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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Twin Dragon Martial Art Schools

Tae kwon-do Syllabus

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Welcome!
As an instructor in TaeKwon-Do I am frequently asked by my students questions about their training. For example questions about the patterns such as What move comes after this.? and questions on the interpretation. Other questions I am asked revolve mainly about what students need to know for their next grading. Over the years various handouts have been given to students a couple of weeks before each grading which were soon forgotten about and lost after the grading itself. Hence the reason for this folder. It contains information about what you need to know for your gradings from White belt to Black Belt. As such it is to be used as a complement to regular training. It is intended only as a memory refresher to the concepts and techniques learnt in class. This will be of particular benefit to the beginner who is unsure about exactly how to stand or what they need to do. Training in TaeKwon-Do will help your physical and mental growth. Physically you will become fitter, stronger and able to perform feats, which you only saw in films. Mentally you will grow in a variety of ways, even if you arent aware of it! You just need to look to the Tenents of TaeKwonDo from the Black Belt Oath. Modesty there are some very talented people who train in Martial Arts Leeds, but none of the really good ones them shout about it. Courtesy when training you are polite and friendly towards each other. Integrity showing the honesty towards yourself to self-assess your efforts. Being honest to yourself is not easy. Perseverance - the character needed to persevere and perfect a technique or action you couldnt do before is a rare quality, but not so rare in the Martial Arts. Self-Control not allowing yourself to lose your temper, showing control when sparring and adhering to the discipline side of training show self-control. Indomitable Spirit - Overcoming fears of confrontation and pushing yourself further than you thought you could go and not giving up shows you a lot about yourself. The instructors will let you know exactly what you need to know for each grade, all you have do is train regularly and keep an open mind. Have fun and Ill see you at Black Belt!

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Basic Tae Kwon-Do History


Tae Kwon-Do is the Korean Art of Self Defence and is the culmination of many styles of Martial Art, but the core techniques and philosophies date back over 2000 years throughout Koreas turbulent history. Tae means foot, Kwon means hand, and Do means way of. So Tae Kwon-Do means The Way of Hand and Foot. This name was invented by the founder of Tae Kwon-Do retired Major General Choi Hong Hi (9th Dan) in 1955. Tae Kwon-Do was developed from the Korean styles, such as Tae Kyon and Soo Bak, but it also has strong influences from Karate and even Western Boxing.

This is the National Flag of Korea. In the centre is the symbol of Ying Yang symbolising the opposite forces of the universe, Good and Bad, Lightness and Darkness etc. Surrounding the Ying Yang are the four Triagrams. These represent (in a clockwise direction from the upper right) Water, Earth, Fire and Heaven.

As can be seen from the map Korea is situated in the Far East. Korea is split into two regions North and South Korea. The entire size is 222,154 square kilometres, almost the same as the United Kingdom. About 70% of the territory is mountainous. As can be seen Korea is situated between China and Japan and therefore suffered regular invasions from both over its history along with internal wars between its three kingdoms, Silla, KoKuryo, and Bak Jai. These internal and external problems resulted in Korea having a strong interest in the Martial Arts and so it developed styles such as Tae Kyon. These styles were born about 2000 years ago and were practised and proven effective on the battlefield. However, when Japan invaded Korea in 1910 they imposed an oppressive regime including a ban on the practice of Martial Arts. Only in the rural areas could Tae Kyon be practised. Many Koreans left and travelled to various parts of the world, commonly to Japan, and so studied other styles of Martial Art. A Korean man called Choi Hong Hi was taught the ancient Korean arts by his schoolteacher, because Choi was so frail.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

During the occupation Choi travelled to Japan where he attained a high standard in Karate. On his return to Korea during the Korean War Choi Hong Hi taught the arts to his men in the 29th Infantry Division. This became extremely popular and effective. Many other Koreans also returned from China and Japan where they had picked up other styles from their native Korean disciplines. In 1955, due to his success within the Military, Choi was made the head of an official board concerned with the development of a unified Korean Martial Art. Korea was at the time very keen to return to Korean values and practices. Choi took techniques from Japanese Karate and combined them with techniques from the old Korean styles and so Tae Kwon-Do as we know it was born.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

The Basics
Rules of the Do-Jang
Always bow when entering or leaving the Do-Jang (training hall). Always ask permission before joining the class (if you are late). Always refer to the instructors as Sabum, Sir or Mr., and respect your fellow students. Always follow the instructors instructions. No running or shouting (unless instructed!) No eating, or smoking. Ensure that toe and finger nails are clipped and no jewellery worn to avoid injury. Ensure that Doboks (uniforms) are clean and pressed .

Black Belt Oath


As a dedicated student of the Martial Arts I will live by the principles of Black Belt: MODESTY COURTESY INTEGRITY PERSEVERANCE SELF CONTROL INDOMITABLE SPIRIT

Student Creed

I will develop myself in a positive manner and avoid anything that may reduce my mental growth or my physical health. I will develop self-discipline in order to bring out the best in myself and others. I will use what I learn in class constructively and defensively to help myself and my fellow human beings and never be abusive or offensive.

Belt Colour Meanings


WHITE YELLOW signifies innocence of the beginner who has no knowledge of Tae Kwon-Do. signifies the earth in which the seed of Tae Kwon-Do is planted as the foundation of TaeKwon-Do is laid. signifies the plants growth as the Tae Kwon-Do skills begin to develop. signifies the heavens towards which the plant matures into a towering tree. signifies danger cautioning the student to exercise control and the opponent to stay away. opposite to white and therefore signifies proficiency and maturity in Tae Kwon-Do Also signifies the wearers imperviousness to darkness and fear.

GREEN BLUE RED

BLACK

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do History and Rules


Twin Dragon Taekwondo is part of Black Belt Schools International, a worldwide organisation including the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Europe. BBSI is a non-style specific organisation which embraces all styles and groups. Far from diluting any one style, it makes everyone in the BBSI stronger through mutual co-operation and understanding. The Headquarters for the BBSI is in Doncaster and is one of the biggest Martial Art Organisations in the UK with 100s of schools nationwide. Twin Dragon Taekwondo practises the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF) style of Taekwondo (which is distinct from World Taekwondo Federation WTF). The club has a direct line from Master Rhee who first brought Tae Kwon-Do to the UK. Master Kim Stones who was trained under Master Rhee started the club in Leeds which was eventually taken over by Mr Paul Landreth-Smith (5th Dan) who runs Twin Dragon Martial Art Schools.

Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do rules


Students must be licenced through the BBSI Only Qualified BBSI Instructors may teach students. The Instructor hierarchy is as follows o Master Instructor o Chief Instructors o Club Instructors o Assistant Instructors Students must own a White Dobok. This must be worn at all Gradings and Taekwondo competition events Students may wear a Club Dobok (Black/Red) for training in classes and competing in BBSI events. Club T-shirts may be worn with dobok pants for training also. Students wishing to grade must hand in grading forms one week before the grading. For details of grading requirements see the appropriate section.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Common Stances
Within Tae Kwon-Do there are some basic techniques. These can be a little boring to practise but it is important that they are learnt well. These are the building blocks on which all the more complex and fun techniques are based. Much like a house will not stand if its foundations are poor, so a Martial Artist will not be much good if their basics are not well learnt. Some of the more traditional basics seem clumsy and impractical, and perhaps they are! However, they are an excellent training tool and help to develop strong muscles and co-ordination to assist with the more practical and realistic techniques. The most basic of the techniques are the Stances TaeKwon-Do has various stances or ways of standing on the floor. These are used primarily in the traditional line work and patterns but can be used in free forms, and to a certain extent sparring.

Attention Stance
this is performed when an instructor shouts Cheriot! Hands are placed straight down at the sides and the student stays perfectly still, chin up, eyes forward, abdominals tight, shoulders relaxed.

Ready Stance
this is one of the basic stances. Performed usually when the instructor shouts Jumbi! When performing this stance the student will Kiai. Weight is 50-50 on each foot, hands placed directly in front of the groin, fists clenched but relaxed. Note both feet face forwards, not splayed outwards.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Sitting Stance
weight distributed 50-50, feet parallel, one and one half shoulder widths apart, knees bent, but back straight and upright. Sometimes called horse stance because of the position of the legs. Prolonged time spent in this stance develops leg strength and muscle tone.

Walking Stance
here the feet are both facing forwards with the weight distributed 50%-50%. The stance is one shoulder width wide and approximately one and one half long. The front knee is bent so that the knee is over the foot and the back leg is locked out straight and braced.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

L-Stance
feet are placed in an L shape so that the front foot would just pass the back if it were pulled back. Weight distribution is 70% on the back leg and 30% on the front. This enables the front foot to be lifted quickly without a lot of posture change. This can be used to avoid attacks (leg sweeps) or to kick off the front leg. It is quite a narrow stance but is between one and one and one half shoulder widths long. Both knees are kept bent. Proper stance will mean that this will become painful on the rear leg if held for any length of time

Fixed Stance this is basically the same as L-Stance but is slightly longer (one and one half to two shoulder widths long and the weight distribution is 50%-50%. Another way to think about it is as being the same as sitting stance except one foot is turned at 90o

There are other stances, which need to be learnt on the road to Black Belt. These are infrequently used however and once the basic stances above are learnt, these others are easily absorbed. One more common stance is Fighting Stance. This stance has no set position, as it is a dynamic stance that changes along with the circumstances. It is also a matter of personal preference to the student how to stand when fighting (much as is how to hold their arms in a guard). As a rough guide however, a fighting stance would be roughly the same as an L-stance but a little wider and a little shorter. Weight would be 50%-50% and the rear foot turned slightly forwards. This gives a flexible stance, able to change direction easily and maintain balance. As a consequence it is the most commonly used stance for practical purposes.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Technical Points
Kiai
The Kiai is a loud shout made upon executing a technique. There are many explanations as to what a Kiai is. These range from the physical and scientific fact that the short, sharp explosive exhalation of breath tenses the abdominal muscles increasing power to the major muscle groups and preventing impacts from winding you. Any sports person knows this, just watch weight-lifters shout or tennis players grunt on a serve. More spiritual explanations say it is a focusing of the bodys life-force or shout from the soul. Whatever you believe (or dont!), the Kiai makes your techniques stronger and is a good way to perform correct breathing. A proper Kiai is a sound, which cannot be spelt and is best described as a grunting shout. Many people feel unsure about what they should say or feel a little silly so few people Kiai properly to begin with. Just look to the senior grades they felt just as silly at first too but now they just get on with it because they realise it makes sense.

Power
Power is generated in a combination of ways. We have already discussed the Kiai. Other methods are as follows: Reaction Force This is using another part of the body as an opposite force. For example to pull the other hand back to the waist when punching. Hip Twist a very important method of power generation. Hip twist is the secret to all power. Even punches should come from the hips using a whiplash effect to use the bodys momentum to transfer energy to the striking tool. Body Weight the subtle act of slightly dropping the bodyweight at the point of impact transfers some of that bodyweight through to the striking tool. Also it is important to position your bodyweight in the correct place as you strike. The heavier you are (or make yourself), the harder you can hit. Focus this is a little harder to grasp. In the Orient it is sometimes called Chi. Basically it is the act of concentrating on the task at hand and not worrying about if anybodys looking at you, or what youre going to eat later, or if youve remembered to set the video etc. With proper focus you can channel all your efforts into the technique and show greater power than you probably thought you could (see breaking section).

With a great deal of practice the TaeKwon-Do student can learn to instinctively combine all of the above elements. True power is fluid and almost effortless. Tensing up and trying to hit hard will probably mean that you have the opposite effect and your muscles work against each other making your techniques less powerful. Power is more in technique than physical size, but it takes time, be patient!

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Tae Kwon-Do Syllabus


The syllabus is really only a guide. Although there are specific requirements as to exactly what needs to be learnt for each grade, these are not absolute. Each student has their own personal abilities and their own personal preferences. Some students love performing patterns and will want to learn them to a high standard. Others will prefer the combative aspect of the Art. These personal traits will determine how far each student progresses in each discipline. The Martial Arts has many pieces to the pie and it is not necessary to excel in them all (in fact it is extremely difficult!). A good rule of thumb, however, is that whatever is in your grade pattern will need to be fully explored in each of the other disciplines.

Fitness
All classes have an element of physical activity, typically at the beginning of the class. This serves two purposes. Firstly it has the benefit of pushing the student to greater physical demands thus increasing their general fitness level. The Leeds instructors are well versed in training methods to promote aerobic fitness (to make you work longer) and resistance work (to make you stronger). Fitness goals set by the instructors are generally aimed at the students in the class who are the fittest in order to make them work. It must be stressed however, that individual students are equipped with a sophisticated selfdiagnostic system, which is able to tell them how much to do! It has taken Nature millions of years of evolution to develop this system so dont ignore it. If you feel pain or very out of breath then STOP! The instructors will never get annoyed and are more likely to be concerned and praise your common sense. This is especially important if you are a beginner. If the instructor shouts 20 press ups and you know you can only manage 5 then try for 6 but no more. Often the instructors will offer an alternative variation for those members not as fit or strong, for example, press up on knees rather than on feet. If, however, you are fit and trying to get out of working hard, then you are only cheating yourself. Remember the Black Belt Oath! Fitness is very important for sparring. It is usually the fitter student who will win a bout over the more technically skilful. Many times the talented but lazy student who can perform excellent technique with little effort will neglect their fitness training, preferring to stop and rest when it gets difficult. When sparring comes though, for the first minute this student will be a skilled fighter but as soon as they get tired they cannot lift their arms and legs and are easily beaten by the fitter opponent. The second benefit if to have a proper warm up. Physical activity is stressful on the body and particularly so in Martial Arts. It is vital therefore to warm up properly before taking part in a class. If you arrive late and have missed the class warm up then you must do some exercises on your own. One of the most important parts of the warm ups is the stretching. A lot of it you wont realise your doing because of the way the instructors do it Dynamic Stretching, but it is there and important. There is no specific test on fitness for each grade. Each student is expected to show a standard of fitness appropriate for their grade, which is necessary to perform all the techniques. As each person has a different personal ability, however, this will be adjusted for each student accordingly.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Flexibility
Obviously the ability to kick someone in the head requires flexibility, and everybody wants to be able to do the splits. It is not however necessary to be able to do the splits or be hyper-flexible to be able to do Tae Kwon-Do. It does, however, make things easier The four best ways to stretch are :1. Dynamic Stretching. This is the movement of the body part using the muscle being stretched. Each movement starts with a small movement and is gradually increased to the full range of movement. This is the best way to stretch at the start of the session because it gets the blood pumping to the muscles and gets the heart rate up. Examples are bouncing your leg over a partners arm or front leg raises. Static Active Stretching. This is where the body part is placed with a quick movement to a stretched position and held with the muscles in place. An example is to throw a front kick and hold it up. This works the muscles and increases muscle strength. It is a fact that flexible muscles are strong muscles and vice versa. This is best done after dynamic stretching. Static Passive Stretching. This is where the body is placed in a stretched position and held whilst trying to relax the muscles into the stretch. An example is to sit on the floor with legs apart and reaching forward. The stretched muscles are not under load, like in static active and so this stretch is best performed as a warm down after physical exercise. It should not be done as a warm up on its own as the muscle does not get warmed up and the heart rate is not increased. It is very good as a cool down however, and useful to purge lactic acid from the muscle fibres (so that your muscles dont ache the next day!). Isometric Stretching. This is very difficult but has tremendous results. The body part is placed in a position of stretch similar to a Static passive stretch e.g. the splits. The student then pushes the muscles in the opposite direction of the stretch (in the splits you would pinch the floor) for a period of a few seconds. The student then relaxes and will (should!) find that the stretch can be increased. The procedure is increased until the stretch cannot be increased where it is held for about 30 seconds. Using this method will produce the best gains in flexibility but should only be performed at the very end of a session due to the exhaustive nature of the stretch.

2.

3.

4.

Again there is no specific requirement of knowledge of stretching for the gradings. Students may be asked what different ways to stretch there are and when to do so.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Basic Routines
These are groups of exercises, which are performed in set pre-determined ways. They are learnt at beginner level but are continued and built upon in the higher grades, as they are a good warm up tool and exercise.

Kicking Routines
These are groups of exercises aimed at practising the basic kicks in a predetermined manner in line work. The routines are learned at beginner level, but are continued and built upon for higher grades. They are often used as part of the warm up in both classes and gradings. They help with muscle memory for basic combinations. The kicking routines are performed in fighting stance. The student performs a jab, a cross followed by a rear leg kick. They then turn 90 degrees and start again. Each set is performed four times so that the student finishes where they started. Beginners only have to learn the first three versions of the routine, but higher grades will need to be able to do all the routines both anti-clockwise and clockwise. The kicks are listed below in order.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Front Kick Round Kick Side Kick Axe Kick Hook Kick Spin Back Kick Spin Hook Kick

These routines again form part of the basic grading syllabus and will feature in all gradings.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Four Directional Punching


This is the first traditional exercise learnt by the TaeKwon-Do student. It is not a pattern but is required for the first grade from White to Orange belt. The basic exercise is the same but can be varied by turning the other way (clockwise instead of anti-clockwise) and using different blocks. Four Directional Punching No.1 Ready stance Left hand up in front, right hand on hip. Step right foot forwards into walking stance, obverse punch Turn anti-clockwise (left) 90o, walking stance, left low section outer forearm block Step right foot forwards into walking stance, obverse punch Turn anti-clockwise (left) 90o, walking stance, left low section outer forearm block Step right foot forwards into walking stance, obverse punch Turn anti-clockwise (left) 90o, walking stance, left low section outer forearm block Step right foot forwards into walking stance, obverse punch (Kiai) After a short pause, come to Ready stance facing the front and repeat but the other way Around (clockwise, left hand punches, right hand blocks). Four Directional Punching No.2 As for No.1 but with left middle section inner forearm block Four Directional Punching No.3 As for No.1 but with left high section outer forearm rising block. All punches are high section also (level with eyes).

Four Directional Blocking


This is similar to four directional punching but is one routine for blocks. It is the traditional blocking routine common to all ITF style Taekwondo clubs. Ready stance Right leg step back into walking stance, left knife hand low block Step forwards into right leg forwards walking stance, right inner forearm middle block Turn 90o left, step right leg back walking stance, left knife hand low block Step forwards into right leg forwards walking stance, right inner forearm middle block Turn 90o left, step right leg back walking stance, left knife hand low block Step forwards into right leg forwards walking stance, right inner forearm middle block Turn 90o left, step right leg back walking stance, left knife hand low block Step forwards into right leg forwards walking stance, right inner forearm middle block After a short pause, come to Ready stance facing the front and repeat but the opposite way.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus .One

Step Sparring

This is a semi-free form of sparring which is a very useful training tool and is learnt from Yellow Belt upwards forming an important part of training. Techniques from the patterns can be practised here on a partner and close quarter timing, distancing, and movement can be honed. These techniques can be directly transferred to Self-Defence (it is lot easier to defend against a swinging punch than a straight one!). Each partner stands at arms' length apart facing each other. One partner attacks using a front obverse punch into walking stance. The defender simultaneously defends and counters. Techniques should be appropriate for the grade with lower grades perfecting their distance, timing etc. and higher grades being more flamboyant and technical. As an addition higher grades will attack with front and turning kicks with suitable defences and counters. Many people think that they do not know what to do or how to go about developing 1-Step. Therefore below is a set of 1-Step routines for students to learn in addition to their freestyle 1-Step and as building blocks for their own routines.

All the below are from a right hand punch. 1. Step right leg back into walking stance with left middle section inner forearm block. Move right leg 45 degrees into sitting stance, right punch to head, left punch to chest, right punch to stomach. 2. Step forward 45 degrees with left leg into sitting stance making right outer forearm block, left punch to jaw, double punch to floating ribs. 3. Step left leg back into L-stance making knife hand guarding block. Grab arm and with right leg pressing kick to knee and side kick to ribs. 4. Step right leg back into L-stance making left scooping block. Grab arm and with left leg perform front snap kick to ribs, push partners punching arm to the side with left hand and ridgehand strike over the top with right hand. 5. Step left leg back into walking stance making right outer forearm middle block. Grab arm and step up foot to foot and perform right turning kick to sterum, place foot forward into walking stance and pull partners arm to hip whilst punching with left hand to head. 6. Step right leg back into walking stance with left inward moving forearm block. Perform back fist with left hand, right leg front snap kick to attackers rear leg and then retract back into walking stance. 7. Step right leg back into L-stance with left palm checking block. Right spin back kick, place foot down forward into L-stance and perform right knifehand strike. 8. Step forward 45 degrees with left leg into sitting stance with left palm block. Perform right inward knifehand strike to groin, right knifehand strike to neck, left punch to jaw, right punch to kidney. 9. Step left leg forward 45 degrees to sitting stance whilst performing right outer moving inner forearm block to wrist/forearm, left blade palm check to elbow and right centre line punch to side of head/neck. 10. Step forwards with right leg into walking stance whilst simultaneous right cross palm deflection to punch and left thrust palm to floating ribs. Shift body back into left L-stance with right knife hand strike to neck. Shift forwards into walkng stance with left punch to sternum with right hand up to right shoulder. Switch stance back to opposite walking stance with right upward hammer fist to groin.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Self Defence
In Self-Defence the format is similar to One Step sparring. However, the attacks can be any technique and come from any direction, e.g. a grab from behind. Techniques to defend and counter are more direct and not flamboyant. The primary aim of self-defence is not to get hurt. Firstly that means avoidance but if necessary it means doing just enough to ensure you can get away. The instructors at Twin Dragon are well versed in practical street fighting techniques and are able to give honest, realistic advice on how to react and deal with situations. Twin Dragon Martial Art Schools teach self defence around 4 types of situation

1. Environment Awareness This is discussed but not practised and is the everyday ability to sense where you are and see problems developing and not putting yourself in danger in the first place. E.g. dont go into a rough pub where fights are common, dont walk alone across a park at night. 2. Retreat This is again discussed but not practised. It is when you thought you were safe but in fact a situation is developing and you retreat. E.g. you go into a safe pub and there are non regular people in their looking for trouble. Leave before they start on you. 3. Break and Escape This is practised and is a range of simple techniques to break away from a half hearted assault (such as a drunken grope) and make your escape. Examples are breaks form wrist grabs, someone grabbing your clothing etc. 4. Combat This is the final type of self defence and must only be used in extreme circumstances where you have no other option but to fight. Techniques taught are brutal and destructive but effective.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Sparring
This is the sport side of TaeKwon-Do. It is an opportunity to test your ability against an opponent within the framework of rules and a referee. Protective equipment is mandatory and includes hand, footpads, headguard, groin guard, shin protectors and mouth guard. Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do enjoys a good reputation as being a safe place to spar. Techniques are all to be aimed above the belt with the target areas being the torso, the kidneys, not the back, and the head. Points are awarded as 1 point for a hand technique, 2 points for a body kick and 3 points for a head kick. Due to the scoring system the sparring tends to be flamboyant with lots of high kicks. The object however is not to get hit so a good defence is a priority.

Points Sparring
There are two referees, one to mirror the other. Opponents spar until one person scores on the other. The referee will then stop the bout, identify the technique and award points. The first person to 10 points or the person with the most points at the end of the round wins.

Light Continuous Sparring


There is one referee but 4 corner judges. Opponents spar for typically 1.5mins while the judges look on and note scoring techniques. The referee is mainly responsible for controlling the fighters and making sure that the rules are followed and ensuring their safety. At the end of the bout the judges show who they think won the bout.

Ultimate Sparring Program Course


Members are trained in the USP course where both Points and Light Continuous are introduced in a structured and systematic manner. Basic members (in their 1st year of training) are taught Points Level 1 and 2 and Senior members (in their 2nd year) are taught Light Continuous Levels 1 and 2. The course is designed so that members are taught all the skills needed to spar without actually needing to free spar and so the fear of injury is greatly reduced!

Contact
Contact levels vary widely within the club. The rules on this are simple. Contact is set at the level of the person who wants to spar at the lowest level. This means that people who don't like a lot of contact and wish to perfect their technical skill can do so without fear of being hurt. This simple rule is strongly enforced at Twin Dragon Kickboxing. There are some people within the club who are experienced fighters and are capable of sparring to very high contact levels. This is acceptable provided that both parties are aware that they are going to spar hard and are happy to do so. Beginners might witness what may appear to be quite an intense fight where it may seem only a matter of time before one or both parties gets seriously hurt. They should realise that it is more likely that the two involved are actually showing a display of great skill where their techniques are controlled and there is no malice or ill intent. The low injury record of the club proves this. Beginners (or anybody else for that matter) are not expected to be able to spar at that level at any time, so don't become concerned you may have to! It must be pointed out that as a contact sport the potential for injury exists and does happen. But remember that you are more likely to get hurt playing football or rugby (or even netball to be honest!).

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Breaking
Breaking is another aspect reserved for the higher grades for reasons of safety due to the level of skill needed to execute it properly. That is not to say that lower grades may not attempt it, but only Blue belts and higher are required to do so as part of their grading. In demonstrations, real wood and tiles can be used for added spectator impact but in class breaking boards are used. These are actually harder to break! Breaking is designed to demonstrate that techniques learnt can also not only be done with correct form, but also with power. Accuracy is important here, as even the strongest technique will not break a board if it does not hit it. It should be noted that the actual act of breaking the board is not necessary to pass. What is more important is that the student attempts to perform the break with correct technique and attitude. In fact a higher mark will be given to a student who gives a good attempt at breaking the board, Kiai-ing properly, using correct form and technique and failing to break, than a student who casually hits the board breaking it easily. After all some of us are just stronger than others. Twin Dragon Taekwondo does not encourage the practice of joint techniques, specifically punches and ridge hands. Even with practice the potential for permanent injury is high and it is felt that the risk of being unable to use your hand properly again is too great! Techniques for each grade are as follows Grading for Blue Belt Elbow strike Side kick Palm Strike Back kick Inward Knife Hand Turning kick Outward Knife Hand Hook Kick Jump Back Kick Jump Side Kick

Grading for Red Stripe

Grading for Red Belt

Grading for Black Stripe

Grading for Black Belt

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

Syllabus requirements for Each Grade


Yellow Stripe Belt
Kicking Routines 1, 2, 3 4 Directional Punching 4 Directional Blocking Black Belt Oath Student Creed

Yellow Belt
Kicking Routines 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Chon-Ji USP Points Level 1

Yellow/Green Stripe Belt


Kicking Routine 6, 7 Dan-Gun 1 Step Routines 1, 2, 3 Basic Self-Defense USP Points Level 2

Green Belt
Do-San 1-Step Routines 4, 5, 6 Self Defense USP Light Continuous Level 1

Green/Blue Stripe Belt


Won-Hyo 1-Step 7, 8 USP Light Continuous Level 2

Blue Belt
Yul-Gok 1-Step 9, 10 Breaking - side kick, forearm smash

Blue/Red Stripe Belt


Joong-Gun Free 1 step Breaking - back kick, palm strike

Red Belt
Toi Gye Breaking - knife hand, turning kick

Black Stripe Belt


Hwa Rang Breaking - hook kick

Black Belt
Choong Moo Breaking - jump back and jump side kick All previous techniques to be advanced

Jumping Grades
Occasionally students can skip a grade and double grade. The requirements to be able to do this are discretionary between the Club Instructors but are outlined below.

A student is proficient in another style and it is inappropriate to make them grade from beginner level. These students will be graded in at an appropriate level, agreed with between the student and the Instructors. There will be no more grade jumps. A student has been training at their current grade for a minimum of 6 months and missed their last grading for a genuine reason (such as going abroad, job interview etc). However the student MUST have shown sufficient progress to justify the double grade and must be a regular attendee to classes (i.e. once a week is not sufficient). Grades above Blue will not be considered to double grade. LUUTKD students may grade twice in their first term of the year for beginners. LUUTKD classes are specifically designed to accommodate this and this is the only time a student could normally grade twice in 3 months. Members who have recorded over 18 classes on their attendance card AND shown sufficient development. Wanting to catch up with friends is NOT a reason to double grade.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

The Tae Kwon-Do Patterns


The patterns in TaeKwon-Do are a excellent method of training. They are sequences of traditional techniques which should be performed with power and focus. They form a good workout and train your body to execute moves needed to train in Taekwon-Do. If you are doing your patterns correctly you should be physically very tired and work up a good sweat! Advanced students, such as Black Belts, study the patterns carefully exploiting the powerful techniques they contain, as many of the moves are deceptively effective. All patterns have a meaning taken from Korean history from which the student is encouraged to read. They give an insight into the history of Taekwon-Do and Korea and the development of the art.

8th Kup, Yellow Belt Grading Chon-Ji


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: Basic Interpretation
Chon-Ji literally means the Heaven and the Earth. It is, in the Orient, interpreted as the creation of the World or the beginning of human history. It is, therefore, the pattern played by the beginner. This pattern consists of two similar parts, one to represent the Heaven and the other Earth.

19 3 - Parallel Ready Stance, Walking Stance, L-Stance

Expanded Interpretation
Chon Ji is the first TaeKwon-Do form. When translated from Korean, Chon Ji means Heaven and Earth. As was interpreted in the first book of the classic I Ching, which explained all processes of growth and change in the natural world, Chon Ji symbolises the creation of the Universe. According to ancient philosophers, the universe came into being through the interaction of two opposing elements which when combined formed the basic elements of matter in the universe. They conceived that nothing in this life is permanent, yet nothing is destroyed. This life is based of changing changelessness, within which all aspects of reality possess the elements of their opposites. Many of the basic techniques of TaeKwon-Do are based on the interaction of opposite forces.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Parallel ready stance left 90o, walking stance left low outer forearm block step forward walking stance right mid section punch right 180o, walking stance right low outer forearm block step forward walking stance left mid section punch left 90o, walking stance left low outer forearm block step forward walking stance right mid section punch right 180o, walking stance right low outer forearm block step forward walking stance left mid section punch left 90o, L-stance left middle inner forearm block step forward walking stance right mid section punch right 180o, L-stance right middle inner forearm block step forward walking stance left mid section punch left 90o, L-stance left middle inner forearm block step forward walking stance right mid section punch right 180o, L-stance right middle inner forearm block step forward walking stance left mid section punch step forward walking stance right mid section punch step backwards walking stance left mid section punch step backwards walking stance right mid section punch (Kiai). Parallel ready stance.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

7th Kup, Yellow/Green Stripe Belt Grading Dan Gun


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: Basic Interpretation
Dan Gun is named after the Holy Dan Gun, the legendary founder of Korea in the year 2333 B.C.

21 3 - Parallel Ready Stance, Walking Stance, L-Stance

Expanded Interpretation
Dan Gun was the father of Korea and founded the Kingdom of Korea in 2333 B.C. The legend is as follows: Hwan Ung came down from Heaven to rule the Universe. At that time a tiger and a bear, who lived in a cave, begged Hwan Ung to change them into humans. The tiger could not comply with the commandments of Hwan Ung so he lost his chance to become human. However, the bear could, became a woman and prayed under an altar to become pregnant. Hwan Ung was moved by her plea, changed himself into a man and married her. They had a son, Dan Gun, the father of Korea. The birth of Dan Gun and the story of the founding of Korea belong to the myths, but after the Silla unification, especially in the era of the Lee Dynasty, the myth became respected by all. The Koryo dynasty viewed Dan Gun as the sole founder of the Korean Kingdom and used this legend to show Korean superiority to the Mongolian tribes because in the past they had invaded and conquered Korea several times.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Parallel ready stance left 90o, L-stance mid section knife-hand guarding block step forward walking stance right high section obverse punch right 180o, L-stance mid section knife-hand guarding block step forward walking stance left high section obverse punch left 90o, walking stance left low outer forearm block step forward walking stance right high section obverse punch step forward walking stance left high section obverse punch step forward walking stance right high section obverse punch right 270o, L-stance twin forearm block step forward walking stance right high section obverse punch right 180o, L-stance twin forearm block step forward walking stance left high section obverse punch left 90o, walking stance left low outer forearm block on the spot left rising outer forearm block step forward walking stance right rising outer forearm block step forward walking stance left rising outer forearm block step forward walking stance right rising outer forearm block right 270o, L-stance left side knife-hand strike step forward walking stance right high section obverse punch right 180o, L-stance right side knife-hand strike step forward walking stance left high section obverse punch (Kiai) Parallel ready stance.

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

6th Kup, Green Belt Grading Do San


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: Basic Interpretation
Do San is the pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Chang Ho (1876-1938) who devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its Independence movement.

24 4 - Parallel Ready Stance, Walking, Sitting, L-Stance

Expanded Interpretation
Do San was the name used by Chang Ho Ahn (1876-1938), who was a renowned educator and advocate of Korean independence. His fathers son, he became a member of the Independence Association at the age of 18. This association was formed to promote independence, to reform domestic affairs and to reduce dependence upon foreign countries. In 1910 when the Yi Dynasty, a minor Kingdom was forcefully absorbed into the Japanese Empire, Chang Ho Ahn started underground activities focused on regaining Korean independence. He advocated freedom of choice in education, culture and speech. Do San exiled himself several times to China and the United States of America, but always returned. He was finally arrested by the Japanese and died in jail. He was an outstanding member of the Korean independence movement.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Parallel ready stance left 90o, walking stance left high section outer forearm block on the spot right reverse mid section punch step turn 180o right, walking stance right high section outer forearm block on the spot left reverse mid section punch left 90o, L-stance knife-hand guarding block step forward walking stance right flat finger-tip thrust, and release manoeuvre left turn 360o moving forwards walking stance left back-fist strike (temple) step forward walking stance, right back-fist strike (temple) left 270o, walking stance left high section outer forearm block on the spot right reverse mid section punch step turn 180o right, walking stance right high section outer forearm block on the spot left reverse mid section punch left 90o, left foot to right, hands to hips, left 45o, step forward left walking stance wedging block right high section front snap-kick land in right leg forward walking stance simultaneous obverse right mid section punch on spot left reverse mid section punch right 45o, right foot to left, hands to hips, right 45o, step forward right walking stance wedging block left high section front snap-kick land in left leg forward walking stance simultaneous obverse left mid section punch on spot right reverse mid section punch left 45o, walking stance left rising block step forward walking stance right rising block left 270o, sitting stance left side knife hand strike step across right sitting stance right side knife hand strike (Kiai) Parallel ready stance

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

5th Kup, Green/Blue Stripe Belt Grading Won Hyo


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: 28 5 Closed Ready Stance A, Walking, Fixed, L-Stance Bending Ready Stance

Basic Interpretation
Won Hyo was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla Dynasty in the year 686 A.D.

Expanded Interpretation
Won Hyo (617-686) was the most renowned Buddhist monk of the Silla Dynasty. He was recognised as a great scholar by the Dang Dynasty of China, although he never studies there, and was highly respected by the people of Korea. Won Hyo hated the idea of different religions arguing with each other over their different beliefs. Instead he established his own system of ideology in which the conflicts between various religious sects could be recognised. Won Hyo reached the highest position possible for a scholar and monk. However, his most remarkable achievements were his activities in relieving the poverty and suffering of ordinary people. After Won Hyo left his monastery he travelled the country and taught Buddhism to the people. Sometimes he played a homemade instrument and used song and dance to communicate. As an example to the people he lived as he preached.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Closed ready stance A o left 90 , L-stance twin forearm block on the spot, left pull to chest, right inward moving right knife-hand strike left foot to fixed stance, left side punch o right 180 , L-stance twin forearm block on the spot, right pull to chest, left inward moving right knife-hand strike right foot to fixed stance, right side punch right foot to left, bending ready stance left mid section side kick land in left L-stance knife-hand guarding block step forward right L-stance knife-hand guarding block step forward left L-stance knife-hand guarding block step forward, walking stance right straight fingertip thrust o left 270 , L-stance twin forearm block on the spot right inward moving right knife-hand strike left foot to fixed stance, left side punch o right 180 , L-stance twin forearm block on the spot left inward moving right knife-hand strike right foot to fixed stance, right side punch o left 90 , right foot to left, left step forward walking stance right circular block right front snap kick move forward right walking stance, left reverse punch on the spot, left circular block left front snap kick move forward left walking stance, right reverse punch move forward right side bending ready stance right mid-section side kick o foot to foot, left 270 , left L-stance forearm guarding block o foot to foot right 180 , right L-stance forearm guarding block (Kiai) Closed ready stance A

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

4th Kup, Blue Belt Grading Yul Gok


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: 38 5 Closed Ready Stance A, Walking, Sitting, L-Stance Bending Ready Stance

Basic Interpretation
Yul Gok is the pseudonym of the great philosopher and scholar Yi IL (1536-1584), nicknamed the Confucius of Korea. th The 38 movements of the pattern refer to his birthplace on the 38 degree line of latitude and the diagram represents scholar.

Expanded Interpretation
Yul Gok was the pen name of master Yi, a great scholar in the Yi Dynasty. He was so brilliant that he passed the national examination selecting public servants at the age of 13. He participated in national affairs and held various government appointments. Later on, he resigned from government service and returned home, devoting himself to writing. He published many books on philosophy, Confucianism and public administration. Yul Gok pointed out various shortcomings of the governmental system and suggested reforms that had tremendous impact on social policy in the Yi Dynasty. Anticipating the Japanese invasion he also advised maintaining an army of 100,000 soldiers. Parallel ready stance left foot to sitting stance, left hand mid-section measure punch with tension right mid-section punch left mid-section punch left foot to right, right foot to sitting stance, right mid-section measure punch with tension left mid-section punch right mid-section punch o right foot move right 45 , walking stance right high section inner forearm middle block left front snap kick forwards to walking stance, left high section obverse punch on spot right high section reverse punch o left foot move, left 90 , walking stance left high section inner forearm middle block right front snap kick forwards to walking stance, right high section obverse punch on spot left high section reverse punch o right foot move, right 45 , walking stance right hand hooking block on spot left hand hooking block on spot, right high section obverse punch step forward, walking stance ,left hand hooking block on spot, right hand hooking block on spot, left high section obverse punch step forward, walking stance right high section obverse punch move forward on right foot, bending ready stance left mid section side kick land in left walking stance, right elbow strike to left palm o step turn 180 right, up onto left foot, bending ready stance right mid section side kick land in right walking stance, left elbow strike to right palm o left foot move, left 90 , L-stance, twin knife hand block step forward walking stance right straight finger-tip thrust o right foot to move, right 180 , L-stance, twin knife hand block step forward walking stance left straight finger-tip thrust o left foot move, left 90 , walking stance, left outer forearm block on spot right mid-section reverse punch step forwards, walking stance, right outer forearm block on spot left mid-section reverse punch jump forwards to X-stance, left back-fist strike (temple) o 270 right turn, to right forward walking stance, high section double forearm block o foot to foot, 180 left, left forward walking stance, high section double forearm block (Kiai). Parallel ready stance

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

3rd Kup, Blue/Red Stripe Belt Grading Joong Gun


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: 32 5 Closed Ready Stance B, Walking, Sitting, L-Stance Bending Ready Stance

Basic Interpretation
Joong Gun is named after the patriot An Joong Gun who assassinated Hiro Bumi Ito, the first Japanese governor general of Korea, known as the man who played the leading role in the Japan-Korea merge. The 32 movements refer to Mr Ans age when he was executed at Lui Shung prison in 1910.

Expanded Interpretation
Joong Gun (1879-1910) is the name of a man who fought against the Japanese Empire for Korean independence and eventually died for his country. In 1905, when Korea was invaded and colonised by Japan, An Joong Gun sacrificed himself as follows:th On 26 October, he sneaked into the Haldin railroad station, which was then under heavy security, and assassinated an important Japanese official, Hiro Bumi Ito, who had stopped there on his way to China. An Joong Gun was eventually arrested and the 32 movements of the form symbolise the age of An Joong Gun when he was executed at Lui Shung prison at the age of 32.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Closed ready stance B o left 90 , L-stance, left reverse knife-hand block on spot, left low-section snap kick step forward to rear foot stance upward moving right palm block o right 180 , L-stance, right reverse knife-hand block on spot, right low-section snap kick step forward to rear foot stance upward moving left palm block o left 90 , L-stance, knife hand guarding block step out to walking stance, reverse (right) upward elbow strike step forward, L-stance, knife hand guarding block step out to walking stance, reverse (left) upward elbow strike step forward, walking stance (left forward), twin vertical punch (to jaw) step forward, walking stance, twin upset punch (to kidneys) o step turn left 180 , X-fist rising block o left 90 , L-stance, left back-fist strike (temple) release manoeuvre, step out to walking stance reverse (right) mid-section punch o left foot to right, right 180 , L-stance, right back-fist strike (temple) release manoeuvre, step out to walking stance reverse (left) mid-section punch o right to left, left 90 , to left walking stance, double forearm block left foot up to fixed stance, left side punch moving forwards, right mid-section side kick land in right walking stance, double forearm block right foot up to fixed stance, right side punch moving forwards, left mid-section side kick land in left L-stance, forearm guarding block step out to walking stance, palm pressing block with tension step forwards to right L-stance, forearm guarding block step out to walking stance, palm pressing block with tension o left foot to right, left 90 , closed stance, right hooking punch right foot out to fixed stance, U-shaped block o right to left, left 180 , right foot out to fixed stance, U-shaped block (Kiai) Closed ready stance B

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

2nd Kup, Red Belt Grading Toi Gye


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: 37 5 Closed Ready Stance B, Walking, Sitting, L-Stance Fixed Stance

Basic Interpretation
Toi Gye is the penname of the noted scholar Yi Hwang (16 Century AD), an authority on neo-Confucianism. The 37 th movements of the pattern refer to his birthplace on the 37 degree line of latitude and the diagram represents scholar.
th

Expanded Interpretation
Toi Gye (1501-1570), otherwise known as Hwang Yi, was a great Confucian philosopher at the time of the Lee Dynasty. In 1534 he passed the prestigious national qualifying examination for the civil service and was eventually appointed to the highest position of civil service. However, he later resigned from the civil service and returned to his home town, where he became a scholar. His speciality was Joo Ja Hak (Confucianism), and he developed many intellectual theories. He founded the Do San learning institute where he spent the rest of his life educating his young disciples. His interpretation of Confucianism, known as Toi Gye Hak is today the subject of study in both Western and Eastern worlds.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Closed ready stance B left 90o, L-stance, left inner forearm middle block step out to walking stance, right low section upset finger-tip thrust right foot to left, right 90o, closed stance, left low section outer forearm block, right back-fist to rear right 90o, L-stance, right inner forearm middle block step out to walking stance, left low section upset finger-tip thrust left foot to right, left 90o, closed stance, right low section outer forearm block, left back-fist to rear step forwards, walking stance, x-fist pressing block on spot twin vertical punch front right, high section, snap-kick land forwards walking stance, right obverse punch on spot, reverse left punch left foot to right, left 90o, closed stance, fists on hips step forward, right 90o, stamp right foot to sitting stance, W-shaped block left leg to move, left 180o, stamp left foot to sitting stance, W-shaped block left leg to move, left 180o, stamp left foot to sitting stance, W-shaped block right leg to move, right 180o, stamp right foot to sitting stance, W-shaped block left leg to move, left 180o, stamp left foot to sitting stance, W-shaped block left leg to move, left 180o, stamp left foot to sitting stance, W-shaped block right foot to left, step forwards L-stance low-section double forearm block step left out to walking stance, twin hand grab (arc hand) right upward knee to hands foot to foot, left 180o, left out to L-stance, knife hand guarding block on spot, left high-section front snap kick land in left walking stance, left obverse, high-section, open finger-tip thrust step forward, to right L-stance, knife hand guarding block on spot, right high-section front snap kick land in right walking stance, right obverse, high-section, open finger-tip thrust look over right shoulder, skip/step back to fixed stance, left low-section outer forearm block to front, right backfist strike to rear 29 jump high and forwards (over strike), land in X-stance, X-fist pressing block (side on) 30 right foot move to right walking stance, double forearm block 31 left foot to move, left 270o, L-stance, left low-section knife hand guarding block 32 step out to walking stance, right circular block 33 left foot to right, right 180o, right step out to L-stance, right low section knife-hand guarding block 34 step out to walking stance, left circular block 35 on spot, left 90o, walking stance, right circular block 36 on spot, right 90o, walking stance, left circular block 37 right foot to move, left 90o, sitting stance right front mid-section punch (Kiai) Closed ready stance B

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

1st Kup, Red/Black Stripe Belt Grading Hwa Rang


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: 29 7 Closed Ready Stance C, Walking, Sitting, L-Stance Fixed, Vertical, Closed Stance

Basic Interpretation
Hwa Rang is named after the Hwa Rang Youth Group, which originated in the Silla Dynasty about 1350 years ago. This group eventually became the driving force for the unification of the three Kingdoms of Korea. The 29 movements of this th pattern refer to the 29 Infantry Division where TaeKwon-Do developed into maturity.

Expanded Interpretation
Hwa Rang was the name of a national institute, which trained its youth for times of national need. A Hwa Rang candidate had to be a man of character, virtue and countenance. Those who met these qualifications could become a Hwa Rang pupil. They were trained to improve their moral principles and military skills. They entertained themselves by listening to music and poetry, and travelled around the country visiting famous mountains and rivers. The youth were taught to be brave, to love their country and to be co-operative. The five leadership qualities of Hwa Rang were as follows:A. Allegiance to the King B. Faithfulness to their parents C. Faithful to friendship D. Prohibition against the killing of animals E. No retreat from the battlefield The main reason why Silla was able to defeat both Ko-Ku-Ryo and Bak Jai, and unify the three Dynasties was because of the Hwa Rang spirit under which the youth had been trained. The Hwa Rang spirit has survived through he ages and today it is used as a motto for youth.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

Closed ready stance C left foot to move, sitting stance, left palm pushing block right mid-section punch left mid section punch o right foot to move, right 90 , L-stance, twin forearm block on spot, right hand pull to chest, left upset punch right foot to fixed stance, right side punch right foot back to vertical stance, right downward knife-hand strike left foot to walking stance, left high section, obverse punch o left 90 , walking stance, left low-section outer forearm block step forward, high section, right obverse punch left foot up to right, grab and pull, right mid section side kick land forwards, right L-stance, right side knife-hand strike step forwards, left walking stance, left high-section, obverse punch step forwards, right walking stance, right high-section, obverse punch o left foot to right, left 270 , left foot out to L-stance, knife-hand guarding block step forwards, walking stance, right flat finger-tip thrust o step turn, left 180 , L-stance, knife-hand guarding block step forwards, right high-section turning kick, ,land in L-stance knife-hand guarding block step forwards, left high-section turning kick, , land in L-stance knife-hand guarding block o left 90 , walking stance, left low-section outer forearm block step left foot back to L-stance, right reverse mid-section punch step forwards, L-stance, left reverse mid-section punch step forwards, L-stance, right reverse mid-section punch step left out to walking stance, X-fist pressing block o skip forwards, right 180 , L-stance, right back elbow strike o left foot to right, left 90 , closed stance, left low-section outer forearm block, right mid-section inner forearm block on spot, , right low-section outer forearm block, left mid-section inner forearm block step forwards to left L-stance, high section knife-hand guarding block o left foot to right, right 180 , right foot out to L-stance, high section knife-hand guarding block (Kiai) Closed ready stance C

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Twin Dragon Tae Kwon-Do Theory and Syllabus

1st Dan, Black Belt Grading Choong Moo


Number of Movements: Number of Stances: 30 5 Parallel, Ready Stance, Walking, Sitting, L-Stance Bending Ready Stance

Basic Interpretation
Choong Moo was the name given to the great admiral Yi Sun Sin of the Yi Dynasty. He was reputed to have invented the first armoured battleship (Kobukson), which was the precursor of the present day submarine, in 1592 A.D. The reason why this pattern ends with a left-hand attack is to symbolise his regrettable death, having no change to show his unrestrained potentiality, checked by his forced reservation of his loyalty to the king.

Expanded Interpretation
In the naval history of the world Choong Moo is actually Admiral Soog Shin Lee of the Lee Dynasty, whose fame is comparable to Admiral Nelson of Great Britain. Admiral Lee was in charge of naval operations during the Lee Dynasty. He anticipated the Japanese invasion and in preparation had his armed forces trained for war. In 1592 when the Im Jin Uae Ran (a conflict between the Japanese Empire and the Lee Dynasty) broke out, Admiral Lee led his battleship, Ko-Buk-Sun (the turtle boat) which he designed against the Japanese invaders. Whenever his naval forces met the Japanese battleships, Admiral Lee was victorious. His forces reigned supreme over the sea during the seven-year conflict. However, Admiral Lee was imprisoned and almost sentenced to death due to the plotting of Won Keun, the naval commander in Kyong San district, who was a rival of his. Won Keun was killed during battle and the king reluctantly th pardoned Admiral Lee and assigned him to the battlefield as a soldier because of the urgent need of his expertise. On 8 November 1592, Admiral Lee was shot to death during a sea battle against the Japanese navy. He died at the age of 54. Admiral Lee showed true allegiance to his country and had a noble character and excellent leadership ability. Admiral Lee was a great hero in Korean History and almost single handedly protected his country. He also wrote a book entitled The Diary During the Conflict. Parallel ready stance o left foot move, left 90 , L-Stance, twin knife hand block step forward into right walking stance , left rising knife hand block, right inner moving knife hand strike o right foot to move, right 180 , L-Stance , knife hand guarding block step forward into left walking stance, high section left flat finger-tip thrust o left foot to move, left 90 , L-Stance, twin knife hand block o up onto left foot, right 180 , bending ready stance right mid-section side kick o left 180 , L-stance knife-hand guarding block step through, scissor, into right jumping side kick , land in right L-stance, knife hand guarding block o left 270 , left L-Stance, left low section knife hand block left foot step out into walking stance, arc-hand throat grab (both hands) pull hands down to right upward knee strike o foot to foot, left 180 , to left walking stance, left downward palm block, right ridge hand (or shoulder throw?) step forward right high section turning kick foot to foot left mid-section back kick o dont complete turn (so reverse direction 180 ), land in right L-Stance, forearm guarding block o step forward, high section left turning kick at 45 to left o foot to foot, right 135 , right Fixed Stance, U-shaped block o jump straight up left 360 , land on spot, L-stance, knife hand guarding block step forward into left walking stance, right upset finger-tip thrust draw left foot back to L-stance, with left low section outer forearm block and right rear back-fist strike step forward to right walking stance, right straight finger-tip thrust o left foot to right, left 270 , step out to left walking stance, double forearm block o step forwards left 90 , sitting stance, right inner forearm inward moving block, on spot, right high section side back-fist strike o left 90 , right mid-section side kick foot to foot, moving forwards left mid-section side kick o foot to foot, right 180 , right foot out to right L-stance, knife-hand checking block step forwards left walking stance, twin upward palm heel block o step turn right 180 , right walking stance, right rising block on spot, left reverse mid-section punch (Kiai) o left foot to right, left 90 , parallel ready stance.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

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