Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 19

ENGLISH

2011

--

2011

www.phoenixbooks.ru

811.111(075.4)
81.29
8032
80

80

. .
English : : 
/ . . . : :
/ : , 2011. 120 . : . ( ).
ISBN 9789666805532 ( )
ISBN 9785222185124 ( )
, 
. . 
. 
. , 

. ,

.

811.111(075.4)
81.2.9

.., 2011

, 2011

, 2011

ISBN 9789666805532
( )
ISBN 9785222185124
( )

www.phoenixbooks.ru

,
. 
. : 
, 
, 
,
, ,
. ,
,  
. , , .
. 
, , , 
, 
. 

.

,
, 
.

.
?
( ) : 
. 
.
,
, .
, 
,
. .
, , : , 
.

www.phoenixbooks.ru


,
, .
,
.
( 
) , 
. 
.

www.phoenixbooks.ru

CharleS DiCkenS
,
(18121870),
 ,
.


.
,
, ,

,
,
.
21
.
:
, ,
,
. , ,
, ,
, ,
,
.

12
, 24
. ,
.
,
.
 ,
. ,

. ,
,
. , ,

.

www.phoenixbooks.ru

From David Copperfield


David was born after his fathers death. He is brought up
and taken care of by his loving mother and his devoted nurse.
Then his mother marries again.
Mr. Murdstone, Davids stepfather, is a hard, cruel man.
He at once takes Davids education out of his wifes hands.
David is really a clever boy, but in the presence of his step
father, whom he is mortally afraid of, he forgets everything
he has learned.
***
One morning when I went into the parlour with my books,
I found my mother looking anxious, Miss Murdstone looking
firm, and Mr. Murdstone binding something round the bottom
of a cane. When I came in, he switched the cane in the air.

He is brought up and taken care of by his loving mother and


his devoted nurse.
.
to bring up
to take care of
devoted [dI'vqutId] ( . 113114 
)
nurse [nWs]
stepfather ['stepfRDq]
...whom he is mortally afraid of ...

mortally ['mLtqlI]
a parlour ['pRlq]
I found my mother looking anxious. ,
.
to look [luk] () ,
anxious ['xNkSqs] ,
to bind [baInd] ,
a cane [keIn] ,
to switch [swIC] ,

www.phoenixbooks.ru

I tell you, Clara, said Mr. Murdstone, I have been often


flogged.
Of course, said Miss Murddstone.
Certainly, my dear Jane, said my mother, meekly. But
do you think it did Edward good?
Do you think it did Edward harm, Clara? asked
Mr. Murdstone, gravely.
Thats the point, said his sister.
My mother answered, Certainly, my dear Jane, and said
no more.
I felt that I was the subject of this dialogue, and looked at
Mr. Murdstone.
Now, David, he said, you must be much more careful than
usual. He gave the cane another switch; and having finished his
preparation of it, he laid it down beside him, and took up my book.
I was frightened, and felt the words of my lesson slipping
off, not one by one, or line by line, but by the entire page;
I tried to stop them, but they seemed to have put skates on, and
to slip away from me.

I have been often flogged. .


to flog [flOg] ,
...do you think it did Edward good? ... , 
? ( )
Do you think it did Edward harm? , 
?
thats the point 
He gave the cane another switch...
...
having finished
felt the words of my lesson slipping off, not one by one... 
, , ...
...but they seemed to have put skates on... ... ,
...

www.phoenixbooks.ru

We began badly, and went on worse. I had come in with an


idea of distinguishing myself, thinking that I was very well
prepared; but it turned out to be quite a mistake. Book after
book was added to the heap of failures. Miss Murdstone was
firmly watching us all the time. And when we came at last to
the five thousand cheeses (canes he made it that day,
I remember), my mother burst out crying.
Clara! said Miss Murdstone, in her hard voice.
I am not quite well, my dear Jane, I think, said my mother.
Mr. Murdstone rose and said, taking up the cane:
Why, Jane, we can hardly expect Clara to be firm, after all
the worry David has given her today. Clara has greatly
improved, but we can hardly expect so much from her. David,
you and I will go upstairs.
As he took me out of the room, my mother ran towards us.
Miss Murdstone said, Clara! Are you a perfect fool? I saw my
mother stop her ears then, and I heard her crying.
He walked me up to my room slowly and gravely I am
certain he enjoyed that formal parade and when he got there,
suddenly put my head under his arm.
Mr. Murdstone! Sir! I cried to him. Dont! Pray dont beat
me! I have tried to learn, sir, but I cant learn while you and
Miss Murdstone are near me, I cant indeed!

I had come in with an idea of distinguishing myself.


.
to distinguish [dIs'tINgwIS] ,
it turned out to be quite a mistake

five thousand cheeses ( 


)
burst out crying
I saw my mother stop her ears. ,
.
He walked me up to my room... 
...
Pray dont beat me! , !

www.phoenixbooks.ru

Cant you, indeed, David? he said. Well try that.


He had my head as in a vice, but somehow I stopped him for
a moment, begging him not to beat me. It was only for a moment
that I stopped him, for he cut me heavily an instant afterwards,
and in the same instant I caught the hand with which he held
me in my mouth, between my teeth, and bit it.
He beat me then as if he would have beaten me to death.
Above all the noise we made, I heard them running up the stairs,
and crying out I heard my mother crying out and Peggoty.
Then he was gone; and the door was locked outside, and I was
lying, hot, and torn, and sore, upon the floor.
How well I recollect, when I became quiet, what an unnatural
stillness there seemed to be in the whole house! How well I
remember, when my anger began to cool, how wicked I began
to feel!
I crawled up from the floor, and saw my face in the glass, so
swollen, red, and ugly that it almost frightened me. My whole

He had my head as in a vice... ,


...
vice [vaIs]
he cut me heavily ()
He beat me then as if he would have beaten me to death.
, .
Above all the noise we made... , 
...
I was lying, hot, and torn, and sore... 
, , ...
How well I recollect, when I became quite, what an unnatural
stillness there seemed to be in the whole house!
, ,
, , !
to recollect [rqkq'lekt] ,
to crawl [krLl] ,
swollen ['swqulqn] ,
ugly ['AglI] ,

www.phoenixbooks.ru

body was sore and stiff, and the pain made me cry when I moved;
but that was nothing to the guilt that I felt.
It had begun to grow dark, and I was lying with my head
upon the sill, crying, when the key was turned, and Miss
Murdstone came in with some bread and milk. These she put
down upon the table without a word, glaring at me with her
usual firmness, and the went out, locking the door after her.
I sat there for a long time, wondering whether anybody else
would come. When nobody came, I undressed, and went to bed;
and there, I began to wonder what would be done to me.
Whether it was a criminal act that I had committed? Whether
I should be sent to prison? Whether I was in danger of being
hanged?
David is kept a prisoner in his room for five days, after which
he is sent to Mr. Creakles school.
The coach stopped; it has come to its destination. A short
walk brought us to Salem House, which was surrounded by a

...but that was nothing to the guilt that I felt ...


,
It had begun to grow dark. .
...wondering whether anybody else would come ...
, 
I began to wonder what would be done to me. 
, .
Whether it was a criminal act that I had committed? 
?
to commit [kq'mIt] ()
Whether I should be sent to prison? ?
Whether I was in danger of being hanged?
?
David is kept a prisoner in his room for five days, after which
he is sent to Mr. Creakles school. 
, 
.
destination [destI'neISn]
A short walk brought us to Salem House... 
( )...

10

www.phoenixbooks.ru

high brick wall, and looked very dull. Over a door in this wall
was a board with the words SALEM HOUSE upon it. When we
rang the bell, the door was opened by a man with a wooden leg.
The new boy, said Mr. Mell.
The man with the wooden leg looked me all over it didnt
take long, for there was not much of me and locked the gate
behind us, and took out the key.
Salem House was a square brick building with wings.
Everywhere it was so very quiet that I said to Mr. Mell
I supposed the boy were out. He seemed surprised at my not
knowing that it was holidaytime, that all the boys were at their
homes, that Mr. Creakle, the owner of the school, was down by
the seaside with Mrs. and Miss Creacle, and that I was sent in
holidaytime as a punishment for my misdoing. All of this he
explained to me as we went along.
I gazed upon the schoolroom into which he took me, and it
seemed to me the loneliest place I had ever seen. It was a long
room with three long rows of desks, and six rows of forms; there
were old copybooks and exercises all over the dirty floor. And

Mr. Mell
The man with the wooden leg looked me all over...

...
it didnt take long
for there was not much of me
He seemed surprised at my not knowing... , 
, ...
was down by the seaside
punishment ['pAnISmqnt]
misdoing ['mIs'duIN] ( ,
)
...it seemed to me the loneliest place I had ever seen ...
() ,


11

www.phoenixbooks.ru

there could not be more ink splashed about everywhere, if it


had rained ink into the room.
I walked softly to the middle of the room, observing all this.
Suddenly I came upon a pasteboard placard, beautifully
written, which was lying on the desk, with these words on it:
Take care of him. He bites.
I got upon the desk immediately, thinking there was a great
dog underneath. But, though I looked all around, I could see no
dog anywhere. When Mr. Mell came back, he asked me what
I was doing up there. I beg your pardon, sir, said I, if you
please, Im looking for the dog.
Dog? said he. What dog?
Isnt it a dog, sir?
Isnt what a dog?
Thats to be taken care of, sir; that bites.
No, Copperfield, said he, thats not a dog. Thats a boy. My
instructions are, Copperfield, to put this placard on your back.
I am sorry to make such a beginning with you, but I must do it.

to splash [xQ] ()
if it had rained ink into the room

observing all this
to observe [qb'zWv] ,
I came upon a pasteboard placard... () 
...
to come upon
pasteboard ['peIstbLd] ,
placard ['plxkRd] ,
Take care of him. He bites. . .
I got upon the desk immediately.
.
immediately [I'mJdjqtlI] ,
underneath ["Andq'nJT]
if you please
Isnt what a dog? ?
Thats to be taken care of... , ...

12

www.phoenixbooks.ru

With that he took me down, and tied the placard on my


shoulders like a knapsack; and wherever I went, afterwards,
I had to carry it.
What I suffered from that placard nobody can imagine.
Whether it was possible for people to see me or not, I always
fancied that somebody was reading it. I knew that the servants
read it, and the butcher read it, and the baker read it, that
everybody, in a word, who came to the house when I was ordered
to walk there, read that I was to be taken care of, for I bit.
I recollect that I began to have a fear of myself, as a kind of
wild boy who did bite. I dreaded the end of the vacation and the
coming back of the boys. Mr. Mell said there were fortyfive of
them then.
I had led this life about a month, when the man with a wooden
leg came with a mop and a bucket of water, from which I knew
that Mr. Creakle and the boys were expected. I was not mistaken.
One day I was informed by Mr. Mell that Mr. Creacle would
be home that evening. In the evening, after tea, I heard that he
had come. Before bedtime, I was told by the man with the

With that he took me down... () ,


...
a knapsack ['nxpsxk] ,
What I suffered from that placard nobody can imagine. 
, .
in a word
...that I was to be taken care of ...
...who did bite ... (did
)
I dreaded the end of the vacation and the coming back of the
boys. .
to dread [dred] ,
a mop [mOp]
a bucket ['bAkIt]
One day I was informed by Mr. Mell...
...
Before bedtime

13

www.phoenixbooks.ru

wooden leg to appear before him. I stood, trembling, before


Mr. Creacle. So frightened was I that I hardly saw Mrs. Creacle
or Miss Creacle, who were both there, in the parlour. I saw
nothing but Mr. Creacle, a stout gentleman, sitting in the arm
chair, with a tumbler and a bottle beside him.
So! said Mr. Creacle. This is the young gentleman whose
teeth are to be filed! Turn him round.
The man with the wooden leg turned me round so as to
exhibit the placard; then turned me round again, with my face
to Mr. Creacle. Mr. Creacles face was fiery, and his eyes were
small, and deep in his head. But the thing which impressed me
most about him was that he had no voice, but spoke in a whisper.
The effort that he made to speak made his angry face look still
more angry.
Now, said Mr. Creacle. What have you to say about this
boy?
Theres nothing against him yet, said the man with the
wooden leg. There has been no opportunity.
I thought Mr. Creacle was disappointed.

stout [staut] ,
a tumbler ['tAmblq]
...whose teeth are to be filed...
Turn him round. .
so as to exhibit the placard ,
to exhibit [Ig'zIbIt]
fiery ['faIqrI] 
But the thing which impressed me most about him... 
...
spoke in a whisper
The effort that he made to speak made his angry face look still
more angry. , ,
, .
opportunity ["Opq'tjHnItI] ,

14

www.phoenixbooks.ru

Come here, sir! Mr. Creacle, beckoning to me.


I have the happiness of knowing your father, whispered
Mr. Creacle, taking me by the ear. A man of strong character.
He knows me and I know him. Do you know me? Hey! said
Mr. Creacle, pinching my ear.
Not yet, sir, said I, in great pain.
Not yet? repeated Mr. Creacle. But you will soon.
I was very much frightened. I felt, all this while, as if my
ear were burning; he had pinched it so hard.
When I say Ill do a thing, I do it, said Mr. Creacle, giving
my ear another pinch that brought the water to my eyes; and
when I say I will have a thing done, I have it done. Now you
have begun to know me, my young friend, and you may go. Take
him away.
I was very glad to be ordered away. But I couldnt help
saying, though I wondered at my own courage:
If you please, sir.

to beckon ['bekqn] , (, )
to pinch [pInC]
in great pain
But you will soon. .
all this while
When I say Ill do a thing, I do it. ,
, .
giving my ear another pinch
water ()
...when I say I will have a thing done, I have it done. ...
,  , .
Take him away. .
I was very glad to be ordered away. ,
.
I couldnt help saying
though I wondered at my own courage

15

www.phoenixbooks.ru

Mr. Creacle whispered, Hah! Whats this? and looked at


me as if he would have burnt me up with his eyes.
If you please, sir, I said, if I might be allowed (I am very
sorry indeed, sir, for what I did) to take this writing off before
the boys come back.
Mr. Creacle burst out of his chair. I retreated, and never
once stopped until I reached my own bedroom, where, finding I
was not pursued, I went to bed, and lay trembling for a couple
of hours.

as if he would have burnt me up with his eyes



if I might be allowed
burst out of his chair
finding I was not pursued ,
to pursue [pq'sjH]
and lay trembling for a couple of hours , , 

couple [kApl] , ,

16

www.phoenixbooks.ru

Mark Twain

(1835
1910)
.

,
,
, ,
,
,

.


,

. ,
1881 , ,
, .
,
  .
.
, ,
.

. , ,
.
,
. ,
.
z



, .
.
, .
, .
, .

17

www.phoenixbooks.ru

................................................................. 3
Charles Dickens ........................................................................ 5
From David Copperfield ....................................... 6
Mark Twain ............................................................................. 17
From The Prince and the Pauper .......................... 18
Jerome K. Jerome ................................................................... 30
A little accident while cycling ................................. 31
Washington Irving ................................................................. 37
From The legend of sleepy hollow ......................... 38
Jack London ............................................................................ 45
The story of Keesh ................................................ 46
Theodore Dreiser .................................................................... 57
From An American Tragedy ................................ 58
Somerset Maugham ................................................................ 67
Up at the Villa ..................................................... 68
Leo (Lev) Tolstoy .................................................................... 81
From The Raid .................................................. 82
O. Henry .................................................................................. 90
The Cop and the Anthem ........................................ 92
,
.................... 115
() ........ 117

120

www.phoenixbooks.ru

..
..
..
..
.. , ..
.
25.02.2011.
841081/32. . .
. . . 6,4. .. 4,5.
3000 .

40009, . , . , 27
Email: publish@book.sumy.ua

./: +38 (0542) 657585
Email: info@book.sumy.ua
www.book.sumy.ua

489 18.06.2001

344082, . , . , 80
.: (863) 2618975, : (863) 2618950
Email: ostashov@aaanet.ru

121

www.phoenixbooks.ru

Оценить