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PROJECT INTRODUCTION

Week Three: Project-Introduction [Type the author name]

PROJECT INTRODUCTION
The topic of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) can span a relatively intimidating array of issues when applied to its application and everyday use within a network infrastructure. Just as a network has internal hardware and software resources that can be found particularly supportive of such services as data or file transfer, internal network support is also necessary in order to ensure the quality and use of VoIP services.

In some instances, it is the case where network resources are such that support for VoIP may conflict with support for file or video transfer, or with other business critical network operations. This is the arena of trade-offs commonly found throughout the subject matter of network design and configuration. In my paper, I will endeavor to discuss these trade-offs, where they are commonly known to manifest, and suggest a solution where these trade-offs pose any formidable obstacle to be overcome. It might also be the case that VoIP implementation within a network has a negative effect on an organizations monetary positions, so I will include this faucet of consideration as well, though briefly. Additionally, my work will assume the adoption of VoIP services over an existing network, assuming the newly conceived network to be well equipped to manage VoIP traffic, but proposed solutions will not be exclusively applicable to existing networks, as is the nature of the beast.

PROJECT INTRODUCTION
Week Three: Project-Introduction [Type the author name]

All network traffic is sent and received by means of packet switching, i.e. as opposed to circuit switching found native to the plain original telephone system/service (POTS). Packet switching is accomplished by breaking transmissions of various types of data into smaller and thus more manageable packets. There are all sorts of mechanisms and methods for managing the transport of packetized data throughout a network. Data types such as files and voice have different packet management requirements. In order for files to be transferred, there is the issue of security or privacy. Because the breach of security poses a threat to network clients, there are many safeguards that have been developed to ensure safe and orderly delivery of such data. Examples include the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and encryption techniques used to scramble data into indecipherable gibberish. These mechanisms are not exclusively established for file transfer alone, but have become commonly accepted criteria for the type of data transfer.

Voice on the other hand is governed by protocols and methodologies of its own, partially due to the later emergence of voice transmission over a network. Examples of such protocols are UDP and VoIP. So you see already, there is room for discrepancies to occur, both in the understanding and technical application or management of different types of data over a network connection. Different data types dont always conflict with each other, but in general, network transmissions of varying types will affect one another, even if indirectly, such as through network performance degradation or resource capacity usurping. It is considered a trade-off when the implementation of one solution brings desired benefits at the cost of causing other, more undesirable results to manifest. Network trade-offs can be analyzed from a number of different perspectives. One such perspective is found in the trade-offs between network services and solutions, as is found when a VoIP solution is implemented at the cost of another type of data solution, such as file transfer speed. Another way to view trade-offs is where the relationship between a solutions implementation affects the overall networks performance in an undesirable manor. There is also the issue of monetary relationships, but aside from implementation costs I will be brief in this aspect. Further elaboration would defeat my purposes as these main areas will serve as my primary subject matter. I have kept the topic description from week one attached for clarity.

PROJECT INTRODUCTION
Week Three: Project-Introduction [Type the author name]

The topic of my course project will pertain to the trade-offs involved within a VoIP network, regarding essential components such as call quality, bandwidth, and compression.
Call Quality: Bandwidth: Compression:

The specific VoIP issues described by my choice in topic selection include the myriad complexities that can arise when designing a network thats most ideally suited for supporting VoIP solutions, while bearing in mind any other possible variables that can effect decisions throughout such a task. In particular, I will endeavor to illustrate the effects that the primary variables in a VoIP supportive network, such as bandwidth and compression, have upon one another, and ultimately strive to include a diverse array of such variables and their interrelations so as to provide a platform for consideration when tasked with the design of such a network. I plan to include multiple VoIP specific protocols and codecs, and to be as concise as I can be as to the demands and requirements of VoIP solutions within a presumed global corporation. Other variables contrasting with VoIP specific technologies found relevant will also be included at some length, so as to provide as clear as I can, the big picture when considering the pros and cons of VoIP implementation, and hopefully a best practice reference to at very least, provide direction in further considerations.

PROJECT INTRODUCTION
Week Three: Project-Introduction [Type the author name]