Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 21

2

Duct Width and Height


What is Width? Well it depends. In the image below a piece of rectangular duct is selected in Plan view. The Width is listed as 30".

In the image below the same piece of rectangular duct is selected in Section view. The Width is listed as 12".

Revit seems to list the dimension for the visible side of the duct in the view first. If it is listed as theWidth or the Height of the duct depends on your point of view... literally. Posted by Todd Shackelford at 3:30 AM 3 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook Labels: Revit MEP

Usefullness:
Monday, March 19, 2012

Custom Sheet Sizes in Revit


In an AutoCAD environment when you need to have a custom sheet size, you can leverage the PC3 file to create what you need. Since Revit wants to use the Windows drivers, you need to be a bit more creative to add the custom sheet sizes you might need.

Go to the start button and select Devices and Printers.

Select the printer/plotter that you need custom sheet sizes for then check below the menu bar for a button that says "Printer server properties"

The dialog that comes up includes a check box to "Create a new form". This will be the new sheet size. Give it a width and a height. Make sure to give it an identifiable name (including the company name helps), then just click the "Save Form" button to add it to the list of available sizes when plotting.

If the printer/plotter is shared from a network location, make sure to complete these steps from the computer the plotter is installed on. Posted by Todd Shackelford at 4:05 PM 2 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook

Usefullness:
Sunday, March 04, 2012

Preset Sub Catagories

I like to use sub disciplines to sort by in the Project Browser. It is easy to define M, E,P, and even T disciplines, whatever. What is not so great is when users get creative with their sub discipline naming and things don't end up matching creating a mess in the Project Browser . A nice way to pre-load your standard sub discipline naming convention is to create view templates in your template and assign the sub discipline names in them. Because they are in the view templates, they will show in the drop down list of sub disciplines even if they have not been used in a view yet. Sweet! Posted by Todd Shackelford at 9:15 PM 1 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook Labels: Fixes, How To, Neat-O, Resources, Revit, Revit MEP, Tricks and Tips

Usefullness:
Monday, February 13, 2012

So you Deleted the Central File...


It happens so often that I wrote down what to do. In the case where the central file has been accidentally upgraded or some other equally bad thing has happened to the central file, a local file can be used to create a new central file. Find a person on the project that has not synced with central and has a very recent version for a local file that can be turned into the new central file. The user with the good local file must; 1. Open the local file directly remembering to detach from central on open. 2. 'Save As' overwriting the bad central. 3. Open Options in the Save As dialog to ensure the "Make Central after save" is checked. 4. All users must create new locals to continue working on this project. Not so bad, considering the alternative. Posted by Todd Shackelford at 7:56 AM 0 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook

Usefullness:
Monday, January 23, 2012

Revit Family Formula Examples and Tricks


When creating formulas in a family it is helpful to have a go to list of examples. Here is mine. IF Statement IF (Length < 30, 2 6, 4) If the Length parameter is less than 30' x = 1 , y = 22'-6" If the Length parameter is greater than 30' this parameter will have a value of 4'-0"

IF that Returns a String IF (Height > 30, This thing is tall, This thing is short) If the Height parameter is greater than 30' this parameter will return This thing is tall If the Height parameter is less than 30' this parameter will return This thing is short Nested IF Statements IF (Length < 35, 2 6 , IF (Length < 45, 3 , IF (Length < 55, 5, 8 ) ) ) If Length is less than 35', this parameter will have a value of 2'-6" If Length is between 35' and 45', this parameter will have a value of 3' If Length is between 45' and 55', this parameter will have a value of 5' If Length is greater than 55', this parameter will have a value of 8' IF applied to a Yes/No condition Length > 40' If Length is greater than 40' the the statement is true and the Yes/No check box is checked

If Length is 40' or less the statement is false and the Yes/No check box is NOT checked

IF OR IF (OR (A = 1 , B = 3 ) , 10 , 5) If A = 1 or B = 3 this parameter will have a value of 10 If A is not = 1 and B is not = 3 this parameter will have a value of 5

IF AND IF (AND (x = 1 , y = 2), 8 , 3 ) If x = 1 and y = 2 this parameter will have a value of 8 If x is not = 1 or y is not = 2 this parameter will have a value of 3

Some Formula Tricks of the Trade This or That only with a Yes/No parameters

By specifing that metal can not be true while Wood is true the user can only specify one of the two materials. They both can not be checked at the same time. This can be used for visibility where a left or right access panel may be required but never both. Pick One and Only One

Here the condtion number will allow only one paramter to be true in a list. Associated with a type, you could control a ton of things simply back picking the correct type. "Don't Change Me Bro"

If you need some text to not change, put that text in the Formula column with quotes around it. It greys it out in the Value column. This should stop the majority of users from changing its value.

Swapping Nested Families In a bookcase family with a nested shelf family, follow these steps to add a parameter that will allow the user to switch from one type of shelf to another.

1. Open the original shelf family and save it as the second shelf option. Add something to make it different. 2. Load this new shelf into the bookcase family, but do not place it. 3. In the Family Types dialog create a new Type parameter named Swappable Shelf. Make its discipline Common, its Type of Parameter and group it under Constraints.

4. When you select the Type of Parameter Revit will open the Select Category dialog. Pick Generic Models.

5. Select the original shelf in the bookcase family now. In the Properties dialog, look for the Label parameter and change it to Swappable Shelf.

6. In the Family Types dialog Create 2 shelf types, Shelf Type 1 and Shelf Type 2. Associate the swappable shelf parameter with the appropriate type.

7. Flex the family. Change the family type and verify that the shelf changes.

Posted by Todd Shackelford at 11:06 AM 4 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook Labels: Families, How To, Revit, Revit MEP, Tricks and Tips

Usefullness:
Friday, January 20, 2012

New Year - New AUGI World

The January edition of AUGI World is available online now. It's chalked full of great articles by good looking authors. Download or view it online today and stay ahead of the pack. Here are some of my favorites;

Joel Londenberg Plumbing Systems for Well-Documented Flow Steve Bennett Ini or Outie? Advancing Your Customization of the Revit ini File

Louisa Holland AutoCAD System Variable Superstars Posted by Todd Shackelford at 7:28 AM 0 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook Labels: AUGIWorld

Usefullness:
Sunday, January 01, 2012

Using Character Map in Text and Tags


If you were not aware that you can use special characters in Revit to add things like a diameter symbol to text, check out my previous post. In that post I showed how to figure out the key-in required to produce certain symbols just by typing them into the text string. in this post, I'll show how to leverage the many special characters that do not have a key in but existing in the font.

Revit MEP supports oval duct, but the symbol in tags my firm has used since hand drafting is the Greek letter PHI. Unfortunately there is no key in for the PHI character. I can however, use the "Select" and "Copy" buttons to copy the character to the clipboard and paste it directly into a text string.

In this case, the symbol legend.

It can also be pasted directly in a label for a tag as a suffix.

Happy New Year!


Posted by Todd Shackelford at 8:30 AM 2 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook Labels: Families, Fixes, How To, Neat-O, Resources, Revit, Revit MEP, Tricks and Tips

Usefullness:
Sunday, December 25, 2011

Overriding Dimensions in Revit


Say you are putting together a detail that has a dimension in it but for it to look appropriate, things really won't be to scale. What I am getting at, is that you want to put down a dimension that is wrong. Revit won't allow you to override it using the feet and inches symbols from your keyboard. Instead you get this judgmental dialog.

Go back to Dimension Text dialog by clicking on the dimension twice and select the "Replace With Text" option. 1. Right click in the text field 2. Select "Insert Unicode control character" 3. Pick "US Unit Separator (Segment separator)"

Type a new dimension into the Text box and click OK. Wa-Shaw! In the image below these walls are either 8'-0" apart or 1'-6" apart. You don't know, because of my awesome Revit trickery.

Follow the same steps and put a space in instead to clear the dimension altogether.

I realize that this may be perceived as pure EVIL in the Revit world.... and well, because it is.
Autodes k Wi kiHel p

Feedback English Sign in Help

Product help with community knowledge

2013 Revit
Search Rev Search Revit

Share Lists Print HomeRevitEnglish2013HelpRevit HelpReferenceDuct Sizing and Calculation MethodsDuct SizingDuct Sizing Examples

Revit
2011 2012 2013 Help Revit Help Whats New? Introduction to Revit Start a Project Preliminary Design Build the Model Document and Present the Project Collaborate with Others Analyze the Design

Tools and Techniques Customize Revit Best Practices Troubleshoot Reference Electrical Sizing and Calculation Methods Duct Sizing and Calculation Methods Duct Sizing Duct Sizing Methods Pressure Drop Calculation Duct Sizing Examples Pipe Sizing and Calculation Methods Hydronic Pipe Sizing and Calculation Methods Energy Analysis Building & Space Type Imperial Data Heating and Cooling Reference for Conceptual Energy Analysis gbXML Schema Support New in Revit 2013 Technical Support Video Galleries More Information API Developer's Guide Videos Community

Community Scoring
Was this page helpful?

TagTags0
This page has no tags

Page statistics
30 views, 1 edit(s), 7231 characters(s)Page last modified 10:21, 7 Mar 2012 bycontentconnector

How to add your knowledge


Create new page Edit page Upload video

Duct Sizing Examples

Revit MEP

The following images show the results of the various duct sizing methods. Friction Only

Before Sizing

After Sizing Velocity Only

Before Sizing

After Sizing Equal Friction

Before Sizing

After Sizing Static Regain

Before Sizing

After Sizing Friction and Velocity

Before Sizing

After Sizing Restricted Height

Before Sizing

After Sizing

Rectangular Duct

Revit MEP

The following example shows how Revit calculates the pressure drop for a 100 foot segment of 36 x 24" rectangular duct carrying air flow of 12,000 CFM. Air Density = 0.0751 lbs/cu ft. Air Viscosity = 0.01805 cP (standard atmospheric air at 66 degrees F) Roughness = 0.0003' (medium smooth galvanized steel duct as defined by 2005 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, page 35.7) Pressure drop is defined as:

This value matches the value for the Hydraulic Diameter parameter in the properties of the duct. The velocity is based on the cross sectional area, where:

The value for the calculated pressure drop matches the value found in the ducts properties inRevit. To open the Site Settings dialog Click Massing & Site tab Model Site panel . To display contour lines and define intervals

1. For Contour Line Display, select At Intervals of. 2. Enter a value for contour line intervals. 3. For Passing Through Elevation, enter a value to set the starting elevation for contour lines.

By default, Passing Through Elevation is set to zero. If you set the contour interval to 10, for example, lines display at -20, -10, 0, 10, 20. If you set the Passing Through Elevation value to 5, lines display at 25, -15, -5, 5, 15, 25. To see contour lines, open a site view. To add custom contour lines to a site plan If you clear At Intervals of, custom contour lines still display. 1. Click Insert for each set of custom contour lines. 2. To create one custom contour line, do the following: 1. Under Additional Contours, for Range Type, select Single Value. 2. For Start, specify the elevation for the contour line. 3. For Subcategory, specify the line style for the contour line. 3. To create multiple contour lines in a range, do the following: 1. Under Additional Contours, for Range Type, select Multiple Values. 2. Specify the Start, Stop, and Increment for the additional contour lines. 3. For Subcategory, specify the line style for the contour lines. To specify section graphics 1. For Section cut material, select a material to use to display the site in a section view. Appropriate materials include Site-Earth, Site-Grass, and Site-Sand. 2. For Elevation of poche base, enter a value to control the depth of the cross-section of earth, for example, 30 feet or 25 meters. This value controls the poche depth for all topography elements in your project. To see changes to section graphics, open a section view. To specify property data settings 1. Specify an option for Angle Display. If you select Degrees, property lines display in the Property Lines bearings table using the 360-degree bearing standard. Property line tags display using the same notation. 2. Specify an option for Units. If you select Decimal degrees, the angles in the Property Lines bearings table display as decimals rather than as degrees, minutes, and seconds.