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AP French Syllabus

Overview The AP French course is designed to fulfill the following curricular requirements of the College Board AP Program: CR 1: The teacher uses French almost exclusively in class and encourages students to do likewise. CR 2: Instructional materials include a variety of authentic audio and video recordings and authentic written texts such as newspaper and magazine articles, as well as literary texts. CR 3: The course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their proficiency in spoken and written Interpersonal Communication in a variety of situations in the Intermediate to Pre-Advanced* range. CR 4: The course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their ability in Interpretive Communication to understand and synthesize information from a variety of authentic audio, visual, audio-visual, written and print resources. CR 5: The course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their proficiency in spoken and written Presentational Communication in the Intermediate to Pre-Advanced* range. CR 6:The course incorporates interdisciplinary topics and explicitly addresses all six course themes: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics. CR 7: The course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate an understanding of the products, practices and perspectives of the target cultures. CR 8:The course provides opportunities for students to make comparisons between and within languages and cultures. Resources AP French: Preparing for the Language Examination (2nd Edition), Richard Ladd and Colette Girard, Scott Foresman /Addison Wesley,1998. Une fois pour toutes, (Deuxime edition ) Longman, Allons au-del!, Richard Ladd, Pearson, 2012. Websites: see attached list at end of syllabus.

Objectives to develop comprehension of written, spoken and audio-visual materials to increase spontaneity in interpersonal communication, both spoken and written to enhance cultural awareness and encourage comparisons to review and solidify grammar concepts to develop new vocabulary, specifically related to the six themes of the course.

Approach The basic approach for this course has been developed according to the backward curriculum design presented by Linda Quinn Allen in her article: Designing Curricula for Student Language Performance, published in The French Review, Vol. 82, No. 6, May 2009. According to this method, each unit centers around a specific theme, and works from original source materials, through interpersonal reflections and critique, toward a final product that demonstrates comprehension and integration. Since this course is offered during the same hour as French 4, the teachers attention is divided between the two classes, and the small group of AP students must work independently at least 50% of the time. During direct instructional time, the teacher will speak almost exclusively in French and require students to do likewise. During the independent time, students will be required to selfevaluate their consistency in speaking only French. The class participation grade will be based on the extent to which a student abides by this requirement of the course. One major project is required for each theme. An outline of each project, with approximate time frame, follows. Work toward these projects will be carried out primarily during class time. Regular homework will be assigned in Allons audel! in accordance with the current theme. A recommended time frame is indicated for each theme. The remaining weeks (Term 2, weeks 10-14 prior to the exam) will be dedicated to intensive review and consideration of selections from Allons au-del! which were not previously covered. As students engage in each project, the suggested contexts will be divided among them, so as to cover all aspects of the theme. At the end of each project,

students will reflect on the essential questions in a formal essay that will summarize the class work on each of the given themes. For first four of these essays, they may use their personal vocabulary lists and any notes they have taken during the project. For the last two themes, they will be required to write without aids. Une fois pour toutes will be used during teacher-directed class time for grammar review. Students will develop a personal vocabulary enrichment list, compiled from reading authentic material for the projects and selected from new words in assigned homework from Allons au del.

Outline of the Course: Theme #1: Global Challenges / Les dfis mondiaux (Term 1 -Weeks 1-5) Recommended Contexts: Diversity Issues / La tolrance Economic Issues / Lconomie Environmental Issues / Lenvironnement Health Issues / La sant Human Rights / Les droits de ltre humain Nutrition and Food Safety / Lalimentation

Peace and War / La paix et la guerre Overarching Essential Questions: What environmental, political, and social issues propose to societies throughout the world? What are the origins of those issues? What are possible solutions to those challenges?

challenges

Integrated Performance Assessment: Communication Tasks: Interpretive communication - locate print texts Interpersonal communication - share summary statements and discuss together the relative importance of each theme among the current global challenges

Presentational Writing - persuasive essay Presentational Speaking - 2-minute speech to secure a TED grant for the area chosen as the most crucial element among the current global challenges.)

Outline of the Project: Students will find one current news article for each of the subjects listed under Global Challenges. (Each student will choose one subject.) Students will create a list of essential new vocabulary discovered in the article. Students will write a persuasive summary statement based on the article, suggesting that this issue is the most critical element among the current global challenges. Students will read their summary statements to other members of the class and compare views on the relative importance of each issue. Based on other students presentations, as well as the individual students research, each individual will select one of the themes/issues as the most critical element among current global challenges. Based on this choice, each student will write a persuasive essay arguing the critical nature of the chosen issue. Student will make use of resources from other students as well as his/her own. Essays will be recorded live and posted as podcasts on the class website. Students will condense their essay into a 2-minute persuasive speech, proposing an idea/solution pitched at a possible TED grant (Model speeches are subtitled in French on the website TED.com.) This speech will be filmed and posted as a Quicktime video on the class website. Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 1 Points de depart / Les verbes pp. 1-16 Leon 2 Les temps du pass (I. II, III) pp. 20-27 Leon 2 Les temps du pass (IV, V, VI) pp. 29-37

Additional resources as time allows: Selections from 7 jours sur la plante, recorded from TV5monde ******** California State Standards addressed in this project:

Content (Level IV) Students address complex, concrete, factual, and abstract topics related to the immediate and external environment, including: f. l. International environmental issues Issues of world hunger and health

Communications (Level IV) Produce and present a complex written, and/or oral product in a culturally authentic way. Structures (Level IV) 4.1 Use extended discourse (native-like text structure) to produce formal communications.

Theme #2 - Science and Technology / La science et la technologie (Term 1 - Weeks 69) Recommended Contexts: Current Research Topics / La recherche et ses nouvelles frontieres Discoveries and Inventions / Les decouvertes et les inventions Ethical Questions / Les choix moraux Future Technologies / Lavenir de la technologie Intellectual Property / La propriete intellectuelle The New Media / Les nouveaux moyens de communication Social Impact of Technology / La technologie et ses effets sur la societe Overarching Essential Questions: How do developments in science and technology affect our lives? What factors have driven innovation and discovery in the fields of science and technology? What role does ethics play in scientific advancement? Integrated Performance Assessment: Communication Tasks: Interpretive communication-locate video or podcast Interpersonal communication create essential vocabulary list and summarize for discussion with classmates

Presentational Writing create an original drama Presentational Speaking filming of the drama

Outline of the Project: Students will find a video file or podcast in French for one of the context/theme areas listed above. Students will summarize the basic information in the file, make a list of unfamiliar vocabulary for their classmates and share findings with classmates. Students will discuss the issues raised in each of the clips and compile a list of implications for a middle-class family living in the year 2030. Students will create a scene from a soap-opera-type drama in which the members of the family will reference the current technological elements and the implications (positive and negative) for their lives. Drama will be filmed using Flip camera and transformed into a movie in Movie Maker. The final production will be presented to the French 4 class.

Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 3 Les temps du futur et du conditionnel (I., II, III,) pp. 38-41 Leon 3 Les temps du futur et du conditionnel (IV, V,) pp. 42-47 Leon 3 Les temps du futur et du conditionnel (VI, VII) pp. 47-49

California State Standards addressed in this project: Content 4.0 Students acquire information, recognize distinctive viewpoints, and further their knowledge of other disciplines. 4.1 o. Students address complex, concrete, factual, and abstract topics related to the immediate and external environment, including: The promise and challenge of technology

Communication 4.2 Interpret written or spoken language.

4.3 4.5

Present to an audience of listeners, readers. Demonstrate understanding of the main ideas and most details in authentic texts.

4.6 Produce and present a complex written, oral, or signed (ASL) product in a culturally authentic way. Culture 4.0 4.1 Students improvise appropriate responses to unpredictable situations. Demonstrate culturally appropriate use of products, practices, and perspectives to others.

Settings 4.0 Students use language in informal and formal settings.

Theme #3: Contemporary Life / La vie contemporaine (Term 1 - Weeks 10-14) Recommended Contexts: Advertising and Marketing / La publicit et le marketing Education / Leducation et lenseignement Holidays and Celebrations / Les ftes Housing and Shelter / Le logement Leisure and Sports / Les loisirs et le sport Professions / Le monde du travail Rites of Passage / Les rites de passage Travel / Les voyages Overarching Essential Questions: How do societies and individuals define quality of life? How is contemporary life influenced by cultural products, practices, and perspectives? What are the challenges of contemporary life? Integrated Performance Assessment: Communication Tasks: Interpretive communication - locate contemporary song or rap Interpersonal communication share lyrics and theme with classmates Presentational Writing collaboratively create an original rap or song Presentational Speaking record song or rap

Outline of the Project: Students will find a current popular song or rap that deals with a selected issue of contemporary life. (all will be assigned) Students will translate the lyrics and write a paragraph linking the message of the song to the issue. In groups of four, students will collaborate to write an original song or rap relating to one of the issues of contemporary life. Songs will be recorded as an MTV-type video.

Additional resources as time allows: Clips from Etre et avoir, and Entre les murs as basis for a discussion of educational methods and current challenges. Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 4 Le subjonctif pp. 53-57 Leon 4 Le subjonctif pp. 57-60 Examen de rvision

#4 - Theme: Personal and Public Identities / La qute de soi (Term 1 - Weeks 15-19) Recommended Contexts: Alienation and Assimilation / Lalination et lassimilation Beliefs and Values / Les croyances et les systmes de valeurs Gender and Sexuality / La sexualit Language and Identity / Lidentit linguistique Multiculturalism / Le pluriculturalisme Nationalism and Patriotism / Le nationalisme et le patriotisme Overarching Essential Questions: How are aspects of identity expressed in various situations? How do language and culture influence identity? How does ones identity develop over time? Interpretive communication-reading of Pierre et Jean (deMaupassant),viewing of modern film adaptation Interpersonal communication discussion/comparison of text/film Presentational Writing reflection personal identity Presentational Speaking Voilcest moi!personal description for

an interview Outline of Project: Students will read the text of Pierre et Jean and view a modernized film adaptation of the story with particular attention to the theme of personal identity. Students will discuss the similarities and differences in the book/film. Students will write a description of their own place/identity in their family structure, academic setting, social network and one other domain (church, workplace,athletics) as part of an application for a position as counselor in a French summer camp for middle school aged children. Students will be interviewed by a native French speaker as the last step in their application.

Additional resources: Selections from the film Paris, je taime, dealing with identity and multiculturalism. Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 5 pp. 67-77 Les pronoms complments et accentus Leon 6 pp. 78-87 Les possessifs et les dmonstratifs

California State Standards addressed in this project: Content 4.1 Students address complex, concrete, factual, and abstract topics related to the immediate and external environment, including: a. e. j. Societal expectations Belief systems Authors and their times

Communications 4.0 Students use extended language (coherent and cohesive multi-paragraph texts). 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.5 Engage in oral, written, or signed (ASL) conversations. Interpret written, spoken, or signed (ASL) language. Present to an audience of listeners, readers, or ASL viewers. Demonstrate understanding of the main ideas and most details in authentic texts.

4.6 Produce and present a complex written, oral, or signed (ASL) product in a culturally authentic way. Culture 4.0 Students improvise appropriate responses to unpredictable situations.

Structures 4.1 Use extended discourse (native-like text structure) to produce formal communications. Settings 4.0 Students use language in informal and formal settings.

#5 - Theme: Families and Communities / La famille et la communaut (Term 2 Weeks 1-5) Recommended Contexts: Age and Class / Les rapports sociaux Childhood and Adolescence / Lenfance et ladolescence Citizenship / La citoyennt Customs and Ceremonies / Les coutumes Family Structures / La famille Friendship and Love / Lamiti et lamour Overarching Essential Questions: What constitutes a family in different societies? How do individuals contribute to the well-being of communities? How do the roles that families and communities assume differ in societies around the world? Interpretive communication- research regarding family support resources in the French and American governmental systems Interpersonal communication Class sharing of findings Presentational Writing Brochure/communiqu for new citizens Presentational Speaking Notes for a conversation with congressional representative

Outline of the Project Students will research the ways in which the French government supports family

systems, including prenatal care (and maternity leave), health maintenance resources, major illness or injury provisions, elder care. Students will compare these findings with similar resources in the U.S. (particularly California). Students will share findings in a particular area with classmates and pool resources. As a group, students will prepare a summary communiqu/brochure for new citizens. Students will prepare notes for a podcast presentation directed to their congressional representative, recommending elements of the French system to be adopted by the U.S. (California in particular)

Additional resources: (World Health Organization http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/135809/E94856.pdf) Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 7 pp. 88-97 Les expressions interrogatives Leon 8 pp. 98-108 Les pronoms relatifs

California State Standards addressed in this project: Content 4.0 Students acquire information, recognize distinctive viewpoints, and further their knowledge of other disciplines. 4.1 Students address complex, concrete, factual, and abstract topics related to the immediate and external environment, including: d. n. World events, social and political issues Policy issues in health care

Communications 4.0 Students use extended language (coherent and cohesive multi-paragraph texts). 4.1 4.2 4.2 4.5 Engage in oral, written, or signed (ASL) conversations. Interpret written, spoken, or signed (ASL) language. Present to an audience of listeners, readers, or ASL viewers. Discuss, compare and contrast, and support an opinion; persuade.

Culture 4.2 Explain similarities and differences in the target cultures and between students own cultures.

4.3

Explain the changes in perspectives when cultures come in contact.

Structures 4.0 Students use knowledge of extended discourse to understand abstract and academic topics. 4.1 Use extended discourse (native-like text structure) to produce formal communications. Settings 4.0 Students use language in informal and formal settings. Theme #6: Beauty and Aesthetics / Lesthtique (Term 2 Weeks 6-9) Recommended Contexts: Architecture / Larchitecture Contributions to World Artistic Heritage / Le patrimoine Ideals of Beauty / Le beau Literature / Les arts littraires Music / La musique Performing Arts / Les arts du spectacle Visual Arts / Les arts visuels Overarching Essential Questions: How are perceptions of beauty and creativity established? How do ideals of beauty and aesthetics influence daily life? How do the arts both challenge and reflect cultural perspectives? Interpretive communication- selection of a French work of art Interpersonal communication presentation of selection to the class Presentational Writing composition of an original poem in French, based on the selected work of art.

Presentational Speaking Notes for a conversation with congressional representative Outline of the Project: Students will choose a painting by a French artist. Students will explain their choice to classmates and attempt to identify personal tastes/biases that led them to their specific selection. Students will then free-associate with their painting until they have a vocabulary bank of at least 50 related words. Using this word bank they will write a 16-line poem as a response. Students will attempt a rhyme scheme in the poem. (They may use verb endings if they

cannot find another word pattern!) Students will prepare an interpretive reading of their poem to the class. Option: Students may find a poem in French that correlates in theme with their painting. They should translate the poem into English, with particular attention to guarding poetic style and diction.

Additional resources as time allows: Analysis of poems by Jacques Joubert as translated by Denise Levertov. Student translations of other poems by Joubert fromthe volume Main de feu. Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 9 pp. 109-117 Les negations Leon 10 pp. 118-124 Les adjectives, adverbes, comparatifs, superlatifs Leon 10 pp. 124-134 Les adjectives, adverbes, comparatifs, superlatifs California State Standards addressed in this project: Content 4.0 Students acquire information, recognize distinctive viewpoints, and further their knowledge of other disciplines. 4.1 Students address complex, concrete, factual, and abstract topics related to the immediate and external environment, including: b. g. Cultural and literary archetypes The visual and performing arts

Communications 4.0 Students use extended language (coherent and cohesive multi-paragraph texts). 4.1 4.2 4.3 Engage in oral, written, or signed (ASL) conversations. Interpret written, spoken, or signed (ASL) language. Present to an audience of listeners, readers, or ASL viewers.

4.6 Produce and present a complex written, oral, or signed (ASL) product in a culturally authentic way.

Culture 4.1 Demonstrate culturally appropriate use of products, practices, and perspectives to

others. Structures 4.2 Identify similarities and differences in the extended discourse (native-like text structure) of the languages the students know. Settings 4.0 Students use language in informal and formal settings. Weeks 10-14 : Grammar Review: Une fois pour toutes Leon 11- pp. 135-151 Les prpositions, les conjonctions Leon 12 pp. 152-157 Linfinitif, le participe present, le discours indirect Leon 12 pp. 157-169 Linfinitif, le participe present, le discours indirect Rvision Examen dessai (Sample released AP exam) Evaluation: Following are Achievement Level Descriptions for a score of 5 on the AP exam in each of the tested areas. 2011 The College Board. The course instructor will use these guidelines as the baseline for a grade of A+ in the course. Since these guidelines are the requirements for a college-level class, and the students at Monrovia High School will be only in their fourth year of study, I am proposing that Achievement Level 4 (available on College Board website) correspond to an A or A-;Achievement Level 3 correspond to a grade of B, and Level 2 to a C.

Written and Print Interpretive Communication Achievement Level 5 (a) Comprehension of content. When reading a variety of authentic written and print resources, students at Achievement Level 5 identify main ideas and supporting details on a range of topics. They use context to deduce the meaning of unfamiliar words and usually infer implied meanings. (b) Critical reading. They demonstrate critical reading skills and usually differentiate facts from opinions. These students identify the intended audience, source, and purpose and describe the basic context of the resource material. (c) Vocabulary. These students comprehend a variety of vocabulary, including culturally appropriate vocabulary and some idiomatic expressions related to topics of personal interest and limited unfamiliar topics.

(d) Cultures, connections, and comparisons. These students identify the relationship among products, practices, and perspectives in the target culture(s) and demonstrate understanding of most of the content of the interdisciplinary topics presented in the resource material. They also compare and contrast geographic, historical, artistic, social, or political features of target culture communities. Audio, Visual, and Audiovisual Interpretive Communication Achievement Level 5 (a) Comprehension of content. When listening to or viewing a variety of authentic audio, visual, and audiovisual resources, students at Achievement Level 5 identify main ideas, some significant details, and the intended audience on a range of topics. These students use context to deduce the meaning of unfamiliar words and usually infer implied meanings. (b) Critical viewing and listening. These students identify significant distinguishing features (e.g., type of resource, intended audience, purpose) of authentic audio, visual, and audiovisual resources. (c) Vocabulary. They comprehend a variety of vocabulary, including culturally appropriate vocabulary and some idiomatic expressions related to topics of personal interest and limited unfamiliar topics. (d) Cultures, connections, and comparisons. These students identify the relationship among products, practices, and perspectives in the target culture(s) and demonstrate understanding of most of the content of familiar interdisciplinary topics presented in the resource material. They compare and contrast geographic, historical, artistic, social, or political features of target culture communities. Spoken Interpersonal Communication Achievement Level 5 (a) Interaction. Students at Achievement Level 5 initiate, maintain, and close conversations on familiar topics in a culturally appropriate manner most of the time. They understand and usually use culturally appropriate expressions and gestures. (b) Strategies. Students at this level use a variety of communication strategies as necessary to maintain communication (e.g., circumlocution, paraphrasing, requesting clarification or information). They often use questions to maintain the conversation and use context to deduce meaning of unfamiliar words. They often recognize errors and self-correct. (c) Opinions. They state opinions and demonstrate some ability to support opinions on topics of personal interest. (d) Language structures. These students use a variety of simple and compound sentences and some complex sentences on familiar topics, and they narrate and describe in all time

frames, with a few errors that do not impede comprehensibility. (e) Vocabulary. They understand and use vocabulary on a variety of familiar topics, including some beyond those of personal interest. (f) Register. Their choice of register is usually appropriate for the audience, and its use is consistent despite occasional errors. (g) Pronunciation. Their pronunciation and intonation patterns, pacing, and delivery are comprehensible to an audience unaccustomed to interacting with language learners; their pronunciation is consistent, with few errors that do not impede comprehensibility. (h) Cultures, connections, and comparisons. These students identify the relationships among products, practices, and perspectives in the target culture(s) and compare them with their own culture. They compare and contrast a variety of geographic, historical, artistic, social, or political features of target culture communities. Written Interpersonal Communication Achievement Level 5 (a) Interaction. Students at Achievement Level 5 initiate, maintain, and close written exchanges in formal and informal communications with good control of culturally appropriate conventions. They understand and respond to questions on familiar topics with some elaboration and detail. (b) Strategies. These students use a variety of communication strategies as necessary in order to maintain communication (e.g., circumlocution, paraphrasing, requesting clarification or information). They use context to deduce meaning of unfamiliar words and often recognize errors and self-correct. (c) Opinions. They state opinions and demonstrate some ability to support opinions on topics of personal interest. (d) Language structures. These students use a variety of simple and compound sentences and some complex sentences on familiar topics, and they narrate and describe in all time frames, with a few errors that do not impede comprehensibility. They use transitional phrases and cohesive devices. (e) Writing conventions. Their writing is marked by consistent use of standard conventions of the written language (e.g., capitalization, orthography, accents) as appropriate for the medium of communication (e.g., online chat, e-mail, letters, blogs, bulletin boards). (f) Vocabulary. They understand and use vocabulary on a variety of familiar topics, including some beyond those of personal interest. They understand and use some culturally appropriate vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. (g) Register. Their choice of register is usually appropriate for the audience, and its use is consistent despite occasional errors. (h) Cultures, connections, and comparisons. These students identify the relationships

among products, practices, and perspectives in the target culture(s) and compare them with their own culture. They compare and contrast a variety of geographic, historical, artistic, social, or political features of target culture communities. Spoken Presentational Communication Achievement Level 5 (a) Discourse and development. When planning, producing, and presenting spoken presentational communications, students at Achievement Level 5 use paragraph-length discourse with mostly appropriate use of cohesive devices to report, explain, and narrate on a range of familiar topics. They develop ideas by showing evidence of synthesis and interpretation of background information. (b) Strategies. These students employ a variety of strategies to clarify and elaborate content of presentation; self-correction is mostly successful. Primary Objective: The student plans, produces, and presents spoken presentational communications. (c) Language structures. These students use a variety of simple and compound sentences and some complex sentences in major time frames. Errors do not impede comprehensibility. (d) Vocabulary. These students use vocabulary on a variety of familiar topics, including some beyond those of personal interest. They use some culturally appropriate vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. (e) Pronunciation. Their pronunciation and intonation patterns, pacing, and delivery are comprehensible to an audience unaccustomed to interacting with language learners. (f) Register. Their choice of register is usually appropriate for the audience, and its use is consistent despite occasional errors. (g) Cultures, connections, and comparisons. These students identify the relationship among products, practices, and perspectives in the target culture(s) and demonstrate understanding of most of the content of the interdisciplinary topics presented in the resource material. They also compare and contrast geographic, historical, artistic, social, or political features of target culture communities. Written Presentational Communication Achievement Level 5 (a) Discourse and development. When planning, producing, and presenting written presentational communications, students at Achievement Level 5 use paragraph-length discourse with mostly appropriate use of cohesive devices to report, explain, and narrate on a range of familiar topics. They integrate content from multiple sources to support their presentation. (b) Strategies. These students employ a variety of strategies to clarify and elaborate the

content of the presentation; self-correction is mostly successful. Primary Objective: The student plans and produces written presentational communications. (c) Language structures. These students use a variety of simple and compound sentences and some complex sentences in major time frames. Errors do not impede comprehensibility. (d) Vocabulary. These students use vocabulary on a variety of familiar topics, including some beyond those of personal interest. They use some culturally appropriate vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. (e) Writing conventions. They demonstrate consistent use of standard conventions of the written language (e.g., capitalization, orthography, accents). Errors do not impede comprehensibility. (f) Register. Their choice of register is appropriate for the audience, and its use is consistent despite occasional errors. (g) Cultures, connections, and comparisons. These students identify the relationship among products, practices, and perspectives in the target culture(s) and demonstrate understanding of most of the content of the interdisciplinary topics presented in the resource material. They also compare and contrast geographic, historical, artistic, social, or political features of target culture communities. Recommended websites for the course: EMCculture.com keyed to the previous Cest toi! see instructor for the password. News articles read aloud change weekly; music and videos. Much good material in archives, which can be searched by keyword or date. TV5.org French TV, music videos, games, a wealth of educational material. rfi.fr -- streamed radio broadcasts 15 minutes after they are aired in Paris click RFI Journaux lemonde.fr articles from Paris most prestigious newspaper click on Actualits and then education for practice exercises in grammar and spelling also check out the results of the most recent bac nrj.fr on the right panel, click ici to listen to daily news broadcasts, music and DJ talk france3.fr French TV station website read, listen, watch, participate in the

BlablaBlog about.com go to homework and click enter on French language good basic grammar practice, including sound files TF1.fr French TV station website read articles, videos are not available in the U.S. france2.fr read, listen, watch French TV requires Silverlight or Flip4mac arte-tv.cm/fr/70.html read, listen, watch French TV news and feature broadcasts m6.fr read, listen, watch French TV news canalplus.fr read, listen, watch French news and entertainment telerama.fr information on French TV and cinema watch trailers for the most recent films liberation.fr full text articles from French daily newspaper, also videos cyberpress.ca/soleil/ -- daily newspaper from Qubec videos provide a good exposure to the Canadian accent parismatch.com -- French weekly magazine complete articles audiolivres.com thousands of stories and full-length books read aloud by amateurs (most of excellent quality) texts also available ViveVoix.com a vast collection of French poetry read by professionals