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Food as Fuel Action Pack

Food as Fuel Action Pack Here is your Action Pack! The materials contained in your Action
Here is your Action Pack! The materials contained in your Action Pack will help you
Here is your Action Pack! The materials contained in your
Action Pack will help you and your family take action to use
food to your advantage and fuel your energy requirements.
Included in your Action Pack:
Food as Fuel Overview: use this to introduce the Food as
Fuel principles to your family
Food as Fuel Cheat Sheets: stick these reference sheets up
on your fridge for everyone to use:
1.
Foods that protect, energize, build, and sustain
2.
Add color to your meals
3.
Liquid energy
Family Top 10’s: get your family together one night and
create your own top 10 lists for easier meal planning
Snacking for Energy: try these new snacking ideas, then
see if you can add some new combinations of your own
Menu Map: use this easy planning tool to quickly help you
use food as fuel
Resources: take advantage of family nutrition counseling
and family-friendly web resources

Food as Fuel

Protect

Energize

Build

Sustain

Hydrate

Food is fuel and can provide what is needed to fuel your performance. Foods that protect, energize, build, sustain, and hydrate will enable your child to focus and perform whatever their energy needs.

What food can do

Simple Strategy

Protect 1. your immune system with fruits and vegetables Add 3 colors to your plate
Protect
1. your immune system with fruits and vegetables
Add 3 colors to your plate
Energize
2. with carbohydrates to sustain energy levels
Think “brown and close to the ground”
Build
3. body tissues with quality proteins
Think: the less legs the better!
Sustain
4. with healthy fats for repair and renewal of cells
Eat fats that give back
Hydrate
5. with water – maintain hydration to maintain performance
Reach for water first

Activity Level

Low: Medium: High: Mental energy day, usual getting from here to there activity Mental energy
Low:
Medium:
High:
Mental energy day, usual getting
from here to there activity
Mental energy day, plus fun,
recreational activities
High energy day, sports,
practice or game
Fueling Needs

Field of Play

Incremental eating is based on fuel (food) needed for physical activity levels and would have to be tailored to meet individual needs. An example of incremental eating is shown above.

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

Food as Fuel

Protect

Energize

Build

Sustain

Protect: Add 3 colors to your plate

FRUITS & VEGETABLES = PROTECTION

Eat a rainbow often
Eat a rainbow often

1 serving size = cupped hand

Fruits & vegetables provide protection for the immune system, brain, and body.

Include fruits & vegetables at each meal.

A wide variety of color provides the biggest benefit.

Optimally protect by eating at least 2 fruits & 3 vegetables every day.

Energize: Think brown and close to the ground

CARBOHYDRATE = FUEL FOR THE BRAIN & MUSCLES

Carbohydrates help sustain energy.

1 serving size = your fist

t a i n e n e r g y . 1 serving size = your
t a i n e n e r g y . 1 serving size = your
brown rice oatmeal 100% whole wheat bread
brown rice
oatmeal
100% whole wheat bread

high fiber cereal

Build: The less legs the better

PROTEIN = BUILDING BLOCKS FOR OUR BODIES

fish chicken/turkey breasts lean red meat
fish
chicken/turkey
breasts
lean red meat

peanut butter

Sustain: Eat healthy fats that give back

HEALTHY FATS = ENERGY DENSITY

pecans, walnuts avocado & almonds oils: fish, flax, olive peanut butter
pecans, walnuts
avocado
& almonds
oils: fish, flax, olive
peanut butter

Food sources are: whole grain cereals, whole wheat bread/pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, granola, beans, fruits & vegetables.

What to look for: high-fiber, unprocessed foods.

The best choices will have more than 3g of fiber per serving.

Think brown and close to the ground.

Optimally energize by including one high-fiber, unprocessed carbohydrate at each meal.

1 serving size = the palm of your hand

Quality protein builds muscle and maintains the immune system.

Quality sources are: fish, poultry, lean meats, low fat dairy, eggs, beans/legumes, natural peanut butter and almond butter.

What to look for: quality protein sources. Typically the less legs on the animal the protein came from, the better it is for you.

Optimally build by including at least one quality protein at each meal.

1 serving size = the tip of your thumb

Healthy fats provide energy, help to regulate blood sugar, improve cholesterol, and keep you feeling full.

blood sugar, improve cholesterol, and keep you feeling full. • Omega-3 fatty acids improve mental processes,
blood sugar, improve cholesterol, and keep you feeling full. • Omega-3 fatty acids improve mental processes,

Omega-3 fatty acids improve mental processes, decrease inflammation, and enhance heart health.

Omega-3s are found in fatty fish like salmon, trout, and tuna, natural peanut butter, almond butter and healthy cooking fats such as olive oil, as well as flaxseed, and walnuts.

Try to get one serving of healthy fat per meal (2 total servings of fatty fish per week).

Food as Fuel

Protect

Energize

Build

Sustain

Hydrate

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

Food as Fuel

Protect

Add 3 colors to your plate

Food as Fuel Protect Add 3 colors to your plate Yellow foods: optimize brain function White
Food as Fuel Protect Add 3 colors to your plate Yellow foods: optimize brain function White

Yellow foods: optimize brain function

colors to your plate Yellow foods: optimize brain function White foods: enhance immune system , lymph

White foods: enhance immune system, lymph system, and cellular recovery

enhance immune system , lymph system, and cellular recovery Red foods: support heart and circulation Purple
enhance immune system , lymph system, and cellular recovery Red foods: support heart and circulation Purple

Red foods: support heart and circulation

cellular recovery Red foods: support heart and circulation Purple foods: promote blood flow through small vessels

Purple foods: promote blood flow through small vessels

Purple foods: promote blood flow through small vessels Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones Orange foods:
Purple foods: promote blood flow through small vessels Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones Orange foods:
Purple foods: promote blood flow through small vessels Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones Orange foods:
Purple foods: promote blood flow through small vessels Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones Orange foods:

Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones

small vessels Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones Orange foods: support skin and tissues inside the
small vessels Green foods: rejuvenate muscles and bones Orange foods: support skin and tissues inside the

Orange foods: support skin and tissues inside the body

Orange foods: support skin and tissues inside the body F o o d a s F
Orange foods: support skin and tissues inside the body F o o d a s F

Food as Fuel

Protect

Energize

Build

Sustain

Hydrate

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

Food as Fuel

Hydrate

Hydrate: Reach for water first

MAINTAIN HYDRATION TO MAINTAIN PERFORMANCE

for water first MAINTAIN HYDRATION TO MAINTAIN PERFORMANCE • Regular hydration helps to maintain normal physical

Regular hydration helps to maintain normal physical and mental performance and protects the immune system.

Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink. The thirst mechanism doesn’t kick in until you are already moderately dehydrated.

The best choice: water. Other good options: herbal teas, natural fruit juices and skim milk. Caffeinated, carbonated and high sugar drinks can actually dehydrate.

80% of our hydration needs are met through water and beverages, while the remaining 20% is derived from moisture in foods.

Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences Hydration Guidelines

Age Range

Daily Water Adequate Intake

Infants

0-6 months

3 cups (0.7 L), assumed to be from human milk.

7-12 months

3.5 cups (0.8 L), assumed to be from human milk and complementary foods and beverages.

Children

1-3 years

4 cups (0.9 L) as total beverages, including drinking water.

4-8 years

5 cups (1.2 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Adolescents 9-13 years

Males

8 cups (1.8 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Females

8 cups (1.8 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Adolescents 14-18 years

Males

11 cups (2.6 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Females

7 cups (1.6 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Adults 19-70+ years

Males

13 cups (3 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Females

9 cups (2.2 L) as total beverages, at least 50% of this drinking water.

Remember: consider the environment. Keep refillable bottles with you to avoid excessive use of disposable bottles and cups.

Food as Fuel

Protect

Energize

Build

Sustain

Hydrate

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

What are your family’s Top 10s?

My family’s top 10 Protectors

My family’s top 10 Builders

1.

1.

2.

2.

3.

3.

4.

4.

5.

5.

6.

6.

7.

7.

8.

8.

9.

9.

10.

10.

My family’s top 10 Energizers

My family’s top 10 Sustainers

1.

1.

2.

2.

3.

3.

4.

4.

5.

5.

6.

6.

7.

7.

8.

8.

9.

9.

10.

10.

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

Snacking for Energy
Snacking for Energy

Smart Snacking Tips

Snacks are a source of energy and can help you stay fueled

Eating every 3-4 hours provides fuel for your body & brain

Like our meals, snacks can be a blend of fueling carbs, quality proteins, healthy fats and lots of color from fruits & vegetables

Snacking is for everyone, whether you are looking to maintain, gain or lose weight

Try these snack ideas if weight management is needed

Nature Valley Granola Bar, Lara Bar, Kashi Bar or any other bars that have 3g of fiber and at least 5g of protein

Fresh Fruit + 1/4c of almonds, walnuts or pecans

Fresh Fruit + String Cheese

Fresh Veggies + Hummus, Natural Peanut Butter or Natural Almond Butter

100% Whole Wheat Crackers + Hummus, Natural Peanut Butter or Natural Almond Butter

Tuna packed in water mixed with low-fat cottage cheese or plain regular yogurt

Low Fat Greek Yogurt + fresh fruit + 1 small spoonful of honey (other great add ons are honey or raw oatmeal)

Beef Jerky + “CP Quick Fix Snack Mix” (CP Snack Mix = 1/4c almonds, walnuts or pecans + 1/2c high fiber cereal + 1/4c dried cranberries or cherries + 1/8c dark chocolate chips)

Try these snack ideas if weight gain is needed

Large whole wheat bagel with any of the following condiments: Low-Fat Cream cheese, sliced cheese, natural peanut butter, almond butter or cashew butter, hummus or honey

Whole grain cereal (w/at least 3g of fiber) with milk and fresh fruit

Natural peanut or almond butter + banana + honey sandwich on whole wheat bread with at least 3g of fiber.

Ready made pizza crust, whole wheat English muffins or whole wheat pitas with tomato sauce, veggies, turkey/chicken sausage or grilled chicken, and part skim mozzarella for a home made pizza

Hot oatmeal, cream of wheat, farina or grits mixed with your favorite toppings: peacans, walnuts, almonds, pepitas, ground flax, dried fruit, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey and/or dried fruit

Almonds, pecans, cashews, walnuts, pistachios, peanuts or sunflower seeds

Natural peanut butter is a great way to healthfully add calories. Try adding it to whole wheat bagels, English muffins, sandwiches, pita and fruit for quick snacks

Protein powder smoothies with peanut butter, fruit/100% fruit juice, and milk make for a delicious snack!

Dried fruit mixed with pretzels, dark chocolate chips, and nuts/seeds

Drink 8 oz of 100% fruit juice or 1-2% milk (flavored is great!) with every meal

Just because you want to gain weight does not mean to fill your body with low-grade fuel. Load up on added whole grains and healthy fats. Added fats should come from unsaturated sources like olive oil, nuts, and avocado.

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

Food as Fuel Menu Map

Map your meal planning to the Food as Fuel categories
Map your meal planning to the Food as Fuel categories

For your daily category targets, use your Food as Fuel cheat sheets

 

SAMPLE DAY

 

DAY

 

DAY

 

DAY

 

DAY

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Oatmeal (1 Energizer)

       

Skim milk (1 Builder)

       

Banana (1 Protector)

       

Orange Juice (1 Hydrator)

       

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

Peanut butter (1 Builder, 1 Sustainer)

       

Jelly (1 Other)

       

Whole wheat bread (2 Energizers)

       

Apple (1 Protector)

       

Carrot & celery sticks (2 protectors)

       

Skim Milk (1 Hydrator)

       

Dinner

Dinner

Dinner

Dinner

Dinner

Spagetti (1 Energizer)

       

Tomato sauce (1 Protector)

       

Lettuce, cukes, tomato (3 Protectors)

       

Cheese (1 Builder)

       

Salad dressing (1 Other)

       

Water (2 Hydrators)

       

Snacks

Snacks

Snacks

Snacks

Snacks

Granola Bar (1 Energizer)

       

Cookies (2 other)

       

String Cheese (1 Builder)

       

Water (2 Hydrators)

       

Food as Fuel Categories*

Food as Fuel Categories

 

Food as Fuel Categories

 

Food as Fuel Categories

 

Food as Fuel Categories

 

PROTECT

 

 

 

 

ENERGIZE

BUILD

SUSTAIN

HYDRATE

 

 

 

 

OTHER

       
 

Activity Level

Activity Level

 

Activity Level

 

Activity Level

 

Activity Level

 

Low: mental energy day

Low

Medium

High

Low

Medium

High

Low

Medium

High

Low

Medium

High

Medium: mental + recreation

High: sports, practice, game

 

Add foods to energize as your activity level goes up!

 

*Circles indicate targets for each category. Check off circles as you use components. Add circles when you go over your targets.

Brought to you by IBM Integrated Health Services, in collaboration with Core Performance VP of Nutrition and Research Amanda Carlson-Phillips, MS, RD, CSSD

Food as Fuel

Protect

Energize

Build

Sustain

Hydrate

2012 CHR Resources

These resources cover the following broad topics

Resources These resources cover the following broad topics Healthy Eating & Healthy Weight Home Fueling families
Resources These resources cover the following broad topics Healthy Eating & Healthy Weight Home Fueling families

Healthy Eating & Healthy Weight Home

Fueling families effectively

bam.gov

kidshealth.org

fns.usda.gov

Mindfulness

The whole family may reap the benefits

wellnessforlifecenter.com/

mindfulness/

reap the benefits wellnessforlifecenter.com/ mindfulness/ Sleep Rest for today, prepare for tomorrow kidshealth.org
reap the benefits wellnessforlifecenter.com/ mindfulness/ Sleep Rest for today, prepare for tomorrow kidshealth.org

Sleep

Rest for today, prepare for tomorrow

kidshealth.org

Nutrition Consultations

Speak with a registered dietitian to help you put the food as fuel concepts into action

wellnessforlifecenter.com/

nutritionconsultation

into action wellnessforlifecenter.com/ nutritionconsultation Physical Activity Helping your family stay active bam.gov
into action wellnessforlifecenter.com/ nutritionconsultation Physical Activity Helping your family stay active bam.gov

Physical Activity

Helping your family stay active

bam.gov

nhlbi.nih.gov

presidentschallenge.org

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