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Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management

Qualification Handbook

CONTENTS 1. Introduction ........................................................................................................ 5

2. Aims for Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management ........................................................................................................................ 5 3. 4. 5. Access and Entry Requirements ...................................................................... 6 Postgraduate Diploma Level and Credit Framework ....................................... 7 Assessment........................................................................................................ 8 5.1 Grading criteria...................................................................................... 8 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 5.10 6. Guidance on Format of Assignments .................................................. 10 Monitoring Candidates and Progress Tutorials ................................... 10 Academic Conventions and Referencing ............................................ 11 Plagiarism and Collusion ..................................................................... 11 Marking Assessments ......................................................................... 12 Submission of Assessments................................................................ 13 Informing Candidates of Grades .......................................................... 14 Security ............................................................................................... 14 Reasonable Adjustment to Assessment ............................................ 14

Learning and Teaching .................................................................................... 15 6.1 Unit Content ........................................................................................ 15 6.3 6.4 6.5 Primary and Secondary Sources ......................................................... 16 Research Ethics .................................................................................. 16 Industry Based Research .................................................................... 16

7. 8. 9.

CTH Postgraduate Diploma Units ................................................................... 17 Relationship of Units to UK National Occupational Standards .................... 18 HTMS: Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies .................................. 19 Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies Assessment ................... 21 MLAC: Management and Leadership Across Cultures ................................. 29 Management and Leadership Across Cultures Assessment .................. 31 HTSP: Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning ....................................... 39 Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning Assessment ...................... 41 MHTP: Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects ...................................... 51
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10.

11.

12.

Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects Assessment ...................... 53 13. RMHTM: Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Managers ........... 61 Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Assessment ................ 63

APPENDIX ONE ASSIGNMENT FRONT COVER .............................................................. 71 APPENDIX TWO ASSIGNMENT PROGRESS TUTORIAL RECORD SHEET ................... 77

1.

Introduction

The purpose of this document is to explain the aims, structure, and content of the CTH Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management.1 This document includes the learning outcomes, assessment criteria and indicative content for each unit. In this document there is guidance relating to learning, teaching and assessment strategies for this qualification, and an explanation of the assessment quality assurance processes.

2.

Aims for Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management

The aims of this qualification are to provide: a qualification that focuses on the interrelationship between the hospitality and tourism sectors; a qualification that focuses on strategic issues in business development, rather than operational issues; an effective academic progression route for hospitality and tourism graduates; an effective academic progression route for non-graduate, but experienced, hospitality and tourism managers; a qualification that enables candidates to gain credit towards either a Masters degree; a qualification that enables candidates to develop higher level academic skills that can be applied in a vocational context;

Here after known as the PGDHTM


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3.

Access and Entry Requirements

The entry requirements below are intended for guidance only, as applicants may apply with a wide variety of backgrounds and qualifications. CTH accredited centres will assess all applicants to ensure they are able to meet the demands of the course. Whilst ensuring the qualification is accessible to all those with the potential to achieve the required outcomes and there is equality of opportunity for all those who wish to access the qualification. Applicant profile CTH Student and Associate Members. Hospitality/Tourism graduate with Bachelors Degree from UK institution. Recommended entry requirements CTH Level 6 Qualifications Minimum of degree in hospitality and/or tourism graded third or above. IELTS 6.0 or other evidence of competence in English at this level.

Hospitality/Tourism graduate Evidence of equivalence of qualification to a UK with Bachelors Degree from a hospitality and/or tourism degree, graded as third of non-UK institution. above. Equivalence to be evaluated through NARIC. IELTS 6.0 or other evidence of competence in English at this level. IELTS 6.0 or other evidence of competence in English at this level. Evidence of at least five years work experience in the hospitality and/or tourism sector at management level or above.

Graduate from non-related field or non-graduate with hospitality and/or tourism work experience.

4.

Postgraduate Diploma Level and Credit Framework

The CTH PGDHTM is a level 7 vocational qualification currently within the National Qualifications Framework. The qualification is designed at 120 QCF credits and developed to adhere to the level 7 descriptors as developed by Ofqual. The Qualifications and Credit framework states that one credit represents ten hours of study at any specified level. Therefore, the CTH Postgraduate Diploma normally requires a programme of study that has been designed to include a minimum 1200 learning hours. These hours would include, but are not limited to, formal classes, self-study, revision and assessment. However, candidates successfully completing a level 7 qualification should be able to demonstrate their ability as independent learners; therefore, candidates should expect that normally no more than 30% of the 1200 learning hours would be spent in classroom based learning (e.g. lectures and seminars). The credit and unit structure for the CTH PGDHTM is set out in the following table. Qualification Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management Credits 120 Units 4 x 30 credit units (3 mandatory units and one optional unit)

In addition, centres may wish to offer an optional unit, the CTH Work Experience Certificate, to those candidates without prior experience of working in either the hospitality or tourism industries. However, credits from the CTH Work Experience Certificate do not count towards the CTH Postgraduate Diploma.

Please also see Section 8 for more details. To achieve Masters Degrees in the UK a candidate must achieve a minimum of 180 credits at level 7. In the UK, Masters Degrees are normally awarded by universities and usually include a final forty-credit dissertation plus 20 credit research unit OR a sixty-credit dissertation. The CTH Postgraduate Diploma is awarded a minimum of 120 credits at Level 7. Therefore, the CTH Postgraduate Diploma offers a progression route to a full Masters Degree, further details of articulation agreements with Universities can be obtained via the CTH website www.cthawards.com

5.

Assessment

Given the broad and highly varied nature of the hospitality and tourism industry, as well as the expected outcomes at level 7, assessment of knowledge by examination is not felt to be an appropriate method. Candidates need to demonstrate the higher-level skills and qualities specified in the learning outcomes, within a non-homogeneous vocational context, investigative assignments and presentations are more appropriate. Assessment of candidates work will be centre based, against the specified learning outcomes and assessment criteria provided for each unit. Mark scheme are provided for each unit and grading criteria is given below to assist assessors in allocating marks. 5.1 Grading criteria

Individual units can be graded either as fail, pass, merit or distinction. However, the qualification is not subject to grading. The qualification is either achieved or not achieved. In terms of certification this means that candidates will receive a transcript of their results showing the grades for each unit successfully completed, plus the Post Graduate Diploma to recognise the level of achievement. The following table explains the generic grading criteria that should be used by centres, in conjunction with the unit mark sheets, to assess all candidates work . To achieve a distinction grade (80%+) candidates must: Demonstrate an outstanding level of achievement: high level of critical analysis and evaluation broad and deep understanding of current research, knowledge and issues in the area of study highly original thinking exceptional clarity of complex ideas, with excellent coherence and logic excellent presentation comprehensive understanding and application of research techniques very clearly formulated conclusions that are clearly communicated clear understanding of how knowledge developed can be applied.

To achieve a merit grade (60% to 79%) candidates must:

Demonstrate a very good level of achievement: good critical analysis and evaluation good understanding of current research, knowledge and issues in the area of study significant originality with very clear ideas high level of coherence and logic very good presentation good understanding and application of research techniques well formulated and fully justified conclusions a good understanding as to how knowledge developed can be applied. Demonstrate a good standard of work: evidence of critical analysis and evaluation some evidence or original thinking good use of research techniques clear and coherent conclusions good standard of presentation. will have major weaknesses or will have not fulfilled the CTH academic regulations failed to meet the requirements of the assessment criteria and learning outcomes of the unit. mainly descriptive answer with limited analysis and evaluation limited and irrelevant examples and application of theory no originality of thinking poor standard of presentation in term s of grammar, spelling and lack of coherent structure no referencing of sources.

To achieve a pass grade (40% to 59%) candidates must:

Candidates who fail:

5.2

Guidance on Format of Assignments All assignments will contain a word count. A margin of 10% is allowed above this word count but any further deviation from this must be authorised by CTH. CTH reserve the right to refuse to mark any assignments which exceed the stated word count. Candidates should use the following font for their assignments: Times New Roman or Arial size 12 with 1.5 line spacing. Assignments must contain a foot note with the candidate name, candidate CTH number, , unit title and page number. Each assignment must have a front cover (Appendix 1) which must include the candidates full name, CTH candidate number, title of the assignment and unit title. Centres are required to submit both a hard copy and electronic copy of the assignment to CTH. Centres are required to keep an electronic copy of all assessments, mark schemes and related assessment paperwork. All hard copies of assessments need to be printed and securely stapled with the electronic copy, ie CD or memory stick, securely fastened to the front page. Assessments should not be bound or placed in a folder as these will be disposed of at CTH. Electronic assessment files must be saved in the following file name order abbreviated unit title and CTH number. For example: MLAC123456.doc. Candidates must ensure that electronic files are saved in Office 97-03 compatible format. CTH cannot process files that are saved in Works or Open Office. Monitoring Candidates and Progress Tutorials

5.3

There is no referral or resubmission once a candidates assessment has been submitted to CTH for moderation. Tutors may review candidates work and offer guidance in line with normal tutorial practice prior to submission to CTH, however it is expected that Candidates will receive no more than three tutorials per assignment. Candidates who receive a fail grade will be required to submit a new piece of work and a new assessment fee will be charged. Tutors are required to provide CTH with a record of all progress tutorials by completing a Progress Tutorial Form for each tutorial, given in Appendix 2. The tutorial system, through discussions and questioning, provides tutors with the opportunity to ensure that the assignments is the candidates own work. Tutors are required to sign a declaration to confirm they are confident the assignment is the sole work of the

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candidate. CTH reserve the right to refuse to moderate any assignments where no record of candidate tutorials has been provided. 5.4 Academic Conventions and Referencing

At level 7 it is expected that candidates use the following academic conventions in order to achieve a pass, merit or distinction grade. i) All sources, whether directly quoted, summarised or paraphrased, should be properly acknowledged through citations and references via the Harvard method. The use of the Harvard method for acknowledging all sources is an expectation at level 7; and failure to do so may result in candidates receiving fail grade. Therefore, to receive a pass, a merit or a distinction, candidates must acknowledge all the sources they have used. All candidate assignments will be subjected to scrutiny by plagiarism software. It is expected that at level 7, candidates write in an impersonal style. The exception to this would be when candidates write self-reflective work. It is expected that at level 7 candidates are able to communicate complex ideas clearly in both written and spoken English. Candidates should be able to use appropriate technical vocabulary and use correct syntax and grammar. Plagiarism and Collusion

ii)

iii)

5.5

When carrying out assessment and moderation, centres must ensure that they have robust policies, procedures and practices to prevent instances of plagiarism and collusion. Centres approaches to these issues will be considered by CTH before granting centre approval and as part of the on-going external moderation process. On submission to CTH all candidate assignments will be submitted for scrutiny using Turnitin, a plagiarism software tool, it is therefore imperative that centers and/or candidates attach to their assignment, the original of any plagiarism scrutiny report that they have undertaken themselves to prevent duplicate entries. Where a plagiarism software scrutiny report indicates an assignment contains over 20% plagiarism, that assignment will be automatically reviewed by the CTH examining team. There is no acceptable level of plagiarism for level 7 assignments, please see section 5.4 on referencing. During the moderation process assignments will be reviewed the by the CTH examining team and if plagiarism is suspected the candidate will be issued a zero grade.

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5.6

Marking Assessments

5.6.1 Written Assessments All written assessments should be internally marked and internally moderated by the centre. The unit tutor is responsible for the first marking of all assignments and then a minimum of 10% of marked assignments should be moderated by an independent member of the tutoring team. The 10% sample of assignments for moderation must be drawn across all grades and all grade borderline assignments (within 3 marks of a grade boundary) should be reviewed by the internal moderator. Where the internal moderator does not agree with the first markers allocated marks then the first marker and the internal moderator are required to review and discuss the marks for the assignment, referring to the grading criteria and mark sheets and come to an agreement. This final mark should be recorded in the final mark column of the mark sheet. Note: CTH encourage accurate recording of all marks by the internal marker and moderator as it acknowledges that it is common that first markers and internal moderators may disagree with the marking. CTH encourages discussion between internal markers and moderators, with reference to the mark scheme and grading criteria, to agree a final mark. It is also important that internal markers and moderators record their comments in relation to this discussion in the boxes provided on the mark scheme. CTH will be looking for evidence of this discussion on the mark sheet and may query mark schemes where internal markers and moderators marking is always identifical. 5.6.2 Presentations Candidate presentations should be blind-marked by two internal markers, one being the tutor and first marker for the related assignment. Both internal markers should be present to observe and question the candidate present on their presentation. Whilst no specific marks are awarded for presentation technique it is expected that candidates will not be able to achieve a pass grade in this part of their assessment if their presentation skills are not of a good standard as per the assessment criteria given in 5.1. Where the internal markers do not allocate the same marks in the first instance, they are required to discuss the marks for the presentation, referring to the grading criteria and mark sheets and come to an agreement. This final mark should be recorded in the final mark column of the mark sheet. Note: CTH encourage accurate recording of all marks by the first and second marker/moderator as it envisages that it is rare, particularly with blind marking, that markers will award identical marks in the first instance. CTH encourages discussion between first and second markers, with reference to the mark scheme and grading criteria, to agree a final mark. It is also important that first and second markers record their comments in relation to this discussion in the boxes provided on the mark scheme. CTH will be looking
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for evidence of this discussion on the mark sheet and may query mark schemes where first and second marking is always identifical in the first instance. 5.6.3 General Guidance and Completion of Mark Sheets Tutors/first markers and moderators should record the marking process and assessment decisions on the CTH Mark Sheets for each of the units provided within this document. The final mark column should be completed for all assignments. On each mark sheet assessors should record their marks in the appropriate columns and provide summative feedback, i.e. strengths and weaknesses of the assessed work and the mark sheet should be signed and dated by each assessor. The first marker should also ensure all sections of the mark sheet are complete and the appropriate documentation is attached on submission. CTH reserve the right to refuse to moderate any assignment with incorrect or incomplete paperwork. 5.7 Submission of Assessments

Centres can submit candidate assessments every month throughout the year. However candidates must be registered and all assessment fees paid at least four weeks prior to their submission. The monthly deadline for submitting assessments is the last working day of the month. Centres can expect to receive results on the last working day of two calendar months from the last working day of the month the assessment was submitted, provided the assessment is submitted with full and complete paperwork as outlined in this document. It is strongly recommended that centres publish their own internal specified deadlines for the submission of all assessed work for candidates to allow adequate time for internal marking, internal moderation and dispatch to CTH. Below is a summary of the documentation that should be included with the submission of each assignment: For assignments: o Front Cover Sheet for all assignments o Written Reports: 1 hard copy and one electronic copy o Presentations: PowerPoint print-outs, handout and speaker notes Mark sheet for each unit Progress Tutorial Sheets for each tutorial/for each unit. Original reports of plagiarism software scan where the assignment has been put through a plagiarism test by the candidate or centre.

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5.8

Informing Candidates of Grades

It is strongly recommended that tutors do not discuss internal marks with candidates. All internal marking is subject to moderation by CTH and marks and/or grades may be altered during the CTH moderation process. CTH will be responsible for informing centres of their candidates final grades in all assessments. 5.9 Security

Centres are required to ensure the security and confidentiality of all candidates submitted work, and also the associated assessment and grading records. Assessments should be sent to CTH using a secure method of delivery, CTH cannot accept any responsibility for lost assessments and in the case of lost assessments the candidates will be required to submit a new assessment. Centres are advised to keep a copy of all candidate assessments and related CTH paperwork, including mark sheets and Progress Tutorial Sheets. 5.10 Reasonable Adjustment to Assessment

CTH has policies and procedures in place to help candidates who need special support during the assessment process. Approved centres are expected to adhere to CTHs Equal Opportunities Policy in relation to support for candidates during the delivery of CTH qualifications. Copies of the Equal Opportunity Policy, Reasonable Adjustment and Special Consideration can be found on the CTH website: www.cthawards.com.

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6. 6.1

Learning and Teaching Unit Content

Centres are responsible for designing the learning and teaching for the qualification, based on the unit syllabi they will be teaching. In broad terms, the outcomes focus on the development and application of learning, the construction of new knowledge and understanding, and the development of candidates independent skills in critical analysis and evaluation. It would therefore, be inappropriate at level 7 to be highly prescriptive in terms of subject content. Instead, candidates should have the freedom to explore established, and emerging, theories and concepts in order to develop their own knowledge and understanding. The role of subject tutors is crucial in enabling candidates to access these theories and concepts. Therefore, it is expected that subject tutors will not only have the pedagogic skills required to develop appropriate learning and teaching strategies, but will also have current subject expertise at the required level. This will normally mean that tutors will be qualified to at least level 7, (or an equivalent professional qualification), and will be able to demonstrate current subject knowledge, developed through on-going scholarly activity. Whilst it is entirely appropriate for tutors to develop and deploy their own learning and teaching strategies and tactics, the expectation at level 7 is that they should guide candidates towards, and help them understand, the appropriate theories and concepts, and also enable candidates to develop the skills required for study at this level. 6.2 Use of Research

At level 7, research is the means to the development of learning. Therefore, it is important that centres consider the range of the research processes within the qualification. Tutors in centres must enable candidates to undertake and develop the skills in both qualitative and quantitative research methods, and also enable candidates to develop and practice deductive and inductive research processes. Given the nature of the industry it should not be difficult to reflect this need in learning design. Additionally, because these are vocational qualifications, tutors should ensure that candidates work is an appropriate balance of theoretical research and applied research. If there is too much emphasis on purely theoretical research, it will be harder for candidates to understand the connections between theory and practice. This is equally likely, if there is too much emphasis on experiential research. The aim therefore, is for candidates to understand and apply, theories and concepts. Candidates will then be able to draw conclusions by comparing and contrasting theory with practice. CTH recognises that providing access to industry related academic texts is essential for students to have the most chance of success at this level of study. CTH student membership at Postgraduate level therefore includes access to the CTH e-resources website and the CTH e-library which includes over 200 relevant textbooks.

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6.3

Primary and Secondary Sources

It is not appropriate at level 7 to be prescriptive regarding the types of data to be collected by candidates when undertaking research. The type of data required will depend on both the subject and the object of any specific research activity, as well the theoretical and/or conceptual models being used to frame the research. However, over the whole qualification candidates should develop skills in both primary and secondary data collection. Therefore, tutors should facilitate the development of these skills through the guidance that they give to candidates. 6.4 Research Ethics

The research activities that candidates will undertake in this qualification are likely to include consideration of human behaviours and attitudes, and/or the results of human behaviours and attitudes. Therefore, it is essential that centres ensure that candidates develop and practise appropriate research ethics. To assist candidates with this, it is common practice for educational institutions to publish clear research ethics policies and procedures. These are normally set out as a code of ethics and include the principles, the compliance procedures, and the action to be taken in cases of non-compliance. For guidance, centres should note that in formulating research codes of ethics, frequently used principles include, (but are not necessarily limited to): the research must be beneficial the research must not damage any business or person informed consent confidentiality honesty objectivity 6.5 Industry Based Research

In a number of units candidates are required to carry out primary research in hospitality and tourism organisations. Candidates may find it easier to focus on one business for all of these research activities; particularly if they have access to people and data because they currently work, or have worked, there. However, tutors should discourage this approach as it could limit candidates learning. If candidates are encouraged to extend their research and understanding beyond the limitations of their own experiences, it should help them to develop deeper levels of learning.

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7.

CTH Postgraduate Diploma Units

The following tables summarises the units that make up the PGDHM. Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management Unit title and number HTMS: Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies 30 credits MLAC: Management and Leadership Across Cultures 30 credits HTSP: Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning 30 credits Plus one of the following options MHTP: Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects 30 credits RMHTM: Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Managers 30 credits Essay Written Report Written Report Presentation 20% 80% 80% 20% Assessment Method Written Report Presentation Written Report Presentation 80% 20% 80% 20%

Discussion Paper 20% Written Report 80%

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8. Relationship of Units to UK National Occupational Standards The following table outlines the relationship of these qualifications to National Occupational Standards. Unit title and number HTMS: Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies Related National Occupational Standards Hospitality Supervision and Leadership Standards (People 1st) Travel & Tourism Standards (People 1st) Hospitality Generic Standards (People 1st) Events Management & Temporary Structures (People 1st) Marketing and Sales Standards for non-specialists (Marketing and Sales Standards Setting Body) National Occupational Standards for Management and Leadership (MSC) MLAC: Management and Leadership Across Cultures Hospitality Supervision and Leadership Standards (People 1st) Hospitality Generic Standards (People 1st) Human Resources - National Occupational Standards (ENTO) HTSP: Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning Hospitality Supervision and Leadership Standards (People 1st) National Occupational Standards for Management and Leadership (MSC) MHTP: Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects Events Management & Temporary Structures (People 1st) National Standards, Project Management (ECITB) RMHTM: Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Managers National Occupational Standards currently not available

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9.

HTMS: Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies Level: Status: Number of Credits: Guided Learning Hours: 7 Mandatory 30 90

Unit Aims In todays increasingly competitive business environment there has been a shift from traditional marketing towards more varied approaches. In particular there has been a change from transactional to relationship management in marketing. The current market consumers determine whether brand and image are coherent and organisations recognise the power of brand and image as central to marketing activity. Todays brands are often built with effective PR campaigns and then maintained through a blend of marketing and PR. The impact of the Internet is having profound effect upon PR and marketing practices. Therefore, the aims of this unit are to enable candidates to develop their understanding and ability to critically evaluate marketing, branding and public relations strategies in the hospitality and tourism industry. Candidates will be able to develop marketing, branding and public relations strategies that increase competitive advantage for the organisation.

Learning Outcomes At the end of this unit the learner will be able to: 1. Develop marketing strategies for hospitality and tourism organisations.

Assessment Criteria The learner can: 1.1 Critically evaluate marketing strategies in the hospitality or tourism sector. 1.2 Assess the role of network and customer relationship marketing strategies for hospitality or tourism organisations. 1.3 Recommend marketing and customer loyalty strategies for a hospitality or tourism organisation.

Indicative Content

Brand identity and strategy

Network and relationship marketing Strategic Customer Relations Developing and creating customer loyalty Brand identity

2. Critically evaluate marketing communication strategies for hospitality and

2.1 Explain how marketing communications can be used to develop brand


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tourism organisations.

identity strategies. 2.2 Assess the effectiveness of e-marketing, viral and guerrilla marketing strategies within hospitality or tourism organisations. E-marketing Viral Marketing Guerrilla marketing

2.3 Recommend and justify marketing communications strategies for a hospitality or tourism organisation.

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Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies Assessment Task 1 Learning Outcome 1 and 2 Assessment Criteria: 1.1, 1.2, 2.1 and 2.2 Weighting 80% Written Report: 4000 words maximum Candidates are required to produce a 4000 word report that critically evaluates the marketing, branding and public relations strategies of a hospitality or tourism organisation of their choice. Candidates should include a brief introduction to the organisation they are researching in terms of their size, markets, customers, products/services. It is envisaged that candidates will only need to carry out secondary research into their chosen organization in order to complete this assignment. As part of their analysis candidates should assess and critically evaluate the role and effectiveness of the organisations: network and customer relationships marketing strategies marketing communications activities and strategies e-marketing, viral and guerilla marketing activities and strategies role and effectiveness of public relations activities and strategies.

Candidates should use and apply marketing and marketing communications theory and conceptual frameworks to critically analyse the above issues. Candidates should then recommend marketing and customer loyalty strategies that would secure and/or enhance the organisations competitive advantage. All recommendations should be justified drawing on the analysis they have carried out. The secondary research undertaken should be appended to this assignment. All theories, concepts, models and industry examples must be appropriately referenced using the Harvard System style. Task 2 Learning Outcome 1 and 2 Assessment Criteria: 1.3 and 2.3 Weighting 20% Individual Presentation with handouts (maximum two sides of A4) and speakers notes. Candidates are required to prepare and carry out a 15 minute presentation explaining the recommendations made in task 1. The presentation should discuss the marketing,
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marketing communications, public relations and customer loyalty strategy recommendations that have been made. Candidates should be explain and justify, using theoretical concepts, how they reached their recommendations and clearly explain how the recommendations will assist the organisation in securing or enhancing competitive advantage. Candidates presentation should address the above assessment criteria and candidates should ensure that they demonstrate that they have achieved the outcomes stated. Candidates should prepare a supporting handout in which they summarise the key points of their presentation; this handout should not exceed two sides of A4. Candidates should also present their presentation slides and accompanying speaker notes when submitting this assignment.

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Level 7 Post Graduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies Mark Sheet DOCUMENTS TO ATTACH TO MARK SHEET. Please indicate below if the following documents are attached. Note: All documents should contain the candidate ID number, unit title and date of submission, clearly on all pages. Front Cover Page of Assignment with candidate and tutor declaration Written Assignment (one hard copy and one electronic copy) Presentation: Power Point Slides Hand-outs Speaker Notes Tutorial Progress Record/s

YES

NO

Please use this box to list any other documents that are being attached to this mark sheet:

I hereby confirm that this candidate produced a valid CTH membership card and appropriate photographic identification (e.g. passport, national ID, driving license or college ID card) during the registration process. Tutor Signature:

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This page is intentionally blank.

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Hospitality and Tourism Marketing Strategies Mark Scheme Task Activity No. of Marks Allocated Internal Marking CTH Moderated/Final Mark Internal Moderator/ Second Marker Agreed Mark

First Marker

Task 1 Written Report (Maximum 4000 words). Critically evaluate the marketing, branding and public relations strategies of a hospitality or tourism organisation

Secondary Research Critical evaluation of: o Network and customer relationship marketing strategies o Marketing Communications o E-marketing, viral and guerilla marketing o Public relations

10 30

Use and application of theory and conceptual frameworks

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Task 2: Presentation Recommendatio ns

Recommendations Task 1 Total: Marks Explanation and Justification of recommendations using theoretical concepts Link to enhancing competitive advantage Task 2 Total Marks Total Mark for Assignment

20 80 10 10

20 100

MARK SCHEME CONTINUED


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First Internal Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Internal Moderator/Second Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Note: This section should be used by assessors to record their summative feedback, i.e. the strengths and weaknesses of the assessed work. CTH Moderators Comments

Signed:

Name:
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Date

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MARKETING STRATEGIES READING LIST Essential Texts Hooley, G. J., Saunders, J.A. and Piercy, N.F. (2008) Marketing Strategy and Competitive Positioning. 3rd ed. Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Kotler, P., Bowen, J. & Makens, J. (2006) Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism. (International Edition). 4th ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Companion Website for 3rd Edition: http://wps.prenhall.com/chet_kotler_marketing_3/6/1554/397872.cw/index.html Reid, R. D. and Bojanic, D. C. (2006) Hospitality Marketing Management. 4th ed. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc. Recommended Reading Adcock, D., Halborg, A. and Ross, C. (2001) Marketing: Principles and Practice. 4th ed. Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Bowie, D. and Buttle, F. (2004) Hospitality Marketing: An Introduction. Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann. Companion website: http://books.elsevier.com/companions/defaultindividual.asp?isbn=9780750652452 Brassington, F.and Pettitt, S. (2006) Principles of Marketing. 4th ed. Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Chisnall P. (2005) Marketing Research. 7th ed. London: McGraw Hill. Kotler, P. and Armstrong, G. (2007) Principles of Marketing. 12th ed. Harlow: Prentice Hall Companion website.http://wps.prenhall.com/bp_kotler_pom_11/31/8124/2079930.cw/index.html Kotler, P. and Armstrong, G. (2007) Principles of Marketing. 4th European Edition. Harlow: Prebtice Hall. Nykiel, R. A. (2005) Hospitality Management Strategies. Prentice Hall Companion website: http://wps.prenhall.com/chet_nykiel_hospitalitymgt_1/ Other learning resources Journals European Journal of Marketing Hospitality International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management International Marketing Review
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Journal of Marketing Marketing Week Marketing Restaurant Hospitality

Useful sites to visit: Chartered Institute of Marketing www.cim.co.uk

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10.

MLAC: Management and Leadership Across Cultures 7 Mandatory 30 90

Level: Status: Number of Credits: Guided Learning Hours:

Unit descriptor This unit enables learners to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to lead and motivate workforces across many different cultural backgrounds and respond to the needs and expectations of culturally diverse customers. Learners will achieve this by developing a critical understanding of the range of issues associated with management and leadership across cultures, including managing cultural diversity and theories of motivation. Learning Outcomes At the end of this unit the learner will be able to: 1. Lead and motivate a workforce across different cultures. Assessment Criteria The learner can: 1.1 Critically evaluate theories of leadership and motivation. 1.2 Compare and contrast different leadership styles across different cultures. 1.3 Compare and contrast different motivation techniques across different cultures. 1.4 Recommend leadership strategies for an organisation that operates across different cultures. 2.1 Critically evaluate the theories relating to managing cultural diversity. 2.2 Recommend responses to the different needs and expectations of culturally diverse guests. 2.3 Recommend techniques for managing and building teams with a culturally diverse workforce. Indicative Content Cultural difference Ethnicity Hofstedes Cultural Dimensions Stereotyping Nationalism Cultural identity & noise Cultural taboos Culture shock Cultures colliding, equality and diversity.

2. Manage cultural diversity within an organisation.

Organisational cultures and strategies for changing organisational culture Host-guest relationships Managing expectations Moments of truths Service gaps Service policies practices and procedures and their

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application in different organisational contexts Cross cultural business ethics and international sustainability Role of international managers Recruitment Cross-cultural training Performance management Employee welfare and benefit International human resource development

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Management and Leadership Across Cultures Assessment Task 1 Learning Outcome 1 Assessment Criteria: 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 Weighting 20% Individual Presentation plus Handout (1000 words maximum) Candidates are required to carry out an investigation into a hospitality or tourism organisation with a culturally diverse workforce and prepare a 20 minute presentation critically evaluating the relevance of motivation and leadership theories and techniques in ensuring that organisation continues to meet the growing needs and expectations of a culturally diverse customer base. It is envisaged that in order to complete this assignment candidates will carry out both primary and secondary research. Candidates presentation should address the above assessment criteria and candidates should ensure that they demonstrate that they have achieved the outcomes stated. Candidates should prepare a supporting handout in which they summarise the key points of their presentation; this handout should not exceed 2 x sides of A4 paper. Candidates should also present their presentation slides and accompanying speaker notes when submitting this assignment. Task 2 Learning Outcome 1 and 2 Assessment Criteria 1.1, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 Weighting 80% 4000 word written report Using the research from the same organisation used for Task 1, candidates must research and analyse how managers in the selected organisation approach the issues associated with management, leadership and motivation within a culturally diverse business environment. Candidates should use appropriate theories, models and concepts (including the management and leadership of cultural diversity) to analyse, and critically evaluate the results of the research. Candidates should then discuss the strategic options available to the organisation to manage staff and guests within the context of cultural diversity. This discussion should include a critical assessment of the relevant theories, concepts and be supported by industry examples.

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Then candidates should make recommendations as to how leadership and management (including team building and management) processes could be improved or maintained within that organisation to ensure it continues to meet and respond to the expectations of its customers. This report is expected to be one of critical analysis and not just a descriptive account of various concepts and theories. Candidates will be expected to make and justify their recommendations. Research undertaken should be appended to this assignment. All theories, concepts, models and industry examples must be appropriately referenced using the Harvard System.

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Management and Leadership Across Cultures Mark Sheet DOCUMENTS TO ATTACH TO MARK SHEET. Please indicate below if the following documents are attached. Note: All documents should contain the candidate ID number, unit title and date of submission, clearly on all pages. Front Cover Page of Assignment with candidate and tutor declaration Written Assignment (one hard copy and one electronic copy) Presentation: Power Point Slides Hand-outs Speaker Notes Tutorial Progress Record/s

YES

NO

Please use this box to list any other documents that are being attached to this mark sheet:

I hereby confirm that this candidate produced a valid CTH membership card and appropriate photographic identification (e.g. passport, national ID, driving license or college ID card) during the registration process. Tutor Signature:

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Management and Leadership Across Cultures Mark Scheme Task Activity No. of Internal Marking Marks Allocated First Internal Marker Moderator/ Second Marker 10 CTH Moderated/ Final Mark Agreed Mark

Task 1 Presentation Critical evaluation of motivation and leadership theories and techniques

Critical evaluation of motivation and leadership theories in relation to culturally diverse workforce Critical evaluation of motivation and leadership theories in assisting the organization meeting customer expectations and needs Task 1 Total: Marks

10

20 10 30

Task 2: Written Report (Maximum 4000 words)

Research (primary and secondary) Use and application of theory and conceptual frameworks Strategic Options, including justification using industry examples Recommendations Task 2 Total: Marks Total Mark for Assignment

20

20 80 100

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First Internal Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Internal Moderator/Second Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Note: This section should be used by assessors to record their summative feedback, i.e. the strengths and weaknesses of the assessed work. CTH Moderators Comments

Signed:

Name:

Date:

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MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP ACROSS CULTURES READING LIST Brotherton, B. (2003) International Hospitality Industry. 5th ed. Oxford: ButterworthHeinemann. Carr-Ruffino, N. (1996) Managing Diversity People Skills for a Multicultural Workplace. London: International Thomson Publishing. Clarke, A. and Chen, W. (2007) International Hospitality Management: Concepts and Case. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Connerley, M. L. and Pedersen, P. B. (2005) Leadership in a Diverse Multicultural Environment: Developing Awareness, Knowledge, and Skills. London: Sage Publications. Cornelius, N. (ed.) (2002) Building Workplace Equality: Ethics, Diversity and Inclusion. London: Thomson. Deresky, H. (2003) International Management: Managing Across Borders and Cultures. 3rd ed., London: Prentice Hall. Francesco, A. M. and Gold, B. A. (2005) International Organisational Behaviour. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Go, F.M. and Pine, R. (1995) Globalisation Strategy in the Hotel Industry. London: Routledge. Covey, S.R. (2004) The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. New York: Hay House Publishers. Thomas, T. (Ed) (2003) The Concise Adair on Leadership. London:Thorogood. Adair, J. (2005) The Action Centred Leader. London: Industrial Society. Adair, J. (2006) Effective Leadership Development. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Armstrong, M. (2004) How To Be An Even Better Manager. London: Kogan Page. Harvey, C. P. and Allard, M. J. (2005) Understanding and Managing Diversity: Readings, Cases, and Exercises. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Kandola, R. and Fullerton, J. (1998) Diversity in Action: Managing the Mosaic, 2nd ed. London, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Marx, E. (1999) Breaking Through Culture Shock: What You Need to Succeed in International Business. London: Nicholas Brealey. Warner, M. and Joynt, P. (ed.) (2002) Managing Across Cultures: Issues and Perspectives. 2nd ed. London: Thomson Learning.

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Magazines and Journals: Caterer and Hotelkeeper Hospitality International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management International Journal of Hospitality Management Tourism Management European Management Journal International Studies in Management and Organisation Theory, Culture and Society Work, Employment and Society

NB: Information can also be found on the Internet.

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11.

HTSP: Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning 7 Mandatory 30 90

Level: Status: Number of Credits: Guided Learning Hours:

Unit descriptor Learners will develop strategic business planning skills for hospitality and tourism organisations. Learners will critically evaluate the theories of business strategy and develop skills to analyse strategic fit and develop business strategy for hospitality or tourism organisations. Learners will be able to evaluate the risks and consider the management of strategic implementation and business ethics.

Learning Outcomes At the end of this unit the learner will be able to: 1. Critically evaluate strategic options for a hospitality and tourism organisation.

Assessment Criteria The learner can: 1.1 Compare and contrast the different approaches and theories used to identify and evaluate business strategy. 1.2 Use strategic business development theories to identify the strategic options available for a hospitality or tourism organisation. 1.3 Critically evaluate the range of strategic options available to a hospitality or tourism organisation. 1.4 Identify the risks to a hospitality or tourism organisation of adopting a strategic option. 1.5 Recommend and justify strategic options available to a hospitality or tourism organisation.

Indicative Content

Ansoff matrix vertical, backwards and forwards integration Cost leadership Mintzbergs strategies (deliberate, emergent) Strategic alliance, merger, acquisition Competitive strategies, valuebased strategy, contingency strategy market niche Market segmentation, adding value, market share, workforce competence development, product portfolio, reconfiguration, benchmarking.

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2. Develop a Business Strategy for a Hospitality or Tourism Organisation

2.1 Use strategic planning models to formulate a business strategy for a hospitality or tourism organisation. 2.2 Critically evaluate the role of ethics in the development of a business strategy. 2.3 Identify and analyse areas of potential conflict in the implementation of business strategy. 2.4 Recommend techniques to reduce potential conflict during the implementation of business strategy.

Reviewing options Attractiveness to stakeholders Stakeholder participation Criteria for judging options, feasibility studies Risk assessment Cost-benefit analysis Consistency with organisational values Scenario planning Simulation Modelling, sensitivity analysis Balanced scorecard Globalisation and internet advantages Resources issues e.g. financial, workforce.

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Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning Assessment Task 1 Learning Outcome 1 and 2 Assessment Criteria: 1.1 and 2.2 Weighting 20% Written report 1500 words maximum Candidates are required to write a 1500 discussion paper that addresses one the following topics: The usefulness of business strategy theory in identifying and evaluating business opportunities and determining business strategies. Note: candidates should compare and contrast a variety of business theories and approaches. The role of ethics in developing strategy for business success.

Candidates should approach this discussion paper as a reflective piece of work that focuses on their individual learning and understanding of the issues raised by the topic/organisation they choose. Their discussion should be critically evaluative and does not need to draw firm conclusions but should concentrate on raising issues for consideration when developing business strategy. Candidates can be supported in their preparation for this task by centres arranging group discussions around the topic areas during which participants are encouraged to express, justify and debate their opinions. Following the discussions participants should be encouraged to record their learning and opinions which could then be used to produce their individual discussion paper. Task 2 Learning Outcome 1 and 2 Assessment Criteria: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4. 1.5 and 2.1 Weighting 80% Written report 4000 words maximum

Candidates are required to develop a business strategy for a hospitality or tourism organisation of their choice. Candidates assignment should include: An introduction into their chosen organisation including for example information on size, markets, products/services, target customers, current corporate/business objectives. The use of a variety of theories, models and concepts to critically evaluate two strategic options and their associated risks available to their selected organisation.

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Recommendation and justification of the best strategic option for the organisation to achieve its strategic objectives. Outline the business strategy for the organisation using appropriate planning models.

Secondary research activities are most likely to be used in this assignment. However, this should not preclude candidates from carrying out primary research if they feel it is appropriate. In this assignment candidates should ensure that they collect, collate, analyse and evaluate sufficient quantitative data to be able to identify strategic options. When selecting an organisation, candidates should be aware that they need access to a range of quantitative and qualitative information in order to analyse and evaluate the businesss capabilities and resources. For example the information required will probably include, but will not be limited to: vision, mission and values financial reports marketing reports and distribution channel information data relating to tangible and intangible assets human resources data.

Candidates may be able to gain access to this information through their contacts in industry. However, if this is difficult candidates should be guided towards hospitality or tourism Public Limited Companies, as the required information should be available through their published reports. The information is usually available through the investor information, (or similar), section on corporate websites. Candidates will also need a range of quantitative and qualitative information in order to analyse and evaluate the external and competitive environments. Data relating to the external environment is most likely to be sourced from reports, particularly those published by government and non-government organisations, industry bodies and research institutions. Competitor data can be sourced directly from competing organisations, and also from industry bodies. All research should be appended to this assessment. All theories, concepts, models and industry examples must be appropriately referenced using the Harvard System.

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Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning Mark Sheet DOCUMENTS TO ATTACH TO MARK SHEET. Please indicate below if the following documents are attached. Note: All documents should contain the candidate ID number, unit title and date of submission, clearly on all pages. Front Cover Page of Assignment with candidate and tutor declaration Written Assignment (one hard copy and one electronic copy) Presentation: Power Point Slides Hand-outs Speaker Notes Tutorial Progress Record/s

YES

NO

Please use this box to list any other documents that are being attached to this mark sheet:

I hereby confirm that this candidate produced a valid CTH membership card and appropriate photographic identification (e.g. passport, national ID, driving license or college ID card) during the registration process. Tutor Signature:

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Hospitality and Tourism Strategic Planning Mark Scheme Task Activity No. of Internal Marking Marks Allocated First Internal Marker Moderator 10 CTH Moderated/ Final Mark Agreed Mark

Task 1 Discussion Paper (1500 words maximum) Usefulness of theory and role of ethics Task 2: Written Report (4000 words Maximum) Business Strategy

Critical evaluation of business strategy theory, concepts and models. Critical evaluation of the role of ethics in formulating business strategy and achieving business success. Task 1 Total: Marks Introduction to organisation and research. Use and application of theories, models and concepts to critically evaluate strategic options. Recommendations, link to strategic objectives and justified. Outline business strategy, use of planning models and synergy with critical evaluation and recommendations. Task 2 Total: Marks Total Mark for Assignment

10

20 10

30

20

20

80 100

45

First Internal Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Internal Moderator Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Note: This section should be used by assessors to record their summative feedback, i.e. the strengths and weaknesses of the assessed work.

CTH Moderators Comments

Signed:

Name:
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Date:

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HOSPITALITY AND STRATEGIC PLANNING READING LIST Essential Texts Johnson, G. Scholes, K. & Whittington, R. (2011) Exploring Corporate Strategy: Text & Cases. 9th ed. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited. Knowles, T. (1996) Corporate Strategy for Hospitality. Harlow: Longman. Mintzberg, H., (2009) Strategy Safari: The Complete Guide through the Wilds of Strategic Management. 2nd ed. Harlow UK: FT Prentice Hall. Mintzberg, H., (2000) The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning. London: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Recommended Reading Lynch, R., (2006) Corporate Strategy. 4th ed. Harlow England New York: FT/Prentice Hall. Harrison, J., (2003) Strategic Management of Resources and Relationships: Concepts and Cases, New York: Wiley. Barney, J., (2010) Gaining and Sustaining Competitive Advantage. 3rd ed. Pearson Education. Grant, R., (2010) Contemporary Strategy Analysis: Text and Cases. 7th ed. Hoboken N.J: Wiley. Gratton, L., (2000) Living Strategy: Putting People at the Heart of Corporate Purpose. London, New York: Financial Times: Prentice Hall. Kaplan, R., (2001) The Strategy-Focused Organization: How Balanced Scorecard Companies Thrive in the New Business Environment. Boston Mass: Harvard Business School Press. McGee, J., (2005) Strategy: Analysis & Practice. London: McGraw-Hill Education. Pettigrew, A., (2006) Handbook of Strategy and Management. London, Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications. Scholes, K., (2001) Exploring Public Sector Strategy. 1st ed. Harlow, England, New York: Financial Times/Prentice Hall. Stacey, R., (2011) Strategic Management and Organisational Dynamics: The Challenge of Complexity to Ways of Thinking about Organisations. 6th ed. Harlow, England, New York: Financial Times Prentice Hall. De Wit, B., (2004) Strategy-Process, Content, Context: An International Perspective. 3rd ed. London: Thomson.

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Recommended Journals Academy of Management Journal (Academy of Management) British Journal of Management (John Wiley and Sons) California Management Review (University of California, Berkeley) European Management Journal (Elsevier) Harvard Business Review (Harvard Business Publishing) Journal of Business Strategy (Emerald) Journal of Management Studies (John Wiley and Sons) Long Range Planning (Elsevier) MIT Sloan Management Review (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Strategic Change (John Wiley and Sons) Strategy and Leadership (Emerald)

Recommended Websites www.ft.com www.managers.org.uk www.sps.org.uk www.strategy-business.com Financial Times Chartered Management Institute Strategic Planning Society Strategy and Business

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12.

MHTP: Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects 7 Optional 30 90 hours

Level: Status: Number of Credits: Guided Learning Hours:

Unit Descriptor Learners will develop the skills required in project management and decision making within hospitality and tourism organisations. Learners will be able to critically evaluate a range of project management tools and apply them to the development and implementation of a project plan. Learning Outcomes At the end of this unit the learner will be able to: 1. Critically evaluate the theories, concepts and tools relating to project management and decision making for a hospitality or tourism organisation. Assessment Criteria The learner can: 1.1 Assess a range of tools for use in managing a hospitality or tourism project. 1.2 Critically evaluate the concepts of project management and decision making within a hospitality or tourism context. 2.1 Compare and contrast the challenges posed by different types of hospitality or tourism projects. 2.2 Use research techniques to identify different project options for hospitality or tourism organisations. 2.3 Define and justify a hospitality or tourism project. 2.4 Evaluate different
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Indicative Content Cost-benefit analysis Gantt Charts Project Management software Project Management Theories Total Quality Management Information Management Management by objectives Change Management

2. Define a specific project for a hospitality and tourism organisation.

Research Forecasting Methods

Quality Improvement Marketing Product Development Human Resource Capital

approaches to managing the project within a hospitality or tourism context. 2.5 Recommend and justify a project management approach. 3.1 Develop a project plan. 3.1 Formulate quantifiable and justifiable project aims and objectives. 3.2 Evaluate the resource and organisational issues and specify requirements associated with the project. 3.3 Identify the impact of not implementing a project for a hospitality or tourism organisation. 3.4 Formulate a project plan for a hospitality or tourism organisation. 3.5 Evaluate the risks to a project plan for a hospitality or tourism organisation. 3.6 Develop quantifiable measures to minimise and control risk during the implementation of a project. 3.7 Evaluate project performance. Resource and Scheduling Forecasting Methods

Cost v Benefit analysis

Feedback Effectiveness of control measures Information and Communications Technology and Decision making

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Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects Assessment Candidates are required to produce a 5,500 word report as follows: Task 1 Learning outcome 1 Assessment Criteria 1.1 and 1.2 Weighting: 20% Word Count: 2000 words maximum Candidates are required to research and critically evaluate several theories, concepts and tools relating to project management and decision-making which they will then apply in task two. Candidates should prepare any essay that discusses this evaluation and may include appendices if necessary, which will be outside of the word count. In their essay candidates should justify statements and opinions with underpinning theories, concepts and tools drawn from up to date and relevant project management and decision literature. The use of theories, concepts and tools must be clearly referenced using Harvard style conventions outlined in this syllabus document. Candidates are required to use the theories concepts and tools to demonstrate their understanding of current project management and decision making theory. It is estimated that candidates will make reference to at least ten sources of literature to demonstrate the breadth of their research. Task 2 Learning outcomes 2 & 3 Assessment Criteria 2.1-2.5 and 3.1-3.7 Weighting: 80%: Word Count: 3,500 words maximum The purpose of this task is to give candidates the opportunity to apply the theories, concepts and tools they have critically evaluated in task one above thus demonstrating their ability to apply these tools in a real life project. Candidates should ensure, through discussions with their tutors, that their selected project is manageable for the time period and purpose of this task, for example a project plan based on building a new hotel or airport terminal would probably be beyond the scope of this task and although capital projects are entirely appropriate as a subject for this task candidates may wish to base their assignment on a smaller scale capital project. Example project topics could include: the refurbishment or re-equipping of part of a business quality improvement projects marketing projects
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product/service development projects human resource development projects

In order to give the assignment clear focus it is strongly recommended that candidates base their project on a real operation. Negotiation with business managers may enable candidates to take on a real project and candidates can minimise difficulties in accessing information by choosing and applying projects within their own workplace. However if this is not possible a simulated project is entirely acceptable. In completion of this report candidates are required to: Carry out research to justify and define the project. Consider the possible approaches to the project and justify the selected approach. Define the development project aims and quantifiable project objectives, with justification. Identify the resource and organisational issues associated with the project. Carry out a cost-benefit analysis and identify the impact of not implementing the project. Formulate a detailed project plan that includes statistical analysis. Identify the risks to the plan and develop measures to control the risk.

In completion of the able tasks candidates should include forecasting activities and consider a range of quantitative data. Evidence of quantitative data analysis should be appended to the report. All research should be appended to this assessment. All theories, concepts, models and industry examples must be appropriately referenced using the Harvard System.

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Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects Mark Sheet DOCUMENTS TO ATTACH TO MARK SHEET. Please indicate below if the following documents are attached. Note: All documents should contain the candidate ID number, unit title and date of submission, clearly on all pages. Front Cover Page of Assignment with candidate and tutor declaration

YES

NO

Written Assignment (one hard copy and one electronic copy)

Presentation: - Not required

Tutorial Progress Record/s

Please use this box to list any other documents that are being attached to this mark sheet:

I hereby confirm that this candidate produced a valid CTH membership card and appropriate photographic identification (e.g. passport, national ID, driving license or college ID card) during the registration process.

Tutor Signature:

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Managing Hospitality and Tourism Projects Mark Scheme Task Activity No. of Marks Allocated Internal Marking CTH Moderated/ Final Mark Agreed Mark

First Marker Task 1 Written Essay (2000 words maximum) Critical evaluation of project management theories, concepts and tools Task 2 Written Report Project Plan (3,500 words maximum) Demonstration of research into current and 6 relevant project management and decision literature and research Understanding of current project 7 management and decision making theory. Critical evaluation of project management theories, concepts and tools 7

Internal Moderator

Task 1 Total: Marks Defining the project via use of research Evaluation of different approaches Clear and justified aims and objectives, including risk analysis and cost-benefit analysis Evaluation of resource and organizational implications Project Plan Measurement and control of plan and associated risk Task 2 Total: Marks Total Mark for Assignment

20 10 10 10

10 30 10 80 100

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First Internal Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Internal Moderator Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Note: This section should be used by assessors to record their summative feedback, i.e. the strengths and weaknesses of the assessed work.

CTH Moderators Comments

Signed:

Name:

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Date:

MANAGING HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM PROJECTS READING LIST Essential Texts Burke, R., (2003) Project Management, Planning & Control Techniques. 4th Ed. Wiley: Chichester. Flouris T. G, and Lock, D. (2009) Managing Aviation Projects from Concept to Completion. Ashgate Publishing Ltd. Ransley, J, & Ingram, H (Eds), (2000), Developing Hospitality Properties and Facilities. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Recommended Reading Doherty, S. (2008) Heathrow's Terminal 5: History in the Making. Illustrated edition John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Gardiner, P. (2005) Project Management: A Strategic Planning Approach. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Huffadine, M. (1993) Project Management in Hotel & Resort Development. London: Morgan Hill. Lock, D. (2001) Project Management. 7th Edition Aldershot: Gower. Mantel, S.J., Meredith, J.R., Shafer, S.M., & Sutton, M.M. (2001) Project Management in Practice. Chichester: Wiley & Sons. Pinto, J.K. (2007) Project Management: Achieving Competitive Advantage. New Jersey: Pearson Education. Ransley, J. & Ingram H. (2000) Developing Hospitality Properties and Facilities. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. Westland, J. (2006) The Project Management Lifecycle: A Complete Step-by-Step Methodology for Initiating, Planning, Executing and Closing a Project Successfully. Kogan Page Ltd. Young T.L., (2003) The Handbook of Project Management, (2nd Ed), London, Kogan Page Ltd. Other Learning Resources A good starting point in project management is to have a look at the various professional institutes and associations associated with project management. There are a number of these with the largest being the US based Project Management Institute (PMI)

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www.pmi.org. The British equivalent is the Association of Project Managers (APM) www.apm.org.uk . In addition you can subscribe to the following publications: Project published monthly by the Association of Project Managers. International Journal of Project Management published monthly by the International Project Management Association. Project Manager Today published monthly.

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13.

RMHTM: Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Managers 7 Optional 30 90

Level: Status: Number of Credits: Guided Learning Hours: Unit descriptor

Candidates will be able to plan and implement a hospitality and tourism research project. Candidates will develop the skills required for research design, research methods and research presentation. Learning Outcomes At the end of this unit the learner will be able to: 1. Plan a hospitality and tourism research project. Assessment Criteria The learner can: 1.1 Critically evaluate a range of research methods that can be applied to a hospitality or tourism context. Indicative Content

Deductive vs inductive Surveys Case studies Action research Experiments

1.2 Critically evaluate a range of research tools that can be applied to a hospitality or tourism research project.

Sampling Probability assessment Questionnaires Interviews Observation Records and documents Diaries and critical incident reports Citations and references

1.3 Assess the ethical considerations when undertaken hospitality, leisure, travel or tourism research projects. 1.4 Formulate a research plan
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Aims

for a hospitality, leisure, travel or tourism organisation.

Justification Project/problem Selection of appropriate and justified techniques Setting quantifiable and justifiable objectives

2. Implement a hospitality or tourism research project.

2.1 Use quantitative and qualitative techniques in a hospitality or tourism research project. 2.2 Critically evaluate information sources. 2.3 Evaluate the results of a hospitality or tourism research project. 2.4 Make justifiable recommendations from the results of research undertaken. 2.5 Present the results of a hospitality or tourism research project. Referencing

Drawing conclusions

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Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Assessment Task 1 Learning outcomes 1 & 2 Assessment Criteria 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 Weighting: 80%: Written Research Report Word Count: 4000 words For this assignment candidates should be given freedom to select an area of hospitality or tourism research that interests them. Candidates should be encouraged to choose applied research or problem solving research that looks at any issue for a particular organisation and this would normally be the organisation where the candidate currently works or the organisation they aspire to work in the future. The idea here is that they take an issue for the organisation and using rigorous research process come up with results and recommendations that will be useful to the organisation. However, candidates need to be aware that this is a relatively small-scale project and therefore they may need advice regarding the scale and scope of the area to be researched. For example solving the problem of high staff turnover in the hotel industry would be beyond the scope of this assignment. However, identifying the causes of high staff turnover at their workplace and proposing solutions would be a manageable project. Other examples could be How can a hotel increase the level of satisfaction among the guests? or which advertising media and methods would give a Theme Park the greatest return for its expenditure. For this type of research project candidates should use a case study approach which may involve questionnaires/interviews/direct observations/participantobservation/documents/archival records/physical artefacts etc. but these would all be focused within the chosen organisation. Candidates should produce a research report that should contain two sections: 1. Develop a research plan for the project which includes: Assessment criteria 1.1, 1.2, 1.4 and 2.2. Maximum 1000 words. An outline of the initial research ideas Problem identification with justification Project aims with quantifiable and justifiable objectives Briefly evaluate a range of research methods that could be used (include deductive vs inductive, surveys, case studies, action research and experiments) Identify a range of research tools that can be applied to your research project (sampling, probability assessment, questionnaires, interviews, observation, records and documents, diaries, critical incident reports, citations and references)

2. A written research report: Maximum 4000 words


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Assessment criteria 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4 Critically evaluate information sources (literature reviews including referencing and bibliography) Critically evaluate the range of research methods used Critically evaluate the range of research tools used Assess any ethical risks and considerations in the research methods and methods used to control risks Evaluate results of project, using quantitative and qualitative techniques Draw conclusions Make justifiable recommendations All research should be appended to this assessment. All theories, concepts, models and industry examples must be appropriately referenced using the Harvard System. Task 2 Learning outcomes 2 Assessment Criteria 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 Weighting: 20%: Individual Presentation with hand-outs and speaker notes Candidates are required to prepare and present the results (findings) and recommendations of their research project. The presentation should be a maximum of 15 minutes and cover three broad areas: What the research was about (aim and research problem) Methodology Findings, conclusions and recommendations.

Candidates should submit hard copies of all presentation materials, (e.g. PowerPoint) together with speakers notes and hand-outs (maximum of two sides of A4), plus copies of the assessment report from the assessor.

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Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Managers Mark Sheet DOCUMENTS TO ATTACH TO MARK SHEET. Please indicate below if the following documents are attached. Note: All documents should contain the candidate ID number, unit title and date of submission, clearly on all pages. Front Cover Page of Assignment with candidate and tutor declaration

YES

NO

Written Assignment (one hard copy and one electronic copy) Presentation: Power Point Slides Hand-outs Speaker Notes

Tutorial Progress Record/s

Please use this box to list any other documents that are being attached to this mark sheet:

I hereby confirm that this candidate produced a valid CTH membership card and appropriate photographic identification (e.g. passport, national ID, driving license or college ID card) during the registration process.

Tutor Signature:

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This page is intentionally blank.

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Research Methods for Hospitality and Tourism Managers Mark Scheme Task Activity No. of Internal Marking Marks Allocated First Internal Marker Moderator/ Second Marker 5 5 5 CTH Moderated/ Final Mark Agreed Mark

Task 1 Written report (5000 words maximum) Research Report

Research Plan including: Justifiable aims and objectives Evaluation of appropriate methods Evaluation of range of tools Research Report including: Critical evaluation of secondary sources Critical evaluation of research methods and tools Ethical considerations Qualitative and Quantitative analysis of research Conclusions based on critical analysis of method and tools Justifiable recommendations Task 1 Total: Marks

5 15 15 15 10 5

80 5 5 5 5 20 100
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Task 2: Presentation Of Findings

Justification of aims and objectives Justification of methodology Justification of conclusions Justification of recommendations

Task 2 Total: Marks Total Mark for Assignment

First Internal Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Internal Moderator/Second Marker Comments:

Signed:.

Name: Date:.

Note: This section should be used by assessors to record their summative feedback, i.e. the strengths and weaknesses of the assessed work.

CTH Moderators Comments

Signed:

Name:

Date:

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RESEARCH METHODS FOR HOPSITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGERS READING LIST Essential Texts: Clark, M., Riley, M., Wilkie, E. and Wood, R.C. (1998) Researching and Writing Dissertations in Hospitality and Tourism. London: Thomson Business Press. Finn, M., Elliot-White, M. and Walton, M. (2000) Tourism and Leisure Research Methods. Harlow: Pearson Education. Ritchie, B.W., Burns, P. and Palmer, C. (eds) (2005) Tourism Research Methods: Integrating Theory with Practice. Wallingford: CABI. Veal, A.J. (2006) Research Methods for Tourism and Leisure: A Practical Guide. 3rd ed. Harlow: Financial Times, Prentice-Hall. Recommended Reading: Bloor, M. (2001) Focus Groups in Social Research. London: Sage. Bradburn, N.M. (2004) Asking Questions: The Definitive Guide to Questionnaire Design. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Gomm, R., Hammersley, M. and Foster, P. (eds) (2000) Case Study Method. London: Sage. Gubrium, J.F. and Holstein, J.A. (2002) Handbook of Interview Research: Context and Method. Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage. Gill, J. & Johnson, P. (2002) Research Methods for Managers. 3rd ed. London: Sage. Hart, C. (1998) Doing a Literature Review. London: Sage. Jankowicz, A.D. (2005) Business Research Project. (4th ed.) London: Thompson Learning. Johns, N. & Lee-Ross, D. (1998) Research Methods in Service Industry Management. London: Cassell. Levine, D.M. (2005) Statistics for Managers using Microsoft Excel. 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Silverman, D. (2006) Interpreting Qualitative Data: Methods for Analysing Talk, Text and Interaction. 3rd ed. London: Sage. Silverman, D. (2005) Doing Qualitative Research. (2nd ed). London: Sage. Yin, R.K. (2003) Case Study Research: Design and Methods. (3rd ed.) London: Sage.

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Useful Reading for Case Studies Tellis, W. (1997) Introduction to case study The Qualitative Report [On-line serial], vol. 3 No 2. Available from: http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR3-2/tellis1.html Tellis. W. (1997) Application of a case study methodology. The Qualitative Report [On-line serial], vol. 3 no 3. Available from: http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR3-3/tellis2.html

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APPENDIX ONE ASSIGNMENT FRONT COVER

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LEVEL 7 POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT FRONT COVER

CTH Number: Centre Name:

Candidate Name: Tutor Name:

Unit Title:

Centre Final Mark CTH Final Result: Plagiarism Score:

Candidate Statement I hereby declare that this assignment is my own work and any use of materials from other sources has been referenced accordingly. Candidate Signature: Date:

Tutor Statement I hereby confirm that this assignment, to the best of my knowledge, is the candidates own work and they have not collaborated in the production of this assignment with any other person. I also confirm that I have a record of this candidates progress tutorial/s.

Tutor Signature:

Date:

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APPENDIX TWO ASSIGNMENT PROGRESS TUTORIAL RECORD SHEET

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CTH Level 7 Postgraduate Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management Assignment Progress Tutorial Record Sheet Students and their unit tutor must arrange a minimum of one progress tutorial over the period of each Postgraduate Diploma unit assignment. This is an opportunity for discussion to take place and advice and guidance to be given and also an opportunity for tutors to verify that the work submitted by candidates is their own and has been produced without any collaboration. A maximum of three progress tutorials is allowed prior to the formal submission of work to CTH. All tutorials must be documented and copies of these documents must be included as part of the assignments submission. Failure to arrange, attend or submit the records for these tutorials may result in failure of this unit.

CTH Centre Candidate Name Module (e.g. MLAC) Report Title Date of Meeting

CTH No Candidate No Course Code Supervisor Meeting No

1. If the candidate's first language is not English, please circle below your assessment of English language ability. No Problems Spoken Written 2. Describe the candidate's progress by ticking the appropriate phrase below: Very Good Good Satisfactory Disappointing Unsatisfactory Adequate Requires Tuition Seriously Inadequate

3. If you have ticked either satisfactory", or "disappointing" or "unsatisfactory", please comment and indicate whether you are concerned about the eventual success of the candidate and outline the guidance you have given the candidate on how to improve their assignment. (If necessary, please use a separate sheet).

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4.

If progress has been less than satisfactory, please give date of a follow up review.

5.

General comments on the candidate's ability, progress and circumstances, including, recommendations you have made to the candidates study, their approach to research and their assignment.

Signature of Student: Signature of Tutor:

Date

Date

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