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DETAILS EMERGE
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By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Ination remains tame
throughout the U.S. economy, with one big
exception: gas prices.
Those higher prices havent derailed a
steadily improving economy. But if they sur-
pass $4 or $5 a gallon, experts fear Americans
could pull back on spending, and job growth
could stall, posing a potentially serious threat
to the recovery.
And the longer prices remain high, the more
they could imperil President Barack Obamas
re-election hopes.
A few weeks ago, economists generally
agreed that the economy was in little danger
from higher gas prices as long as job growth
remained strong. But fears are now mounting
that gas prices could begin to weaken con-
sumer condence.
The average pump price nationwide is
$3.83 a gallon. Energy analysts say its bound
to climb higher in the weeks ahead.
Its a thorn in the side of the consumer and
businesses, said Chris Christopher, an econo-
mist at IHS Global Insight. The economy this
year would have been better and stronger if
we didnt have to deal with this.
So far, higher prices arent undermining the
economic recovery, which is getting a lift
from strong job creation. It would take a big
jump to around $5 a gallon before most
economists would worry that growth would
halt and the economy would slide into anoth-
er recession.
Thats because an improving economy is
somewhat insulated from any threat posed by
higher prices at the pump.
Will gas priceshurt economy?
Economists fear mounting fuel costs could weaken consumer confidence
Bill to kill high-speed
rail gaining support
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A bill that will cut off funding for the
states high-speed rail project is gaining
steam as the Orange City Council voted
unanimously Tuesday night to support
Assembly Bill 1455, authored by
Assemblywoman Diane Harkey, R-Dana
Point.
AB 1455, the High-Speed Rail Lemon
Law, was introduced by Harkey in January and several coun-
ties and cities across the state have already voted to support it.
When initially introduced, Peninsula ofcials also offered
support for the legislation including Burlingame Mayor Jerry
Deal and Belmont Mayor Dave Warden.
Harkeys Lemon Law would repeal more than $9 billion in
available state debt funding for the project. A vote on the leg-
islation is expected in mid-April.
In spite of the huge taxpayer funded marketing budget for
this complex project, the people and their elected ofcials are
searching for the facts and discovering that they were sold a
lemon. Already cash strapped and weary of the wasteful nan-
cial decisions being made in Sacramento, local governments
are now learning they will have to pay a share of the project
even if it never serves their constituents. I encourage everyone
Diane Harkey
Burlingame to finalize its
new leaf blower schedule
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Burlingame ofcials will hold a public hearing Monday on
new restrictions on leaf blowers introduced earlier this month.
Under the plan, Burlingame will be split into three areas and
commercial gardeners will be allowed one day a week
Tuesday, Thursday or Friday to work in each area. The
rules, which go into effect July 1, also limit the sound level and
hours in which leaf blowers can be used, according to a staff
report by City Manager Jim Nantell.
Residents will be allowed to use leaf blowers 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
on weekends. Properties greater than 5 acres in size are
allowed to use leaf blowers from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on weekends and holidays.
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
On St.Patricks Day,try Fiddlers Greens specialties like Irish lamb stew,shepherds pie,beer-battered sh and chips and of course,
corned beef and cabbage.There will also be bagpipers throughout the day playing traditional Irish music at the Millbrae pub.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When talk of pinching, green and
brews come together it can only mean
one thing St. Patricks Day, the cele-
bration of all things Irish, is upon us.
Rain isnt expected to keep people
from celebrating this holiday. Local
businesses actually anticipate fewer peo-
ple heading to the city, creating bigger
parties on the Peninsula. There will be
traditional food, bagpipers and lots of
fun throughout the Peninsula. The
biggest challenge will be picking the
Toasting St. Patricks Day
See CELEBRATE, Page 23
See BLOWERS, Page 23
See RAIL, Page 23
See ECONOMY, Page 31
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 183
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Kurt Russell
is 61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1912
The Camp Fire Girls organization was
incorporated in Washington, D.C., two
years to the day after it was founded in
Thetford, Vt.
It is my rule never to lose me temper
till it would be detrimental to keep it.
Sean OCasey, Irish playwright (1880-1964)
Actor Patrick Duffy
is 63.
Rock singer Billy
Corgan is 45.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Wolfgang Loitzl of Austria soars through the air during the men's FIS World Cup ski jumping ying hill individual competition
in Planica, Slovenia.
Saturday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers and a slight chance of thunder-
storms. Some thunderstorms may produce
small hail. Highs in the lower 50s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance
of showers and a slight chance of thunder-
storms. Some thunderstorms may produce small hail. Lows
around 40. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs around 50. Northwest
winds 15 to 20 mph. Chance of showers 50 percent.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Lows in the lower 40s.
Northwest winds around 20 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, in rst place; Solid Gold, o. 10, in
second place; and Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
third place.The race time was clocked at 1:42.14.
(Answers Monday)
AFOOT LAUGH RADIAL AFFORD
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When James Watt talked about his steam engine,
some people thought he was FULL OF HOT AIR
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HYONE
KKISO
SOMLBY
FRACTY
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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6 0 6
28 29 43 51 53 7
Mega number
March 16 Mega Millions
8 19 24 29 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 0 4 8
Daily Four
6 1 5
Daily three evening
In A.D. 461 (or A.D. 493, depending on sources), St. Patrick,
the patron saint of Ireland, died in Saul.
In 1762, New Yorks rst St. Patricks Day parade took place.
In 1776, British forces evacuated Boston during the
Revolutionary War.
In 1861, Victor Emmanuel II was proclaimed the rst king of
a united Italy.
In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt rst likened crusading
journalists to a man with the muckrake in his hand in a
speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington.
In 1910, the U.S. National Museum, a precursor to the
National Museum of Natural History, opened in Washington,
D.C.
In 1941, the National Gallery of Art opened in Washington,
D.C.
In 1942, six days after departing the Philippines during World
War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur declared, I came through
and I shall return as he arrived in Australia to become supreme
commander of Allied forces in the southwest Pacic theater.
In 1950, scientists at the University of California at Berkeley
announced they had created a new radioactive element, cali-
fornium.
In 1966, a U.S. midget submarine located a missing hydrogen
bomb which had fallen from an American bomber into the
Mediterranean off Spain.
In 1970, the United States cast its rst veto in the U.N.
Security Council. (The U.S. killed a resolution that would have
condemned Britain for failure to use force to overthrow the
white-ruled government of Rhodesia.)
In 1992, 29 people were killed in the truck bombing of the
Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In Illinois, Sen.
Alan Dixon was defeated in his primary re-election bid by
Carol Moseley-Braun, who went on to become the rst black
woman in the U.S. Senate.
Jazz/New Age musician Paul Horn is 82. The former nation-
al chairwoman of the NAACP, Myrlie Evers-Williams, is 79.
Rock musician Paul Kantner is 71. Singer-songwriter Jim
Weatherly is 69. Singer-songwriter John Sebastian (The
Lovin Spoonful) is 68. Rock musician Harold Brown (War;
Lowrider Band) is 66. Country singer Susie Allanson is 60.
Actress Lesley-Anne Down is 58. Actor Mark Boone Jr. is 57.
Actor Gary Sinise is 57. Country singer Paul Overstreet is 57.
Actor Christian Clemenson is 54. Former basketball and base-
ball player Danny Ainge is 53. Actress Vicki Lewis is 52. Actor
Casey Siemaszko is 51. Writer-director Rob Sitch is 50.
Saint Patrick (385?-461) was the patron
saint of Ireland. Born in Britain, Patrick
was a missionary credited with bringing
Christianity to Ireland.
***
The largest statue of St. Patrick is in Saul,
Ireland. The statue was built in 1938 at
the site where Patrick rst preached in
Ireland.
***
The only town in the world named after
St. Patrick is St. Patrick, Mo. In honor of
its namesake, the town has a Shrine of St
Patrick, complete with Celtic crosses, a
round bell tower and stained glass win-
dows made in Dublin, Ireland.
***
The shamrock is a symbol of St. Patricks
Day because St. Patrick used a three-leaf
shamrock in his sermons to represent the
Holy Trinity.
***
The President of the United States and
Irelands Taoiseach meet at the White
House every St. Patricks Day for the tra-
ditional Shamrock Ceremony, which
symbolizes the friendship between the
two countries. During the ceremony the
president is presented with a bowl full of
shamrocks.
***
The song Im Looking Over A Four
Leaf Clover was made popular by Art
Mooney (1911-1993) in 1948. In the
song, the four leaves signify sunshine,
rain, roses and the one I adore.
***
March is Irish American Heritage Month.
***
Do you know what city dyes their river
green every year to celebrate St. Patricks
Day? See answer at end.
***
President Grover Clevelands (1837-
1908) favorite dish was corned beef and
cabbage.
***
The famous Blarney Stone is embedded
in the tower wall of the Blarney Castle in
Ireland. More than 200,000 tourists from
all over the world travel to the castle
every year to kiss the Blarney Stone. It is
said that the gift of eloquence goes to all
who kiss the stone.
***
The oldest Irish organization in the
United States is the Charitable Irish
Society. The society was formed in 1737
by Irish merchants in Boston.
***
Erin Go Bragh means Ireland Forever.
The Gaelic phrase is used to express alle-
giance to Ireland.
***
Hundreds of thousands of Irish citizens
came to America during Irelands potato
famine in the mid-1840s. The peak of
Irish immigration to America was in
1847.
***
Leprechauns are usually portrayed as
cobblers. The most popular imagery of a
leprechaun was created by Irish poet poet
William Allingham (1824-1889). In his
18th century poem Fairy Shoemaker
Allingham describes a leprechaun as a
wrinkled, wizend and bearded Elf, spec-
tacles stuck on his pointed nose, silver
buckles to his hose, leather apron [with a]
shoe in his lap.
***
The logo for the Boston Celtics NBA
team is a leprechaun wearing a vest dec-
orated with shamrocks, smoking a pipe
and balancing a basketball on his nger.
***
Lucky the Leprechaun has been the mas-
cot for Lucky Charms since the cereal
was introduced in 1962. The mascot was
changed to Waldo the Wizard in 1975.
However, Waldo was less popular then
Lucky and the next year the leprechaun
magically reappeared.
***
Answer: Chicago. Every year the pipet-
ters union pours vegetable dye into the
river to turn the water green. The rst
year the river was dyed, in 1962, 100
pounds of vegetable dye was used and the
water stayed green for a week. Today they
use 40 pounds of dye, which keeps the
river green for several hours during the
annual St. Patricks Day Parade.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
28 32 33 34 45 21
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Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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property taxes and insurance
BURLINGAME
DUI. A man was arrested for driving under the inuence on the
1000 block of Ansel Road before 8:27 p.m. Monday, March 12.
Vandalism. The rear tire on a vehicle was slashed on the 1000
block of Carolan Avenue before 8:09 p.m. Monday, March 12.
Vandalism. A vehicle was keyed on the 900 block on Paloma
Avenue before 6:21 p.m. Monday, March 12.
Theft. A computer was taken from a hotel business center
before 11:19 a.m. Sunday, March 11.
Burglary. Two laptops and other items were stolen from a
vehicle on the 1600 block of Bayshore Highway before 9:21
Wednesday, March 7.
FOSTER CITY
Burglary. A computer type bag containing papers worth $80
was taken from a vehicle on Vintage Park Drive before 1:38
p.m. Wednesday, March 14.
Petty theft. Merchandise worth $80 was taken from a com-
mercial building on Metro Center Boulevard before 7:40 p.m.
Monday, March 12.
Police reports
That heater is hot
A space heater was taken and later recovered by police on
the 200 block of El Camino Real before 5:55 p.m.
Sunday, March 11.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Redwood City residents are looking
at sewer and water rate hikes to help the
city absorb wholesale utility costs and
fund multi-million dollar upgrades to
both systems.
City officials say the 12 percent water
increase and 9 percent sewer rate hike
proposed to start in July shouldnt be
that surprising to residents, coming on
the heels of two previous 9 percent
increases. However, the city will hold
public meetings and hearings in the
next two months to insure home and
business owners are aware of whats
coming and have the chance for input
before the changes are implemented.
Residents and business owners can
stave off the increases if 50 percent plus
one of those owning properties served
by water and sewer file protest, said
city spokesman Malcolm Smith.
If the City Council approves the
increases, a typical household will see a
$4 increase in water and $5 increase in
residential sewer rates. Commercial
account increases will be based on
water usage and business type.
Over the next 10 years, the city says
it needs to spend $200 million for its
share of replacing outdated facilities at
the regional sewage treatment plan and
$100 million for the repair or replace-
ment of its aging sewer infrastructure.
In terms of the water system, the city
is looking at $80 million over the next
20 years to maintain its drinking water
system and $10 million annually for
the next 30 years to seismically
upgrade the Hetch Hetchy water sys-
tem.
The wholesale cost of water from the
San Francisco Public Utilities
Commission will go up 10 percent on
top of a significant 38 percent jump the
previous year. The city tries easing the
unpredictable increases by approving
more uniform, moderate amounts of 8
percent to 10 percent on an annual
basis, according to the assessment by
Marilyn Harang, interim assistant pub-
lic works director.
The community information meeting
is 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 at the
Public Works Services building, 1400
Broadway. The City Council meeting is
7 p.m. Monday, May 7 at City Hall,
1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Sewer, water upgrades may mean rate increases
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO An irritated
district attorney said he has some con-
cerns about the sincerity of Sheriff Ross
Mirkarimis guilty plea to a misdemeanor
charge of false imprisonment in a domes-
tic violence case.
Statements Mirkarimi made in the days
after he entered his plea Monday is lead-
ing District Attorney George Gascon to
question whether the
sheriff believes he is
guilty of any crime,
Gascon said.
There is a guilty
plea here, and I know
theres almost an
attempt to deny that
this has occurred: I
didnt really do this.
Im being forced to
do this. Thats very concerning to me, to
be very honest with you, Gascon told the
newspaper.
Gascon said he plans to take up the
issue with the judge during Mirkarimis
sentencing on Monday.
Under a plea agreement, Mirkarimi
could be ned $590 and sentenced to
three years of probation along with coun-
seling, community service and mandato-
ry domestic violence treatment classes.
Official questions sincerity of sheriffs plea
Ross Mirkarimi
4
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Pedestrian fatally struck
by car in crosswalk identified
A pedestrian who died after being struck
by a car in South San Francisco Saturday
night has been identified by the San
Francisco medical examiners office as 41-
year-old Heliodoro Torres-Flores.
Torres-Flores, a South San Francisco resi-
dent, was pronounced dead at San Francisco
General Hospital at 12:48 p.m. Monday.
He was in a crosswalk at the intersection of
Grand and Walnut avenues around 11:25
p.m. Saturday when a car hit him, authorities
said.
Police said the driver who struck Torres-
Flores failed to see him.
His cause of death has not yet been deter-
mined, according to the coroners office.
Supporting youth
activities in Millbrae
Kelly Shea Gallo, who was a wonderful
coach and mentor to Millbrae kids before her
untimely death in 2004, is remembered today
through a foundation with her name.
Created in Gallos honor by her mother
Caroline, the organization raises money to
support youth activities in Millbrae.
The annual fundraising event, which will
include dinner, dancing and drawings for
prizes will be held from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Saturday, March 24 at St. Dunstans, 1133
Broadway. Tickets are $30. For more infor-
mation, or to buy tickets, visit
Local briefs
CITY
GOVERNMENT
The Millbrae
P l a n n i n g
Commission will
hold a public hearing
about plans to build a
new mixed-use
development with 54 multi-family residen-
tial condominium units, about 11,000
square feet of commercial condominium
space and two levels of concealed parking at
120 S. El Camino Real, currently the
Wendys restaurant site.
The commission meets 7 p.m. Monday,
March 19 at City Hall, 621 Magnolia Ave.,
Millbrae.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO The Legislative
Analysts Office on Friday estimated that a
compromise tax measure for the November
ballot would generate about $2.2 billion less
in the first year than estimates from Gov.
Jerry Browns Department of Finance.
The Democratic governor this week
reached a deal with supporters of a rival tax
plan known as the millionaires tax. The
revised initiative would raise the state sales
tax by a quarter-cent for five years. It also
would raise taxes on a sliding scale from 1
percent to 3 percent on incomes over
$250,000 a year for seven years.
A review released Friday by the nonparti-
san analysts office estimates revenue of
$6.8 billion in 2012-13, which is $2.2 billion
less than Browns projection. Revenue for
the following year would be $5.1 billion,
according to the LAO, which would be about
$2 billion below the finance department
forecast.
The two agencies previously differed in
their revenue forecasts for Browns original
initiative, which sought to raise the sales tax
by a half-cent and raise income taxes on the
wealthy for five years. The difference in the
two projections is partly because the gover-
nors finance department estimates higher
revenue from capital gains taxes.
Both forecasts include revenue from an
expected Facebook initial public offering
later this year. The legislative analyst pre-
dicts that will bring in about $408 million in
2013-14 from the sale of stock.
Brown forged the compromise with the
California Federation of Teachers, the
Courage Campaign and other supporters of a
higher tax on millionaires this week, after
polls showed his measure slipping in public
opinion.
Analyst: Lower revenue from Brown tax deal
REUTERS
Gov. Jerry Brown speaks in Long Beach.
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A new analysis of
President Barack Obamas budget for next year
says the decit scenario for next year isnt as
rosy as the White House gured last month.
Fridays Congressional Budget Ofce report
said Obamas budget would produce a $977 bil-
lion decit next year $75 billion more than
predicted by the White House.
Over the coming decade, CBO says Obamas
policies would result in decits totaling $6.4
trillion. Decits would be even higher were it
not for Obamas proposals to raise taxes on
higher-income people.
The White House seized on the gures as val-
idation of its claims that Obamas budget brings
the decit under control at least when meas-
ured against the economy, the measure used by
most economists in evaluating the decit.
CBO found that by 2016 decits as a share
of the economy would be below 3 percent a
key milestone of scal sustainability, said
White House budget ofce acting director
Jeffrey Zients. Debt held by the public will
decrease and then stabilize as a share of the
economy, also a key indicator of improving s-
cal health.
The nonpartisan CBO said Obamas budget
ofce consistently overestimates tax revenues
over the coming decade. CBO predicts revenues
on average that are about $120 billion less each
year than predicted by the White House.
Still, CBO said Obamas budget would gen-
erate somewhat lower decits over the coming
decade than the White House predicts. Much of
that is due to lower interest costs and less gen-
erous cost-of-living adjustments in Social
Security benets.
The forecasting differences for 2013 arent
unusual and generally are caused by CBOs less
optimistic view of the economy over the next
couple of years. The White House forecasts
higher income and corporate prots.
For the current budget year, CBO says
Obamas policies, if enacted, would generate a
$1.25 trillion decit. Thats $74 billion better
than the White House forecast but still repre-
sents the fourth consecutive year of trillion dol-
lar-plus decits.
The report is a precursor to the annual budget
debate in Congress. House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., plans to unveil
his budget plan next week, which will call for
sharply lower spending on federal health care
programs, lower taxes than called for by Obama
and less money for the day-to-day budgets of
federal agencies than called for in last years
budget and debt pact.
CBO: Obama budget produces 2013 deficit of $977B
6
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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O
n Monday, students at the College
Park Elementary School will
plant an American Heart
Association Teaching Garden as part of an
education initiative to help build healthy
bodies and minds. The Plant Day
Celebration will feature a performance by
the school choir; a produce market where
students can select a vegetable and a healthy
recipe to take home; and special guests
Ticker, the giant heart, and his friends, the
Produce Posse.
The program combines nutrition educa-
tion with garden-based learning. In this real-
life laboratory, students learn how to plant
seeds, nurture growing plants, harvest crops
and make the connection to good eating
habits. Numerous studies have shown that
participating in school garden programs
improves students attitudes toward fruit and
vegetables. We are excited to combine
hands-on garden learning with nutrition and
science lessons, said Principal Diana
Hallock. We are growing healthy hearts at
College Park.
College Parks Teaching Garden is spon-
sored by Mills-Peninsula Health Services.
***
Families are encour-
aged to watch the half
hour, anti-bullying docu-
mentary, Speak Up.
This cartoon will begin
with an opening mes-
sage from President
Obama. Speak Up will
be aired on 5:30 p.m.
and 8 p.m. Sunday,
March 18. It will also be
posted on www.stopbul-
lyingspeakup.com.
***
Meredith Charlson,
an Aragon High School senior, will be fea-
tured on Biz Kid$ 4:30 p.m. Tuesday,
March 20 on KCSM. Charlson launched a
business called City Servers in San Mateo
when economic conditions led to a dip in the
catering industry. She appears in the episode
The Economics of Economics and dis-
cusses finding a niche for her business.
***
Recycle your old electronics in the most
socially and environmentally-responsible
way possible and help raise funds for
Lutheran Redeemer
School in Redwood City.
On site to manage the
event, e-waste handling
innovator GreenCitizen
Inc. will reward the
school for every monitor
or computer collected
along with a portion of
the proceeds of any prod-
uct collected that is
reused/resold.
E-waste will be accept-
ed from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, March 24 at
Lutheran Redeemer
School, 468 Grand St. in Redwood City.
Items accepted for recycling include com-
puter monitors, TVs, laptops, desktops,
scanners, keyboards, mice, all other comput-
er accessories, printers, DVD/VCR players,
media (CDs DVDs, etc.), phones,
microwaves, fridges, appliances, toasters,
ink cartridges, cables, etc. Almost anything
that plugs into a wall is fair game. Batteries
and light bulbs are not accepted.
***
Notre Dame de Namur University stu-
dents will dance through the night to help fix
an iconic building on campus. In response to
the closure of Ralston Hall Mansion, due to
seismic safety concerns, students will hold
the We <3 Ralston Dance-A-Thon from
2 p.m. Saturday, March to 2 a.m. Sunday,
March 25 to raise funds to retrofit the his-
toric building.
Participants will raise money by asking
donors to sponsor them to dance for a desig-
nated period of time. Attendees are invited
to watch the dancers and enjoy music span-
ning multiple decades. Other activities
include a performance by NDNUs dance
squad, raffle drawings and childrens activi-
ties.
General admission to the Dance-A-Thon
is $20 and includes dinner. Children ages 3-
12 are $10; children 2 and under are free.
The Walter Gleason Gym is located on the
NDNU campus at 1500 Ralston Avenue in
Belmont.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Heather
Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200,
ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
7
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Beginning
Bridge
Lessons
Wednesdays April 11 thru June 27, 2012
9:30am to 11:30am
Thursdays April 12 thru June 28, 2012
7:30mp to 9:30pm
Bayshore Bridge Club
1100 Bayshore Highway, Suite 168
Burlingame, CA
(Behind the Hyatt Cinema)
Join us on April 4 at 9:30am or
April 12 at 7:30pm for a free introductory les-
son, followed by 12 lessons.
Cost is $120 plus Book. We use ACBL Club Series,
classes taught by ACBL accredited teachers.
Call for reservations and more information
560-863-7575 or 650 342-7193
Kids Across
1. Twinklers that seem to
come out at night (or
popular people on TV)
6. To revolve around the sun
again and again (or a
brand of chewing gum)
7. If you were an
astronaut, through the
galaxy youd roam,
but when you got back
down to _____ youd
finally be at home.
10. Seven circles around
Saturn (or O-shaped onion
slices)
12. Words heard at a space
shuttle launch: We have
____ off!
15. This tennis pro shares her
name with a planet
16. Chewbaccas cozy covering
17. The giant dimples on the
face of the moon
21. This occurs when the
moon passes between the
Earth and the sun
22. Its the largest planet in the
solar system
23. The team that works on a
spaceship
Parents Down
1. Visible from your own, its
the home of the 1A
2. Franco lm that soared at
the box ofce in 2011:
Rise of the Planet of the
_____
3. Those who, according to
the oft-quoted relationship
book title, are natives of
15A
4. Cosmic belief with
universal repercussions (or
CBS sitcom): The ___
Bang Theory
5. Hot invention that allows
people to see mercury
rising
8. In colorfully cosmic terms,
if youre looking at 9D,
youre seeing ____
9. Candy maker named for a
planet
11. Classic composition: Form
in which Disney delivers a
promise to wishful
stargazers
12. There is no proof of ____
in outer space
13. Signature Star Wars
farewell: May the ____ be
with you.
14. As every earthling knows,
its a real downer
18. System in which the 20D is
central
19. Federal agency whose focus
is above and beyond (abbr.)
20. Solar storms occur here
Enjoy fun time with Mom, Dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for adults.
This Weeks Solution
2012 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by
Tribune Media Services, Inc.
3/11/12 kris@kapd.com Visit www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family!
Crossword Planet
LOCAL/NATION 8
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Theodore W. Wiedemann
Theodore Ted Wiedemann died March 7,
2012 at his home in San Mateo with family by
his side. He was 82.
Wiedemann was born in Kansas City, Mo.
Jan. 10, 1930 to V. Webner and Florence
Wiedemann.
A longtime resident of the Bay Area,
Wiedemann attended Burlingame High
School and graduated from the University of
Colorado at Boulder. He owned and operated
his insurance and retirement plans business,
The Wiedemann Company, until shortly
before his death.
Wiedemann is survived by his wife of 58
years, Marion; his two daughters: Catherine
Wilcox (Rick Bolander), Barbara Carpenter
(John); four grandchildren: Jeff Wilcox
(Michelle), Jason Tola (Lindsey), Stephanie
Martin (Shawn), Kevin Carpenter; and one
great-grandson, Jax Martin. Wiedemann was
preceded in death by his brother Donald
Wiedemann and his sister Carolyn
Wiedemann Reller, of Palo Alto. He is sur-
vived by William Reller of Palo Alto, Jim and
Shannon Clark of Mammoth Lakes, Bob and
Donna Clark of Walnut Creek, Fred and Lori
Clark of Albuquerque, N.M., nieces and
nephews, as well as extended family mem-
bers. Tell will be missed by many friends he
met throughout his life.
Wiedemann was past president of the San
Francisco Chapter of the Chartered Life
Underwriters Association and was a past
member of the San Mateo Elks Club and San
Francisco Toastmasters Club.
There will be a celebration of life 11 a.m.
Friday, March 23 at the Twin Pines Park
Lodge, 1225 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Donations in Wiedemanns memory can be
made to the Jean Weingarten Peninsula Oral
School for the Deaf or Pets in Need.
The family wishes to acknowledge the
Sutter Visiting Nurses Association and
Hospice, especially Jane Porter, and care-
givers Joel and Mariasha of San Francisco for
their assistance and care of Wiedemann.
Arthur Lepore
Arthur Lepore, 84 , World War II Vet, a
retired Capuchino High School teacher,
served 17 years on Millbrae City Council, 12
years on the Millbrae School Board and many
other contributions to the community died
March 14, 2012.
Survived by his wife Mary Lepore; daugh-
ters: Sherry, Jill, Leah, Susan, Holly and
Nancy; 9 grandchildren and one great-grand-
child. Lepore was the oldest of 10 children
and is survived ve brothers and two sisters.
He was a native of Minneapolis, Minn., raised
in West Jordan, Utah, and had resided in
Millbrae for 51 years.
Family and friends may visit after 4 p.m.
Monday, March 19 and then attend the vigil 7
p.m. at Chapel of the Highlands, 194
Millwood Drive, Millbrae. The funeral will
leave the chapel Tuesday, March 20 and pro-
ceed to St. Dunstan Catholic Church, 1133
Broadway in Millbrae where mass will be cel-
ebrated at 10:30 a.m. Services will conclude at
the church.
In lieu of owers, family requests that dona-
tions be given to the Alzheimers Association,
www.alznorcal.org or the Caregivers Alliance,
www.caregiver.org.
Obituaries
By Thomas Beaumont
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO After two Deep South losses,
Mitt Romney is intensifying his campaign
efforts in the economically challenged Midwest
a friendly region for him in hopes of
regaining his front-runners momentum when
Illinois holds its Republican presidential pri-
mary Tuesday.
But the race for Illinois and its cache of 54
delegates is tighter than might have been
expected, thanks to Rick Santorums recent rise
in opinion polls. And President Barack Obama,
the Democrat they both hope to oust, is making
his presence felt, too, in his adopted home state.
Romney is clearly mindful of the threat from
Santorum. He and his allies are pouring money
into the state, near Michigan where he grew up
and his father was governor. Romney won the
Michigan primary on Feb. 28.
Logistically, hes also looking to take advan-
tage of Santorums failure to get the signatures
needed to ensure hes on the ballot statewide in
Illinois.
And Romneys on the attack.
We are not going to be successful in replac-
ing an economic lightweight if we nominate an
economic lightweight, the former
Massachusetts governor said Friday during an
early morning stop in suburban Rosemont near
Chicago. The criticism, focusing on the econo-
my, which is the voters No. 1 concern, was a
one-two punch against both President Barack
Obama and Republican Santorum. I am an
economic heavy weight, and I know how to x
this economy, Romney declared.
Romney also began airing a television adver-
tisement in Illinois accusing Santorum, a former
two-term senator, of having little understanding
of the economy. And he began airing a radio ad
pointing to Santorums crushing defeat for re-
election in 2006. Santorum lost his seat in
Pennsylvania to Democrat Bob Casey by 18
percentage points.
Santorum, just back from campaigning in
Puerto Rico for Sundays
primary there, sounded
condent despite Romneys
heavy organizational and
advertising edge and
unconcerned about the crit-
icism of his economic acu-
men.
Appearing at a Hispanic
grocery store in Prospect
Heights, Ill., he shot back at
his rival.
I believe in a light touch
of government where
Governor Romney believes
in a very heavy touch,
Santorum said. So he is an
economic government
heavyweight.
Obama was fundraising
and campaigning in
Illinois, too, on Friday and
taking his own shots at the
Republicans for negative
campaigning.
Noting he was in the
land of Lincoln, Obama
said the Republicans
werent exactly appealing to
in the Civil War presi-
dents words the better
angels of our nature. He
told his audience at a
fundraiser in Chicago, Im thinking maybe
some Lincoln will rub off on them while theyre
here.
In a wry reference to the heated Republican
race, he said, Weve got some guests in Illinois
this week. Apparently they have not wrapped
up on the other side.
Romney, after Illinois, headed to campaign in
Puerto Rico, where hes hoping to win Sundays
primary.
Santorum faces the same obstacles in Illinois
that he has in previous contests a lack of
money and campaign organization.
Romney, Santorum
and Obama
trade campaign digs
Mitt Romney
Rick Santorum
Barack Obama
OPINION 9
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
What if Iran means it?
Editor,
War with Iran has been in the news
every day lately, as Mike Caggiano
wrote in his March 10 letter to the
Daily Journal Tomorrows
Mississippi. He argues that if only the
Jews in Israel would give up their land,
sovereignty and right to self-defense,
then magically and overnight the Arab
world will end their 100-year war to
destroy the Jewish State, the ayatollahs
in Iran will abandon their quest for
nuclear weapons and peace will reign
in the Middle East.
That is quite a worldview; the Jews
cause the problems. But what if you are
wrong, Mike? What if the Jews are not
the cause? What if Israel withdraws
without a comprehensive peace agree-
ment, as they did from Gaza, and
10,000 more rockets are red at Jewish
children instead of get[ing] the ball
rolling on normalization?
In 2006, after Israel withdrew from
southern Lebanon, the U.N. failed its
obligation to prevent Hezbollah from
re-arming with 20,000 Syrian and
Iranian rockets. Did you demand peace
from the Arabs? And what if you are
wrong about the ayatollahs in Iran?
What if the ayatollahs mean what they
say, just like another genocidal tyrant
in World War II? What if trusting other
governments to stop the ayatollahs
leads to another 6 million Jews being
murdered in a single ash? Will you
and the world say I am sorry, again?
Larry Feinstein
San Carlos
Clarifying position on Iran
Editor,
The letter published in the March 15
edition of the Daily Journal from
Patricia Gray accuses me of advocating
America attacking Iran in my letter of
March 12. If someone is going to
attack me, at least be honest. Nowhere
in that letter did I advocate, or hint, that
America should attack Iran. I presented
a case for taking Iran seriously, and if
Israel does attack, to know the reason
why. Israel is a sovereign country, and
must do what it has to do to continue to
exist.
Saul Eisenstat, MD
Los Altoss
Reality of threat of nuclear Iran
Editor,
Patricia Gray (author of a letter pub-
lished in the March 15 edition of the
Daily Journal) is appalled that some
letter writers take the threat of nuclear
bombs in the hands of Irans Islamic
terror cheerleading Mullahs very seri-
ously and urge thinking seriously about
destroying their atomic weapons capa-
bility. Instead, Ms. Gray urges that we
concentrate our resources on such
things as solar panels for all our build-
ings. Does Ms. Gray think it really
matters how many buildings are solar
paneled if our children and grandchil-
dren live in those buildings under the
daily threat of atomic annihilation?
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Contra Costa Times
O
ne of the many visions of
Steve Jobs was an all-iPad
classroom in which digital
textbooks replace expensive hardback
books. With the technology developed
and widely disseminated, his dream
should already be a reality.
Mobile devices like the iPad offer far
more than low-cost texts, they can be
valuable teaching tools that greatly
expand students ability to access infor-
mation, explore and create. Moreover,
young students are no strangers to
them.
San Ramon Valley school district
spokesman Terry Koehne understands
this. He said that using an iPad, for
many kids, is like what using a pencil
was to their parents. These kids are
born with a digital device in their
hands. Theyre digital natives. The rest
of us are digital immigrants.
Therein lies a challenge for the
immigrants to accommodate the
natives. If young students have the
ability and desire to use digital devices,
why not use the new technology to
teach them?
Some school districts agree and have
embarked on ambitious programs to
employ iPads or similar devices. The
San Ramon Valley district has a three-
year plan to boost technology, includ-
ing iPads in schools.
The Emery district in Alameda
County plans to use bond money to buy
an iPad for every student in grades
seven to 12. Acalanes High in Lafayette
used iPads in the classroom, and other
schools have pilot programs.
Theres a lot more to mobile digital
devices than a new way to access texts.
They can change the way teachers pres-
ent core materials. Students can interact
with iBooks, view objects in three
dimensions, individualize lessons and
view related materials.
John Perry, director of information
technology in the Emery school district,
is right in saying it is time for the edu-
cation industry to catch up with the stu-
dents, some of whom have been using
digital technology for years.
Unfortunately, there is still a digital
divide. Wealthier school districts and
families have access to the latest tech-
nology, while many students in poorer
neighborhoods do not.
That is why it is so important for all
school districts to provide digital
devices to all students. With the spread
of Wi-Fi on campuses, it is possible for
every student in every classroom to
have an iPad or something like it.
Universal distribution of mobile digital
devices can eliminate the unfair techno-
logical advantage some students have
while enhancing learning of all stu-
dents.
Of course, the devices by themselves
do not provide an adequate education.
School districts need to gure out what
they want to teach and then buy the
right technology to help them succeed.
Despite the obvious and exciting
advantages of digital devices, there is
still some resistance. One teacher in
Palo Alto complained that the devices
dont help our kids be prepared to be in
the classroom. Perhaps its the class-
room and teacher that need to make an
adjustment. Another complaint made by
school districts is the cost of providing
iPads to every student. In a time of
tight education budgets, this is a real
issue, although it shouldnt be.
According to research by the Bay
Area News Group, providing an iPad
and digital texts for a class of 32 stu-
dents for six years (the typical life span
of a textbook) is $36,000. The cost of
regular texts and workbooks for the
same class for six years is $11,328. The
difference is $24,672, which comes out
to and additional expenditure of
$128.50 per student per year.
According to the National Education
Association, California spends $9,541
per student per year. Thus the cost of
providing students with mobile digital
devices like iPads would be an increase
in overall school spending of just 1.34
percent.
Even with a weak economy and tight
education budgets, there is no real scal
reason California cannot move ahead
and provide its students with the latest
21st century technology.
State should provide students digital devices
What you want and
what you can have
O
ne of the requirements of personal maturity is under-
standing the limitations of what one can have, despite
how much one
earnestly wishes for more.
This applies to nations, also.
I particularly refer to military
interventions. The United
States earnestly and sincerely
entered the Vietnam crisis hop-
ing to save the south from
being taken over by the north,
considering that the latter
called itself communist. But
the reality is it was more of a
civil war, after which the
reunited nation began moving
into a market economy.
Because we had become the
strongest nation in the world,
we assumed we could pull that off. That mistake, believing that
strong nations can permanently control and direct other
nations, has plagued the strongest as the Roman and British
Empires, in particular, found out. For example, Britain
assumed it could do so with India when that nation had a pop-
ulation nine times its size. With so many colonies around the
globe, it was impossible for it to keep a sufciently large per-
manent military presence to retain control.
It is this sort of conceit an arrogance of power that got
us into a land war in the divided nation of Vietnam, with a total
population of 60 million. In order to have our way there we
would have needed a permanent occupation. That would have
just pleased the then Soviet Union, having our troops tied up
there with a death loss of 58,000, the wounding of more than
130,000 and, collaterally, the drugging and mental break down
of innumerable others of our young.
Then, we get embroiled in the landmass of Iraq, something
wisely avoided by President George H. W. Bush and General
Colin Powell after Desert Storm, expecting to create a
democracy in a nation of 25 million of an entirely different cul-
ture. And people, such as little old me, warned that as soon as
we pulled out it would go right back to the 1,400-year
internecine battles we had interrupted with our invasion. And,
that is happening right now, after the government asked us to
leave. American human toll: 5,000 dead, 42,000 wounded.
Chasing Bin Laden, we entered the landmass of Afghanistan
10 years ago, with an estimated population of 34 million and
became embroiled in war with our previous ally against their
Russian invasion, the Taliban. How could our leaders at that
time not have realized that we cannot permanently defeat an
indigenous army made up from a population that has been
there, perhaps, more than a thousand years and just pull out
and go home, as planned? Shattered American lives: 1,800
dead, 10,000 wounded.
And, that is not counting the estimated trillions of dollars
these adventures cost that could have been used to further build
up and strengthen our own nation.
Moral: Its not what you want but what you can realistically
have. Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas rightly called it
The Arrogance of Power, or the immortality syndrome of an
older nation becoming an adolescent in power.
***
Rick Santorums victories in some of the Republican primar-
ies in the South, narrow as they have been, doesnt surprise me.
He is an excellent campaigner, a very likable guy, sincere and
forthright in his convictions and an underdog, nancially, to the
super-funded Romney and Gingrich.
Of course, I would be concerned about what those convic-
tions are that stir his soul so deeply. If I would need to con-
dense them, it would be this advocate of no walls between his
church and state in our land would, as president, seek to imple-
ment its tenets legislatively.
But, since the conservatives have complained endlessly they
have not been able to gain the White House recently because
their candidates have not been conservative enough, I would
like to see him take the Republican nomination. Then, in the
election, we would have a clear-cut voter test of the political
and economic philosophies of the majority of our citizens, even
to the most extreme.
They know what they want. Lets see if they can have it.
***
Other than that, Ive come to the conclusion that conservative
candidates are like suicide bombers. The more they ignite
their bombs against their competition, the more they blow
themselves up for the national elections. And, as for conserva-
tive talk show bombers, now advertisers are also shying
away from Mark Levin, Tom Leykis, Michael Savage, Glenn
Beck and Sean Hannity. Conservative defenders of these, right-
fully, counter that liberal talk show hosts more often get a pass
on the demeaning names they use. But there is simply no other
occasion in talk media history that has even been within a
country mile of Rushs nine hours of tirade, ending with his
suggestion that Fluke and other women make videos of their
sexual experiences. Bamm!!
Keith Kreitman has been a resident of Foster City for 26 years.
After degrees in political science and journalism and advanced
studies in law, he retired after a 50-year business career in
insurance, as a commodities options broker and with four
major private corporations. His column appears in the week-
end edition.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,232.62 -0.15% 10-Yr Bond 2.298 +0.75%
Nasdaq3,055.26 -0.04% Oil (per barrel) 107.150002
S&P 500 1,404.17 +0.11% Gold 1,660.50
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK It was a mundane
end to an electrifying week on the stock
market.
Stock indexes wavered indecisively
between small gains and losses Friday
before closing mixed. Earlier in the
week, the Standard & Poors 500 and the
Nasdaq composite index were on a tear,
hitting levels that hadnt been reached in
years.
On Friday, the Dow Jones industrial
average and the Nasdaq both ended the
day down. The Dow fell 20.14 points to
13,232.62. The Nasdaq fell 1.11 points
to 3,055.26. The broader S&P 500 index
edged up 1.57 points to 1,404.17.
Despite Fridays losses, the three
major indexes were all still up more than
2 percent for the week. The Dow had its
rst down day after seven straight gains,
ending its longest winning streak since
February 2011.
Investors were weighing competing
reports about the health of the U.S.
economy. A key measure of consumer
sentiment came in lower than expected,
and high gas prices continued to weigh
down hopes about a recovery. On the
plus side, prices for other goods,
including food, stabilized.
Telly Zachariades, a partner at The
Valence Group investment bank, said the
market appears to be on the upswing,
even if its marred by a few off-days.
Its almost like today was a spring train-
ing game that ended up getting rained
out, he said.
Others think the markets rise earlier
this week only masks underlying prob-
lems in the economys fundamentals,
like uncertainty over oil prices and tax
policies and the countrys burgeoning
decit.
The market is giving us a free pass on
our unsustainable fiscal positions
through the presidential election, said
Barry Knapp, head of equity strategies at
Barclays Capital. But in 2013, were
going to have to deal with this.
What weve seen today, Knapp
added, is a little bit of a warning sign.
The markets back-and-forth pattern
this week was caused partly by conict-
ing news about the economy. The
University of Michigans closely
watched consumer sentiment index
came in below analysts expectations,
driven by worries about rising gas prices.
Stocks end mixed
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange
and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Dole Food Co. Inc., up $1.16 at $11.13
The fruit and vegetable company said that it
returned to protability in its scal fourth
quarter as it reduced its costs.
Renesola Ltd., up 35 cents at $2.81
Although the Chinese solar panel maker said
that it lost money in its fourth quarter,it expects
current quarter shipments to rise.
New York & Co. Inc., up 18 cents at $3.67
The womens clothing retailer posted a smaller
loss in the scal fourth quarter than what Wall
Street analysts had been expecting.
Getty Realty Corp., down $1.71 at $14.25
The Jericho, N.Y.-based real estate investment
trust said it will defer its next dividend payment
citing cash ow uncertainty.
Nasdaq
Perfect World Co. Ltd., up $3.46 at $16.01
The Chinese online game developers scal
fourth-quarter net income more than doubled,
as more users played the companys games.
Buffalo Wild Wings Inc., down $3.10 at $86.33
A Wedbush analyst downgraded shares of the
restaurant operator saying that the price of
chicken wings will likely stay high.
Transocean Ltd., up $2.56 at $58.70
A Citi analyst raised his price target on the
offshore oil rig owner by $3 to $65, based on
three new drilling contracts.
Cogo Group Inc., up $1.16 at $3.10
The Chinese distributor of computer parts said
that its founder and chief executive offered to
buy 30 percent of the company.
Big movers
By Kelvin Chan and Robert Barr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Apples latest iPad drew die-hard fans
to stores in the U.S. and nine other coun-
tries Friday, many of whom lined up for
hours to be among the rst to buy one.
The third version of the iPad went on
sale there at 8 a.m. local time, with 25
other countries getting it a week later.
The new model, at prices starting at
$499 in the U.S., comes with a faster
processor, a much sharper screen and an
improved camera, though the changes
arent as big as the upgrade to the iPad 2.
I dont think its worth the price but I
guess Im a victim of society, Athena
May, 21, said in Paris.
About 450 people lined up outside
Apples Ginza store in downtown
Tokyo. Some had spent the night
sleeping outside the store. In
Madison, Wis., people brought reclin-
ing lawn chairs for naps, while a few
played games on older iPads.
Dipak Varsani, 21, got in line in
London at 1 a.m. Thursday local time
and said he was drawn by the new
devices better screen.
Youve got clearer movies and clear-
er games, he said. I use it as a multi-
media device.
In Hong Kong, a steady stream of buy-
ers picked up their new devices at preset
times at the citys sole Apple store after
entering an online lottery.
The system, which required buyers to
have local ID cards, also helped thwart
visitors from mainland China Apples
fastest growing market who have a
reputation for scooping up Apple gadg-
ets to get them earlier and avoid sales tax
at home. A release date in China has not
yet been announced.
Kelvin Tsui, a 26-year-old hospital
worker in Hong Kong, was allowed to
buy two and planned to sell the second
to make money.
Two years after the debut of the rst
iPad, the devices launch has become the
second-biggest gadget event of the
year, after the annual iPhone release.
Customers could have ordered iPads
ahead of time to arrive at home Friday,
but many came out in person for the
atmosphere.
People always stop to talk to us,
Harry Barrington-Mountford, 22, said in
London. I am exhausted though. I have
only had about 45 minutes of sleep.
Christos Pavlides, 24, got to a down-
town Philadelphia store at 10 p.m.
Thursday and was the rst in line. He
already owns the two previous iPad
models and several iPhones and gures
the new iPad was next.
Despite competition from cheaper
tablet computers such as Amazon.com
Inc.s Kindle Fire, the iPad remains the
most popular tablet computer. Apple Inc.
has sold more than 55 million iPads
since its debut in 2010.
Apple fans buy iPad on first day
By Peter Svensson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK AT&T Inc. on Friday
gave up on appealing an $850 award
won by an iPhone user in small claims
court, and sent him a check.
Matt Spaccarelli, of Simi Valley,
Calif., had sued the phone company
because it was slowing down the data
service on his phone. Spaccarelli has an
unlimited data plan, but as of this fall,
AT&T had begun slowing download
speeds for these subscribers if they use
more than a certain amount of data in a
month.
Spaccarelli argued that unlimited is
unlimited, and the judge agreed at a
hearing on Feb. 24.
AT&T initially said it would appeal
the decision. It then offered to go into
settlement talks with him, in a letter that
implied that AT&T was looking at can-
celling his service completely.
Spaccarelli has admitted to tethering
his phone to other devices, providing
them Internet access through AT&Ts
wireless network. Thats against AT&Ts
rules.
Spaccarelli turned the settlement offer
down.
AT&T scotches appeal, pays small-claims litigant
By Elliot Spagat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO A judge approved a
settlement Friday to give owners of
Honda Civic hybrids up to $200 each
over claims that the fuel economy of the
cars was inated.
In making the ruling. Superior Court
Judge Timothy Taylor cast aside argu-
ments that a motorists victory in small
claims court entitled other owners to a
larger award.
Taylor said the essence of a settlement
is compromise.
No doubt plaintiffs would have loved
to have gotten more. Certainly their
counsel had every incentive to get as
much as possible, he said. Honda
undoubtedly has many arrows left in its
quiver, and certainly would have pre-
ferred to pay nothing.
Taylor listened to nearly two hours of
arguments before issuing the nal rul-
ing.
The case gained widespread attention
after a Los Angeles woman won a
$9,867 judgment last month against
Honda in small claims court a ruling
the carmaker vowed to appeal. Plaintiff
Heather Peters opted out of the class
action so she could try to claim a larger
damage award for her the failure of her
2006 Civic to deliver the 50 mpg that
was promised.
The judge said Peters legal victory
carried little weight.
Peters, who recently reinstated her law
license, said Friday that she was disap-
pointed but not surprised at the ruling by
Taylor.
The judge got testy with her last
month when she tried to address him at a
hearing, saying he had not yet received
confirmation that her license was
renewed.
Judge OKs Honda mileage settlement
Administration outlines
options on birth control
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Obama administration signaled
Friday its willing to help insurance companies offset the cost
of providing free birth control to women working at church-
afliated institutions like hospitals and colleges.
By nding a way to make the middlemen whole, the admin-
istration may be able to extricate itself from an unexpected
political furor over birth control that has mobilized partisans
across the political spectrum a half-century after the advent of
the pill.
A 32-page regulatory proposal unveiled Friday offered
options for providing free birth control to women whose
employers object to contraception on religious grounds. The
government now classies birth control as preventive care, and
President Barack Obamas health care law requires health
plans to cover prevention at no cost to the consumer.
Churches, synagogues, mosques and other institutions
whose primary purpose is to propagate faith are exempt from
the mandate. But when the administration sought to impose the
requirement on religious nonprots serving the public, it trig-
gered a backlash. That forced President Barack Obama himself
to offer a compromise: insurers, not the religious employers
would bear the responsibility.
Fridays proposal lists options for carrying out the presi-
dents compromise without forcing insurers to bear the whole
cost or tempting them to engineer backdoor maneuvers to
recoup money from religious institutions that object to birth
control.
Administration ofcials are seeking public comment for 90
days and will sift the responses before making any nal deci-
sion. Reecting the sensitivity of the issue, ofcials spoke only
on condition of anonymity.
Our general principle is that we want to maintain the pos-
ture that a religious organization that objects to paying for con-
traception, wont, said an ofcial who briefed reporters.
<< CSM OL Fanaika signs with LSU, page 15
Saint Marys is one and done, page 13
Weekend, March 17-18, 2012
RECORD-SETTING ROUND: MENLO BOYS GOLF TEAM SETS NEW SCHOOL SCORING MARK WITH TEAM TOTAL OF 4-UNDER 176 >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After ending the previous two Peninsula
Athletic League seasons looking up at
Hillsdale atop the Bay Division standings, the
Carlmont softball team appears poised to
retake the top spot and, like the Scots did from
2003 to 2009 in winning the Bay Division
title, hold on to it for a long time.
The Scots are off to a 7-1 start to the pre-
season with the PAL opener scheduled for
Tuesday. In the Bay Division, Aragon will
open at Capuchino, Burlingame heads to the
coast to take on Half Moon Bay, while the
schedule makers wasted little time in match-
ing up the two-time defending Hillsdale
Knights at the Scots.
In the Ocean Division openers Wednesday,
Menlo-Atherton should be a good test for a
hot Woodside squad, last years surprise team
San Mateo travels to a strong Sequoia side,
while Mills rejoins the Ocean after a year in
the Bay and will travel to South City. El
Camino at Jefferson wraps up the opening-
day schedule.
All games are slated for 4 p.m. starts.
As usual, the Bay Division should be wide
open as it continues to rank as one of the top
divisions in the Central Coast Section.
Carlmont, however, with eight returners and a
four-deep pitching staff, has to be the odds-on
favorite to take down Hillsdale.
We have a pretty good group of girls, said
Carlmont looks poised to regain Bay crown
By Steve Reed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GREENSBORO, N.C. The Lehigh
Mountain Hawks said they werent afraid of
mighty Duke.
Maybe no one believed them at the time, but
the Patriot League champions proved they
were serious.
C.J. McCollum scored 30 points and Lehigh
upset Duke 75-70 to become the second No.
15 seed to beat a No. 2 during a wild Friday in
the NCAA tournament.
The Mountain Hawks are the sixth 15 seed
overall to pull off the trick. Norfolk State
edged Missouri 86-84 in the West Regional
earlier in the day, and No. 13 seed Ohio
knocked off Michigan to add to the madness.
Duke dropped its rst tournament game for
only the second time in the past 16 years, and
this one occurred just 55 miles from its cam-
pus. The Blue Devils also lost their opener
against 11th-seeded Virginia Commonwealth
in 2007.
The Blue Devils had no answer for the
speedy McCollum, the two-time Patriot
League player of the year and the nations
fth-leading scorer.
It didnt help that the Blue Devils hit just 6
of 26 shots from 3-point range.
Lehigh (27-7) led most of the game, draw-
ing support from North Carolina fans who
borrowed brown signs from Mountain Hawks
supporters that read Go Lehigh to root
Lehigh
stuns
Duke
By Joedy McCreary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RALEIGH, N.C. The stealthy 49ers
are in the chase for Peyton Manning. The
Dolphins and Cardinals are out. And the
Broncos and Titans want to make sure the
four-time NFL MVP is healthy.
Got all that?
After a brief lull, the pursuit of Manning
sure got interesting in a hurry Friday.
The years top free agent, who has been
rehabbing in North Carolina after a string
of neck surgeries, threw the football at
Dukes athletic facilities for Hall of Fame
QB turned Broncos executive John Elway
along with Denver coach John Fox.
The workout lasted a little under two
hours, and when it was over Elway seemed
convinced that Manning is still Manning.
We enjoyed visiting with Peyton today
in N.C., he wrote on his Twitter account.
He threw the ball great and looked very
comfortable out there.
A few minutes later, Elway posted:
Watching him throw today was the next
step in this important process for our team
and Peyton. It was a productive visit and
went well.
See 49ERS, Page 17
Bay Division appears wide open; Woodside, Sequoia look like the teams to beat Ocean
See SOFTBALL, Page 16
See UPSET, Page 13
No. 15 Lehigh 75, No. 2 Duke 70
SPORTS 12
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
LOTUS
BUDDHIST CIRCLE
(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)
851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D
San Mateo
650.200.3755
English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM
Study: Tuesday at 7 PM
www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
FOSTER CITY
ISLAND UNITED CHURCH
Foster City's
only three-denomination Church
Methodist, Presbyterian (U.S.A.),
and United Church of Christ
1130 Balclutha Drive (at Comet)
Worship/Child Care/Sunday School
at 10am
All are Welcome!
Call (650) 349-3544
THE
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Synagogues
PENINSULA TEMPLE
BETH EL
1700 Alameda de las Pulgas
San Mateo at Hwy 92
(650) 341-7701
Friday Shabbat Services 6:30 pm
Except the last Friday of the Month
7:30 pm
We offer Tot Shabbat, Family Services,
Adult Education and Innovative
Education Programs for
Pre-K thru 12th Grade
Join Us!
Serving the Peninsula for over 50 years
A member of the Union for
Reform Judaism
Visit our website www.ptbe.org
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Whenever a team does something unexpected
early in the season, coaches can sometimes
wonder if their team is peaking too soon.
Or, it can be a sign of things to come.
Well have to wait to see how the rest of the
season plays out, but the Menlo School boys
golf team is on pace to have an outstanding
2012. The Knights set a school record in beat-
ing Crystal Springs, 176-220 at Poplar Creek
Golf Course Thursday afternoon.
The score of 176 tops the mark of 184 set last
season. But the most amazing part is the
Knights nished 4-under par as a team, with six
birdies and two eagles among them. Usually a
team will have one, maybe two, players shoot a
sub-par round. Menlo had three under par and
two others just miss, nishing at 1-over.
Not many teams shoot 4-under, said Menlo
coach Dave Buchanan. It was really quite a
round.
Making the achievement even more amazing
is the fact the Knights record-setting round
came in less than ideal conditions. While the
wind and on-and-off drizzle can make the ball
dance around in the air, the greens were espe-
cially receptive. If the Knights could get their
ball on the green, it would stay.
Perhaps those conditions helped contribute to
eagles from junior Andrew Buchanan, who
added two birdies on the day for a 3-under 33,
and freshman Ethan Wong, who nished the
day with a 1-under 35.
Wongs was especially impressive. He drove
the 259-yard, par-4 seventh hole and then
drained a 10-foot putt for eagle.
The great thing about Poplar is, there are
three drivable par 4s, so these guys were licking
their chops at that, Buchanan said. [Wongs]
was the closest ball, so he had to sit there on the
green and watch three chips and four putts, and
it didnt bother him at all.
Finishing between Buchanan and Wong was
senior Jackson Dean, who shot a 2-under 34.
Dean was nailed down the stretch, scoring a
birdie on three straight holes 6, 7 and 8 to
turn a 1-over into a 2-under.
Seniors James Huber and Will Petit both n-
ished with 1-over 37s.
[Huber] was the one [who] really came
through for us. He made a big jump in his
scores this week. Hes been (shooting) in the
50s, Dave Buchanan said. [Petit] scrambled
well.
Colum Coyne, who is playing his rst year of
varsity golf, red a 7-over 43. Not great, but not
terrible.
For everybody but Andrew, this was every-
bodys best round of the year, but only our third
match, Dave Buchanan said. I dont think, at
the end of the season, this will be their lowest
scores of the season.
Menlo puts together record-breaking round
Not many teams shoot 4-under. It was really quite a round.
Dave Buchanan, Menlo boys golf coach
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MESA, Ariz. Eric Surkamp made anoth-
er pitch to become part of San Franciscos
rotation.
A long shot to claim a spot, Surkamp threw
four effective innings as the Giants beat the
Chicago Cubs 3-2 Friday.
Surkamp went 2-2 in six starts for San
Francisco as a rookie last season. He gave up
one run and four hits, striking out four.
Im happy with how I did, said Surkamp,
nicked only by Anthony Rizzos home run.
My arm speed is coming back a little bit. I
ran into a little dead arm early in spring train-
ing. But Im starting to feel better.
Surkamps chances to make the rotation rest
on whether the Giants start somebody on the
disabled list.
Eric threw well, Giants manager Bruce
Bochy said. It seems like hes developing
more and more condence each time he gets
out there.
For the Cubs, Matt Garza chopped into his
sky-high spring ERA by allowing two runs
and three hits in four innings. He walked one
and struck out three.
I pulled out all my stuff today, said Garza,
hoping to be the opening day starter for the
Cubs. That makes it a lot easier when I need
a weapon besides a fastball and a changeup.
Im happy we made progress but Im still
not done, he said. Ive done this the last
seven years. Six actually it took one year to
gure it out. I getting my ready at my pace. I
know my body.
Garza carried a 16.20 ERA into the game.
He sailed through the rst three innings before
giving up two runs in the fourth.
When April 5th comes, Ill be ready to go.
Its one step at a time to get everything right,
get everything in sync. The hardest thing
about this game is getting back into the
rhythm, he said.
Rizzos homer was his second of the spring.
Catcher Blake Lalli, a non-roster invitee, also
hit a solo homer for the Cubs.
Cubs manager Dale Sveum has been
preaching aggressive baserunning. But in this
game, the approach backred in the ninth
inning.
With the Cubs trailing 3-2, Joe Mather sin-
gled but was then thrown out trying to go form
rst to third on Brett Jacksons sacrice bunt.
For the Giants, Buster Posey went 1 for 2.
He is scheduled to serve as the DH in a minor
league game, then take a few days off, Bochy
said.
The Cubs will play a split-squad set
Saturday, with one game against the Athletics
at Phoenix and the other being the rst of two
against the Texas Rangers in Las Vegas.
It breaks up spring training, Sveum said
of the Vegas trip. I dont know if its a
reward. Youre still playing. You dont get to
enjoy Vegas, though Im sure somebody will.
NOTES: The game drew a packed crowd of
13,245...The Cubs picked up RHP Frankie de
la Cruz off waivers from Milwaukee.
Surkamp strong in Giants win
Pettitte makes
comeback, rejoins Yankees
TAMPA, Fla Andy Pettitte went with his
heart and headed back to the hill.
A year after the star left-hander said he did-
nt have the desire to keep pitching, Pettitte
ended his brief retirement and announced
Friday he was returning to the New York
Yankees.
Three months shy of his 40th birthday,
Pettitte signed a minor league deal with an invi-
tation to spring training. If his comeback is suc-
cessful and hes added to the major league ros-
ter, he would get a $2.5 million, one-year con-
tract.
My desire to work is back, Pettitte said on
a conference call. The commitment level was-
nt there last year. I dont know if it was
because I had a year off, just my desire to work
was back. This is where Im at right now.
Yankees general manager Brian Cashman
said there are no incentives in the deal and that
Pettitte who is expected in camp Tuesday
will only be a starter. Pettitte has pitched in the
majors for 16 seasons, 13 with the Yankees.
Baseball brief
SPORTS 13
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
against their rivals.
Lehigh coach Brett Reed said before the
game his team came to Greensboro to do more
than just compete and thats exactly what it
did.
The Mountain Hawks led most of the rst
half despite shooting just 38 percent from the
eld.
Lehigh grabbed the lead for good at the 8:21
mark of the second half when Mackey
McKnight made a 3-pointer.
The Mountain Hawks momentum contin-
ued to build as the game went on and they
started to pull away in the nal three minutes.
McCollum hit a 3-pointer off a screen from
Gabe Knutson and John Adams followed with
a breakaway dunk to push the lead to 61-54
with two minutes to go.
Duke would get as close as three twice in
the nal 30 seconds, including when Quinn
Cook hit a 3-pointer with 1.2 seconds left.
Duke fouled McCollum on the inbounds
pass and he made up for two earlier misses
from the line by hitting both shots to seal a
shocking victory that sent the Greensboro
Coliseum crowd into a frenzy.
Lehigh got a huge game from Knutson, who
scored 17 points on 5-of-5 shooting from the
eld and a 6-of-7 performance from the foul
line.
McCollum was 9 of 24 from the eld and 10
of 16 from the foul line. He also handed out
six assists and grabbed six rebounds.
Mason Plumlee and Austin Rivers led Duke
with 19 points apiece. The Blue Devils (27-7),
who were playing without injured forward
Ryan Kelly, nished the year with back-to-
back losses. They lost to Florida State in the
ACC seminals.
Continued from page 11
UPSET
By Eric Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OMAHA, Neb. Purdue made it through
its NCAA opener again, but Saint Marys
made it interesting.
Lewis Jackson made the go-ahead free
throws with 22.8 seconds left after the Gaels
had rallied from 11 points down late to take
their rst lead, and the Boilermakers won 72-
69 in the Midwest Regional on Friday night.
Jorden Page hit a 3-pointer with 44.2 sec-
onds left to nish a 14-2 run that brought the
Gaels back from a 66-55 decit with 4:24 to
play.
Purdues Terone Johnson and Saint Marys
Clint Steindl were called for traveling before
Jackson made his free throws. Page badly
missed what would have been a go-ahead 3
with 10 seconds left, and Robbie Hummel
made two free throws for a three-point lead.
Rob Jones, who had 17 of his 23 points in
the second half, missed a 3 at the buzzer for
the seventh-seeded Gaels (27-6).
Purdue won its NCAA tournament opener
for the 14th straight time. The Gaels were
back in the tournament for the rst time since
their surprising run to the round of 16 in 2010.
Johnson had 21 points for the 10th-seeded
Boilermakers (22-12). Jackson scored 15 of
his 18 in the second half and Hummel and
Anthony Johnson nished with 10 apiece.
Purdue turned back the Gaels repeatedly in
the second half before the West Coast
Conference champions made one last push.
Matthew Dellavedovas three-point play got
the Gaels within 66-58 with 4 minutes to play.
After Dellavedova took a charge from D.J.
Byrd, he drove the length of the oor for a
layup. Hummel missed at the other end, and
Jones hit a jumper to make it a four-point
game with 2:41 left.
Terone Johnson badly missed a free throw,
and Jones hit a baseline jumper.
Jacksons drive to the hoop put Purdue back
up 68-64 with 1:37 left. Dellavedova made a
couple of free throws to pull the Gaels within
two. After Hummel missed a 3, Page took a
pass from Dellavedova for his only 3 of the
night and a 69-68 Saint Marys lead.
Hummel, back in the tournament after miss-
ing the past two Purdue appearances because
of ACL tears in his right knee, didnt seem to
miss a beat on the big stage. He hit an early 3,
swapped some skin with Ryne Smith on the
way back to play defense, and later got a
friendly bounce from the rim on a baseline
jumper.
But Terone Johnson, starting his eighth
straight game after beginning the season on
the bench, carried the Boilermakers in the rst
half. He shot 6 of 8 and had 15 points, almost
double his season average.
He scored seven points in an 8-0 Purdue
run, nishing the spurt with a layup after Byrd
rebounded Jacksons missed free throw for a
27-16 lead.
Saint Marys struggled for the rst 20 min-
utes, shooting just 31 percent and missing all
but one of their 15 3-point attempts. The
Gaels nished at 42 percent and went 4 of 25
on 3s.
The atmosphere at CenturyLink Center was
subdued early, with the crowd drained from
No. 15 seed Norfolk States 86-84 upset of
Missouri in the previous game.
During the rst media timeout a group of
Norfolk State players walked into arena, some
still in game jerseys, and got a big cheer as
they lifted their hands to raise the roof.
A short NCAA tournament stay for St. Marys
No. 10 Purdue 72, No. 7 St. Marys 69
West Region
No. 15 Norfolk St. 86, No. 2 Missouri 84
OMAHA, Neb. Kyle OQuinn had 26
points and 14 rebounds, making several key
plays in the closing minutes, and No. 15 seed
Norfolk State held on to stun second-seeded
Missouri 86-84 on Friday in the West Regional.
Pendarvis Williams and Chris McEachin each
added 20 points for the MEAC champion
Spartans (26-9), who made their rst trip to the
NCAA tournament a memorable one. They
became the fth No. 15 seed to beat a No. 2 and
the rst since fellow conference member
Hampton in 2001.
OQuinn had a chance to take some of the
drama out of the nish when he went to the free
throw line with 3.8 seconds to go, but the 70-per-
cent foul shooter missed both tries.
Missouri coach Frank Haith called a timeout
with 2.9 seconds left to set up a nal play, and
the ball wound up in the hands of Phil Pressey.
He took a couple of hard dribbles and let loose a
3-pointer from the wing that clanked off the
back iron as the buzzer sounded.
Norfolk State advanced to play No. 7 seed
Florida in the third round Sunday.
Michael Dixon led Big 12 tournament cham-
pion Missouri (30-5) with 22 points, and Pressey
and fellow guard Marcus Denmon nished with
20 points each. Pressey also had eight assists.
No. 9 Saint Louis 61, No. 8 Memphis 54.
COLUMBUS, Ohio Kwamain Mitchell
scored 22 points, including three big 3-pointers,
and Saint Louis rode its gritty defense to a 61-54
victory over Memphis on Friday night in a West
Regional second-round game.
Mitchell closed the rst half by banking in a 3,
then nailed two others to help the ninth-seeded
Billikens (26-7) overturn an eight-point second-
half decit. Theyll move on to play the winner
of LIU Brooklyn and top-seeded Michigan State
on Sunday.
Brian Conklin added 16 points, including ve
free throws in the nal minute to salt the game
away.
Will Barton had 16 points for the eighth-seed-
ed Tigers (26-9), who had won 20 of their last 23
games.
Midwest Region
No. 11 N.C. State E 79, No. 6 SDSU 65
COLUMBUS, Ohio Richard Howell
scored 22 points, double his season average,
and North Carolina State used its muscle
inside and sticky defense to beat San Diego
State.
Lorenzo Brown added 17 points and C.J.
Leslie 15 for the Wolfpack (23-12), who
improved to 12-5 in NCAA tournament open-
ers. N.C. State has won at least one game in
seven of its last eight trips.
Jamaal Franklin had 23 points and Chase
Tapley 19 for the Aztecs (26-8), regular-season
champions of the Mountain West Conference.
No. 13 Ohio 65, No. 4 Michigan 60
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Walter Offutt
grabbed a loose ball, was fouled by Evan
Smotrycz and sank both of his free throws
with 6.8 seconds left to preserve Ohios 65-60
upset of Michigan on Friday night in the sec-
ond round of the NCAA tournaments
Midwest Regional.
The 13th-seeded Bobcats (28-7) had the
Wolverines on their heels throughout the
game, but Michigans Trey Burke hit a 3 with
4:12 left to cut it to 63-60. But the Wolverines
missed their nal ve shots, four by Burke.
Fourth-seeded Michigan (24-10) got the
rebound on Burkes third miss, a 3-point shot
with 22 seconds left, but Smotrycz lost control
of the ball, and Offutt grabbed it.
Ohio shot 51.2 percent and held Michigan to
40.7 percent shooting, including 7 for 23 from
3-point range, typically the Wolverines com-
fort zone.
D.J. Cooper led the Bobcats with 21 points
on 7-of-11 shooting.
Burke nished with 16 points.
No. 8 Creighton 58, No. 9 Alabama 57
GREENSBORO, N.C. Doug McDermott
scored 16 points and Creighton overcame an
11-point decit in the second half to beat
Alabama 58-57 Friday for its rst NCAA tour-
nament victory in 10 years.
Alabama had a chance to win during the
frantic nal seconds, but Josh Jones blocked
Trevor Relefords 3-point attempt from the top
of the key as time expired.
McDermott, the MVP of the Missouri Valley
Conference and the nations third-leading
scorer at 23.2 points per game, was held score-
less for more than 14 minutes but then scored
nine points in the games nal 14 minutes.
NCAA capsules
SPORTS 14
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As the home of the San Francisco Giants,
AT&T Park has seen its fair share of low scor-
ing games.
So, Saturday, when the San Jose
Earthquakes borrow the friendly connes to
host the Houston Dynamo in a Major League
Soccer game, AT&T Park should feel right at,
well, home.
The Dynamo come into town as part of their
seven-game road trek to begin the MLS sea-
son as they patiently await the completion of
their new stadium in Houston.
The Dynamo began the year much like San
Jose, scoring a lone goal in a win against
Chivas USA.
But unlike the Dymano, the Quakes looked
like a team that had more than one idea on
offense. Their score in the 15th minute off the
foot of Chris Wondolowski was the beginning
of an evening where San Jose controlled the
run of play until the games nal two or
three minutes, there was very little doubt that
the Quakes would and should come away with
the win.
Its much too early to start thinking play-
offs, but San Jose has pieces on the 2012
squad that may in fact do some positive
things.
Last year, we would have most probably, if
not denitely, conceded a late goal, said San
Jose head coach Frank Yallop after the 1-0
win. I said this week its like a Cup nal to us
(the season opener against New England), and
we won the cup nal. So now we can build on
it.
The play of forward Steven Lenhart stood
out. The other San Jose striker didnt get on
the stat sheet, but his play up top for the
Quakes went a level above promising. Lenhart
was placed slightly in front of Wondolowski
and gave New England defenders ts the
entire night with his constant pressure on the
ball. He drew a handful of fouls and did what
he does best: cause headaches, which opens
the door for Wondolowski to score goals.
Thats not to say that Lenhart wont be expect-
ed to nd the net, but if he continues to play
the way he did against the Revolution, the
goals will come.
Speaking of pressure, Marvin Chavez, had
himself quite the game on the wings for San
Jose.
Much like Lenhart, Chavez will be looked
upon for pressure he showed last Saturday
that he has a knack for challenging lazy
defenders in their defensive third, getting
steals and jump-starting the Quakes offense
on a kind of condensed counter-attack.
Chavez did just that at least a handful of times
against the Revolution. Hes faster than the
man he replaced, Bobby Convey, and his
crosses into the box will get better as he accli-
mates himself with his new team better.
Theres no question hes got the touch:
Yallop had Chavez take all the corner kicks in
the 70 minutes that he was in the game.
Saturdays matchup with Houston will be a
defensive battle and by the looks of things,
San Jose has the soldiers for that type of
game.
Quakes hope to build on solid start
PHOTO COURTESY OF SJEARTHQUAKES.COM
New winger Marvin Chavez showed some
grit,speed and touch during the Earthquakes
1-0 win over New England last weekend. See QUAKES, Page 16
SPORTS 15
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 44 19 7 95 194 155
Pittsburgh 43 21 5 91 224 175
Philadelphia 41 22 7 89 226 199
New Jersey 41 25 5 87 196 182
N.Y. Islanders 28 32 11 67 166 214
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Ottawa 37 25 10 84 220 210
Boston 40 27 3 83 225 176
Buffalo 33 29 9 75 178 201
Toronto 31 32 8 70 205 218
Montreal 28 32 12 68 189 200
Southeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 34 23 13 81 177 195
Washington 36 29 6 78 191 200
Winnipeg 34 29 8 76 189 199
Tampa Bay 32 31 7 71 198 237
Carolina 27 29 15 69 185 211
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 45 19 8 98 186 141
Detroit 44 24 3 91 219 171
Nashville 41 21 8 90 201 181
Chicago 39 25 8 86 217 210
Columbus 22 41 7 51 161 226
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 42 20 8 92 219 177
Colorado 38 30 5 81 191 194
Calgary 34 25 12 80 180 194
Minnesota 29 31 10 68 150 194
Edmonton 27 36 7 61 185 209
PacicDivision
W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 39 28 5 83 189 192
Phoenix 35 26 11 81 188 186
San Jose 35 25 10 80 191 179
Los Angeles 33 25 12 78 159 154
Anaheim 30 30 11 71 177 196
Two points for a win,one point for overtime loss or
shootout loss.
SaturdaysGames
Philadelphia at Boston, 10 a.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 10 a.m.
Carolina at Minnesota, 11 a.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 25 19 .568
Boston 23 19 .548 1
New York 20 24 .455 5
Toronto 15 29 .341 10
New Jersey 15 30 .333 10 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 32 11 .744
Orlando 29 16 .644 4
Atlanta 25 19 .568 7 1/2
Washington 10 33 .233 22
Charlotte 6 36 .143 25 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 36 10 .783
Indiana 25 17 .595 9
Milwaukee 19 24 .442 15 1/2
Cleveland 16 25 .390 17 1/2
Detroit 16 27 .372 18 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 28 13 .683
Memphis 24 18 .571 4 1/2
Dallas 25 20 .556 5
Houston 24 20 .545 5 1/2
New Orleans 10 34 .227 19 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 10 .767
Denver 24 20 .545 9 1/2
Minnesota 22 22 .500 11 1/2
Utah 21 22 .488 12
Portland 21 23 .477 12 1/2
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 27 16 .628
L.A. Clippers 24 18 .571 2 1/2
Phoenix 21 22 .488 6
Golden State 18 22 .450 7 1/2
Sacramento 14 29 .326 13
SaturdaysGames
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m.
Toronto at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
New York at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 5p.m.
New Orleans at New Jersey, 5 p.m.
Boston at Denver, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 6p.m.
SundaysGames
Atlanta at Cleveland, 12 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 3 p.m.
Washington at Memphis, 3 p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 4 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS NHL STANDINGS
vs.Detroit
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/17
@L.A.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/20
vs.Boston
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/22
vs. Ducks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/19
vs.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/24
@Portland
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/25
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/27
vs. Bucks
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/16
vs.T-wolves
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/19
@New
Orleans
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/21
vs.Phoenix
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/24
vs.Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/26
@Anaheim
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/28
@Houston
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/22
@RedBulls
4p.m.
CSN+
4/14
vs.Real Salt
Lake
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@Philly
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/28
vs.Dynamo
2p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/17
@Toronto
10a.m.
CSN-CAL
3/24
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/31
vs. White
Caps
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/7
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Detroit 10 1 .909
Toronto 12 2 .857
Oakland 10 3 .769
Seattle 11 4 .733
Boston 7 3 .700
Kansas City 8 6 .571
Los Angeles 8 6 .571
Minnesota 7 8 .467
New York 7 8 .467
Baltimore 5 6 .455
Cleveland 4 8 .333
Tampa Bay 3 9 .250
Texas 3 9 .250
Chicago 3 10 .231
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Los Angeles 8 3 .727
San Francisco 10 4 .714
Miami 7 4 .636
Houston 7 5 .583
St. Louis 6 5 .545
Colorado 7 6 .538
San Diego 7 8 .467
Pittsburgh 6 7 .462
Chicago 6 8 .429
Milwaukee 6 8 .429
Philadelphia 6 8 .429
Washington 5 7 .417
Arizona 5 9 .357
Cincinnati 5 9 .357
New York 3 9 .250
Atlanta 2 11 .154
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings;
games against non-major league teams do not.
SaturdaysGames
St. Louis vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
Boston (ss) vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05
a.m.
Houston vs. N.Y.Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05
a.m.
Toronto (ss) vs.Atlanta (ss) at Kissimmee,Fla.,10:05
a.m.
Minnesota vs. Miami (ss) at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
Miami (ss) vs.Washington at Viera, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
Toronto(ss) vs.Philadelphiaat Clearwater,Fla.,10:05
a.m.
Atlanta (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10
a.m.
Baltimore(ss) vs.Boston(ss) at Fort Myers,Fla.,10:35
a.m.
Seattle vs.Chicago White Sox at Glendale,Ariz.,1:05
p.m.
Milwaukee vs.L.A.Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 1:05
p.m.
Cincinnati vs.Clevelandat Goodyear,Ariz.,1:05p.m.
Arizona vs.Texas (ss) at Surprise, Ariz., 1:05 p.m.
Oakland(ss) vs.SanFrancisco(ss) at Scottsdale,Ariz.,
1:05 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Las Vegas, Nev.,
1:05 p.m.
MLB SPRING TRAINING
SATURDAY
BASEBALL
Westmoor at Hillsdale,San Mateo at Mt.Eden-Hay-
ward,SacredHeart PrepatWoodside,West-Tracyat
Carlmont, 11 a.m.; Valley Christian at Serra, Half
MoonBayat Cupertino,noon;Gunnat Burlingame,
1 p.m.; Menlo-Atherton at Washington-SF, Terra
Nova at Soquel, 2 p.m.
SOFTBALL
Aragonvs.Watsonvilleat Circleof Champions tour-
nament,9 a.m.; Menlo-Atherton at Andrew Hill,10
a.m.; Burlingame at Tournament of Champions,
TBA
WHATS ON TAP
THURSDAY
MenloSchool 4, Hillsdale3
Hillsdale10020000 364
Menlo20100001462
WP Batchelder.LP Taylor.2B Wallace (H);
Greenstein (MS). Multiple hits Mayer 2 (MS).
SacredHeart Prep3, Mills 2
Mills 0100100242
SHP2000001330
WP Nahmens (1-1). LP Carney. 2B
Esponilla, Hidalgo, Pellegrini (M); Robson (SHP).
Records Sacred Heart Prep 7-1-1 overall; Mills 2-
5.
BOYS GOLF
MenloSchool 176, Crystal Springs 220
At Poplar CreekG.C., par 36
M Buchanan 33;Dean 34;Wong 35;Petit,Huber
37; Coyne 43.
Harker 190, SacredHeart Prep193
At SanJoseC.C., par 33
SHP Ackerman 34;Vetter 38; B.KNox 39; K.Knox
40; Lamb 42; Clark 43.
H McNealy 32; Dwivedi 35; Roter 38; Cherukuri
39; Jia 46; Vij 48.
Records Sacred Heart Prep 3-1 WBAL; Harker
3-0.
BOYS LACROSSE
MenloSchool 8, MountainView7
MenloSchool 3041 8
MountainView22217
Menlogoal scorers Grzejka6;Ferguson2.Menlo
assists Osborne 5; Buja, Grzejka. Menlo goalie
saves McNally 10. Records Menlo School 2-
1 SCVAL.
BOYSTENNIS
SacredHeart Prep4, Harker 3
SINGLES Tzeng (H) d. Pizzuti 6-2, 2-6, 6-1; Kirk-
patrick (SHP) d.Chang 7-6(3),6-2; Jain (H) d.Kremer
3-6, 6-1, (10-8); Reoglu (SHP) d. Chu 6-3, 6-3. DOU-
BLES Sarwal-Foster (SHP) d. Naruyen-Dseirazu
6-2,6-3;Savage-Boggs (SHP) d.Mangat-Panu 4-6,6-
3, 6-2; Yang-Luong (H) d. Evans-Walecka 0-6, 6-0,
6-4.
GIRLS SWIMMING
Burlingame90, Sequoia55
200medleyrelay Burlingame(Goldman,S.Saisi,
Thomas,Brennand) 1:54.21; 200 free Goldman
(B) 2:01.80; 200 IM Goldman (B) 2:11.53; 50 free
Park (S) 26.28; 100 y Brennand (B) 1:01.30;
100 free Thomas (B) 54.79; 500 free Maxwell
(B) 5:14.38; 200 free relay Burlingame (Ander-
son,Gebhard,Girard,Maxwell) 1:39.43; 100 back
Li (B) 1:07.57; 100 breast S. Saisi (B) 1:12.28.
BOYS SWIMMING
Burlingame111, Sequoia38
200medleyrelayBurlingame(Tan,Pease,Yeager,
Bakar) 1:45.48; 200 free Tan (B) 1:48.71; 200 IM
Pease (B) 2:12.55; 50 free Bakar (B) 23.34; 100
y Tan (B) 53.34;100 free Bakar (B) 51.21;500
free Popovic (B) 5:06.72; 200 free relay Se-
quoia (Archbold,Knoth,Ledbetter,Pauley) 1:39.65;
100 back Yeager (B) 57.77; 100 breast Led-
better (S) 1:06.62.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The ink is drying on the offer letter
and its ofcial: College of San
Mateo offensive lineman Hoko
Fanaika is going from Bulldog to
Tiger.
CSMs football signed their
biggest transfer of the off-season
Friday when Fanaika, a Sacramento
native, agreed to play for the
Louisiana State University Tigers and
Les Miles of the Southeastern
Conference.
Fanaika, a JC All-American line-
man, elded offers from all over the
country with programs like Florida
and Kansas sending offers and
requesting visits.
Hes so excit-
ed, said Tim
Tulloch, CSM
assistant head
coach and defen-
sive coordinator.
What I love
about him, hes
just a competi-
tive kid. And
when youre
looking at options like Florida, LSU,
Kansas and Hawaii, and you choose
the one at the highest level, it just
shows what a competitor he is. He
wants to go play with the best. Im
extremely excited for him and I know
hes really looking forward to the
opportunity.
Fanaikas signing is the 17th for the
CSM program this offseason, and
Tulloch said seven more Bulldogs are
weighing offers and are expected to
sign by June. Fanaika was the crown
jewel of the transfer period and
signings dont get much bigger than
LSU, who nished No. 2 last after
losing in the BCS National
Championship game.
To Hoko, his number one thing
was getting his education and being
able to get a degree in his major,
Tulloch said of Fanaikas choice, one
that has played out a bit on CSM
Footballs Facebook page, with pic-
tures of his visits posted online. And
then two, having an opportunity
when its all said and done, to play in
the NFL. They had a very detailed
plan for him in terms of strength and
conditioning, and the types of things
they were going to ask him to do [in
the offense]. They have great aca-
demic support and he just felt like it
was the right t for him.
Fanaikas signing is the latest in a
great string of transfers for CSM.
Last year, wide receiver Rashaan
Vaughn transferred to Pac-12 power-
house Oregon and offensive lineman
Jeremy Galten donned the red and
yellow of USC. Both those teams are
expected to be in the Top 5 when the
Associated Press releases its pre-sea-
son poll later this year. LSU is in on
that list too.
And it isnt just Fanaika. Earlier
this week, CSM long-snapper Daniel
Pearlstone committed to Missouri
Valley. Before him, linebacker Justin
Sagote accepted an offer from
Washington State.
Im just so proud, Tulloch said.
All the hard work these guys do, and
they work we really push these
guys. And we push them in all areas
weight room, academics, on the
eld, life skills, all the stuff that we
do, were really a demanding pro-
gram. And to see the hard work pay
off to get to a place like LSU [is
great].
Theyre great kids. They under-
stand whats important. These are
guys that were unrecruited out of
high school who made a commitment
to doing things the right way within
our program and theyre playing at
the highest level and doing incredibly
well.
College of San Mateo Fanaika signs with LSU
Hoko Fanaika
16
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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Carlmont coach Jim Liggett. I think all our kids,
with the exception of a couple, have played at the
varsity level.
Four of the eight returners are either freshmen or
sophomores, giving them all at least one season of
varsity experience under their belts. The Scots also
have a corps of senior leaders to help guide the
young but experienced team through the
rigorous Bay Division season.
I think Cap is going to be strong again,
Burlingame is going to be strong, Liggett said. I
think this will be a season where ve or six teams
can knock anybody off.
Hillsdale lost some of the pop that made the
Knights a two-time defending Bay Division
champion, as well as one of the best pitchers in
CCS the last four years. The Knights should be
OK in the pitching department as Dani Fonseca
takes over. Shes already earned a scholarship to
University of Colorado-Colorado Springs as a
pitcher. The Knights offense, however, will be a
work in progress.
Capuchino, the defending CCS Division III
champion, lost one of the top pitchers and catchers
in the PAL to graduation, but the Mustangs still
have plenty of talent coming back. Seven players
from last years third-place nishing team are back
and if the Mustangs nd a capable pitcher, they
should be right in the mix.
Burlingame is off to a strong pre-season start,
going 5-3 against a relatively tough schedule. Both
Natalie Saucedo and Kristin Chaney are raking
right now, with both sporting batting averages over
.500 right now.
Terra Nova, Aragon and Half Moon Bay have
struggled early in the preseason, but as history tells
us, Aragon and Half Moon Bay are capable of
beating anyone at anytime, while the Tigers took a
big step forward last season. If they can maintain
that caliber of play, theyll be OK.
While the Bay Division has any number of
teams winning the crown, the Ocean Division has
been a two-, three-team race the last several years.
At the top of that list has been Sequoia and
Woodside, which have both battled down the
stretch several years in a row. San Mateo jumped
up and took the championship last season, but look
for it to be a two-team race between rivals
Woodside and Sequoia.
Woodside, especially, has looked good in the
preseason, running out to an 8-1 record and
outscoring its competition 116-13.
We have a young team, (but) we have a pretty
good hitting team, said Woodside coach Mike
King, who is entering his ninth season at the helm.
Im solid one through nine at the plate. I havent
had that since Ive been coaching at Woodside.
The Wildcats will have to replace a four-year
varsity starting pitcher, but King has a trio who he
likes.
I have two sophomore pitchers and a freshman
pitcher. Theyre learning on the y,
After a third-place nish last year, Sequoia
looks poised to make a serious run at a division
title. Nicole Kielty provides a nice one-two punch
from the pitchers circle as well as at the plate and
Alaina Woo has made a quick transition from the
basketball court to the softball diamond, with ve
hits in eight at-bats in the early going.
with San Mateo struggling in the preseason,
perhaps Mills will ll the Bearcats role this season
and be that third team to challenge for the division
title. The Vikings went winless in Bay Division
play last season, but went 4-2 during the presea-
son. They return six players from last year and that
experience against Bay Division squads last year
should help them this season.
Menlo-Atherton could also factor into the mix.
The Bears return six players from last years fourth
place nish, but they will be mixing in ve fresh-
men this season.
Continued from page 11
SOFTBALL
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Danielle Giuliacci, who handled the bulk of
the pitching duties for Carlmont last season,
is one of three sophomores who will see time
in the circle this season.
There was no Earthquake more impressive
than Victor Bernardez, San Jose centerback. He
established his presence on that backline early in
the game and played some mean, clutch defense
for the Quakes.
I think Victors presence and calming inu-
ence on the team, its what we needed, Yallop
said.
It will be interesting to see who Yallop pairs
with Bernardez in the heart of the defense
expected starter Jason Hernandez did not play
last week and when healthy, Ike Opara (who was
recently named to the United States U-23 train-
ing camp team) has shown tremendous upside.
Justin Morrow got the start against New
England.
Houston counters with one of the most solid
defensive backlines in the league Corey
Ashe, Bobby Boswell, Geoff Cameron and
Andre Hainault will be a much harder defense to
crack than last weeks Revolution. Hainault
scored the winning goal in the 92nd minute of
Houstons game against Chivas.
The Dynamo and San Jose have a built-in
rivalry. When the Earthquakes franchise left
MLS back in 2005, they departed to Houston,
where they proceeded to win a pair of MLS
Cups.
The Earthquakes own an even 4-4-1 all-time
record against the Dynamo, including 3-1-1 at
home.
Saturdays matchup will be the lone meeting
between the two teams this season. Kickoff is
scheduled for 2 p.m.
Continued from page 14
QUAKES
SPORTS 17
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Whether San Francisco executives and
coaches feel the same way, they werent saying.
But they also have shown interest in the man
who led Indianapolis to a Super Bowl victory in
2007. A person familiar with the situation said
that Manning worked out for 49ers coach Jim
Harbaugh on Tuesday night at Duke. ESPN
rst reported on the session.
Blue Devils coach David Cutcliffe was
Mannings offensive coordinator at the
University of Tennessee and the two remain
friends.
As it became clear the 49ers were in the race,
Miami and Arizona dropped out.
Another person conrmed to the AP that
Manning phoned the Miami Dolphins on
Thursday to advise them hell sign elsewhere.
The team has now turned its attention to free
agent quarterback Matt Flynn.
The people who spoke to the AP did so on
condition of anonymity because Mannings
workouts have remained private and most
teams involved have refused to comment on
their free agency negotiations.
The Cardinals decided to pay quarterback
Kevin Kolb the $7 million roster bonus he was
due on Saturday, ending their pursuit of
Manning. Arizona hosted Manning for about 6
1/2 hours at the teams facility on Sunday, but
the teams chances faded as the week pro-
gressed.
Acquiring Peyton Manning is no longer an
option for us, coach Ken Whisenhunt said.
After he missed the entire 2011 season,
Mannings uncertain health led the Colts to
balk at the $28 million roster bonus they would
have owed their 35-year-old leader on March 8.
So they released him, ending his long and
incredibly successful run with Indy.
Now the question is which club will land a
quarterback who could make a team an instant
Super Bowl contender.
Will it be San Francisco, which seemed to be
out of the picture?
The 49ers had been working to re-sign quar-
terback Alex Smith, the No. 1 overall draft pick
in 2005 who made a comeback last year under
rst-year coach and former NFL QB Harbaugh.
Smith has acknowledged he was happy with
the three-year offer. Both he and Manning are
represented by Tom Condon and CAA Sports.
Alex is trying to gure out what he wants to
do, 49ers CEO Jed York said earlier this week.
There have been good conversations back and
forth.
The NFC West champion 49ers on Monday
signed wide receiver Randy Moss after he spent
a year out of football, hoping he will be the
dynamic wideout and deep threat he once was.
An email to Smith, multiple phone messages
to his agency and to his father were not
returned.
The 27-year-old Smith threw for 3,150 yards
and 17 touchdowns with only ve interceptions
as San Francisco went 13-3 and made the NFC
title game last season after an eight-year play-
off drought.
Neither running back Frank Gore nor tight
end Vernon Davis had been told by the 49ers
they were pursuing Manning. Both are big fans
of Smith. Asked if Smith is still the man for San
Francisco, Gore said, I think he is.
Mannings whirlwind free agency tour of-
cially kicked off soon after he bid farewell to
the Colts in an emotional press conference.
The Broncos had the rst crack at wooing
him, rolling out the red carpet for his visit.
Team ofcials ew him in and he spent the
spent the day chatting with Elway and other
Broncos brass. He also was escorted around the
teams building by Fox and general manager
Brian Xanders as he listened to their sales pitch.
After that, Manning journeyed to nearby
Castle Rock, Colo., and spent the evening with
good friend Brandon Stokley, who played catch
with Manning the next morning and spoke
highly of his former teammate in an interview
on a local radio show.
Mannings next stop was Arizona and then,
this week, it was Tennessee.
The QB has a big fan in 89-year-old Titans
Continued from page 11
49ERS
By Bob Baum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX Out of the race to nab Peyton
Manning, the Arizona Cardinals are moving
on with quarterback Kevin Kolb.
Kolb remained on the Arizona roster at a 4
p.m. EDT deadline Friday, ensuring him a $7
million roster bonus that the team would not
have paid if they had landed Manning.
Coach Ken Whisenhunt issued a statement
acknowledging that acquiring Peyton
Manning is no longer an option for us.
Also on Friday, the Cardinals agreed to
terms on a ve-year contract for offensive
tackle Levi Brown, who had been released by
Arizona on Tuesday in a salary cap move.
The Cardinals were an early entry in the
Manning sweepstakes. The four-time MVP,
released by the Indianapolis Colts after miss-
ing last season following a series of neck sur-
geries, had dinner at Whisenhunts house last
Saturday night, then spent nearly 6 1/2 hours
at the Cardinals facility on Sunday.
But as the week wore on, the Cardinals
hopes faded as the Tennessee Titans joined the
Denver Broncos as contenders. In what had to
be sour news for the Cardinals, NFC West
rival San Francisco became a late entry in the
Manning competition.
Whisenhunt said that pursuing Manning
was an opportunity the team had to attempt.
Obviously something very unique and
unexpected presented itself, he said. Weve
said many times: If there is an opportunity to
make our team better, we view the potential of
adding a rst-ballot Hall of Famer quarterback
as one of those.
He said the Cardinals quickly put together
an aggressive plan to go after it.
Cardinals move on with Kolb
18
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION/WORLD
By Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Afghan
President Hamid Karzai says hes at
the end of the rope, and a majori-
ty of Americans feel the same way.
Of all the past decades setbacks
in the endeavor to form a solid
alliance with Afghanistan and
defeat the Taliban, the war effort has
been driven to a new low by the
slaughter of nine Afghan children
and seven adults allegedly by a U.S.
soldier whose identity had been
kept secret until late Friday.
He is Army Staff Sgt. Robert
Bales, 38, of Lake Tapps, Wash., his
attorney conrmed.
The soldier was on his way Friday
from a U.S. military detention facil-
ity in Kuwait to the maximum secu-
rity prison in Fort Leavenworth,
Kan., though Karzai demanded
anew that he be tried under the
Afghan justice system.
Karzai also is now insisting that
U.S. forces retreat from rural areas
immediately and let Afghans take
the lead in security next year. But
the White House and the Pentagon
said Friday that nothing would col-
lapse the war plan, even after the
massacre, the inadvertent Quran
burnings by U.S. soldiers and the
deaths of seven American service-
men at the hands of their allies.
Polls have shown that up to 60
percent of Americans say its time
to end the war in Afghanistan. And
thats not lost on the administration.
The Afghan people are tired of
war, Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta, just back from Afghanistan,
acknowledged on Friday. The
American people share some of that
tiredness after 10 years of war, as
well. All of thats understandable.
But he also said he is condent
that Americans realize the U.S.
needs to nish its work of stabiliz-
ing Afghanistan to ensure that al-
Qaida cannot against use that coun-
try as a launch pad to attack the
United States. His theme
patience is likely to dominate the
discourse in Washington and in
allied capitals in the lead-up to a
NATO summit meeting in Chicago
in May.
President Barack Obama called
Karzai on Friday seeking clarica-
tion on the demand concerning U.S.
troops in rural areas, and White
House press secretary Jay Carney
said the leaders agreed to keep dis-
cussing the matter, which is at the
heart of the military strategy.
I think that the two men were
very much on the same page about
gradually handing over security
responsibility to Afghan forces,
with U.S. and other international
troops switching to a support role
throughout Afghanistan sometime
in 2013, Carney said. A nal transi-
tion to Afghan control is supposed
to happen by the end of 2014.
Another pillar of the war strategy
is creating meaningful peace talks
with the Taliban insurgents, but that,
too, suffered cracks in the aftermath
of the village massacre. The Taliban
said it was no longer talking on
terms set by the Americans.
A senior U.S. official familiar
with the discussions said American
ofcials presume that the timing of
the Taliban announcement follow-
ing Sundays killings was an
attempt to gain greater leverage.
Ofcials have long calculated that
the Taliban would not engage seri-
ously in peace talks unless it had
lost more ground militarily.
Despite calls for the Army sus-
pect to be tried in Afghanistan,
Bales was own Wednesday to a
military detention facility in
Kuwait, where that countrys of-
cials expressed unhappiness that
they were not rst consulted.
War effort hits new low
By Bassem Mroue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Syrian rebels ignited
a new front Friday outside the capi-
tal, Damascus, in the rst signicant
ghting there since regime forces
swept over the suburbs weeks ago.
The clashes highlight the shifting
nature of Syrias conflict, with
rebels lying in wait to rise up when
the regime turns its guns elsewhere.
The return of violence to the
Damascus suburbs raises questions
about how long troops can control
areas before they re-erupt. Though
government forces have shown they
can crushed armed fighters, the
regime has appeared unable to con-
duct major offensives in more than
one place at once. That points to the
likelihood that a conict that is now
a year old and is estimated to have
killed more than 8,000 could grind
on as it slides closer to a civil war.
Diplomatic efforts have so far
brought no result, but U.N. envoy
Kofi Annan told the Security
Council in a brieng Friday that he
was determined to continue his mis-
sion and would return to Damascus.
Talks last week between Annan and
Syrian President Bashar Assad in
Damascus saw no progress in
attempts to cobble together peace
talks between the two sides.
After the condential brieng via
videolink, Annan told reporters in
Geneva that he urged the council to
speak with one voice as we try to
resolve the crisis in Syria. Russia
and China have blocked council
action against Assads regime.
The rst objective is for all of us
to end the violence and human
rights abuses and the killings and
get unimpeded access for humani-
tarian access to the needy, and of
course the all-important issue of
political process that will lead to a
democratic Syria, Annan said.
Both Assad and much of the oppo-
sition spurned Annans appeal for
talks. Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov said Moscow and
Beijing were pressing Assad to coop-
erate and that other countries should
do the same with the opposition,
which he accused of stonewalling the
U.N. mission. Other Security
Council members also need to do
their part of the work and urge the
opposition not to provoke the exacer-
bation of tensions, he said.
Syrias Foreign Ministry said in a
letter sent to the U.N. Security
Council on Friday that Damascus
will continue its crackdown. But the
ministry also said it will cooperate
with Ko Annan, the envoy charged
with trying to help end the violence
in Syria.
Syrian revolt simmers outside capital
REUTERS
Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, left, 1st platoon sergeant, Blackhorse Company,
2nd Battalion,3rd Infantry Regiment,3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team,2nd
Infantry Division,is seen during an exercise at the National Training Center
in Fort Irwin.
U.S.: North Korea planned
rocket launch a deal-breaker
PYONGYANG, North Korea
North Korea plans to blast a satellite
into space next month to mark the
centenary of the birth of its founder,
Kim Il Sung, which the U.S. quickly
called a deal-breaker for a new
agreement where the U.S. would
exchange food aid for nuclear con-
cessions.
After Fridays surprise announce-
ment, the United States warned it
would not send food aid to North
Korea if it goes ahead with the long-
range rocket launch, and U.N.
Security Council members said it
may violate sanctions.
The North agreed to a moratorium
on long-range launches as part of the
food deal with Washington, but
argues that satellite launches are part
of a peaceful space program that is
exempt from international disarma-
ment obligations. The U.S., South
Korea and other critics say the rocket
technology overlaps with belligerent
uses and condemn the satellite pro-
gram as a disguised test of military
missiles in deance of a U.N. ban.
The launch is to take place three
years after a similar launch in April
2009 drew widespread censure.
U.S. wants Iraq to stop
arms reaching Syrian govt
WASHINGTON The Obama
administration expressed concern
Friday that Iranian planes may be fer-
rying weapons over Iraq to Syrian
President Bashar Assads regime, and
asked Baghdad to cut off its airspace
to any such ights.
State Department spokeswoman
Victoria Nuland said Iranian arms
exports are banned by a U.N.
Security Council resolution. She said
Iranian cargo ights are crossing Iraq
and that the U.S. is worried about
possible weapons shipments.
Any arms sent to the Syrian
regime at this time would obviously
be used in the brutal repression that
the regime is exacting on its own peo-
ple, Nuland told reporters. She said
the U.S. was speaking with Iraq to
ensure that it isnt aiding and abetting
a U.N. violation by helping to arm
the Syrian regime.
Washington has consistently criti-
cized Iran for supporting Assads
government during a yearlong crack-
down on protesters and armed oppo-
nents.
Around the world
Now
Circa Then
An entertaining lesson
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Pulgas, Belmont. For more information visit
smcl.org. Free.
Amelia Earhart
Amelia Earhart.Was she a freckle-faced all-
American girl in love with adventure? Or
could she have been a government agent?
Join History Professor Michael Svanevik as he
takes a penetrating look at a modern
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Light refreshments served. For information
call 550-8811. Free.
Best bets
A desire to
take action?
By Chloee Weiner
I
t happened on a Monday
night. I was taking a break
from homework (also known
as procrastinating relentlessly on
Facebook) and
was absent-
mindedly
browsing my
news feed when
it appeared. It
was everywhere
on statuses,
in friends pro-
le pictures and
all over wall posts. Before I knew
it, my night had been taken over by
the words Kony 2012. My rst
thoughts as to what Kony 2012
could be were embarrassingly inac-
curate. I immediately assumed that
a new presidential nominee had
joined the race in a last-minute
attempt to take advantage of the
general dissatisfaction with the cur-
rent candidates (or at least that
somebody had devised a fake cam-
paign to poke fun at the election).
But my misconceptions were soon
eradicated when I watched the half-
hour video that explained it all
or claimed to.
I spent the following 30 minutes
of my night with my eyes glued to
the screen, entranced, like many
others, rst by the story being told
and secondly by the surprisingly
high-production value of the lm. If
you havent seen the latest viral
YouTube video, it was released a
week ago by the charity organiza-
tion Invisible Children. The group
released the short lm in an attempt
to raise awareness of the Lords
Resistance Army and its leader,
Joseph Kony, who the video relays
is largely responsible for the abduc-
tion of hundreds of thousands of
Central African children into their
forces. The video, undoubtedly, was
impressive. Its use of Facebooks
new timeline and the charity
leaders innocent, young son to tell
the story werent short of marketing
genius. I was surprised with my
own gut-reaction to the lm. I, too,
felt immediately emotionally
attached. But my school has been
involved with Invisible Children for
a few years now, and so despite the
lms ability to instill a strong
desire to want to help, I was not
enticed by the action kit suggested
at the end of the video nor by ease
with which the video could be
passed along, given the negative
rumors Id heard about the organi-
zation over the past few years.
From its recent media attention,
Invisible Children has received as
much criticism as praise. Although
this is not all too uncommon for a
charity, claims that the organization
spends around 70 percent of its
money on stafng fees, video pro-
duction and other costs that do not
See STUDENT, Page 22
Grainy, bloody, montage
of a spaghetti Western
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Its a total goof, of course.
Thats obvious even before Will Ferrell, dressed in a cowboy hat
and a neckerchief sitting astride a horse in the Mexican desert,
opens his mouth and utters his rst overly enunciated Spanish
words in Casa de mi Padre. Its clear from the opening titles: a
grainy, bloody, Quentin Tarantino-style montage of melodramatic
spaghetti Western imagery, featuring Christina Aguilera belting
out the bombastic theme song.
The affection for B-movies and telenovelas is clear in this
sendup from Matt Piedmont (making his directing debut)
and writer Andrew Steele, longtime collaborators of
Ferrells from Saturday Night Live and Funny or Die.
But the premise, which would have been just ne as a
sketch, feels as if its been stretched awfully thin to ll an
entire feature.
Still, you have to give everyone involved credit for just
going for it. That starts with Ferrell himself, speaking
solid Spanish (albeit with an Americanized accent) as
Armando Alvarez, a dimwitted ranchero whose
successful businessman brother, Raul (Diego
Luna), is the star of the family as far as their
father (the late Pedro Armendariz Jr.) is con-
cerned.
Armando actually has a lot in common with
Ferrells most famous comic characters, men who are
steadfastly self-serious and unaware of their own idiocy. He
could be un hermano to Ron Burgundy or Ricky Bobby, or at least
un primo; the performance isnt too far off from Ferrells impres-
sion of former President George W. Bush, either. That he sings a
drunken campre tune with his best friends (Efren Ramirez and
Adrian Martinez) celebrating the fact that all he understands is
cows softens and sweetens him by comparison.
Everyone plays it totally straight no one questions how the
gangly Ferrell could possibly belong in this family and when
Raul brings home his stunningly beautiful ancie, Sonia (Genesis
Rodriguez), it further seals Armandos inferiority. But it turns out
Raul is a drug dealer locked in a turf war with the powerful Onza
(Lunas friend and frequent co-star Gael Garcia Bernal).
Armando must nd a way to restore the familys respectable
name, even as he nds himself falling in love with Sonia. And
Rodriguez, a former telenovela actress who also appeared this year
as a knockout jewel thief in Man on a Ledge, seems quite com-
fortable with this kind of over-the-top material.
Intentional continuity errors, missing frames and cheap produc-
tion values abound. Far more effort went into making Casa de mi
See PADRE, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS AT
ACTORS THEATRE OF SAN FRANCIS-
CO. Even if you never were sold a house that
was too big for your budget or never got talked
into an adjustable rate mortgage, you might be
inclined to check for your wallet as David
Mamets Glengarry Glen Ross brings you in
close contact with a pack of rapacious real
estate salesmen who look at a customer like a
wolf looks at a lamb. Decked out in slick suits
and two-toned shoes, these predatory housing
subdivision hustlers salivate and snarl over lists
of leads, and when they land a glad hand slap on
a prospective buyers back, you can be pretty
sure they are feeling for a place to insert the
knife. An extremely strong acting ensemble
serves Mamets dark comedy well. One hour 45
minutes with one intermission. Directed by
Keith Phillips. Through March 24.
CAST:
John Krause as Shelly Levene: Frank Willey
as John Willliamson; Mark Bird as Dave Moss;
Sean Hallinan as George Aaronow; Randy Blair
as James Lingk; Christian Phillips as Richard
Roma; and Carole Robinson as Detective
Baylen.
TICKETS:
Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m.
General Admission: $38, Student and Senior:
$26. For tickets, call (415) 345-1287, email
tickets@actorstheatresf.org or visit
ticketweb.com, brownpapertickets.com or dra-
malist.com. Tickets are also sold one-half hour
before the show at the theatre box ofce.
Reservations strongly suggested, as tickets are
subject to availability. General information at
www.actorstheatresf.org.
STAGE DIRECTIONS:
Actors Theatre of San Francisco is located at
855 Bush St., San Francisco, near Union
Square, in a busy block of small hotels, restau-
rants and apartment buildings. There are numer-
ous parking lots in the area, including the
Stockton-Sutter garage three-blocks away
(enter on the Bush Street side).
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW?:
In writing Glengarry Glen Ross, about real
estate agents prepared to engage in unethical
and illegal acts to sell undesirable real estate to
unwitting prospective buyers, David Mamet
drew on his experiences in a Chicago real estate
ofce, where he worked briey in the late
1960s. Mamet dedicated the play to fellow
playwright Harold Pinter.
AN ASIDE:
Artistic Director Christian Phillips said, The
play is full of profanity and vulgarity and pres-
ents a hard world with truly brutal behaviors.
And it is considered a masterwork because
within this brutal world the situations are uni-
versally engaging, the almost too easily identi-
ed with characters are brilliantly developed
and there is a perverse humor throughout the
play. Our production has focused on capturing
the humor in David Mamets magnicent dia-
logue and, most importantly, on the irtation
with redemption that provides the emotional
whallop for the plays ending.
***
KATHLEEN TURNER STARS IN HIGH
AT THE CURRAN THEATRE. When Sister
Jamison Connolly (Turner) agrees to sponsor a
19-year-old drug user in an effort to help him
combat his addiction, her own faith is ultimate-
ly tested. This show contains adult language,
adult content including sexual violence, drug
use, frank discussion of sexual assault on a child
and full male nudity. Two hours 15 minutes.
Curran Theatre, 445 Geary St. The Downtown
Center Garage at 325 Mason (at OFarrell) is
the closest lot. The BART Powell Street station
is three blocks away. Tickets online at
shnsf.com or by calling (888) SHN-1799.
March 21-25.
***
JULIUS CAESAR AT AFRICAN-AMER-
ICAN SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. Has
politics always been a blood sport? Must patri-
otism and violence be commingled? What hap-
pens when regime change comes not from the
voting booth but from an assassins blade?
Director Michael Gene Sullivans production
pares Shakespeares Julius Caesar to its core
and the intriguing use of a six-person cast in
multiple roles provides a fast-paced two hours
without intermission. Buriel Clay Theatre in the
African-American Art & Culture Complex, 762
Fulton St. Free parking on site. $15-$30.
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. (800)
838-3006 or african-americanshakes.org.
Through April 1.
MAXUDOV
John Krause, left, as Shelly Levene and Christian Phillips as Richard Roma, in David Mamets
Pulitzer Prize-winning Glengarry Glen Ross, at Actors Theatre of San Francisco.
See CITY, Page 22
WEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Keith Kreitman
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Again, Robert Kelley, founder and artistic
director of TheatreWorks, brings us another
socially conscious play that addresses the
interests of the broad diversity of population
that is the Bay Area.
First thing, about Carly Mensch, the author
of the comedy Now Circa Then relative-
ly new to the theater, she is proving herself a
rst-rate playwright. She brings her characters
to life so vividly, one feels one is watching
real life in real time. Perhaps, it is in the
German origin of her name, human being,
that she is gifted with an insight about the
characters she creates.
What I particularly appreciate is her dia-
logue. Not only unaffected but in the scenes of
the current era, when she peppers in some
dirty words, they are not for shock value but
are no more than one hears daily in our mod-
ern middle-class conversations.
This West Coast premiere is blessed with
two super actors: Kimiye Corwin is Margie,
an escapee to New York City from a limited
life in a small town in Michigan and desperate
for any job. Matt R. Harrington is Gideon,
whose mother has been a famed historian,
who has become a fanatical history buff who
treasures participating in historical recre-
ations, including working as a re-enactor at a
New York City tenement museum.
When the inexperienced Margie lands the
job, she is daily in close work with Gideon, as
the two are recreating, in one of the museums
tenement sets, a Jewish family of immigrants
from Europe who arrived in New York City
from East Prussia in 1890. So, the play oper-
ates at two levels, the recreated years of the
immigrants Julian and Josephine Glockner
and the romance that develops as the two play
out those roles at the museum.
At its roots, this is a play about how con-
stant and similar human relationships and
responsibilities are in even over a century. The
key lines of the play are voiced by Gideon:
Its about two people. About how they go
through life together. About how they gure
out how to be decent to each other even as
times get rough. How, maybe, they lose their
way sometimes but, ultimately, enrich each
others lives. And then, how all of that some-
how ts into the larger history of a place
called The Lower East Side (of New York
City) circa 1890.
As Margie, Kimiye Corwin is the scene-
stealer as she bounces from mood to mood,
sexy affection to cold rejection of poor
Gideon who has fallen madly in love with her.
She is, obviously, shying away from commit-
ment to Gideon and trying to escape her fam-
ily in Michigan where her folks expected her
to end up pretty much like Josephine, the
woman she plays at the museum: a domestic
slave with ve kids and no prospects. At one
point she almost demolishes the set in frustra-
tion.
Gideon, on the other hand, rooted in the
past, is more restrained and has the funniest,
mostly sarcastic lines. Has to be seen is the
scene in which he is giving Margie acting les-
sons.
Much of the success of this production is in
the authentic moveable period sets of the inte-
rior of the museum by Andrew Boyce and the
costuming by Jill Bowers.
For those whose ancestors immigrated dur-
ing that time period, this is a learning experi-
ence about the debt they owe to those who
risked all for a better life in America.
For those who just want to experience well-
written comedy and great performances, this
is the show for you.
An entertaining lesson
Now Circa Then
BY: Carly Mensch
PERFORMED BY: TheatreWorks
DIRECTED BY: Meredith McDonough
WHERE: Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305
Middleeld Road, Palo Alto
WHEN: 7:30 p.m.Tues. and Weds.; 8 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Saturday.; 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sundays
through April 1
TICKETS: $19 - $69
CONTACT: 463-1960 or
theatreworks.org
If you go
TRACY MARTIN
In this off-beat comedy from Weeds writer Carly Mensch, Matt R. Harrington and Kimiye
Corwin play two historical re-enactors whose private lives become entwined in their characters
lives in Now Circa Then at TheatreWorks.
Find a quiet beach
getaway in Mexico
By Kim Curtis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MAJAHUAL, Mexico My criteria for a
vacation were simple: Warm weather.
Postcard beaches. Clear, sunny skies. Long,
languid days to immerse myself in beach
books. A price that wouldnt break the bank.
And most of all, solitude.
So when I arrived in Majahual, on the
Caribbean coast of Mexico, I was taken aback
no, horried by the throngs of tourists,
beach massage tables, souvenir hawkers, and
drunken 20-somethings dancing shirtless in
the streets.
Fortunately, the bed-and-breakfast I had
reserved for the week was a half-hour drive
from the center of town, and it turned out to be
a vacation paradise where the only noise was
from the waves crashing on the beach.
I had chosen the Costa Maya area, near the
border of Belize, after considering Thailand,
Honduras and a few other tropical spots. The
Costa Maya town of Majahual is about six
hours south of the Riviera Maya, the popular
tourist region that stretches from Cancun to
the Mayan ruins at Tulum. Id been to Mexico
City and a few colonial towns in central
Mexico in the past, but I was a little wary of
planning a Mexican beach getaway, with
images of drunken spring breakers and nonde-
script all-inclusive resorts springing to mind.
But despite the busy scene I encountered
when I arrived in Costa Maya which I later
learned changes depending on what cruise
ships are docking Majahual turned out to
be exactly what I wanted, solitude included.
Id gotten my sightseeing out of the way en
route to Majahual. Id own into Cancun, then
quickly left behind the colossal resorts by tak-
ing a bus about 80 miles south to Tulum for a
three-day visit to see Mayan ruins and spend a
little time at Tulums South Beach, where I
rented a simple and reasonably priced cabana
at the Shambala Petit Hotel. Restaurants, bars,
bicycle rentals and yoga classes were all with-
in a few minutes walk of my cabana. It was
nothing fancy ceiling fans, shared bath-
room and shower but I loved the pristine
beachfront location and relaxed vibe. Its easy
to nd similar accommodations nearby.
Early one morning, I traveled to Coba, an
ancient Mayan city about 27 miles northwest
of Tulum, with a private driver arranged
through my hotel.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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directly benet its cause have been vali-
dated. Similarly, the quality of the
information presented in the video in
regards to the LRAs location and activ-
ity, as well as the Ugandan govern-
ments own involvement in the atroci-
ties, has already been attacked by politi-
cians and philanthropists alike. I really
cant pretend to be an expert on the
cause or the organization, but I have
seen how its message and call for
action has effected the people around
me and quite honestly, its been
astounding.
Even with the recent Arab Spring and
other examples of social medias ability
to mobilize the worlds youth, to me,
the idea of modern-day unity toward a
cause seemed distant, or even a trend of
the past. But Facebook statuses like,
Finally something to care about that
followed the spread of the video made
it clear that American youth (or at least
the ones from this area who contribute
to my Facebook news feed) are also
craving something over which to be
passionate. However, with this desire to
take action has also come the trend of
hollow, almost meaningless action.
Regardless of whether or not Invisible
Childrens methods are sound, they are
drawing attention to a worthy cause
(especially the importance to rebuild
areas of Central Africa that have been
destroyed by the atrocities over the
years). However, the hollow response I
mentioned results from the tendency of
many peoples response to be all talk
and no action. Invisible Children has
exploited the youths addiction to social
media and it is only my hope that they
use this potential in the effective way
possible. Spreading a message is one
thing, but instilling a long-term passion
for a cause is another. Perhaps if
Invisible Children can attract motivated
youth rather than those momentarily
enraptured by their cause, they will
receive more credit for their newfound
following.
Chloee Weiner is a junior at Crystal Springs
Uplands School. Student News appears in
the weekend edition. You can email Student
News at news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
Padre look like crap than making it,
you know, legitimately good. Thats the
source of steady humor but never out-
right hilarity, and it all might have
seemed far more novel if directors like
Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez hadnt
already staked out this territory. An
example of outright weirdness
which Casa de mi Padre could have
used more of is the stream-of-con-
sciousness fever dream Armando expe-
riences after an encounter with a mysti-
cal snow leopard in the desert, an ani-
matronic cat that gives him advice cre-
ated by Jim Hensons Creature Shop.
When its obvious that Armando and
Sonia arent really riding their horses,
for example, but rather are sitting in
front of a chintzy background, its good
for a chuckle. During one of many
zooms in this 70s-style production,
you can see the camera crew in the
reflection of a characters sunglasses.
Again, cute, but not much more. But
maybe its better if youve had a couple
margaritas with friends beforehand.
Casa de mi Padre, a Pantelion
Films and Lionsgate release, is rated R
for bloody violence, language, and
some sexual content and drug use. In
Spanish with English subtitles.
Running time: 84 minutes. Two stars
out of four.
Continued from page 19
PADRE
***
ITS ALL THE RAGE. Comedian
Marilyn Pittmans parents died in a mur-
der-suicide in 1997. Poring through her
mothers journals and her fathers post-war
love letters, Pittman asks the questions:
Did they really love each other? Why did
they stay married if they were so unhap-
py? Could we see this coming? Can I
share the funny parts, too? Pittmans solo
show Its All The Rage is both a murder
mystery and a story of survival through the
lens of a stand-up comic. 60 minutes with-
out intermission. Written by Marilyn
Pittman. Directed by David Ford. The
Marsh, 1062 Valencia St. (at 22nd). $15-
$50. www.themarsh.org or (800) 838-
3006. Ages 18 and up. Through April 15.
Susan Cohn is a member of the San
Francisco Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle
and the American Theatre Critics
Association.
Continued from page 19
CITY
Jeff, Who Lives at Home Mark Duplass has said that he
and his brother, Jay, look to the veteran Belgian lmmaking
brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne for artistic inspiration,
with their naturalistic, documentary-style approach to telling fea-
ture stories. Thats evident once again in this sweet, slight tale
told with simple intimacy and a deadpan tone to its absurd humor.
Not much happens over a meandering day in suburban Baton
Rouge, La., but it all builds to a climax that makes the journey
worthwhile. Jason Segel plays the titular character, a 30-year-old
slacker who still lives in the basement of his childhood home.
Inspired by the M. Night Shyamalan movie Signs, he believes
there are no coincidences, that everything happens for a reason if
youre willing to open your mind and pay attention to the daily
details that can determine your fate. And so a simple errand for
his widowed, enabling mother (Susan Sarandon in a lovely,
understated performance) turns into a weird and winding adven-
ture involving pickup basketball, amateur sleuthing and an elu-
sive man named Kevin. The Duplasses create the sensation that
were just following along wherever Jeff takes us, without judg-
ment. Ed Helms and Judy Greer co-star. R for language includ-
ing sexual references and some drug use. 82 minutes. Three stars
out of four.
***
21 Jump Street The TV show that made Johnny Depp a
star is little more than a jumping-off point for this rowdy, raunchy
big-screen update that aims for laughs over action and delivers
them intermittently. Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum are surpris-
ingly amusing together as newbie cops sent undercover as high
school kids to root out a drug ring. Directors Phil Lord and
Christopher Miller take everything the car chases, the
shootouts, the teen kegger, the goofy idiocy of the characters to
the extreme. Some of the absurd violence is funny, some is point-
lessly mean and nasty enough to jar viewers out of the action now
and then. Hill and Tatums odd-couple act is the best thing about
the movie, both playing the straight man yet managing to make
their partnership much funnier than the hit-and-miss jokes and
action really are. 109 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.
Also in theaters
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, MARCH 17
Secured Gold is Coming to San
Mateo and Palo Alto. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. San Mateo Marriot, 1770 S.
Amphlett Blvd., San Mateo and the
Sheraton, 625 El Camino Real, Palo
Alto. Find out how much your
unwanted gold and silver is worth
with free appraisals by Secured Gold
Buyers. For more information call Kyle
Gershbain at (949) 999-8489.
San Mateo County Youth
Conference. 9:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.,
College of San Mateo, College Center,
Building 10, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
San Mateo. Free youth conference.
The day features a variety of youth
speakers and presentations with the
intent to bring youth from all over
San Mateo County and the greater
Bay Area together. Featuring free
breakfast and lunch, raffle prizes, two
international film showing, more than
15 different presentations by youth,
and various inspiration speakers. Free.
For more information call 401-8617
ext. 20 or visit
www.facebook.com/smcyouthconfer
ence.
The Ugly Duckling. 10 a.m. Fox
Theatre, 2215 Broadway, Redwood
City. $18.50 to $26.50. For more
information call 369-7770 or visit
tickets.foxrwc.com.
Learn Encaustic Painting with
Eileen P. Goldenberg. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Burlingame Recreation Center,
850 Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
Encaustic is a painting made by
melting beeswax, dammar resin and
pigments together. Eileen will teach
all the basics including use of tools,
safety and mixing colors. For more
information 558-7300.
CuriOdyssey Chemistry. 10:30 a.m.
to noon. CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote
Point Drive, San Mateo. Join us for this
reactive workshop where we look at
acids and bases, surprising solutions
and interesting indicators. Aspiring
chemists wont want to miss this
workshop. Recommended for
children ages six to 11 years old. For
member, $20 covers one adult and
one child. For non-member, $25
covers one adult and one child. For
more information call 342-7755.
Growing Great Tomatoes. 10:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. 687 Arastradero Road,
Palo Alto. Learn which tomatoes have
really great flavor and reliable
production and are able to hold up
under regular garden conditions. Will
learn excellent trellising methods, soil
preparation, what not to do and how
to avoid the brown, crispy foliage blues
so a bountiful harvest will be yours
until frost. As the University of
California Cooperative Extension Past
Farm Advisor and Past Master
Gardener Program Coordinator, Nacy
continues to learn from the annual
Master Gardeners tomato variety
evaluations. $31. To register call 493-
6072.
St. Patricks Day WIne Tasting Day.
Noon to 4 p.m. La Honda Winery, 2645
Fair Oaks Ave.., Redwood City. Look
forward to the release of the 2010
exponent, a cab, syrah, merlot and
sangio, Irish jokes, mystery green
wine taste test, Irish cheese and
Italian meats, along with four other
award-winning wines. For more
information call 366-4104.
SWA watercolor demonstrations. 1
p.m. SWA Gallery, 2625 Broadway,
Redwood City. Street and water
scenes by Ferenc Besze. For more
information call 737-6084.
The Bubble Lady. 2 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. This crazy, zany, silly show
can be enjoyed by both parents and
children. Free. For more information
visit smcl.org.
West Coast Swing Workshop. 3 p.m.
to midnight. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. The West Coast Swing
Workshop is being taught by Luis
Crespo. Ticket prices vary. For more
information and advance tickets on
sale visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Elks Lodge annual St. Patricks
Dinner Dance. Appetizers and no
host bar at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 7:15.
Elks Lodge, 920 Stonegate Drive,
South San Francisco. Members $24,
Guests $25. For more information or
to RSVP call 589-4030.
Hybrid Three St. Pattys Day Brawl.
6 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway,
Redwood City. $30 to $50. For more
information call 369-7770 or visit
tickets.foxrwc.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents Looking Glass Land. 7
p.m. Barrett Community Center, 1835
Belburn Drive, Belmont. This wild
adaptation of Lewis Carrolls original
Through the Looking Glass
highlights the pure fun of the story
with a huge helping of unabashed
silliness. Tickets can be purchased
online at
sancarloschildrenstheater.com. $12
General Admission. For more
information visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Burlingame High School presents
Anything Goes. 7 p.m. Burlingame
High School Theatre, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $15 general admission.
$10 students, seniors and children.
For more information and
reservations call 558-2854.
Woodside High School presents
Elton John and Tim Rices AIDA. 8
p.m. Woodside High School, 199
Churchill Ave., Woodside. Ancient
Egypt comes to Woodside High
School. The Theatre Arts Department
presents Elton John and Tim Rices
AIDA, a contemporary musical take
on a grand classic tale of the tireless
bond between a enslaved Nubian
princess and an Egyptian soldier. The
musical is under the direction of
drama teacher Barry Woodruff and a
cast of over 40 students. Adults $20,
Seniors 65+ $15 and students $10.
Visit www.whsdramaboosters.com
for ticket information or contact 367-
9750.
With Strings Attached, A
Celebration of Strings and Voices. 8
p.m. Transfiguration Episcopal
Church, 39th Avenue, Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo Avenue. With
Strings Attached celebrates the
quintessential pairing of stringed
instruments and the human voice.
Come and join us for this jubilant
collaboration of voice and strings.
$25, $10 with student ID. For more
information visit
www.masterworks.org or call 574-
6210.
Crestmont Conservatory of Music
Gourmet Concert Series. 8 p.m. The
Crestmont Conservatory of Music,
2575 Flores St., San Mateo. The
concert will feature pianist Brian
Connor and will include pieces by
Beethoven, Debussy and Chopin.
There will also be a reception with
gourmet refreshments. Proceeds
benefit the scholarship program. $15
for general admission. $10 for seniors
and students 16 and under. For more
information call 574-4633.
SUNDAY, MARCH 18
Julianas Journey Community
Breakfast Benefit. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Elks Lodge, 920 Stonegate Drive,
South San Francisco. Support the
family of Juliana Pena, a 2-year-old
who recently lost her battle with
neuroblastoma. $10 per person for a
breakfast buffet including pancakes,
eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns,
juice, coffee and tea. Silent auctions
and raffles will also take place. For
more information contact Kamala
Silvia Wolfe at
ELKS2091SSF@yahoo.com.
Author Emily Wagner Book
Reading and Signing. 11:30 a.m.
Story Time, Keplers Books, 1010 El
Camino Real, No. 100, Menlo Park.
Wagner will be reading from her
book, Asleep Under the Moon. For
more information contact Traci Jones
at (888) 361-9473.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents Looking Glass Land. 1
p.m. Barrett Community Center, 1835
Belburn Drive, Belmont. This wild
adaptation of Lewis Carrolls original
Through the Looking Glass
highlights the pure fun of the story
with a huge helping of unabashed
silliness. Tickets can be purchased
online at
sancarloschildrenstheater.com. $12
General Admission. For more
information visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Third Sunday Ballroom Dance. 1
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. $5. For more information 616-
7150.
Burlingame High School presents
Anything Goes. 2 p.m. Burlingame
High School Theatre, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $15 general admission.
$10 students, seniors and children.
For more information visit
bhs.schoolloop.com.
With Strings Attached. 4 p.m.
Transfiguration Episcopal Church,
39th and Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. The award-winning
Masterworks Chorale presents With
Strings Attached, A Celebration of
Strings and Voices full of mini-
masterpieces from Handel to Mozart.
$10 to $25. For more information call
574-6210.
San Francisco Mandolin Orchestra:
Pergolesis Stabat Mater. 4 p.m. All
Saints Episcopal Church, 555
Waverley St., Palo Alto. San Francisco
Mandolin Orchestra with singers
Susan Gundunas and Twilia Ehmcke
will be performing Stabat Mater. For
more information visit
www.sfmandolin.org.
St. Bedes Church presents Organ
Recital by Rodney Gehrke. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. St. Bedes Episcopal Church,
2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park. $10
for regular tickets, $8 for seniors, $5
for students. For more information
call 854-6555.
Book Sale. Noon to 4 p.m. Menlo Park
Library, 800 Alma St., Menlo Park.
Sponsored by The Friends of the
Menlo Park Library and located in the
downstairs meeting room. For more
information call 330-2530.
Prelude to Spring Concert. 4:30 p.m.
Carlmont High School Theater, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. The
Peninsula Youth Orchestra performs
Bernsteins Candide Overture and
West Side Story Selections, along with
Tchaikovskys Swan lake Ballet Suite.
$10 adults, $5 students and seniors.
Tickets at the door. For more
information call 325-7967.
Jayme Stones Room of Wonders.
4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach House, 307
Mirada Road, Half Moon Bay. Banjoist
makes music inspired by folk
traditions from around the world. $35.
For more information visit
http://www.bachddsoc.org.
Afiara String Quartet. 7 p.m. Great
Hall, Kohl Mansion, 2750 Adeline
Drive, Burlingame. $45 adult, $42
senior, $15 for ages 30 and under. For
tickets and more information call
762-1130.
MONDAY, MARCH 19
Samaritan House Free Tax
Preparation for San Mateo County
Residents. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo, second floor.
Samaritan House is providing
confidential tax preparation with
certified tax preparers for individuals
and families with income in 2011
under $54,000. State and federal
returns are available with e-filing. We
are focusing on capturing the
maximum Earned Income Credits for
working individuals and families. Tax
filers must bring paperwork
including: photo ID, SS card, W-2 for
jobs held in 2011, a copy of their 2010
tax return, childcare provider and
landlord information for the
Californias renters credit. Free. To
make an appointment call 523-0804.
Deadline date for reservations for
Graceful Again/Healthy Living by
Inter-Generational Services for
Community Health Salad
Luncheon with guest speakers.
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on March 21.
Calvary Lutheran Church, 401 Santa
Lucia Ave., Millbrae. Actual date of
event is Wednesday March 21. March
19 is the reservation deadline date.
For reservations call 588-2840.
The Hunger Games Relay
Challenge. 3:30 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Get ready for the library's very own
survival-of-the-fittest, Hunger Games
Challenge! Compete in mini-
challenges, complete with a
cornucopia to win a grand prize. Who
will be the District winner? May the
odds be in your favor. For ages 12-19.
Free. For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
The History of the Fourie Family. 7
p.m. Magnolia Senior Center, 501
Grand Ave., South San Francisco. Will
be featured at the Historical Society
of South San Franciscos program and
general meeting. Tom Fourie will be
the guest speaker. Free. For more
information call 829-3872.
TUESDAY, MARCH 20
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Sequoia Wellness Center, 749
Brewster Ave., Redwood City. Food
Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA)
is a free 12-step recovery program for
anyone suffering from food
obsession, overeating, under-eating
or bulimia. For more information call
(800) 600-6028.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
to review the facts, not the spin, and send a
message to Sacramento to halt this ill-con-
ceived, costly and unnecessary project,
Harkey wrote in a statement Thursday.
On Tuesday, Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-
San Mateo, held a press conference in San
Mateo to urge the California High-Speed Rail
Authority to fund construction of the two
bookends of the system in San Francisco and
Los Angeles while starting construction on
the project in the Central Valley concurrently.
To fund electrication of Caltrain, the rail
authority would need to pledge about $750
million that would have to be matched by
local sales tax revenue.
Hill said previously that Harkeys legisla-
tion was unnecessary since economic condi-
tions could improve that would make the
project easier to fund in the coming years.
The Legislature can decide on its own
whether to vote for or against Gov. Jerry
Browns proposal to issue $2.6 billion in state
bonds later this year to get the project under
way in the Central Valley, Hill said.
State voters approved the project by passing
Proposition 1A in 2008, which commits about
$9.5 billion in bond proceeds to build a high-
speed rail system from San Francisco to Los
Angeles.
Already, the cities of Rancho Santa
Margarita, Mission Viejo, San Juan
Capistrano, Orange and Orange, Kings and
Shasta counties have voted to support the bill.
AB 1455 will also be appearing on several
more county and city council agendas over
the next few weeks, according to Harkeys
ofce.
Harkey has been most critical of the esca-
lating price tag for the project that is now esti-
mated to cost more than $100 billion. When
voters passed Proposition 1A, the estimated
price tag was about $36 billion.
The state is already in debt, Harkey said,
and cannot afford to fund the project. She also
said voters were deceived by the ballot lan-
guage in Proposition 1A that included ques-
tionable ridership and cost projections.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
RAIL
place to celebrate.
If youre a Jameson fan consider heading
to Molloys Tavern, 1655 Mission Road in
South San Francisco. Fun fact, Molloys is
one of the top sellers of Jameson an Irish
whiskey worthy of this pub inspired by its
homeland in Northern California. As
someone posted on the bars Facebook page,
Everyone is Irish on their Uncle Jamesons
side. The bar is cash only. But dont worry,
there is an ATM on site.
Irish-owned-and-operated Fiddlers Green
333 El Camino Real in Millbrae cele-
brates the motherland year round. On St.
Patricks Day, try house specialties like Irish
lamb stew, shepherds pie, beer-battered fish
and chips and of course, corned beef and cab-
bage. There will also be bagpipers through-
out the day playing traditional Irish music.
Down the road in Burlingame, Behans
Irish Bar 327 Broadway is putting up
a tent for the first time ever. Rain wont keep
people from showing up, but those running
the bar are worried about fitting a St.
Patricks Day crowd inside. The tent goes up
at 8 a.m. Saturday morning. Corned beef and
cabbage will start to be served at 5 p.m.
Corned beef and cabbage is definitely a
theme throughout the Peninsula. Its being
offered at Original Nicks Pizzeria and Pub,
1214 S. El Camino Real in San Mateo,
Clooneys Pub, 1189 Laurel St. in San
Carlos, and also Paddy Flynns, 246 Lorton
Ave. in Burlingame.
Continuing to travel south, ONeills in
San Mateo, 34 S. B St., opens at 6 a.m.
Saturday with Irish coffee stands set up. The
afternoon is when the beer starts flowing, a
food truck will be on hand and bagpipers
will provide background music.
Before heading out, plan for a designated
driver or have a cab companys number on
hand. Alternatively, call AAA Northern
California which is offering free tows from 6
p.m. Saturday to 6 a.m. Sunday through its
Tipsy Tow program.
Many people enjoy getting in the spirit of
St. Patricks Day, which tends to involve
plenty of celebrating, AAA Northern
California spokeswoman Cynthia Harris said
in a press release. If youve been drinking
alcohol, dont get behind the wheel.
Drivers, potential passengers, party hosts,
bartenders and restaurant managers can call
(800) 222-4357 for a free tow home of up to
10 miles by saying I need a Tipsy Tow.
The service is a one-way ride for the driver
and vehicle home. Additional passengers
will be transported only if there is room in
the tow truck cab.
How traditional an experience is desired is
up to each individual but take a minute to
realize the celebration didnt begin as a beer-
drinking, people-pinching day.
The day was intended to be a religious cel-
ebration for St. Patrick, the patron saint of
Ireland. For thousands of years, the Irish
have observed this day as a religious holiday,
going to church in the morning then cele-
brating in the evening. Although the celebra-
tion falls during Lent, the rules against meat
were lifted and people would dance, drink
and eat.
Until the 1970s, Irish law mandated pubs
be closed on the holiday. In 1995, however,
the government decided to capitalize on the
widely popular holiday by opening pubs and
inviting tourists to celebrate St. Patricks
Day in Ireland.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
CELEBRATE
Under the new rules, all leaf blowers can be no
louder than 65 decibels and to have them cer-
tied by the city.
During a period of emergency, the city man-
ager can temporarily suspend enforcement of
the rules. Violators face a ne of $50.
Looking at leaf blower restrictions came
about last year when the Burlingame Citizens
Environmental Council recommended the ban
to maintain clean air and water while cutting
down on air and noise pollution. Since then, a
community poll showed residents were split
over a complete ban but showed stronger sup-
port for a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers.
Current law limits how loud a leaf blower
can be and the hours of operation to 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to
4 p.m. on Sundays and holidays.
At the same meeting, the council will hear
results of a six-month trial expanding the off-
leash hours for dogs in Washington Park to
include 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The council
approved the extension in August on a 3-2
vote with Vice Mayor Anne Keighran and
Councilwoman Cathy Baylock dissenting.
In 2008, the council voted to allowed off-
leash dogs on the upper eld of Cuernavaca
Park and the eastern most lawn in Washington
Park before 7:45 a.m.
In September 2010, the council discussed
extending the hours to include after 6 p.m. but
asked the Parks and Recreation Commission
to gather more public opinion. A survey from
last year showed a positive response for the
additional hours. The commission again rec-
ommended the expansion for a trial period,
which was granted.
The trial period ended Feb. 15 with no
reports of issues or complains, according to a
report from the Parks and Recreation
Commission. The police department issued
one citation, one leash law warning and took
two calls about dogs in the park during the
trial but all calls were outside of the designat-
ed hours. As a result, the commission is rec-
ommending to permanently allow the extend-
ed hours.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday, March 19
at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
Continued from page 1
BLOWERS
SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2012
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)One of your very best
assets is the ability to see value in things that others
totally overlook. Keep an eye peeled for these kinds
of opportunities.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)Get your duties out of
the way as early as possible, because you are going
to want some time to have a little fun with your
friends as well. You deserve it.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)The trends and tides of
time will start shifting in a favorable direction, mak-
ing it possible for you to achieve a huge objective
that you never thought would be possible.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)If possible, avoid
involvements with friends who are too deeply im-
mersed in tradition. Theres nothing wrong with it,
but your benefts will come through more progressive
interests.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)Dont discount a unique
idea that dominates your thinking just because it
happens to be a departure from your usual concep-
tions. Being different can be good at times.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)Listen attentively when
others speak, whether or not you consider the orator
to be smart. Valuable information or a brilliant idea
could come from someone whom youd least expect.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)Dont be hesitant to
experiment with a new procedure or technique
involving your work or an independent project.
What you develop might be a time-saver and could
increase productivity.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)While your associates are
trying to articulate the problem, youll have effectively
analyzed the issue and already come up with the an-
swer. Dont wait for themmove ahead on your own.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)Its a good thing that
youll be resourceful enough to squeeze things in un-
der the wire, because youre inclined to let important
duties go until the last minute. Dont make it a habit.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)Try to keep your
schedule as fexible as possible, because there is
a strong possibility that an enticing situation will
manifest itself. Find time for fun as well.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)When it comes to
anything fnancial, both chance and circumstances
are likely to favor you. Something opportune is in the
making, and you should be a part of it.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)Because associates
have considerable respect for your judgment, they
are likely to support an endeavor that youre develop-
ing. Take help where you fnd it.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
3-17 -11 2011, United Features Syndicate
fRIDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Singer Horne
5 Fold-up mattress
10 Volcanic rock
12 Harley rival
13 Ink shooters
14 Slanted print
15 me up, Scotty!
16 Road guide
18 Maj.s superior
19 Arctic foater
23 Electrical unit
26 Ground breaker
27 Strong and healthy
30 Chiffonier
32 Song words
34 Trip to the top
35 Fossil resins
36 Ocean fsh
37 Nay opposite
38 Protein source
39 Farthest behind
42 Crumple up
45 Ex-GI
46 Wanes
50 Apollos priestess
53 Stuffed corn husk
55 Garage squirter
56 de corps
57 Final word (hyph.)
58 Pile
DOwN
1 Delicate fabric
2 Is, to Pedro
3 Supermodel Campbell
4 Peak for Heidi
5 Like some cats
6 Ms. Thurman
7 Bath powder
8 Buckeye State
9 Table salt in the lab
10 Hope or Newhart
11 Short break
12 Holy cow!
17 Honest fellow
20 Last name in perfumes
21 Jingles
22 Apparel
23 Wall Street deg.
24 Quit talking
25 Killer whale
28 Mortgage, e.g.
29 Pantyhose color
31 Cartoon shrieks
32 Baby shower gift
33 Fast fier of yore
37 Stun
40 Part of the range
41 Fiesta Bowl site
42 Romances
43 Divas melody
44 Whats My Line? host
47 Silents vamp Theda
48 Object on radar
49 Collection
51 Vaccine amts.
52 Thai neighbor
54 Fire residue
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
SUNSHINE STATE
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
24 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Company representatives will be available to meet with you to discuss
these employment opportunities.
Join a team where you really matter!
Graniterock offers consistent work, great benets, excellent educational opportunities,
and is an established local company with a great reputation for customer service and integrity.
Download an application from our website:
www.graniterock.com/careers
or email your resume to jobs@graniterock.com.
Completed applications/resumes may be faxed to 831.768.2260.
EOE dedicated to a diverse workforce.
Graniterock has career opportunities available for the
following positions:
Concrete Mixer Drivers
Oil Distributor/Spreader Drivers
Oil Transport Driver
Building Materials Yard/Inside Sales
Bilingual English/Spanish
Driver positions require a Class A drivers license
All positions require recent related experience and
a clean driving record
SATURDAY,
March 24, 2012
8:00 am - Noon
330 Blomquist St.
(off Seaport Blvd.)
Redwood City
I MMEDI ATE OPENI NGS!
Redwood City & San Jose areas
MEET WITH US IN PERSON AT OUR OPEN HOUSE!
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
AUTHENTIC SYRIAN CHEF
Minimum 3 years exp., Full Time,
starting $12-$14 per hour. Send
resume to: tastein2009@att.net.
Taste in Mediterranean
1199 Broadway Burlingame.
(650)348-3097
CAREGIVERS
Were a top, full-service
provider of home care, in
need of your experienced,
committed care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits
Call for Greg at
(650) 556-9906
www.homesweethomecare.com
DAYCARE ASSISTANT - Experienced
CPR/Cert., PT/FT, (650)245-6950
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES
Experienced, bilingual
sales person wanted.
Must have excellent
customer service
skills. Work on the
Peninsula.
Call
(650)533-4424
Ask for Oleg
110 Employment
JEWELRY STORE
HIRING!!!
REDWOOD CITY LOCATION
Assistant MGR.-Exp Required
Top Pay, Benefits,
Bonus, No Nights
(714)542-9000, Ext. 147
Fax (714)542-1891
mailto: jobs@jewelryexchange.com
LOOKING FOR A HOUSEKEEPING
JOB? DO YOU HAVE 3-5 YRS EXP.
WORKING IN A PRIVATE HOME?
If so, stop by Town + Country on
Monday, March 19th between
9am & 6pm and talk to us about potential
jobs. 425 Sherman Avenue, Suite 130,
Palo Alto CA 94306 No appointment
needed. We look forward to seeing you!
www.tandcr.com 650-326-8570
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Fax resume (650)344-5290
email info@smdailyjournal.com
SR. SYSTM ENGR - Implement/test stor-
age syst. Req. inclu. BS + 5 yrs. exp., in-
clu. Deduplication implementation, bun-
dling sw, archit. design, large grid stor-
age syst, MD5, SHA-1, VMware Ready
Virtual App Prog, Linux. Travels to client
sites. Reports to HQ in Redwood City,
CA. Mail resume to Amplidata, Inc., Attn:
HR, Pacific Shore Center, Building #1,
2100 Seaport Blvd, Suite 400, Redwood
City, CA 94063.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING: Line Cooks and
dishwashers for Kincaides
Steakhouse! Please apply at the
Restaurant in person ONLY
60 Bayview pl., Burlingame.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 512060
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jose A. Villanueva and Maria B. Villa-
nueva
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jose A. Villanueva filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Jancey Noemy Villanueva
Villanueva
Proposed name: Jancey Noemy Villa-
nueva Villanueva
Present name: Caterin Emperatriz Villa-
nueva
Propsed name: Caterin Emperatriz Villa-
nueva Villanueva
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 1, 2012
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/23/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/23/2012
(Published 02/25/12, 03/03/12, 03/10/12,
03/17/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249232
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: I and F Excellence Janitorial
Services, 851 N. Amphlett Blvd. #221,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Ingnacio
Cobian and Filomena Duarte, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Husband and Wife. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Filomena Duarte /
/s/ Ingnacio L. Cobian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
26 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 512061
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Micah Eunice Malig
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Micah Eunice Malig filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Micah Eunice Malig
Proposed name: Micah Eunice Malig
Dayag
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 1, 2012
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/23/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/23/2012
(Published 02/25/12, 03/03/12, 03/10/12,
03/17/12)
CASE# CIV 512188
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Kari Guy
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Kari Guy filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Kari Guy
Proposed name: Kari Chiara Galatolo
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 25,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/07/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/06/2012
(Published 03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12,
03/31/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #2489026
The following person is doing business
as: Burma National News, 397 Shipley,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Patrick
Sue, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Patrick Sue /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/25/12, 03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #248577
The following person is doing business
as: Bait and Switch Sportfishing, 15
Johnson Pier, Pillar Point Harbor, HALF
MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: The Prince-
ton Pantry, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Elizabeth Knier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/25/12, 03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249066
The following person is doing business
as: Taxi Cab Service Co., 1451 Tilia St,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Paul S. Na-
mini, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/01/2012
/s/ Paul Namini /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/25/12, 03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249006
The following person is doing business
as: Alex Mizuno Photography, 1157
Edgeworth Ave. #16, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Alex Mizuno, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Alex Mizuno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/25/12, 03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #248857
The following person is doing business
as: GDW Industries, 270 Redwood
Shores Pkwy. #724, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94065 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Adam L. Jastremski,
4436 Cristy Way, Castro Valley, CA
94546. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Adam L. Jastremski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249128
The following person is doing business
as: Rivera Realty, 260 Gateway Dr., PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Trang Luu Riv-
era, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/01/2012.
/s/ Trang Luu Rivera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249168
The following person is doing business
as: Limone, 619 Laurel St., SAN CAR-
LOS, CA, 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Vesuvio Foods,
INC., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Vincenzo Rosano /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249075
The following person is doing business
as: Core Code Systems, 8 Howard Ave
Apt. 4, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Core Code Systems, INC., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/02/2012 .
/s/ Emad Eddin Omar El-Quran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249157
The following person is doing business
as: Organic Planet Cleaning Services,
410 Lincoln Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Diego Vargas, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Diego Vargas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/03/12, 03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249311
The following person is doing business
as: Macs Cleaning Services, 1540
Monte Diablo, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Macario Enriquez, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Macario Enriquez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #248882
The following person is doing business
as: Mens Wearhouse & Tux, 42 Serra
Monte Center, #42, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: The Mens Wearhouse, INC.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Claudia Pruitt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249237
The following person is doing business
as: Mural Mural on the Wall, 25 Oak
Creek Ln., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lisa Marlene Ravella, same address The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Lisa M. Ravella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249145
The following person is doing business
as: Common Brights, 1025 S. Claremont
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Com-
mon Brights, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ James Seevers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/10/12, 03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249296
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Groupbookers, 2)
Groupbookers.com, 644 Spruce Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
EFS Consulting, INC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/04/2011
/s/ Edwin Salgado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249361
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Epic Swing, 2) Epic Swing Night,
100 N. Ellsworth Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Silicon Valley Swing Dance,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Audrey Kanemoto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249327
The following person is doing business
as: A&A Services, 735 Hickey Blvd.
#302, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Peter
Alicbusan, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Peter Alicbusan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249004
The following person is doing business
as: Christmas Markets Travel, 303 Twin
Dolphin Dr. 6th floor, REDWOOD
SHORES, CA 94065 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Barbara Cray,
165 Glasgow Ln., San Carlos, CA 94070.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Barbara Cray /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249330
The following person is doing business
as: Communication Concierge, 115
Camellia Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Micaela Musante, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Micaela Musante /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249248
The following person is doing business
as: Seesaw Games, 1801 Murchison Dr.
#100, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Seesaw Media, INC., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Stephanie Cheng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
ORDER FOR PUBLICATION
OF SUMMONS
CASE No.: 114193
In Re:
Petitioner: JIM LOUIE
vs.
Respondent: YE CHEN
Upon reading and filing evidence con-
sisting of a declaration as provided in
Section 415.50 CCP by Trudy Nicole
LeDee, and it satisfactorily appearing
therefrom that the Respondent, Richard
Kennedy LeDee, cannot be served with
reasonable diligence in any other man-
ner specified in Article 3, Chapter 4, Title
5 of the Code of Civil Procedure, and it
also appearing from the verified Petition
that a good cause of action exists in this
action in favor of the Petitioner, therein
and against the Respondent, and that
the said Respondent is a necessary and
proper party to the action or that the par-
ty to be served has or claims an interest
in, real or personal property in this State
that is subject to the jurisdiction of the
Court or the relief demanded in the ac-
tion consists wholly or in part in exclud-
ing such party from any interest in such
property.
NOW, ON APPLICATION of Jim
Louie, Petitioner in Pro Per, IT IS OR-
DERED that the services of said Sum-
mons in this section be made upon said
Respondent, by publication thereof in the
Daily Journal, a newspaper of general
circulation publish in San Mateo County,
California, hereby designated as the
newspaper most likely to give notice to
said Respondent; that said publication
be made at least once a week for four
successive weeks.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a
copy of said Summons and of said Peti-
tion in this action be forthwith deposited
in the United States Post Office, post-
paid, directed to said Respondent, if his
address is ascertained before expiration
of the time prescribed for the publication
of this Summons and declaration of this
mailing, or of the fact that the address
was not ascertained, be filed at the expi-
ration of the time prescribed for the publi-
cations.
Dated: 02/17/12
Signed: Susan Greenberg
Judge/Commissioner of the Superior
Court
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
March 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others 650 344-6565
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
295 Art
6 FRAMED colored modern art pictures
36" by 26" $90 for all or $15 each
(650)345-5502
296 Appliances
CHOPPERS (4) with instructions $7/all.
(650)368-3037
ELECTRIC HEATER - Oil filled electric
heater, 1500 watts, $30., (650)504-3621
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 (650)458-8280
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT "A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head" See: http://tinyurl.com/4y38xld
650-204-0587 $75
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
65 EUROPEAN Used Postage Stamps.
Some issued before 1920. All different.
Includes stamps from England, France,
and Germany. $5.00 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, $8. each, (650)364-
7777
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
PEDAL CAR 1950's vintage "No Rust"
rare $100 obo. SOLD!
PRECIOUS MOMENTS vinyl dolls - 16,
3 sets of 2, $35. each set, (650)518-0813
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
PRINTER - Epson Stylus NX1000, copy,
print, scans, includes some ink cartridg-
es, $25. obo, (650)349-6969
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
RADIO-CONTROL SAILBOAT: Robbie
model. Power: Futabas ATTAK, 75.750
mghz.Excellent condition, ready to use.
Needs batteries. $60.00 650-341- 3288
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
VINTAGE FISHING LURES - (10) at be-
tween $45. & $100. each, CreekChub,
Helin Tackle, Arbogast, some in original
boxes, (650)257-7481
303 Electronics
19" TOSHIBA LCD color TV $99
(650)343-4461
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
3 TVS 4 DVD players VCRs, ect. almost
free. Nothing over $9 SOLD!
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
PS2 GAME console $75.00
(650)591-4710
SONY TRINITRON 36" TV with Remote
Good Condition Sacrifice for $25. SOLD
TOSHIBA 42 LCD flat screen TV HD in
very good condition, $300., Call at
(650)533-9561
TV SET Philips 21 inch with remote $40.,
(650)692-3260
ZENITH TV 12" $50 650 755-9833 (Daly
City). (650)755-9833
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BEAUTIFUL ORIENTAL Table. 32" by
32" 12" legs, Rosewood, Lightweight,
$75 650 871-7200
BED - King size, Somma Infinity Flota-
tion bed, includes 10 large tubes, foam
enclosure with plastic covers & indented
foam mattress cover, $99.obo, (650)349-
6969
BOOKSHELF $10.00 (650)591-4710
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53X66, $29., (650)583-8069
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921, 650-
245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DOUBLE BED mattress and box spring
$25., (650)637-8244
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
304 Furniture
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
650-692-1942
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
650-692-1942
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATTRESS TOPPER chrome full size
$15., (650)368-3037
MIRROR, NICE, large, 30x54, $25.
SSF (650)583-8069
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
25 LOVELY Vases all sizes $1 to $3
each ( Florist Delight ) 650 755-9833
3 LARGE Blue Ceramic Pots $10 each
650 755-9833
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
(650)343-4461
MIXER & CITRUS JUICE combo by
Ham. Beach - sturdy model, used, c.70's
$22.,SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $80. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
18 VOLT ROYBI circular saw & Sawall
with charger both $40 650 593-7553
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
27 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Outlying expanse
4 Fay Wray in
King Kong, to
movie buffs
15 The Giants
retired his #4
16 The Bucharest
Buffoon of 70s-
80s tennis
17 Unit whose
symbol is an
omega
18 Military
communications
branch
19 Site of Cretan
ruins
21 Shine, in ads
22 Blofelds constant
companion, in
Bond films
23 Goes
unhurriedly
24 Joel Chandler
Harriss brother?
25 Tennis score
word
26 Take __ at
27 Dock bloc, briefly
28 Ford from
Tennessee
30 Big party bottles
33 River through
Hesse
34 Calls the game
37 Some saints
39 Mates
40 Doesnt come
through
42 Glide
44 Proof abbr.
45 El __: Peruvian
volcano
49 Ahem relative
50 Curt turndown
52 Youve done
enough
53 Bar order,
initally
54 Cologne never
55 Took a vacation
56 Colonialism
59 Manual
transmissions?:
Abbr.
60 Garb for
Columbo and
Clouseau
61 Coalesce
62 Its highly
classified
63 Sounds omitted
in transcription
DOWN
1 Showing-off
expression
2 Cultural group
3 Tops
4 Bike passengers
support,
facetiously
5 Campaign
rewards
6 Fixes
7 Gloaming, in verse
8 Made 60-Across
for technocrats?
9 Atlantic City
director
10 Familiarity/appeal
measurement
used in
marketing
11 __-Aztecan
languages
12 Sweet pop music
13 Trellis for training
fruit trees
14 Sleeping kittens,
e.g.
20 Marine layer
24 __-ray Discs
27 Ordered
29 Wine flavored by
pine resin-sealed
barrels
31 North Sea
country: Abbr.
32 Give a little
34 Goes from
second to third,
say
35 Arrive after a long
sail
36 Tot lot
38 Most aloof
41 Bk. after Ezra
43 Joseph
Kennedys
middle
daughter
46 Underground
waste
47 News opening,
often
48 Rustic poems
51 Weather forecast
components
52 Tropic Thunder
actor
55 __ gum: food
thickener
57 Tolkien creature
58 Bird in a fable
By John Farmer
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
03/17/12
03/17/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
3,450 RPM $50 (650)347-5373
HAND DRILL $6.00 (415) 333-8540
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
650 593-7553
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
10 WALL shelfs with brackets 24" to 50"
by 5" wide $30 for all(650)345-5502
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS of Christmas vintage drinking
Glasses 1970 Color prints Prefect
condition original box $25 (650)873-8167
1970 TIFFANY style swag lamp with
opaque glass, $59., (650)692-3260
3 FLOORBOARDS: for 8 INFLATABLE:
Our boating days over. Spar-Varnish,
very good condition; Stored inside.
All:$10.00 SOLD
310 Misc. For Sale
2 AUTOMOTIVE MANUALS:
1) CHILTON'S Auto Repair Manual 1964
- 1971 2) MOTOR SERVICE'S
Automotive Encyclopedia. Each: $5.
SOLD!
2 TODDLER car seats, hardly used.
Both for $75.00. (650)375-1246
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
29 BOOKS - Variety of authors, $25.,
(650)589-2893
3 CRAFT BOOKS - hardcover, over 500
projects, $40., (650)589-2893
30 DISNEY Books $1.00 each
650 368-3037
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 CUP electric coffee marker $8.00
650 368-3037
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln war years books, $90., B/O must
see, (650)345-5502
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ANGEL WITH lights 12 inches High $12.
(650)368-3037
AREA RUG - 8x8 round, 100% wool pile,
color ivory, black, SOLD!
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others $10 each
650-364-7777
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
310 Misc. For Sale
BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD hard-
back books. 4 at $3.00 each or all for
$10., Call (650)341-1861
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ GILL with Cover 31/2' wide by 3'
tall hardly used $49. 650 347-9920
BBQ KETTEL Grill, Uniflame 21 $35
(650)347-8061
BBQ SMOKER BBQ Grill, LP Coleman,
Alaskan Cookin Machine, cost $140 sell
$75. 650-344-8549
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 650-344-8549
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18., (650)347-
5104
BIRD FEEDER 3" high, free standing,
sturdy, and never used $15
(415) 333-8540
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMPING CUPS and plates (NEW)-B/O
(650)591-4710
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45., (650)592-
2648
COLEMAN PROPANE camp stove
$25.00 (650)591-4710
COLEMAN PROPANE lantern $15.00
(650)591-4710
310 Misc. For Sale
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DUFFEL BAGS - 1 Large Duffel Bag ,1
Xtra Lg. Duffel w Wheels, 1 Leather
weekender Satchel, $75. (650)871-7211
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
ELVIS PRESLEY poster book $20.
(650)692-3260
FOAM SLEEP roll (2)-$10.00/each
(650)591-4710
FOOD SLICER. Oxo Mandolin. Little
used. $15. (650)630-2329
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HANGING PLANTER. 2-black plastic-
coated steel, 20" wide, 10" deep. With
chains, hooks. Both for $35
(650)630-2329
HARDBACK BOOKS - Complete set, 6
volumes, by Winston S. Churchill, 2nd
WW, published 1948-1953, great condi-
tion, dustjackets, $90.all, (650)347-5104
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition $65 650 867-2720
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JANET EVANOVICH (4) hardback
books $3/each (8) paperback books
$1/each 650-341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LARGE PRINT. Hard Cover. Mystery
Books. Current Author. (20) $1 each
650-364-7777
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
310 Misc. For Sale
MAGNIFYING MIRROR. Swivel, wall
mount, 5Xx1X. Satin nickel finish. New,
in box. $20. (650)630-2329
MEN'S ASHTON and Hayes leather
briefcase new. Burgundy color. $65 obo,
(650)343-4461
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $50
(650)593-7553
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PR. MATCHED PEWTER GOBLETS by
Wilton. Numbered. 7-1/2-in ht.
Excellent bridal gifts or mantel vases.
No polishing. $10/ea.or $18/pr.
(650)341-3288
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER POOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TENT $30.00 (650)591-4710
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20., (650)345-
5446
310 Misc. For Sale
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays $25 650 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE TV /RADIO TUBES - 100 of
them for $100. total, (415)672-9206
WALGREENS BRAND Water Pitcher
Royal Blue Top 2 Quart New in Box $10
Ea use all brand Filters 650-873-8167
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALKER. INVACARE 6291-3f, dual re-
lease walker. Fixed 3" wheels & glider
tips. Brand new. $50. (650)594-1494
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WINE CARBOYS, 5 gal. $5 ea., have 2
Daly City (415)333-8540
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small Ac-
cordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ELECTRIC STARCASTER Guitar
black&white with small amplifier $75.
650-358-0421
GUITAR - Classical nylon strings, Suzu-
ki, $85., (650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
MAGNUS TABLE top Organ:: 2-1/2 oc-
taves. Play by number, chords by letters
Excellent condition, 5 starter books. All
$30. (650)341-3288
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
49ER SWEATSHIRT with hood size 8
extra large $100 obo. (650)346-9992
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
28 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
BRIDAL PETTICOAT: Taffeta. Fitted
waist-to-hip above bouffant crinolines;
ruffled taffetas over and under crinoline
Sz: 10 $20. (650)341-3288
BRIDAL PETTICOAT: Taffeta. Fitted
waist-to-hip above bouffant crinolines;
ruffled taffeta liners over + under
crinolines. Sz. 10. $20.00 (650)341-3288
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
LADIES 3 PC. SEERSUCKER, (shorts,
slacks, jacket (short sleeves), blue/white
stripe. Sz 12, Excellent condition. $12.
all, (650)341-3288
LADIES DOWN jacket light yellow with
dark brown lining $35. (650)868-0436
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES ROYAL blue rain coat with zip-
pered flannel plaid liner size 12 RWC
$15. (650)868-0436
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MANS SUEDE-LIKE jacket, Brown.
New, XXLg. $25. 650 871-7211
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all, (650)347-
5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NINE WEST. 3 black handbags. Very
good condition. All for $10. (650)630-
2329
PICTURE HAT: Leghorn straw, pouf
bow, vintage red/pink velvet roses. Fem-
inine Easter Bonnet! From: Hats On
Post, SF @ $75. Steal at $20.,
(650)341-3288
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$20.00 SOLD!
SAN FRANCISCO SOUVENIR JACKET:
Hooded, zip-front. Reversible, outer: tan
all-weather; inner: navy plush. Each has
SF landmarks' embroidery. Large: $20.
(650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE WOMEN'S hats various styles
B/O, Daly City, (650)755-9833
WOMEN'S BLACK Motorcycle Jacket
Size M Stella/Alpine Star $80. obo
(415)375-1617
WOMEN'S VINTAGE clothing $5.00 &
up, Daly City, (650)755-9833
317 Building Materials
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $75.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BOXING gloves $8. 341-8342
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
GOLF BALLS (325) $65 (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS (325) $65 (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS in new carton Dunlop,
Wilson, & Top Flight $9.00 650 341-8342
GOLF SET. 6 clubs with Sun Mtn.
Sports bag and cart. $100.
SOLD.
TENNIS RACKET oversize with cover
and 3 Wilson Balls $25 (650)692-3260
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
YOUTH GOLF Bag great condition with
six clubs putter, drivers and accessories
$65. 650-358-0421
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE
2315 Easton Dr.
Burlingame, CA 94010
Friday, 16th &
Saturday, 17th
10am-4pm
THE THRIFT SHOP
HALF PRICE SALE!
ALL MENS
CLOTHING
Open Thurs. & Fri 10-2:00
Sat 10-3:00
Episcopal Church
1 South El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 82,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
IVORY WOOL blend rect. 3x5 Blue Wil-
335 Garden Equipment
(GALVANIZED planter with boxed liners
94 x 10 x 9. Two available, $20/all,
(415)346-6038
BAMBOO poles 6 to 8 Ft, 30. $15/all,
(415)346-6038
FLOWER POTS many size (50 pieces)
$15/all, (415)346-6038
POTTED PLANTS (7) $5/each
650-207-0897
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 82,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
429 Out of Area R.E.
OREGON VINEYARD - For Sale or
Lease. 40 acres, with 28 acres of vine-
yard, 12 acres Pinot Noir, 16 acres Pinot
Noir Gris. Above average fruit. Mature
plants. 2,200 sq. ft. house, 3 car garage,
Shop/ Barn, Fantastic view. Turn Key
Operation. Call: (702) 755-1442 or
(702) 558-2199
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
Studio $1125, 1 bedroom $1450. New
carpets, new granite counters, dishwash-
er, balcony, covered carports, storage,
pool, no pets. (650) 592-1271
SAN MATEO $1200 Per Month. LG 1
Bedroom, AEK, 1 block from Central
Park and Downtown, RENTED!
SAN MATEO - Large 2 Bedroom, 2 bath.
Next to Central Park. Rarely Available.
Prestigious Location & Building. Gated
garage. Deck, No pets, $2,200/mo.
Call (650) 948-2935
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOM FOR rent, near 101, 92, 280,
private bath, parking, utilities/cable
included, $650.00 call tel. no.
(650) 504-7122 after 6 pm females only
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
69 GTO weld wheels, frozen engine &
transmission. $100 SOLD!
76 PORSCHE sportmatic NO engine
with transmission $100 SOLD!
CADILLAC 93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
AUTO AUCTION
The following repossessed vehi-
cles are being sold by Meriwest Credit
Union - 2006 Ford Mustang
#229334.The following repossessed
vehicles are being sold by First United
Services Credit Union Credit Union -
2005 Chevrolet Suburban #184587,
2004 BMW 550i #113906, 2005
Dodge Durango #535168, 2006 Chev-
rolet HHR #592656. Plus over 100
late model Sport Utilities, Pick Ups,
Mini Vans, and luxury cars ---IN-
DOORS---Charity donations sold.
Sealed bids will be taken from 8am-
8pm on 03/19/2012 and 8am-5pm on
03/20/2012. Sale held at Forrest
Faulknor & Sons Auction Company,
175 Sylvester Road, South San Fran-
cisco. For more information please
visit our web site at www.ffsons.com.
AUTO AUCTION
The following repossessed vehi-
cles are being sold by Patelco Credit
Union on March 20, 2012 starting at
8am ---2000 Ford Explorer #C15668,
2006 Chevrolet Tahoe #169338, 2004
Toyota Sienna #029182, 2003 MBZ
CLK500 #051980, 2005 Toyota Se-
quoia #252413. Sealed bids will be
taken starting at 8am on 03/20/2012.
Sale held at Forrest Faulknor & Sons
Auction Company, 175 Sylvester
Road, South San Francisco. For
more information please visit our web
site at www.ffsons.com.
BMW 02 325CI -fully loaded, black
leather interior, auto, heated seats, new
tires, much more! 112K miles. $9,400.
(650)692-7916
BMW 530 95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, 165K miles,
$3,850 (650)349-0713
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
SUTTON AUTO SALES
Cash for Cars
Call 650-595-DEAL (3325)
Or Stop By Our Lot
1659 El Camino Real
San Carlos
VOLKSWAGEN GT 07 No engine, no
Trans. $100 or B/O (650)481-5296
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $4900 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
NISSAN 87 Centura - Two door, man-
ual, stick shift, 150K miles. Clean title,
good body, $1,250., (415)505-3908
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
630 Trucks & SUVs
TOYOTA HIGHLANDER - 08, 2WD
Sport, 38K miles, original owner, many
extras, excellent condition, 3rd row seat,
tow package, roof rack, back up camera,
blue tooth, $23,750 obo, (650)255-1865
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PLEASURE BOAT, 15ft., 50 horsepow-
er Mercury, $1,300.obo (650)368-2170
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
RV. 73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiberglass
Bubble Top $2,450. Will finance, small
downpayment. Call for appointments.
(650)364-1374
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
CADILLAC CHROME factory wheels 95
thru 98 Fleetwood $100 SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CARGO COVER, (black) for Acura MDX
$75. 415-516-7060
DENALI WHEELS - 17 inches, near
new, 265-70-R17, complete fit GMC 6
lug wheels, $400. all, SOLD!
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
E. L. SHORT
Bath Remodeler
Lic.#406081
Free Design Assistance
Serving Locally 30+ Years
BBB Honor Roll
(650)591-8378
K .A. Mattson
Design and Construction
Where Kitchen and
Bath Remodeling
combine with the
latest in technology.
Natural stone and tile.
Over 45 years experience.
Lic# 839815
650-652-9664
Building/Remodeling
DRAFTING SERVICES
for
Remodels, Additions,
and
New Construction
(650)343-4340
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484
www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
* BLANCAS CLEANING
SERVICES
$25 OFF First Cleaning
Commercial - Residential
(we also clean windows)
Good References 10 Years Exp.
FREE Estimates
(650) 867-9969
Cleaning
MENAS
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
Move in/out
Steam Carpet
Windows & Screens
Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
Cleaning Concrete
29 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pictures on Yelp
Happy
St. Patricks Day
Construction
BELMONT
CONSTRUCTION
Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Plumbing
Remodeling &
New Construction
Kitchen, Bath,
Structural Repairs
Additions, Decks,
Stairs, Railings
Lic#836489, Ins. & Bonded
All work guaranteed
Call now for a free estimate
650-766-1244
Kevin@belmontconstructionca.com
Construction
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair,
Termite & Dry Rot Repair,
Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting.
(650) 548-5482
neno.vukic@hotmail.com
Lic# 728805
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
MORALES
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Arbors
Retaining Walls Concrete Work
French Drains Concrete Walls
Any damaged wood repair
Powerwash Driveways Patios
Sidewalk Stairs Hauling
$25. Hr./Min. 2 hrs.
Free Estimates
20 Years Experience
(650)921-3341
(650)347-5316
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
KEITH A. DAVEY
ELECTRICAL
(Your Current Connection)
Two Man Operation, Specializing
in Recessed Lighting.
All Phases of Electrical
Lic. #767463 & Bonded
(650)759-0440
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns, Sprinkler
Systems, Clean Ups, Fences, Tree
Trimming, Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Phone: (650) 345-6583
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
JOSES COMPLETE
GARDENING
and Landscaping
Full Service Includes:
Tree Trimming
Free Estimates
(650)315-4011
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
Gutter Cleaning - Leaf Guard
Gutter & Roof Repairs
Custom Down Spouts
Drainage Solutions
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Insured
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
DISCOUNT
HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing
Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST
HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing
New Construction,
General Home Repair,
Water Damage
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
General Home Repairs
Improvements
Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
Handy Help
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando
(650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
Honest and Very
Affordable Price
Excellent References
Free Written Estimates
Top Quality Painting
(415)895-2427
Lic. 957975
JOE RYANS
PENINSULA PAINTING
Local residential painting
experts for 25 years
We Get It Right
The First Time
(650)888-9305
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
JK PLASTERING
Interior Exterior
Free Estimates
Lic.# 966463
(650)799-6062
Plumbing
STANLEY S.
Plumbing & Drain
Only $89.00 to Unclog
Drain From Cleanout
And For All
Your Plumbing Needs
(650)679-0911
Lic. # 887568
Remodeling
PATRICK
BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS BASEMENTS
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Buy 2 get
1 Free
Bath &
Showers
650 868 - 8492
30 Weekend Mar. 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
NORDIC TREE SERVICE
Large Removal Trim, Thin, Prune
We do demolition and do waste hauls
Stump grading
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
FREE ESTIMATES
Jorge Sr. (650) 465-6019
Jorge Jr. (650)518-2512
jorges_handyman@yahoo.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks, tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona

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VelaShape IIand
VASER

Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
General Dentistry for
Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
---------------------------------------------------
(Combine Coupons & Save!).
$69 Exam/Cleaning
(Reg. $189.)
$69 Exam/FMX
(Reg. $228.)
New Patients without Insurance
Price + Terms of offer are subject
to change without notice.
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
HOUSE OF BAGELS
SAN MATEO
OPEN EVERYDAY
6:30AM-3PM
Bagels,Santa Cruz Coffee,
Sandwiches, Wifi, Kids Corner
Easy Parking
680 E. 3rd Ave
& Delaware
(650)548-1100
Food
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
14 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
Health & Medical
REVIV
MEDICAL SPA
www.revivmedspa.com
31 S. El Camino Real
Millbrae
(650)697-3339
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
GOUGH INSURANCE &
FINANCIAL SERVICES
www.goughinsurance.com
(650)342-7744
CA insurance lic. 0561021
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
MAYERS
JEWELERS
We Buy Gold!
Bring your old gold in
and redesign to
something new or cash it in!
Watch Battery
Replacement $9.00
Most Watches.
Must present ad.
Jewelry & Watch Repair
2323 Broadway
Redwood City
(650)364-4030
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breech of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Low Cost
Divorce
We handle Uncontested
and Contested Divorces
Complex Property Division
Child & Spousal Support Payments
Restraining Orders
Domestic Violence
Peninsula Law Group
One of The Bay Areas Very Best!
Same Day, Weekend
Appointments Available
Se Habla Espaol
(650) 903-2200
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HEALING MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Open daily 9am - 9pm
2305-A Carlos St., Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Pet Services
BOOMERANG
PET EXPRESS
All natural, byproduct free
pet foods!
Home Delivery
www.boomerangpetexpress.com
(650)989-8983
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Seniors
A NO COST
Senior Housing
Referral Service
Assisted Living. Memory.
Residential Homes.
Dedicated to helping seniors
and families find the right
supportive home.
(650)787-8292
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
NATION/WORLD 31
Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
South San Francisco M-Fri: 8AM 8PM
Sat: 9AM 7PM Sun: 10AM - 6PM
View Entire Inventory
HertzCarSalesSanFrancisco.com
650-952-4720
177 SOUTH AIRPORT RD.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080
Very Competitive Used Car Pricing
With 12 mo/12,000 Mile Warranty*
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is reducing by $1,000 the price it would ordinarily charge for all vehicles. This reduction cannot be combined with any other discount. Financing
are for illustration purposes only. See dealer for details. Valid through 3/31/12.

No Purchase Necessary. Free membership (until April 30th) Membership fee normally $60.00.

2010 NISSAN VERSA S
$
Was:
VIN AL467647
46,089miles
Silver
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
$
$
Was:
VIN AC384314
40,457miles
Blue
2011 CHEVY MALIBU LS
$
$
Was:
VIN BF131981
43,899miles
White
2010 MERCURY GRD MARQ
Was:
VIN AX638266
40,836miles
Silver
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
$
$
Was:
VIN BU611852
41,759 miles
White
2011 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$
$
Was:
VIN BF149991
47,105 miles
Silver
2011 NISSAN ROGUE S
$
$
Was:
VIN BW256859
44,449miles
White
2010 TOYOTA RAV4
$
$
Was:
VIN AW054865
39,310 miles
Silver
2010 BMW 328 i
$
$
Was:
VIN ANM69955
40,756 miles
White
2010 MAZDA 5
$
$
Was:
VIN A0370962
42,209 miles
Gray
2010 TOYOTA CAMRY SE
$
$
Was:
VIN AU576247
40,396 miles
Red
2010 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S
$
$
Was:
VIN AN463354
50,897 miles
Silver
2010 VW JETTA S
$
$
Was:
VIN AM049702
44,560miles
Black
2010 TOYOTA YARIS
Was:
VIN A1371724
33,029 miles
Blue
2010 NISSAN SENTRA S
Was:
VIN AL644570
37,810 miles
Gray
VIN AL459991
39,915 miles
Light Blue
2010 NISSAN VERSA H/B
$
Was:
+
The risk is that gas prices could eventually slow growth by
causing some people to cut spending on other goods, from
appliances and furniture to electronics and vacations. Gasoline
purchases provide less benet for the U.S. economy because
about half of the revenue ows to oil-exporting nations, though
U.S. oil companies and gasoline retailers also benet.
Many American businesses suffer, too. They must pay more
for fuel and shipping and for materials affected by high oil
prices, such as petroleum-based plastics. Prot margins get
squeezed.
Even if prices ease after the summer driving season, dont
expect gasoline to fall below $3 a gallon. The government esti-
mates that this years average will be $3.79, followed by $3.72
in 2013.
Most economists accept a rough guideline that a 25-cent rise
in gas prices knocks about 0.2 percentage point off economic
growth.
Gas prices also have an outsize impact on consumer con-
dence, Christopher noted. Its a high-frequency purchase.
Consumers notice the price whether theyre lling up or driv-
ing past a gas station.
Along with the unemployment rate and stock market levels,
gasoline prices heavily determine how Americans see their
nancial health.
That effect was evident Friday when a decline was reported
in the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan index of con-
sumer sentiment. The result surprised some economists who
had assumed that higher stock prices and lower unemployment
would lift consumer sentiment.
The Michigan report showed that gasoline worries ... are
outweighing stock market gains and job growth when it
comes to influencing consumer attitudes, said Michael
Hanson, an economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch.
The price of gasoline has climbed 17 percent since the year
began to a national average of $3.83 a gallon. Thats the
highest ever for this time of year. A month ago, it was $3.52.
Gasoline prices have followed oil prices up. Oil is rising, in
part, because of tensions surrounding Irans nuclear program.
Iranian leaders have threatened to close a shipping route into
the Persian Gulf. Experts say the standoff could lead to tighter
global oil supplies later this year.
Contributing to higher gas prices is stronger demand from
China and other developing economies.
Most economists expect gas prices to top $4 a gallon by
May. That would drag on consumer spending and the econo-
my.
Its like a tax, Hanson said.
Economists note that gas prices tend to hit consumer con-
dence especially hard once they surpass round numbers, such
as $4 a gallon or $5 a gallon. Consumer condence levels pro-
vide a rough guide to what Americans will actually do when at
the mall or their favorite store.
A Gallup poll last week found that nearly half of Americans
would make signicant spending cuts in other areas if gas
topped $5 a gallon. On average, Americans said gas prices of
$5.30 to $5.35 are a tipping point that would cause them to
make those cutbacks.
Motorists have responded to rising pump prices by driving
fewer miles in more efcient vehicles. Theyve conserved so
much fuel this year that theyve effectively reduced gasoline
spending even though a gallon is an average of 32 cents high-
er than it was a year ago, said Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at
the Oil Price Information Service.
Gas prices really choked the consumer in 2008, Kloza
said. This year Im not so sure.
Retailers have begun to worry that higher gas prices will
eventually force many consumers to cut back.
If gas prices do start (going) upward again and creeping
back up to $4 and $5, I think that is going to be a problem for
our customer, Charles Holley, Wal-Marts chief nancial of-
cer, said this month.
Some trends in the economy should cushion the impact of
higher gas prices. Americans saved more last year. That gives
them some leeway to pay for costlier gas out of savings rather
than cutting spending in other areas.
Easing the impact further, other energy prices have fallen
even as gas costs have soared. The price of natural gas to resi-
dential consumers has dropped an average of 8 percent a year
since 2009.
Consumers saved more money in January from lower natu-
ral gas and electricity prices than they paid in higher gas costs,
Christopher said.
The price of gasoline will likely follow developments in
Iran. Continued sparring between Iran and the West means
prices will keep going up. But if Iran adopts a more concilia-
tory tone, oil and gasoline prices could tumble.
The outcome will help determine the U.S. elections in
November. Obama has been under pressure to do something to
ease prices even as the economy is producing its best job
growth since the recession ended.
A Washington Post-ABC News poll conducted last week
found that 59 percent of voters disapproved of the way Obama
has handled the economy. A month ago, the same poll found
that 53 percent disapproved.
Obamas Republican opponents have criticized him for
blocking efforts to expand drilling in restricted areas of the
Gulf of Mexico and in the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge.
Continued from page 1
ECONOMY
By Brett Zongker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON George Clooney
and his father were arrested Friday dur-
ing a protest outside the Sudanese
Embassy, and the actor said he has asked
President Barack Obama to engage
China on stopping a humanitarian crisis
in northern Africa.
The protesters accuse Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir of provoking a
humanitarian crisis and blocking food
and aid from entering the Nuba
Mountains in the countys border region
with South Sudan.
Clooney, his father, Nick Clooney, and
others were arrested after being warned
three times not to cross a police line out-
side the embassy. Those taken into cus-
tody included NAACP President Ben
Jealous, Martin Luther King III, and
actor and comedian Dick Gregory.
Several members of Congress also
were arrested, including Massachusetts
Reps. James McGovern and John Olver,
Texas Rep. Al Green and Rep. Jim
Moran of Virginia. They were hand-
cuffed and placed into a U.S. Secret
Service van.
Clooney was released several hours
later after paying a $100 ne.
The arrests came after Clooney met
this week with Obama, testied in the
Senate and attended a state dinner for
British Prime Minister David Cameron.
Clooney told The Associated Press
before he was arrested that he can only
hope to draw attention to the crisis in
Sudan but that he doesnt know if any
progress has been made. He said he was
impressed, though, with Obamas
engagement on the issue.
Its amazing to sit down with a world
leader who knows all of the intricacies
of whats going on in Sudan, he said.
The actor said he asked Obama to
involve China more in pushing for a
solution in Sudan. A YouTube video
Clooney recently posted online from his
trip to Sudan appears to show a Chinese-
made missile being used against the
Nuba community.
Clooney said international leaders
need to follow the money owing to
Sudans leaders to expose corruption.
This is a moment where we have a
chance to do something because if we
dont, in the next three to four months,
theres going to be a real humanitarian
disaster, Clooney said before his arrest.
The situation is urgent, he said, because
the upcoming rainy season would block
transportation of food aid to the area.
Clooney said he didnt know if his
actions would make a difference but that he
at least wanted to make more people aware.
Its such a silly thought to think
youre actually succeeding in any of
this, he said. But if its loud enough
and you keep making it loud enough at
the very least people will know about it,
and you cant say we didnt know. Thats
the rst step.
Clooney arrested at Sudanese Embassy
REUTERS
George Clooney is arrested for civil disobedience after protesting at the Sudan
Embassy in Washington, D.C.
32 Weekend March 17-18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Gold Jewelry Watches Platinum Diamonds
1211 Burlingame Ave 650-347-7007
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
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Deal With Experts Quick Service
Unequal Customer Care
Estate Appraisals Batteries
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$50
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 3/31/12
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