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Maastricht University

Faculty of Economics and


Business Administration
4
Model Points for
Asset Liability Models
June 28, 2008
Master thesis
Author
N.C. Jansen
i040010
Supervisors
Dr. J.J.B. de Swart (PwC)
Dr. F.J. Wille (PwC)
Prof. dr. ir. S. van Hoesel (UM)
Prof. dr. R.H.M.A. Kleynen (UM)
Abstract
ALM models are used by insurance companies as input to evaluate
their Solvency. They give rise to computational complexity because of
the number of policies and mainly the stochastic element. This stochastic
element denes the need for scenarios. Some insurance companies now use
data grouping methods to reduce run times, however these lack a theoret-
ical basis. In this paper we develop a theoretical framework to optimize
grouping strategies and to derive upper bounds for the inaccuracy caused
by grouping. We discuss determinants for the projected future cash ow
deviations, and as a result of those we try to bound the error resulting
from a certain grouping strategy. One of the main results in the paper is
the eect of linear data on the grouping strategy; we can simply group
them away. To make the method work in practice we rely on grid con-
struction, innity norms and numerical derivatives. We will furthermore
apply the method to a real life insurance product.
1
Contents
1 Introduction 3
2 Life insurances 5
2.1 ALM models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.2 Solvency II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.3 Model Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3 Framework for the model point generation 7
3.1 The problem in an Operations Research context . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2 Minimizing the error induced by making use of model points . . 8
3.3 Numerical model point creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3.3.1 Grid construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3.3.2 Determining the amount of buckets . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.3.3 Creating the model points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.3.4 Assigning the policies to the model points . . . . . . . . . 13
3.3.5 Estimating the errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4 A real life example 14
4.1 Describing the product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.2 Selecting the attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.3 Exploring the function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.4 Interpreting the function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
4.5 Generating model points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.6 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.6.1 Grouping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.6.2 Approximate deviation from the base run . . . . . . . . . 19
5 Conclusion and future work 20
A Appendix 22
A.1 Gridconstruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
A.2 Notations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
A.3 Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
A.4 Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
2
1 Introduction
Insurance companies have gained increasing interest for Economic Capital, which
is used for making the optimal economic decisions, risk based pricing and perfor-
mance management. In addition, regulators are further developing their capital
requirement regulations in the appearance of Solvency II, with which insurers
need to comply to stay in business. Insurance companies use Asset Liability
models to project their future cash ows as input for evaluating their solvency
position.
Insurers have a portfolio of policies with dierent attributes and dierent
scenarios that can occur. To make a projection of their expected cash ows
they need to calculate for every scenario/policy combination the present value.
These projections can take an enormous amount of time given current process-
ing power. This is so much so that they needed to invent more sophisticated
techniques to tackle this problem. Multiple options exist to deal with the prob-
lem, and generally it is not the case that one option alone will solve the problem.
The options are:
Replicating portfolios
Software optimization
Scenario optimization
Grid technology
Model Points
Replicating portfolios has found usage in the nancial industry to value
cash ows that are not actively traded, such as insurance products. Investing
in a replicating portfolio will however not eliminate all risk, but this risk is
non-systematic and can therefore be diversied away. The market value of the
replicating portfolio is then used to determine the value of the liability cash
ow.
Optimizing the software so that it runs faster could be done, however since
most companies use certied products such as MoSes it is not our goal to beat
these well known software products.
Scenario optimization is performed by carefully selecting a subset of a large
set of scenarios, which is still accurately predicting future events. In this paper
we assume that this has already taken place.
Grid technology is a method where they spread the calculation burden for
ALM models across a grid of computers. Run times can be reduced by approxi-
mately the number of processors available. However, the drawback is that extra
hardware costs money and in addition the processors cannot concurrently be
used for other purposes.
The following observation makes data reduction methods very powerful. Pro-
jecting the future cash ows takes a lot of time, however the model that com-
putes them still runs in polynomial time. This means that we can decrease
3
the input size and achieve a great reduction in the time needed to calculate
the present values. By using model points, which is the technique that we will
present in this paper, we try to minimize the input size while still being accurate
within some bounds.
Insurance products depend on the bare essentials on policies and scenarios,
where the scenarios are generated by a scenario generator which produces up to
a certain amount of scenarios. We will assume that scenario optimization has
already taken place. Therefore, only the amount of policies can be reduced.
Model points are already being used by life insurers and have historically
been based on actuarial knowledge. Theoretical foundations are therefore not
made and as far as our knowledge reaches, no research has been done to inves-
tigate the process of creating the model points and measuring the inaccuracy of
them as an application for insurers.
Correctly measuring the inaccuracy is an important task. Inaccuracy can
now only be measured by comparing a grouped run to an ungrouped, the so
called base run. As said previously, a base run does take a lot of time and can
therefore not be performed to often. However, the base run is based upon a set
of policies which may change over time. What is done now, is that the grouped
run at time t
0
is compared to the base run at time t
0
, which is still correct. The
inaccuracy can now be measured perfectly. However, an additional time con-
suming task is to validate the model points as time has passed and the portfolio
has migrated. Here an error is made by comparing the grouped run at t
1
to the
ungrouped run at t
0
. By presenting a recipe based on theoretical foundations
we can therefore improve not only processing times, but also estimate the error
correctly, without having to perform a base run again.
The remainder of the paper is organized as follows: in Section 2 we explain
more about life insurances, ALM and Solvency, and the idea of model points.
From there we continue to Section 3, where we create a theoretical framework
for the model points. We explain notations, model the problem and nd good
indicators for grouping and error approximation. We then we move on to a
real life product in Section 4 on which we will apply our model and present the
results. Finally in Section 5 we make concluding remarks and comment on some
further research.
4
2 Life insurances
Insurers protect the insured for some unforeseeable (mostly negative) events that
can occur in the future. Of course this does not come for free. The insured pays
a premium which can be monthly, yearly or some other frequency. Whenever
a certain event happens, the insurer has a liability to full. To calculate the
present value of the expected liabilities to which they are exposed at a certain
moment in time, they use an Asset Liability Model (ALM). ALM models are
used to calculate the present value of all future assets and liabilities. However
in this paper we are only interested in the liability side.
2.1 ALM models
By using these ALM models, companies can show that they are able to pay
out all policies under normal conditions. There exist some minimum amount
of nancial resources that insurers must have in order to cover the risks. The
rules that stipulate those amounts are bundled under the name Solvency. It is
to ensure the nancial soundness of insurance undertakings, and in the end to
protect policyholders and the stability of the nancial system as a whole.
Previously, only closed form ALM models where used, which calculated the
present values deterministically. In the last decade they have been moving to-
wards a more realistic valuation [12] where stochastic modeling has been proved
to be very useful. It makes use of various scenarios, where every scenario repre-
sents some future event. These scenarios are produced by a scenario generator.
However the development of more realistic models does also come with a number
of drawbacks. Most notably is the very slow runtime.
2.2 Solvency II
Recently (July 2007)[14], they have announced the arrival of Solvency II, which
replaces old requirements and establishes more harmonized requirements across
the EU and therefore promoting competitive equality as well as high and more
uniform levels of customer protection. It is similar to the Basel II, which is
the regulation within the banking world. For Solvency II, market consistent
embedded values and other initiatives make it even more important for insur-
ance companies to model on a stochastic basis. Doing so, as already said, has
signicant implications for run times in valuing insurance portfolios. However,
reporting needs to be done on a frequent basis which means there are certain
time constraints that need to be fullled. Since Solvency II is expected to be ef-
fective from 2012 [15], there is an enormous interest in methods that can rapidly
as well as accurately predict the liabilities to which they are exposed[13]. As
said in the introduction, model points are a way to accomplish this.
5
2.3 Model Points
A model point is an aggregate of policies, that should be a good representation
of a cluster of policies. However what does good mean? If we think of what
present value the original policies produce, and compare the resulting present
value when using our model points, then we do have an indication of the quality
of our model points. An additional criterion, is that we do not want too many
of those, otherwise we do not see any computation time reduction.
A typical liability model can be grouped in three components: scenarios,
policies and attributes. As already stated, scenarios are calculated by a scenario
generator and we have assumed that they are already optimized. Therefore they
are assumed to be really dierent and necessary, which means that there is no
further grouping to be done here. The attributes are characteristics of the policy
holder (age, sex, insured amount, etc) and product specics (duration, product,
premium, etc.). These are necessary to dene the product. Furthermore the
amount of attributes a policy has could be around 50, as compared to the
number of policies, of which there are innitely many. This means it is the
policies that we can group together. This is done, in such a way that, if policies
do resemble one another, we can simply group them in a new ctional policy,
which represents the individual policies. This is called the model point.
6
3 Framework for the model point generation
3.1 The problem in an Operations Research context
In this section we will outline the model and provide a theoretical framework
for model point creation. We expect as inputs a data set X M
mn
which is
an mn matrix with policy data, where m is the number of policies, and n the
number of attributes. A single policy is denoted by x = [x
1
x
2
. . . x
n
]
T
, which is
a column vector of the attributes. Furthermore, we expect a black-box model
C(x), which calculates for a scenario, and a policy x, the projects the cash ows
of this policy to a certain time moment. A set of scenarios S, where s S is
implicitly assumed in the model.
In the matrix X, every element is denoted by x
i
j
X, i M and j N,
where M is the set of the policies and N the set of the attributes of a policy.
The black-box model is described by the function C(x) : R
m
R in which
for every policy x the discounted cash ows are calculated. The objective is to
minimize the CPU time to calculate the present value of the cash ows C(x),
subject to the restriction that the quality of the model points is sucient.
Note that attributes are can be of very dierent types (e.g. dates, amounts,
percentages, etc.) which are all on a dierent scale. In order to compare them in
a later stage, they can be scaled to correct for this. This is done by considering
the maximum and the minimum of the range of an attribute and divide the
value of every attribute minus the minimum value by their respective range.
For the sake of notation we assume the data to be already scaled.
Model point creation could be done in two ways: we could just take a rep-
resentative sample out of the policies and view these as the model points, or we
could use a more sophisticated method by carefully constructing these model
points. We take the approach of carefully constructing the model points, and we
will call this grouping. This is done by aggregating policies in the n-dimensional
space D R
n
.
We will now dene our objective function. Let X

be our set of obtained


model point policies, k M

the index of a model point, where M

is the set
of all model point indices. Furthermore, let the amount of model point policies
be dened as m

= [M

[. Then assuming that the time needed to calculate the


present value of every policys cash ow is a constant t in minutes,
1
we get the
simple objective function:
min t m

(1)
There are of course limits to the amount of policies we can group, since we
still need to ensure that our set X

is a good representation of the original set X.


In other words we do not want the loss of accuracy to be bigger then a certain
amount p R. The next question, how to measure this accuracy loss? In the
end, the present value of the cash ows resulting from the use of the model
1
Note that this needs not to be true in practice. Policies with a longer duration tend to
take longer then policies with a short duration.
7
points or the use of the original data set should be very close to one another.
This implies that the accuracy loss should be measured as the dierence in the
pv of the cash ow calculations. This suggests the following constraint to be
added to the program:
s.t. [

iM
C(x
i
)

iM
C(x
k
)[ p s S (2)
where p can be set company specic. To be able to solve the problem men-
tioned above, we need to know

iM
C(x
i
) which we will call the base run
calculation. Furthermore, we need to construct the set of model points X

and
obtain

kM
C(x
k
), where x
k
is a model point policy. We would also like to
know before we group, in which way we should group, in order to make the error
as small as possible. This is called the estimation of our errors and we denote
them per model point policy as
k
. Which means that there are basically three
actions we need to perform;
1. Calculate the base run (we still need this at rst, to check if our estimation
works)
2. Calculate the estimated errors from the model points as compared to the
base run
3. Calculate the empirical discounted cash ows resulting from the model
points (to check against the base run)
3.2 Minimizing the error induced by making use of model
points
So on which criteria should we group, and what error do we create by grouping
in this way? Can we upper bound this before we even group? Let us rst dene
our groups G
k
, k M

. Suppose that we have created m

groups. Let every


group contain a subset of the policies G
k
X = 1, . . . M , and let every
policy be in at least one group
k
G
k
= 1, . . . , M. Furthermore, let no policy
be in more then one group: G
k
G
k
= , k, k

, k ,= k

. We dene the
averages of the policies in each group as our model points. Then we can express
the distance of a policy to the respective model point, as follows: x x
k
where we dene x
k
= [

iG
k
x
i
1
|G
k
|
. . .

i
G
k
x
i
n
|G
k
|
]. Which is now the vector of
averages of every attribute j over all policies in group k.
Now, how much does the projected present value of the cash ows deviate
as we represent our policy x by a single model point x
k
? To approximate this,
we will make use of the Taylor series expansion. Let us rewrite C(x), by adding
and subtracting the model point x
k
from it.
C(x) = C(x +x
k
x
k
) =
C(x
k
) +
dC(x
k
)
dx
(x x
k
) +
1
2
_
x x
k
_
T
d
2
C(x
k
)
dx
2
(x x
k
) +

q=3
1
q!
dC
(q)
dx
(q)
_
x x
k
_
(q)
(3)
8
where

q=3
1
q!
dC
(q)
dx
(q)
are the q-the order derivatives
2
.
Furthermore the Jacobian is:
dC
dx
=
_
C
x1
,
C
x2
, . . . ,
C
xn
_
and the Hessian,
H =
d
2
C
dx
2
=
_

2
C
x
2
1

2
C
x1x2
. . .

2
C
x1xn

2
C
x2x1

2
C
x
2
2
. . .

2
C
x2xn
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

2
C
xnx1

2
C
xnx2
. . .

2
C
x
2
n
_

_
If we now sum our equation (3) over all policies we get the following formula:

iM
C(x
k
) +
dC(x
k
)
dx

iM
(x
i
x
k
) +
1
2

iM
_
x
i
x
k
_
T
d
2
C(x
k
)
dx
2
(x
i
x
k
) +

iM

q=3
1
q!
dC
(q)
dx
(q)
)
because of the equivalence of the Jacobian, Hessian and higher order derivatives
for every policy i we can take these terms out of the sum.
For simplicity, suppose rst that
1
q!
dC
(q)
dx
(q)
= 0 for q = 2, which means that
we suppose that C(x) is linear, then the following set of equations hold
3
:

iM
C(x
i
) =
N C(x
k
) +
dC(x
k
)
dx

iM
(x
i
x
k
) =
N C(x
k
) +
dC(x)
dx
_

iM
x
i
N

iM
x
i
N
_
. .
0
=
N C(x
k
)
(4)
This states that we do not make any error at all! For grouping this is a really
powerful result, because this means that we can use only one bucket for a specic
attribute that is linear in the present value of its cash ows. In other words, we
can group this attribute away.
Suppose now, that
1
q!
dC
(q)
dx
(q)
,= 0?. If we now rewrite C(x), this gives:
2
Note that this is a non-standard use of a Taylor representation. If we replaced x x
k
by
h we see the familiar Taylor expression. If lim
h0
h is equivalent to an increase in the amount
of model points
3
This implicitly sets all higher order derivatives also equal to 0
9

iM
C(x
i
) =

kM

iG
k
C(x
i
) =
()

kM
[G
k
[C
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

iG
k
x
i
1
|G
k
|

iG
k
x
i
2
|G
k
|
.
.
.

iG
k
x
i
n
|G
k
|
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
+

kM

iG
k
1
2
_
x
i
x
k
_
T
k
H
mp
_
x
i
x
k
_
=

kM
[G
k
[C
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
x
k
1
x
k
2
.
.
.
x
k
m
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
+

kM

iG
k
1
2
_
x
i
x
k
_
T
k
H
mp
_
x
i
x
k
_
where in (*) we used our result from (4). However this is only holds whenever
1
q!
dC
(q)
dx
(q)
= 0 for q = 3. However we will assume from now on, that higher
order eects are negligible, which denes the error that we make to be solely in
the second order derivatives. Note that we can only consider them negligible,
whenever our distance x
i
x
k
, k M

, i G
k
is small.
Considering now only one group k, for this group we can express the error
made as follows:

k
=

iG
k
C(x
i
) [G
k
[C(x
k
)
=

iG
k
_
1
2
_
x
i
x
k
_
T
H
mp
k
_
x
i
x
k
_
_
=

iG
k
1
2
_
x
i
x
k
_
T
_

jN

2
C(x
k
)
x1xj
(x
i
j
x
k
j
)

jN

2
C(x
k
)
x2xj
(x
i
j
x
k
j
)
.
.
.

jN

2
C(x
k
)
xnxj
(x
i
j
x
k
j
)
_

_
Now for j
1
, j
2
N we have

k
=

iG
k

j1N

j2N
1
2

2
C(x
k
)
xj
1
xj
2
(x
ij1
x
k
j1
)(x
ij2
x
k
j2
)
(5)
Suppose now that the cross derivatives are equal to zero

2
C(x
k
)
xj
1
xj
2
= 0, j
1
,=
j
2
, then the error per model point is reduced to:

k
=

iG
k

jN
1
2

2
C(x
k
)
x
2
j
(x
i
j
x
k
j
)
2
This now denes our grouping method. The grouping should be done in the
following way; if

2
C
x
2
j
is large in a certain area, then we need x
i
j
x
k
j
to be small.
This means that we need a lot of groups in those areas where the second order
derivatives are large.
10
But what if the cross derivatives are not equal to zero? By determining the
norm of the Hessian |H| we can dene our grouping method. Let us denote by
|
k
H
mp
| the Hessian evaluated at model point k. If we would calculate |H|
2
we
would have to calculate the eigenvalues of H and consequently solve the system
(H I) u = 0 of linear equations, where u is the eigenvector corresponding to
the eigenvector . Using Cramers rule, this system has only non-trivial solutions
if and only if its determinant vanishes, which means that the solutions are given
by: det (H I) = 0 which is the characteristic equation of H. This however
involves solving polynomial function of order n , p () =

jN
(1)
j
S
j

nj
,
where S
j
are the sums of the principal minors. Since there exist no exact
solutions to this system when n > 4, one has to resort to root nding algorithms
such as Newtons method. In packages such as Mathematica or Matlab, these
algorithms are readily available, but this is very costly and not desirable in
practice. What we can do however, is instead of making use of the 2-norm we
can use the norm, |H|

= max
jN

N
[H
jj
[
4
, where j are the rows in
H and j

the columns, H
jj
the element of H in row j and column j

. This is
an easy calculation and can therefore be done in practice. We can now upper
bound the error by

k

|
k
H
mp
|

iG
k

j1N

j2N
_
x
ij1
x
k
j1
_ _
x
ij2
x
k
j2
_
k M

(6)
which states again that we should create more buckets whenever the innity
norm is bigger. We can see that whenever our function C(x) is linear in its
attribute j, the innity norm equals zero, and again, one bucket suces.
3.3 Numerical model point creation
Before we move on, we will rst solve some practical issues with the method in
Section 3.2. So far we have assumed that the function C(x) is known and we have
shown that, whenever we know this function we can analytically dierentiate it.
Furthermore, we can obtain a grouping strategy, as well as an upper bound on
the error made as we have shown in equation (6). However, we do not always
have access to this function. Therefore we will also dene a numerical way to
obtain a grouping strategy.
3.3.1 Grid construction
To obtain information about the function C(x), we need to explore the function
over the range of the attributes. In order to do so we create a grid. We will call
this grid our exploration grid. We call it exploration grid to avoid confusion
later on, when we describe the creation of the model points in Section 3.3.3.
The exploration grid is measuring the value of C(x) at dierent values of x
j
over the range of every attribute j. Constructing such a grid can be a time
4
If cross derivatives are 0 we simply have only the diagonal elements of H as every sum
11
consuming task, especially if we want it to be very precise. We discus this in
Appendix A.1. This however is a one time only investment. Whenever we know
the landscape where our function C(x) lives we do not have to perform this
action again. In this paper we assume that we have created a grid in a nested
way as in Appendix A.1. Denote by L the set of grid points and let a single grid
point be denoted by l L. The amount of grid points is now [L[. These grid
points are then constructed by dening per attribute j an amount of buckets b
e
j
,
which we will call our exploration buckets. The feasible range per attribute j
is now divided in b
e
j
buckets. This implies a division of the space D in an equal
amount of hypercubes [L[ =

jN
b
e
j
, which we index by l L. Then D
l
is a
hypercube, where
l
D
l
= D and D
l

D
l
= , l ,= l

, l, l

L. In Appendix
A.1, we describe two grid construction methods. For more advanced grids we
refer to [10], where an adaptive grid is discussed.
If we move back to our Hessian H, as discussed in Section 3.2, it now has
to be evaluated in l points. Each point is now the center of a hypercube D
l
.
Let us distinguish between those Hessians by introducing the notation
l
H
e
for
the exploration Hessian evaluated in grid point l. Since we need to numer-
ically compute the Hessian by using the central dierence formula, we need
to evaluate the function C(x), 3 times (C(x
1
, . . . , x
j
, . . . , x
n
), C(x
1
, . . . , x
j
+

j
, . . . , x
m
), C(x
1
, . . . , x
j

j
, . . . , x
n
)) per entry of
l
H
e
. This means that for
every
l
H
e
, being a symmetric n n matrix, we need to call C(x), 3
n(n+1)
2
times. In total this makes [L[3
n(n+1)
2
function calls. Whenever we construct
such a grid, this should really be taken into consideration, since the amount of
function calls becomes very large, even for a small number of grid points.
3.3.2 Determining the amount of buckets
Let us now dene the maximum for every attribute j over all grid points l
in
l
H
e
, l L, by h
e
j
= max
lL

N
[
l
H
e
jj
[, j N. We can now put all
these h
e
j
in a column vector h
e
R
n
. The most important attribute is now the
attribute

j corresponding to the value |h
e
|

. Note that this value is equal to


max
lL
|
l
H
e
|. The vector h
e
denes our grouping structure. First we set the
amount of buckets for attribute

j, the amount of buckets for the other attributes
is now determined, based on their relative value of h
e
j
, j ,=

j compared to h
e

j
.
Let b
mp
j
denote the amount of model point buckets for attribute j. Then we
can calculate b
mp
j
by using the following formula b
mp
j
= b
mp

j
h
e
j
h
e

j
|, j N

j,
where [0, 1] is some parameter that should be chosen in any way to adjust
for the amount of buckets b
mp
j
. Note that the amount of buckets b
mp
j
, j N
can never be more then b
mp

j
.
3.3.3 Creating the model points
The amount of buckets for every attribute j can be spread in various ways over
the range of every attribute. We could spread them evenly for every attribute j,
or be somewhat more sophisticated and let the population distribution decide
12
on the cut-o points. Dividing the range of every attribute j in any way, we
obtain

jN
b
mp
j
hypercubes in the R
n
. Note that some of these hypercubes
may not contain any policies. We will not create any model points in empty
sets, which means that the amount of model points constructed in such a way
is m



j
b
mp
j
, where k is the model point of G
k
, just as in Section 3.2.
Whenever the amount of model points is considered to be too large, one should
decrease b
mp

j
and recompute b
mp
j
, j ,=

j until the desired amount of groups k
is formed.
3.3.4 Assigning the policies to the model points
The next step is to assign to every policy i a group G
k
. This is done by checking
if the policy is within the range of group G
k
in every dimension n. Once we
know i M, its group i G
k
, we can compute the nal model point policies
x
k
, k M

as follows: x
k
=
_

iG
k
x
i
1
|G
k
|
. . .

iG
k
x
i
n
|G
k
|
_
T
, k M

3.3.5 Estimating the errors


To estimate the errors made by using the model points we can use the formula
introduced in (6). However we need to evaluate |
k
H
mp
|

, k M

to obtain
an exact upper bound on the error made by our grouping strategy. This involves
again calling the function C(x), m

3
n(n+1)
2
times. Note that this is no
problem whenever m

is small (this is what we are trying to achieve anyhow).


However, whenever m

is considered to be too large, we can also get an ap-


proximation on the upper bound by considering the values of |
l
H
e
|

, l L,
which we have already calculated. This means that this does not cost any ex-
tra function calls. We can approximate this, by considering the distance from
the model point to every grid point (x
l
x
k
), and use either the maximum or
the closest |
l
H
e
|. Another, somewhat more sophisticated method, would use
interpolation techniques as in [1]. We will describing an interpolation method
by looking at the grid points that are the closest in every direction. So in our
dimension n we have 2
n
closest grid points, because in every dimension we have
two ways in which we can go. These will all be incorporated for the estimation
of |
k
H
mp
|

, by considering their relative distance from x


k
. Let all closest grid
points to k be denoted by l
z
L where z = 1, . . . , 2
n
|
k
H
mp
|


|
l1
H
e
|

(x
l1
x
k
) +. . . +|
l
2
n
H
e
|

(x
l
2
n
x
k
)

2
n
z=1
(x
lz
x
k
)
Of course since this is only an indication, it cannot guarantee a certain amount
of error, but is still important from a practical view.
13
4 A real life example
4.1 Describing the product
The product of focus, is a so called lijfrente polis, and the policies that we will
look at are already in force. The product consists of a single premium payment,
the policies are already in-force. When a policy is in-force, it is means that policy
holder is currently insured. We make a picture at a certain time moment and
look at which policies are captured by the interval between the start date
and end date
5
. This implicitly means that the premium payment has already
occurred and we will therefore only look at cash outows. The payment takes
place at the start date and the amount is equal to the grosspremium. For
some reason, this is not available in the database and the grosspremium is
calculated by discounting the insured amount. The insurance company invests
the grosspremium in stocks and bonds and while doing this it guarantees a
return on the clients investment equal to an interest rate over the rst ve
years and another interest rate over the rest of the period. For this product,
there are three types of benets for the insured: the surrender, death, and the
maturity benet.
Surrendering means that you have the option of withdrawing money in be-
tween. Whenever someone surrenders, the surrender value that he wishes to
withdraw will be used to buy an immediate annuity. The market value of this
immediate annuity is scenario dependent and will be paid out as the surrender
benet. The minimal annuity duration is based on the age and sex of the pol-
icy holder which is looked up on a specic table. The surrender cash ow is
now the total discounted value of all future annuity payments. The probability
associated with a surrender is scenario dependent.
Furthermore we have a death benet which is equal to the insured amount.
This is the money that is paid in case of death.
Finally the product has a maturity benefit which is equal to part of the
insured amount. The maturity benet is the money you get upon expiration
of the policy.
Annuities that were already in-force were also in our data set. However,
given annuities are modeled deterministically, and therefore not dependent on
scenarios we do not consider them. Furthermore, there were 500 scenarios for
which we did not know the rationale behind, nor the likelihood of the occurrence
of the scenarios.
4.2 Selecting the attributes
The rst thing we need to do is get a feeling for the attributes before we can
compute our Hessian. What are they, and on what scale are they projected?
This becomes really important whenever we will disturb them with our
j
.
In our model there exist 32 policy attributes which we have to examine. We
should be careful here, as some of them are not real valued (e.g. product type).
5
Attributes are denoted in monospace
14
Therefore, this is why we will look at a specic product type. Some other
attributes have only a few outcomes over the range of the attribute which means
there is not much grouping to be done. There also exist a lot of attributes that
are calculated by the model, and attributes that are not used for our specic
product. So at rst we will produce the descriptive statistics of some of the
attributes in Table 1. According to these statistics we can get a broad idea on
which attributes it might be interesting to group. We can already specify one
on which we will not group: sex, since it only has two possible values, which
are integers. After a thorough investigation in the total set of attributes, we
concluded with ve attributes that where thought to be the main determinants.
All others where either dependent on those ve or, were considered to be critical,
which means that they will not be grouped upon. The resulting attributes are
presented below:
1. date of birth
2. start date
3. end date
4. insured amount
5. interest
4.3 Exploring the function
Now that we have found our set of interesting variables we want to measure their
inuence on the projected cash ow under every scenario. For this, will follow
our method as described in Section 3.3 we will construct a grid with virtual
policies. It is virtual in the sense that the policies do not come from the data
set X. They are made using the feasible input range for every attribute. This
feasible input range is assumed to accompany every program. In our program
however, we did not have this feasible input range and we constructed these by
looking at the descriptive statistics of the data set. In Table 1 we present these
statistics. The feasible input range of an attribute is now determined by the
dierence between the maximum and the minimum value of an attribute.
There exist various options to create such a grid and we discuss two methods
in Appendix A.1. Let us rst consider a nested grid. This would require at
least 2 3
n
amount of function calls, when we consider only 2 grid points per
attribute (one in its minimum and one in the maximum, and disturbing them
all with a + and a ). For n = 5 this is already 7776 calls of C(x). Since
a policy takes on average 70 seconds to calculate on our hardware, this would
take more then 6 days to calculate. This was considered to be too long for us.
Therefore we use a sequential grid construction, which means that for every
attribute we move from its minimum to its maximum in 10 steps and set all
other interesting parameters equal to their averages. These are then the virtual
policies. We are aware of the fact that we lose a lot of accuracy in this way
and we can only hope that the averages are a good representative of the whole
15
function. This also means that we have only one entry in the matrix H(x
l
)l L
, which is the second order partial derivative with respect to the attribute on
the corresponding axis where we created our grid. This is immediately the
norm of the matrix
l
H
e
, l L. Before we continue, we should check if the
constructed grids represent feasible combinations of the attributes. This means
that no start date can fall after an end date or that the date of birth of
a person should be before the start date of a policy.
After constructing the grid points, we can put them one by one in the model
and obtain the resulting discounted cash ows for every scenario.
4.4 Interpreting the function
Now that we have projected the cash ows for every virtual policy for 500
scenarios we will rst investigate the cash ow movement over the ten grid
points. We will look at scenario 1, which we plotted in Figure 2.
A rst step is interpreting these graphs. Starting with the cash ows for
the date of birth, we see that the later you are born the more negative the
projected cash ow becomes. This can be explained by the fact that the later
you were born, the younger you are now and the longer you are expected to
live. The insured amount is build up of two components, the death benefit
insured amount and the surrender benefit insured amount. The relation
between the death benefit and the surrender benefit is on average 1 : 4,
which makes the surrender benefit the strongest determinant of projected
cash ows. Once you have died, there will not be any possibility to surrender.
This means that, the longer you live the more surrender benefit you will get,
and maybe in addition even the death benefit.
The start date is uctuating a lot and one can hardly tell what the drivers
behind this function are. However, if we look at the scale, it is not an interesting
variable at all. We can therefore simply put this attribute in one bucket without
making a signicant error.
Looking at the end date, we see that when we move our end date to a later
time moment, the cash ow is also increasing, which means that the liability is
decreasing (the cash ows are all negative). Because we expected the liability
to increase when a policy has longer duration the result is really counter intu-
itive. However looking at the actuarial model, it can easily be explained. By
shifting the end date to a later time moment, we are increasing the duration.
When investment premium is calculated, it makes use of the insured amount,
the duration and the interest rate. Discounting the insured amount at
the same interest rate over a longer term, results in a lower investment
premium. In turn, the investment premium is used to calculate the possible
amount of surrender cash ows, which is now of course lower.
Considering the insured amount we see a linear relationship between at the
chosen grid points between the project cash ows and the insured amount.
However, this is only an expectation, the function may still uctuate in between
the grid points. However when making the buckets, we expect that we can put
this attribute in one bucket without making any signicant error.
16
Discounting with higher interest rate will result in a lower investment
premium, which again causes the discounted cash ows will be lower.
What we can see from these functions is that they are either monotonically
increasing or monotonically decreasing except for the start date, which was
not considered important because of its scale. However, if the scale would have
been very large the amount of buckets needed would be very big which would
cause issues. However, all the functions seem to be not that far from linearity
and we therefore do not expect large errors at all, even if we will group them
all in one large model point (we will further discuss this in Section 4.6).
To estimate our second order partial derivatives for every attribute we use
the central dierence formula. The graphs are presented in Figure 3. If we look
at them, one can rst of all see, that all second order derivatives ar not far
from zero which means linearity. Since we did not know the whole cash ow
function, the function like end date might uctuate a little bit in between. This
can simply be seen as numerical noise. Using the recipe presented in Section
3.3, we can take the maximum second order partial derivative for every grid
point and take the maximum of these to determine the amount of buckets for
the attribute. The results are presented in Table 3, where they are all sorted
according to importance. We now see that the end date is considered the
most important attribute. Setting the amount of buckets for the end date,
automatically induces the amount of buckets for the other attributes as dened
in Section 3.3.2.
4.5 Generating model points
Until now, we have not yet used any policy data. The projected cash ow
functions were solely based on the feasible range of the attributes as discussed
in Section 4.3. The policy data that we will use is from an existing insurance
company. However for privacy and computational reasons we have modied the
data. We will now make use of these policies for the bucketing of the attributes,
by spreading the population evenly over the buckets as described in Section
3.3.2. In Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) we developed a script
to produce a cumulative distribution function which gave us our cut-o points
for the buckets at 1/b
j
. Now that we have set our buckets, we need to nd out
which policies are in a certain group. We will do this by using the method as
described in Section 3.3.4. For this we again used VBA by checking if a policy
is within the range of every buckets cut-o points and code every policy with a
group number. The model points are now the averages of every attribute over
the policies within the group.
4.6 Results
We will rst produce a base run, where we calculate the cash ow by using all
single policies. In our resulting data set we have 243 policies. The important
statistics we need are the calculation time and the resulting present value per
17
scenario. We will present them in Table 2. As shown in Table 2 calculating the
cash ows for all single policies took 160 minutes.
4.6.1 Grouping
To show our method at work, we will explain stepwise what we can achieve.
Table 3 is produced as described in Section 3.3.2, from which we can see that
the end date requires the most groups. We will initially set the end date to 3
groups which gives the date of birth 2 groups and the amount insured and the
interest rate only 1 according to our formula in 3.3.2. Therefore we go from
243 individual policies to 6 model point policies. However, let us start bottom up
to show the algorithm at work. We start by grouping the insured amount in one
model point. Since this attribute looked linear we do not expect any error, apart
from the error that we made by assuming that the cross derivatives are zero.
When grouping this attribute away we could decrease the amount of policies by
a factor 3, i.e. 243 policies to only 81 model point policies. Computation times
dropped from over 2.4 hours to only 62 minutes. If we now look at our cash
ow deviation, we still have an accuracy of 99.9995% which is in line with our
theory.
Now, as we have seen, we can eliminate the start date attribute since it
does not contribute much to the discounted cash ow. When doing this, we
actually also group this one away and set the value equal to its average. A
reduction of 3 is again made i.e. 81 model point policies to 27. Our accuracy
lowers slightly but we are still 99.83% accurate. Solving this took only 20
minutes.
The interest rate is then grouped in one bucket which leaves us with only
9 model point policies. Computation times are now only 7 minutes and, quite
unexpectedly, the accuracy is only 97.15 %, which is still fair for most life insur-
ers since they are aiming for an accuracy in between 95% and 98%. The result
was unexpected given that the interest rate looked linear. However, recall
that we only gained very local insight by assuming that the cross derivatives
are zero and that we have at every grid point only the second order partial
derivative in one direction. Although the interest rate is nearly linear on
this local part of the hyperplane, it uctuates more elsewhere.
Therefore we will see if perhaps the date of birth should have been next
on the list instead of the interest rate. When now grouping, in addition to
insured amount and start date, the date of birth in one model point, we are
98.25 % accurate. This is also unexpected but can be explained by the weakness
of our local grid (see Appendix A.1)
However, let us continue in the way that our algorithm predicted. In the
end, this leaves us with 6 model points which are 95.91 % accurate. This took
only 3.3 minutes. Therefore, what would happen if we would group them all in 1
model point? Doing this, leaves us still with 95.72 % of accuracy. Again we are
5
All runs where performed on an IBM Lenovo T61 with Intel T7500 Core 2 Duo 2.2
GHz Processor with 2.0 Gb of RAM. Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications was run on the
Windows XP operating System.
18
confronted with the limited reliability of the local insight of a sequential grid.
The function C(x) seems to be very at and does not seem to uctuate very
much over the whole domain. As insurance companies really do have trouble
grouping policies while maintaining accuracy, this is generally not the case as.
It could be due to the chosen product or the restriction on the input parameters.
It was however not very well suited for demonstration purpose of our method.
4.6.2 Approximate deviation from the base run
For the insured amount we looked at the error that we can predict by grouping
them all in one model point. By using the interpolation method as described
in Section 3.3.5 our model estimates an accuracy of 99.999999% which is higher
than the actual accuracy as we can see in Table 3. Although this does not look
too bad as compared to the 99.9995%, one has to put this in perspective to the
total error range we are looking at. We will never make a higher error than
95.72% since this is the error made when we group all policies in one model
point. Again, we can not be conclusive and the lack of a good grid disturbs the
outcomes.
19
5 Conclusion and future work
In this paper we have provided a solution to estimate the error induced by the
usage of model points, a solution to a problem that insurance companies were
not even aware of. They estimated the errors of their grouping strategy based
on an outdated base run. We have shown how we can correctly upper bound
these errors without having to calculate the base run again.
Furthermore we have dened a way how insurance companies could group
their policies. Whenever a linear attribute is encountered it can be grouped
away, without making any error at all. If an attribute is non-linear, it should be
grouped according to the Hessian in a certain area of the domain of the function
that discounts the cash ows.
Even if the exact analytical function is not available, we have shown numer-
ical ways to group the policies. We made use of grids to explore the function
that calculates the present value of the cash ows. These exploration grids do
consume a lot of time, however if one is willing to make the one time only invest-
ment of exploring this function, we can upper bound the error made. Moreover,
if one does not want to invest too much in the construction of the grid we can
still provide an approximate upper bound.
For a simple but real life example we have illustrated the method. We have
shown the tradeo and drawbacks of a fast local exploration of the landscape,
by making use of the sequential grid versus a slow nested grid construction. The
slightly weak results can be attributed to the unfortunate choice of the product
and lack of computing power for a good grid.
Improvements can be made by better distributing the buckets over an at-
tribute. This could be done by distributing them depending on the Hessian over
the range of the attribute, instead of uniformly distributing them. Considering
the grids, a more sophisticated grid such as an adaptive one, may be of great
help. However, if we know the analytical function we might not need to use the
exploration grids at all and we can perfectly upper bound the errors. The exact
calculations can be performed by making use of software such as Mathematica
or Maple.
There is still a lot of work to be done in this area, however a rst step has
been made which can greatly benet insurance companies.
20
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[5] Hans U. Gerber. Life Insurance Mathematics. Springer, 1997.
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21
A Appendix
A.1 Gridconstruction
When we do not have an analytical model, we rely on numerical methods. To
gain insight in our cash ow function in order to later construct the Hessian, we
need to know the value of C(x) evaluated at dierent points. A correct grid can
only be constructed when we can isolate an attribute. This means we need to x
all attributes at a value except for one which we let increase over its range in a
certain number of steps depending on the chosen grid size. We can do this for all
attributes. However we need to check that the policies generated in this fashion
are feasible. This means that no end date can fall before a start date, etc.
6
. There are a many ways to construct such a grid, see [10], but we will present
two ways; sequential and nested grid construction. A nested grid construction
considers all possible combinations of the attribute values. On the contrary a
sequential grid construction calculates a grid per attribute, while xing the other
attributes at a certain value. Therefore set obtained by calculating sequential
grid points is actually a subset of the nested version. Although the nested
version is far more accurate, the computational complexity is overwhelming [1].
6
If we let our grid size go to we have the exact n-dimensional landscape
22
Algorithm A.1: Sequential grid construction(C(x))

j
= [0 . . . 0
j
0 . . . 0]
T
for r 0 to [R[
do
_

_
x
r1
= min
i
x
i
1
+r
maxi x
i
1
mini x
i
1
|R|
x
r2
= x
2
, x
r3
= x
3
, . . . , x
rn
= x
n
C(x
r
)
C(x
r
+
1
)
C(x
r

1
)
for r 0 to [R[
do
_

_
x
r2
= min
i
x
2
+r
maxi x2mini x2
|R|
x
r1
= x
1
, x
r3
= x
3
, . . . , x
rn
= x
n
C(x
r
)
C(x
r
+
2
)
C(x
r

2
)
.
.
.
for r 0 to [R[
do
_

_
x
rn
= min
i
x
i
n
+r
maxi x
i
n
mini x
i
n
|R|
x
r1
= x
1
, x
r2
= x
2
, . . . , x
r,n1
= x
n1
C(x
r
)
C(x
r
+
n
)
C(x
r

n
)
As illustration, let R be the set of buckets for every attribute j, and r R
a bucket. Consider then constructing [R[ buckets for every attribute j. This
will construct in total [R[
n
(1+2n) policies which is exponential in its attribute.
Suppose now that the time to compute the cash ow of one policy is t seconds.
The nested grid construction, as described above, will take t [R[
n
(1 + 2n)
seconds. To visualize this consider 4 attributes, for which we would like to
to compute 10 grid points, and the time to compute a single policy on this
computer is 70 seconds. This would take about 72 days to compute. For the
purpose of this paper, this was considered to be too long and we will look at the
sequential grid which takes (3 nt [R[) seconds and is a factor
|R|
n1
(1+2n)
3n
faster.
For the nested version we need to make a choice at what point to x the other
attributes. For now we will x them to be their averages, but we are well aware
that this might not be the correct choice. In addition the few points created in
23
the sequential loops only give very local insight in the true n dimensional space.
Algorithm A.2: Nested grid construction(C(x))
for r
1
0 to [R[
do
_

_
x
r11
= min
i
x
i
1
+r
1

maxi x
i
1
mini x
i
1
|R|
for r
2
0 to [R[
do
_

_
x
r22
= min
i
x
i
2
+r
2

maxi x
i
2
mini x
i
2
|R|
.
.
.
for r
n
0 to [R[
do
_

_
x
rnn
= min
i
x
i
n
+r
n

maxi x
i
n
mini x
i
n
|R|
C(x
r1,1
, x
r2,2
, . . . , x
rn,n
)
C(x
r1,1
+
1
, x
r2,2
, . . . , x
rn,n
)
.
.
.
C(x
r1,1
, x
r2,2
, . . . , x
rn,n
+
n
)
C(x
r1,1

1
, x
r2,2
, . . . , x
rn,n
)
.
.
.
C(x
r1,1
, x
r2,2
, . . . , x
rn,n

n
)
Faster hardware or splitting the workload over multiple processing units
could help speeding up the computation times for the grid construction, however
this still does not reduce the exponential n which is the main determinant for
the long runtime. The bottom line is that one should really make use of adaptive
grids.
24
A.2 Notations
1. D = [0, 1]
n
: the n-dimensional space in which the scaled function C(x)
lives
2. M = 1, . . . , m: represents the policies, where i M is a policy
3. M

= 1, . . . , m

: represents the model point policies, where k M

is
a model point
4. N = 1, . . . , n: represents the policy attributes, where j N is an
attribute
5. L: represents the grid points, where l L is a grid point
6. G
k
: group of policies represented by model point k
G
k
M, G
k
G
k
= ,
k
G
k
= M, k, k

7. x R
n
: a generic policy consisting of n attributes
8. x
i
R
n
: a specic policy i
9. x
k
R
n
model point policy k,
10. x
i
j
[0, 1]: the value of attribute j for policy i
11. C(x) : R
n
R: the function which discounts the future cash ows of
policy x
12. b
e
j
: the amount of buckets for attribute j in the exploration grid
13. b
mp
j
: the amount of buckets for attribute j in the model point grid

jN
b
mp
j
m

14. H R
nn
: the general Hessian
15. H
j
R
n
: the j-th row in H
16. H
jj
R: the element at row j and column j

of the Hessian
17. |H|

R: the norm of the Hessian


18.
l
H
e
R: the Hessian evaluated in exploration grid point l
19.
k
H
mp
R: the Hessian evaluated in model point k
20. h
e
j
R = max
lL

N
l
H
jj
: the maximum sum over the rows in every
exploration grid point l, for every attribute j
21. h
e
R
n
= [h
e
1
h
e
2
. . . h
e
m
]
T
22. |h
e
|

= |H|

R: the maximum value in the vector h


e
25
A.3 Figures
Grouped
policies
Individual
policies
Model
point
genera
tor
C(X)
Grouped cash
flows
Baserun cash
flows
Compare
Estimate
the
error
Figure 1: An overview of the structure
26
-100000
-95000
-90000
-85000
-80000
-75000
-70000
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Date of birth
Date of birth
94304 66
94115,3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Startdate
94872,76
94683,4
94494,03
94304,66
Startdate
60000
40000
20000
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Enddate
160000
140000
120000
100000
80000 Enddate
-1400000
-1200000
-1000000
-800000
-600000
-400000
-200000
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Insured amount
Insured amount
-110000
-105000
-100000
-95000
-90000
-85000
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Interest
Interest
Figure 2: cash ows for 5 dierent attributes
27
-0,0004
-0,0002
0
0,0002
0,0004
0,0006
0,0008
0,001
0,0012
0,0014
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Date of birth
Date of birth
-0,008
-0,006
-0,004
-0,002
0
0,002
0,004
0,006
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
End date
End date
-4E-14
-3E-14
-2E-14
-1E-14
0
1E-14
2E-14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Insured amount
Insured amount
-0,02
-0,018
-0,016
-0,014
-0,012
-0,01
-0,008
-0,006
-0,004
-0,002
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Interest rate
Interest rate
Figure 3: 2nd order partial derivative for 4 dierent attributes
28
A.4 Tables
Parameter Nr Of Dif-
ferent Val-
ues
Min Max Average
date of birth 2137 16-8-1933 31-12-1975 26-11-1952
sex 2 0 1 -
start date 1156 5-4-1995 23-6-2007 36679
end date 1469 22-7-2009 21-6-2037 43254
insured amount 2505 1086 213292 2911885
interest rate 1327 0 0.08552 0.065022
Table 1: Descriptive statistics
Accuracy (%) Time
(s)
Number
Of
Poli-
cies
buckets
date
of
birth
start
date
end
date
insured
amount
ih
100 9655 243 - - - - -
99.9995 3718 81 - - - 1 -
99.83 1194 27 - 1 - 1 -
97.19 415 9 - 1 - 1 1
98.25 285 9 1 1 - 1 -
95.9153 200 6 2 1 3 1 1
95.72 9 1 1 1 1 1 1
Table 2: Results
Attribute h
e
end date 431257.4164
date of birth 305609
interest 1.2607455
insured amount 0.098635801
Table 3: Maximal second order partial derivatives (scaled)
29