFICE:

College of Nursing and Health Sciences 105 Rowell Building 106 Carrigan Drive Burlington, VT 05405 (802) 656-2529 (voice mail) (802) 656-2191(fax) patricia.prelock@uvm.edu

E-MAIL:

COURSE INSTRUCTOR: Patricia A. Prelock, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Dean, College of Nursing and Health Sciences Professor, Department of Communication Sciences GUEST INSTRUCTORS: Catherine Lord, Ph.D. Rebecca Landa, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Founder & Director, Kennedy Kriegers Center for Autism & Related Disorders Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences John Hopkins School of Medicine Stephen Shore, Ed.D. Assistant Professor, Special Education Adelphi University, NYC Trisha Self, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Associate Professor, Communication Sciences & Disorders Wichita State University Wichita, KS Linda Watson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP Professor, Division of Speech & Hearing Sciences University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill 1

COURSE SUMMARY: This course is offered as a one-week intensive session featuring international, national, regional and local experts in autism & other developmental disabilities. It is open to community teams and the families they serve in Vermont and interdisciplinary teams across the New England area. Participants represent several disciplines, including speech-language pathologists, special educators, general educators, medical professionals, family members, administrators, early interventionists, paraprofessionals, occupational therapists, physical therapists, psychologists, child care service providers, and community resource parents. The content emphasizes best practices in early identification and early intervention, and evidence-based interventions for providing parent training, insuring inclusive practices and preparing for lifespan needs. The primary goals will be to: 1) discuss the significance of early screening for children presenting with symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) & identify ASD specific screening tools that can be given by health and education professionals; 2) identify targeted, early intervention strategies for children presenting with ASD; and, 3) define key instructional strategies designed to address ASD core deficits across the lifespan. The specific content focus and educational objectives for each day of the course are listed in the course outline. REQUIRED READINGS: Readings are listed for each day on the course outline. These readings can be found on the UVM blackboard site under CMSI 295 Summer Autism Institute. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: 1. Attendance & Facilitated Discussions. Attendance for the entire five days of the course and participation in the facilitated discussions is required of all students. At the end of the presentations by the national experts, time has been set aside for participants to form 4-5 groups (of no more than 6-8 individuals) and engage in discussions in response to targeted questions posed on the course outline. Each group should assign a facilitator to lead the group through the questions ensuring full participation of all participants, a recorder who will take notes that reflect the discussion of the team and address the questions that were posed, and a time keeper to make sure the group completes the task in the time allotted. Each group member is to sign the notes representing the group's reflections on the questions. Each of the day's reflections are worth 4 points (x5 days) for a total of 20 points. Group notes will be submitted to the course instructor at the end of each facilitated discussion. NOTE: additional roles can be assignedsee handout on meeting roles

2. Journal Article Review. Because of the intensive nature of the course, required readings will be assigned for each day. Students are expected to read all of the assigned readings. In addition, each student is expected to select the readings from one of the 5 days and will critically review these readings and respond to the questions listed below. These readings or links to them can be found on Blackboard. To facilitate your critical reflection on what has been read, the following questions should be addressed in your review: a. In what way does this information expand your knowledge of the receptive & expressive language (4 pts.), cognitive communication (2 pts.), social aspects of communication (2 pts.)& communication modalities (2 pts.) challenges and needs of individuals affected by autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (10 points) b. Based on your current views of individuals and their families affected by ASD and what is known about best practice for this population, describe how the information you read supports or refutes your current beliefs and what is known about best practice for this population in the areas of receptive & expressive language (4 pts.), cognitive communication (2 pts.), social aspects of communication (2 pts.) & communication modalities (2 pts.). (10 points) c. Explain how you will apply the knowledge you gained from reading the articles that ensures your collaboration with school and family team members to accommodate and support the receptive & expressive language (4 pts.), cognitive communication (2 pts.), social aspects of communication (2 pts.) & communication modalities (2 pts.) needs of individuals affected by ASD. (10 points) The article review should be typed and be no more than two pages in length. It is worth a total of 30 points and is due on or before Friday, June 29. See the explanation of receptive & expressive language, cognitive communication, social aspects of communication and communication modalities attached at the end of the syllabus. Learning Goals: 1) Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the etiologies and characteristics of receptive/expressive language, cognitive communication, social aspects of communication & communication modalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (ASHA Standard III-C). 2) Students will possess knowledge of methods of prevention, assessment, & intervention for communication disorders in individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-D). 3) Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze, synthesize & evaluate information regarding methods of prevention, assessment, & intervention for communication disorders in individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-D).

4) Students will demonstrate knowledge of research & integration into evidence-based clinical practice for individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-F). Indicator of Achievement: Students will achieve the learning goals above & obtain at least 26 of the total 30 points for these assignments. 3. Applied Assignment. Students may collaborate on this assignment, where appropriate, with team members who are also taking the class. If individual students are taking the course, they are welcome to join a team, although they can complete the applied assignment independently. The applied assignment is designed to give students an opportunity to share the information they have learned with their community through an inservice training so that the knowledge base of all providers and families affected by ASD or other neurodevelopmental disabilities can be expanded. An outline of the inservice training plan with relevant materials should be submitted to the course coordinator on or before July 16. The following components should be included: a. A statement of purpose (4 pts.) for the inservice training with educational objectives (4 pts.) listed. (8 points) b. Description of the content to be covered with justification, including literature support for the focus of the training, specifically emphasizing needs in the areas of receptive & expressive language (6 pts.), cognitive communication (3 pts.), social aspects of communication (3pts.) & communication modalities (3 pts.). (15 points) c. Teaching strategies which will be used to facilitate and ensure adult learning. (5 points) d. Copy of the handouts (6 pts.) that will be provided, including a reference list or relevant bibliography (4 pts.). (10 points) e. Copy of the evaluation tool that will be used to assess the effectiveness of the training. (7 points) f. Follow-up plans for supporting the ongoing learning of staff in your community in the area of ASD (5 points) If an inservice training is not the most effective way for students who are participating in the course to exchange information with their community, then an alternative applied assignment can be negotiated. This could take many forms, including developing a screening protocol for all students in your program to ensure early identification and intervention; designing a parent training protocol to support families and children affected by ASD; identifying appropriate strategies for children with ASD in inclusive classrooms; designing a training program for paraprofessionals who are supporting the needs of children with ASD; etc. The applied assignment is worth a total of 50 points. Undergraduate students who are registered for the course should talk with the course coordinator to determine an appropriate applied assignment. The applied assignment for undergraduate students is worth 20 points instead of 50 points. Learning Goals: 1) Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the nature of receptive/expressive language, cognitive communication, social aspects of 4

communication & communication modalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (ASHA Standard III-C). 2) Students will demonstrate an understanding of ways to disseminate information, communicate effectively and collaborate around issues affecting children with ASD, their families and the professionals who serve them (ASHA Standard IV-G). Indicator of Achievement: Students will achieve the learning goals above & obtain at least 42 of the total 50 points for graduate students & 17 out of 20 points for undergraduate students. 4. Pre- and Post-Assessment. All participants taking the course are required to complete a pre-assessment of their knowledge in the assessment and intervention of children with ASD, and to establish individual goals for enhancing their knowledge throughout the week. This pre-assessment will be completed on Monday, June 25, during the scheduled time for facilitated discussions and should be given to the assigned facilitators. All participants are also required to complete a postassessment of their knowledge in the assessment and intervention of children with ASD, and to evaluate the effectiveness with which they met their individual goals for the week. This post-assessment will be completed on Friday, June 29, during the scheduled time for facilitated discussions. NOTE: Any student who has a disability that may prevent him/her from fully demonstrating his/her abilities should contact the course instructor no later than the second day of class so we can discuss accommodations necessary to ensure full participation and facilitate your educational opportunity. ASSIGNMENTS: Attendance & Facilitated Discussions Article Review Applied Assignment TOTAL GRADING: Graduate Students Graduate 20 pts. 30 pts. 50 pts. _______ 100 pts. Undergraduate 20 pts. 30 pts. 20 pts ________ 70 pts.

Undergraduate Students (undergraduate credit) A AB+ B BC F 65-70 points 63-64 points 62-61 points 60-59 points 56-58 points 54-55 points 52-53 points 49-51 points 42-48 points 5 A AB+ B BC+ C CD

94-100 points 93-90 points 89-87 points 86-84 points 83-80 points 79-75 points below 75 points

41 points or below COURSE OUTLINE: MONDAY, JUNE 25: (Pending)

Educational Objectives: As a result of this session, participants will be able to:

(ASHA Standards III-C & III-D; VT Standard 1: Learning, Principle #1; VT Standard 2: Professional Knowledge, Principles #4, 5, 6, & 7) Instructor: Catherine Lord, Ph.D.

Required Reading for MONDAY, JUNE 25: Pending

Recommended Readings for MONDAY, JUNE 25:

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion on MONDAY (3:30 - 5:30): 1. 2. DUE: Team Reflections Pre-assessment & Goal Setting

TUESDAY, JUNE 26:

Early Achievements: An intervention model for improving social, language, play, and cognitive outcomes in toddlers with ASD

This class session will provide an overview of the Early Achievements model, which is designed to improve social, language, play, and cognitive outcomes in toddlers and preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The model also targets pre-literacy skill development. The intervention ingredients of Early Achievements will be defined and illustrated using video examples. Data supporting the evidence base for this intervention model will be presented. Educational Objectives: As a result of this session, participants will be able to: 1. 2. Define three major intervention targets that address core deficits of ASD. Define three important ingredients (instructional strategies) for early intervention designed to address ASD core deficits. 6

3.

List three children's books to adapt for intervention use with very young children with ASD Rebecca Landa, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Founder & Director, Kennedy Kriegers Center for Autism & Related Disorders Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences John Hopkins School of Medicine

Instructors:

Required Readings: 1. Landa RJ, Holman K, ONeill A, Stuart E. (2011). Intervention Targeting Development of Socially Synchronous Engagement in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 52 (1), 13-21. PMCID:21126245 Rogers SJ, Vismara LA. Evidence based comprehensive treatments for early autism. J Clin Child and Adol Psychol. 2008; 37(1):8-38 Pierce-Jordan, S. & Lifter, K. (2005). The interaction of social and play behaviors in preschoolers with and without pervasive developmental disorders. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 25 (1), 34-47.

2. 3.

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion on TUESDAY (3:30 - 5:30): 1. Identify 3 major intervention targets that address the core deficits of autism for a child you currently support. 2. Describe 3 instructional strategies you would employ as part of early intervention for a child with ASD and explain why. 3. Bring one childrens book to class and adapt it to use for intervention with a young child with ASD. DUE: Team Reflections

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27:

Obstacles into opportunities: Turning away from closed doors and opening up new ones for promoting life-long success for people with autism

Going against conventional wisdom, this presentation examines how deficits and challenges so pervasively attributed to autism can be reframed as strengths. Employing an autobiographical structure combined with audience participatory experiences of what having autism may be like, participants in this class session will come away with practical solutions for considering characteristics of autism as potential springboards to success in education from preschool to post graduate, employment, effective selfadvocacy, meaningful engagement in the community as building blocks for leading a fulfilling and productive life. Educational Objectives: As a result of this session, participants will be able to: 1. List at least three situations where a deficit can become a strength. 7

2. Describe how strengths can be used to navigate around challenges. 3. Explain how decisions can be made to avoid areas of challenge while still leading a fulfilling and productive life. 4. Describe importance of people with autism understanding themselves as a key factor in success. 5. Describe how one challenge experienced during autism simulation activities will inform your work in supporting individuals with autism. Instructor: Stephen Shore, Ed.D. Assistant Professor, Special Education Adelphi University, NYC

Required Readings: Shore, S. (2003). Life on and slightly to the right of the autism spectrum: A personal account. Exceptional Parent, 10 (3), 83-90. Shore, S. (2011, Summer). Effective self-advocacy for people with sensory issues. S. I. Focus Magazine, 18-23. Questions to consider during facilitated discussion for WEDNESDAY (3:30 5:30) 1. 2. 3. Describe 3 instances where strengths can be used to navigate through challenges. Why is it important that individuals with ASD understand their strengths and challenges? Describe one challenge you experienced during the autism simulation activities and how will that experience support your work with individuals with autism. Team Reflections

DUE:

THURSDAY, JUNE 28:

Whos Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders? The Role Allied Health & Education Professionals Play in Early Detection & Intervention

There is evidence documenting that children are not being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) early enough. Even with increased awareness, many children are not properly diagnosed until years after the symptoms common to ASD have emerged. In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement urging physicians to screen all children for ASD during regular wellchild visits at age 18 and 24 months, respectively. Reports indicate, however, that many physicians do not screen children even when parents insist that something is not right with their childs development. This is unfortunate, as there is a good deal of evidence documenting the positive effects early intervention and education have on children presenting with ASD. Consequently, there is a need for other qualified allied 8

health and education professionals to become more active in screening and referring children who present with symptoms of ASD. This class session will discuss the importance of early detection and intervention for children presenting with characteristics of ASD. Screening, assessment, and referral strategies used by an interdisciplinary ASD screening team will be presented. Finally, early intervention strategies for children with ASD and their families will be discussed. Educational Objectives: As a result of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Discuss the significance of early screening for children presenting with symptoms of autism spectrum disorders. 2. Determine allied health and education professionals role in screening for ASD. 3. Identify ASD-specific screening tools. 4. Describe an interdisciplinary team approach used to screen and assess for ASD. 5. Describe targeted, early intervention strategies for children presenting with ASD. Instructor: Trisha L. Self, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Associate Professor, Communication Sciences & Disorders Wichita State University Wichita, KS

Required Readings: Ozonoff, S., Young, G.S., Carter, A., Messinger, D., Yirmiya, N., Zwaigenbaum, L., Bryson, S., Carver, L.J., Constantino, J.N., Dobkins, K., Hutman, T., Iverson, J.M., Landa, R., Roger, S.J., Sigman, M., & Stone, W.L. (2011). Recurrence risk for autism spectrum disorders: A baby siblings research consortium study. Pediatrics. Advance on-line publication, doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-2825. Self, T., Coufal, K.L., & Parham, D.F. (2010). Allied health care providers role in screening for autism spectrum disorders. The Journal of Allied Health, 39(3), 165174. Questions to consider during facilitated discussion for THURSDAY (3:30 - 5:30) 1. What is the role of allied health providers and educational providers when screening for ASD? 2. What would be one ASD-specific screening tool you would use and why? 3. How can an interdisciplinary team best be used to screen and assess for ASD? DUE: Team Reflections 9

FRIDAY, JUNE 29

Research and Practice in Early Autism Identification and Intervention: Travels on a TwoWay Street

This class session will discuss the implications of research for improving early identification and early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and the implications of practice issues for research. Research has provided tools that make it possible to identify toddlers at-risk for ASD at much younger ages than is common in current practice, but many practitioners encounter barriers to using the available tools. Similarly, intervention research continues to provide empirical support for various approaches to early intervention for children with ASD, but practitioners frequently find that there is a mismatch between empirically supported interventions and policies, funding, and family life realities that impact their services. This presentation will cover research findings that can be applied to practice, and also will engage attendees in considering how community practitioners and academic researchers can partner more effectively to improve community services for young children with ASD and their families. Educational Objectives: As a result of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Identify at least two screening tools appropriate for identifying toddlers who are at increased risk for an eventual diagnosis of ASD 2. Interpret screening results appropriately and explain the results to parents with clarity and sensitivity 3. Apply information on pivotal social-communication skills to recommend goals for toddlers at-risk for ASD and preschoolers diagnosed with ASD Select strategies for teaching/scaffolding social-communication skills in 4. young children with ASD served in home or classroom settings Instructor: Linda Watson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP Professor, Division of Speech & Hearing Sciences University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Required Readings: Reznick, S., Baranek, G. T., Reavis, S., Watson, L. R. & Crais, E. R. (2007). A parent-report instrument for identifying one-year-olds at risk for an eventual diagnosis of autism: The First Year Inventory. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37, 1691-1710. Dykstra, J. R., Boyd, B. A., Watson, L. R., Crais, E. R., & Baranek, G. T. (in press). The impact of the Advancing Social-communication and Play (ASAP) intervention on preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder. Autism: The International Journal of Research and Practice. (28 manuscript pages) doi:10.1177/1362361311408933 10

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion for FRIDAY (3:30 - 5:30) 1. How would you apply information on pivotal social-communication skills to recommend goals for toddlers at-risk for ASD and preschoolers diagnosed with ASD 2. Describe three strategies you would use to scaffold social-communication skills in young children with ASD served in home or classroom settings DUE: Team Reflections Post Assessment Journal Article Review July 16, 2011

FINAL ASSIGNMENT DUE:

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STUDENTS ARE REMINDED OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONTS COMMON GROUND FOR BEHAVIOR AS A STUDENT IN A COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS

Our Common Ground


The University of Vermont is an educationally purposeful community seeking to prepare students to live in a diverse and changing world. We who work, live, study, teach, do research, conduct business or participate in the University of Vermont are members of this community. As members, we believe in the transforming power of education and agree to help create and foster an environment where we can discover and reach our true potential. We aspire to be a community that values:

Respect: We respect each other. We listen to each other, encourage each other and care about each other. We are strengthened by our diverse perspectives. Integrity: We value fairness, straightforward conduct, adherence to the facts and sincerity. We acknowledge when things have not turned out the way we had hoped. As stewards of the University of Vermont, we are honest and ethical in all responsibilities entrusted to us. Innovation: We want to be at the forefront of change and believe that the best way to lead is to learn from our successes and mistakes and continue to grow. We are forward-looking and break new ground in addressing important community and societal needs. Openness: We encourage the open exchange of information and ideas from all quarters of the community. We believe that through collaboration and participation, each of us has an important role in determining the direction and well-being of our community. Justice: As a just community, we unite against all forms of injustice, including, but not limited to, racism. We reject bigotry, oppression, degradation and harassment, and we challenge injustice toward any member of our community. Responsibility: We are personally and collectively responsible for our words and deeds. We stand together to uphold our common ground.

Academic Integrity Code: Students are encouraged to review the academic integrity code described on the UVM Dean of Students website (effective July 1, 2009). Copy and paste the link below into your browser (Internet Explorer): http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/acadintegrity.pdf Students will be responsible for understanding the four standards of academic integrity and will be fully accountable for these: plagiarism, fabrication, collusion, and cheating. Violations of this code will be reported to the Academic Integrity Council and appropriate consequences will be determined. 12

As part of the Unit Faculty for the University of Vermont that prepares speechlanguage pathologist, teachers, and counselors as educators in school settings, the following conceptual framework is shared across educators at UVM to ensure quality learning and teaching:

Conceptual Framework
The heart and mind of programs
Unit faculty at the University of Vermont aspire to prepare a committed reflective practitioner, instructional leader and change agent, collaborating with other professionals to make a positive difference in schools and in the lives of all learners.

Through Reflective learning and practice, the UVM prepared educator is grounded in . . .

Constructivism
Knowledge is socially constructed through dialogue and community-based practice (constructivism).

Collaboration
Teachers and other school professionals work collaboratively to problem-solve with stakeholders (collaboration, inter-professional practice, reflective practice, excellence).

Human development & empowerment


Education facilitates development of human potential (developmentally appropriate practice, strengths perspective, empowerment).

Inclusion
All students can learn and have value in their communities (inclusion).

Multiculturalism/culturally responsible pedagogy


Learning communities demonstrate respect for and honor diversity; pursue knowledge and affirmation of our diverse cultures (multiculturalism, culturally responsive pedagogy, equity).

Equity & justice


Education should advance social justice and democracy (equity).

. . . and meets these standards - KSD Standards for Beginning Teachers and Others School Professionals in Initial Programs
Demonstrates content knowledge and skills Understands learners and differences Understands learning Translates curriculum into instruction Creates equitable, inclusive learning environments Assesses student learning Practices culturally responsive pedagogy Demonstrates collaborative and interpersonal skills Engages in reflective practice Integrates technology Acts consistently with the belief that all students can learn Engages in self-directed learning and professional development for growth

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Faculty beliefs have shaped their professional commitments that are expressed in Outcome Statements for Candidates. The professional educator in initial preparation programs at The University of Vermont . . .
1. Knows content/subject matter, understands connectedness with other disciplines, and translates curriculum into materials and instructional strategies appropriate for subject matter and learners. (Critical Thinker) 2. Understands all learners as individuals, in the context of families and social groups, and uses standards based instruction to create equitable safe and supportive learning environments that promote acceptance and belonging. (Problem Solver) 3. Understands learning and ways of evaluating and enhancing it, including through the application of technology. (Instructional Leader) 4. Knows social, cultural, historical, legal and philosophical context of schools in a democracy and practices equitable and culturally responsive pedagogy appropriate for subject matter and learners. (Reflective Practitioner) 5. Can create inclusive learning environments which meet diverse learning needs, incorporate and reflect all learners experiences, and facilitate students learning, including about their own biases and understandings. (Reflective Practitioner/Change Agent) 6. Demonstrates effective collaborative and interpersonal skills in problem-solving with students, families, colleagues and related professionals. (Interprofessional Practitioner) 7. Engages in professional development and continually examines own assumptions, beliefs and values. (Reflective Practitioner)

8. Demonstrates the belief that all


students can learn and that they can take responsibility for their own learning; demonstrates high expectations for all students and takes responsibility for helping them aspire to high levels of learning. (Student Advocate)

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JOURNAL ARTICLE REVIEW FORMAT


(CMSI 295 Summer Autism Institute) NAME: ___________________ TITLE & AUTHOR OF ARTICLE/CHAPTER REVIEWED: DATE: __________

1.

In what way does this information expand your knowledge of the receptive & expressive language (4 pts.), cognitive communication(2 pts.), social aspects of communication (2 pts.)& communication modalities (2 pts.) challenges and needs of children affected by autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (10 points)

2. Based on your current views of children and families affected by ASD and what is known about best practice for this population, describe how the information you read supports or refutes your current beliefs and what is known about best practice for this population in the areas of receptive & expressive language (4 pts.), cognitive communication (2 pts.), social aspects of communication (2 pts.) & communication modalities (2 pts.). (10 points)

3.

Explain how you will apply the knowledge you gained from reading the article/chapter as you collaborate with team members (which includes families) to accommodate and support the receptive & expressive language (4 pts.), cognitive communication (2 pts.), social aspects of communication (2 pts.) & communication modalities (2 pts.) needs of children affected by ASD. (10 points)

TOTAL POINTS: ___/30 points

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

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APPLIED ASSIGNMENT: INSERVICE TRAINING


(CMSI 295 Summer Autism Institute) NAME: ___________________ DATE: __________

1) A statement of purpose (4 pts.) for the inservice training with educational objectives (4 pts.) listed. (8 points)

2) Description of the content to be covered with justification, including literature or research support for the focus of the training, specifically emphasizing needs in the areas of receptive/expressive language (6 pts.), cognitive communication (3 pts.), social aspects of communication(3pts.) & communication modalities (3 pts.). (15 points)

3) Teaching strategies, which will be used to facilitate and ensure adult learning. (5 points)

4) Copy of the handouts (6 pts.) that will be provided, including a reference list or relevant bibliography (4 pts.). (10 points)

5) Copy of the evaluation tool that will be used to assess the effectiveness of the training. (7 points)

6)

Follow-up plans for supporting the ongoing learning of staff in your community in the area of ASD (5 points)

TOTAL POINTS: ___/50 points

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ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Definitions of Terms used in Preparation for Answering the Questions in Article Review COGNITIVE COMMUNICATION=>generally refers to attention, working memory, organizational skills, problem-solving; overall the thinking skills involved in communicating, learning and interacting Cognition comprises of thinking skills such as; attention, memory, orientation, and higher level executive functions such as; reasoning, problem solving, planning and decision making. Characteristics associated with cognitive-communication impairments include: Confusion and disorientation Confused language Poor concentration Inability to maintain topic of conversation Reduced recognition of people and places Trouble learning new tasks or motor activities Inappropriate behavior Confabulation Lack of awareness of difficulties Lack of cohesive organization of thoughts & topics Retrieved from: www.speechlanguagelearning.com/cog.html SOCIAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATION=>ability to engage in reciprocal (back-and-forth) communication or conversation; understanding & using social conventions; turn-taking; appropriate use of gestures, eye contact, body posture and facial expression in social situations; initiating, sustaining and terminating topics of conversation appropriately; etc. Some challenges in social aspects of communication might include: Non-typical social behaviors which affect a person's ability to participate in a conversation Maintaining somebody elses topic of conversation Atypical interest in or perseveration on a chosen topic Limited awareness of the breakdowns in communication & the effect those breakdowns might have on a listener COMMUNICATION MODALITIES=>are WAYS in which communication is transferred from one partner to another; verbal communication is a modality - as is gestural and written communication. Sign language is a modality that uses gestures to communicate. Picture exchanges, used for communicative purposes, are a modality. There are many augmentative or alternative forms of communication, and these are all modes; "talkers" that use synthesized speech, "talking" picture boards, etc. are all modes of communication. So if you have a child with autism who is verbal, their communication modality is verbal. If they use sign language or picture exchange that would be their communication modality. Any way that a thought or idea is coded into symbols, exchanged with another person, and de-coded so a response can be formulated is a communication modality. RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE=>understanding spoken, written and/or gestural language use; relates to listening and comprehending oral, written and/or gestural communication EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE=>using spoken, written and/or gestural language; relates to the sounds, works, sentences and discourse involved in speaking and/or writing & other communication systems used to communicate a message 17

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