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An Introduction to ISIS

Instruction Manual Software v. 2.10

Lighting Technologies

M 1203

1106.01.203

Chapter Overview

CHAPTER OVERVIEW 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. INTRODUCTION QUICK START GUIDE TURNING ON & OFF AREAS OF THE DESK: WORKING FIELDS CHANNEL CONTROL GROUPS SUBMASTERS RECORDING AND LOADING MEMORIES PLAYING BACK MEMORIES & OTHER EVENTS CHASERS & EFFECTS THE LIVE WORKING FIELD USING COLOUR CHANGERS & MOVING LIGHTS OUTPUT PATCH SHOW MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SETUP TOUCHSCREEN CONTROL HELP ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION CHAPTER OVERVIEW 2 5 8 9 12 17 23 39 63 83 110 116 138 145 153 162 170 172 173

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Introduction

1. 1.1

INTRODUCTION Welcome

ISIS software is used by many ADB high-end lighting control desks, including the PHOENIX and Mentor ranges. ISIS provides total control of conventional luminaires, colour changers and moving light instruments. One of the concepts behind ISIS is to make the system intuitive for the operator, whether control is required over a small generic lighting system, or a rig comprising many moving lights and DMX instruments. Any show programmed on an ISIS system can be run on any other console or PC running the software. This means that shows can be easily transported between different lighting desks, and the operator can be quickly familiarised with other consoles of the ISIS family. ISIS software runs on a powerful real-time 32-bit operating system, providing multi-user and preemptive multi-tasking capabilities, with a very short boot-up time. This system has proved highly reliable and stable.

1.1.1 About this short-form manual


This manual describes the key functions of ISIS software that will be required by a new operator, and provides examples of their use. A full explanation of all functions, including many advanced concepts, is given in the full ISIS Operators Manual.

This introductory manual is split into logical chapters, allowing the required information to be found quickly. It is designed to be useful for those operators who prefer to use the manual when necessary, as well as for those who would like to follow the chapters from start to finish. In addition to this short-form manual, the ISIS software contains a complete on-line help system, accessed by pressing the <HELP> key. The on-line help system contains hypertext links between various topics, allowing relevant information to be found. Importantly, using the on-line help does not affect the physical operation of the lighting desk: all faders and controls can still be used whilst the online help is active. Use of the on-line help system is described in the chapter *Help*.

The following chapter *Quick Start Guide* provides a very simplified guide to the most common requirements and functions of the lighting desk: it can be used as a quick reference chart or as a basic tutorial to the ISIS system.

1.2

Introduction to the ISIS system

Before using an ISIS system for the first time, the basic methods used to navigate the system and select functions should be understood.

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Introduction 1.2.1 Access to functions


Access to ISIS functions is provided through the menu bar, accessed by pressing the <MENU> key, although there are also dedicated keys for many functions on the hardware platform.

The most commonly required functions are loaded onto the eight function keys F1 to F8, and are displayed at the bottom of the screen. The functions assigned to these keys will change as the operator performs different actions, providing immediate access to the most logical functions.

1.2.2 Navigation
The <MENU> key displays the main menu bar, from which functions can be selected. The menu bar can be navigated using the function keys to make the selection indicated by the numbers 1 to 8, or the arrow (or cursor) keys used to highlight a function which is then selected with the <ENTER> key.

Many menu selections will bring up a display, or dialogue box, on screen, where the operator can browse and configure options and make selections. These dialogue boxes can be navigated using the four arrow keys and the <ENTER> key, or the function keys F1 to F8 directly.

Items can be highlighted from lists using the arrow keys, but more directly by using the main fader wheel. Pressing <ALT> in combination with an arrow key will produce the functions <HOME>, <END>, <PAGE UP> and <PAGE DOWN> when navigating longer lists.

Numerical items in any manager or list can be directly selected by typing the number on the keypad. The number entered will appear in the information bar at the bottom of the list, and can be reset one digit at a time by pressing <CLEAR>.

1.2.3 User Profiles


At first glance, ISIS software can appear complex or confusing to the untrained operator. This is not surprising, as there are a huge number of functions and settings and also the possibility of customising many displays and actions! Of course, these are all necessary features when providing advanced control of a lighting system.

It is possible to simplify the software by preventing access to some functions this also prevents inexperienced operators from changing certain configuration settings! ISIS provides a system of configurable profiles, which determine what functions and options are available.

Profiles can also be used to create customised settings for a number of operators each of which have their own preferences and favourite settings. A profile allows custom configurations to be stored and quickly recalled.

This manual is written with the understanding that the default profile is active, allowing all dialogue boxes to be accessed and all options to be selected. Information on selecting the active profile is given in the chapter *System Setup*.

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Introduction 1.2.4 Messages


From time to time, ISIS displays messages to the operator on the screen (if these have been enabled in the active profile). These messages appear in a small blue window which automatically disappears after a few seconds, or on a subsequent keypress. The latest message is at the bottom of this message list.

If the operator wishes to redisplay the blue message window, this facility is available from the Tools option of the menu, under the function Show Messages.

1.3

Summary

ADBs ISIS software provides the operator with complete command over a lighting control system. The software is very easy to use and, once the basics have been mastered, the system is highly intuitive. It is not necessary to understand all of the concepts and functions of the ISIS system before it can be used: the lighting for many shows can be controlled straight away using only the submaster faders. However, the advanced functions of ISIS give the operator control of stage lighting to a precise and repeatable level. The software offers highly sophisticated functions and can be customised as required by the operator. A full description of the software is given in the ISIS Operators Manual. We hope that you will enjoy using ISIS software and, with the aid of this introductory manual, learning to exploit this high performance system.

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Quick Start Guide

2.

QUICK START GUIDE

2.1

Turning on

When the desk is turned on, the monitor displays the systems warm start routine: you can see all Warning: Selecting and initialising the ISIS files, and the current show being loaded. the Configuration option After a normal start, the desk configuration is exactly as it was when the desk was last used will reset the monitor displays to their default submasters loaded, fades running, all memories intact. settings. Show Initialisation (clearing the desk) It may be desirable to initialise the system clearing previous work from the desk. To initialise the desk, allow the system to boot normally and then select <SHOW INIT> in the File option of the Menu. This allows areas of the desk to be selected for deletion. Make the required selections and confirm with <F8 {OK}>.

2.2

Working field selection


All channel operations are sent to the selected working field (a submaster, Stage, Preset etc): press the selector key associated with the desired field before entering channels and intensities. The content of the working field is displayed on the monitor.

2.3

Channel selection

On systems with one keypad, any number entered is assumed to be a channel number unless ISIS is told otherwise. Therefore, simply type the desired channel number on the keypad. On systems with two keypads, enter the desired channel number on the dedicated Channels keypad. Lists of channels can be quickly built up with the <+> <>- <THRU> <NEXT> <PREVIOUS> <ALL> <INVERT> functions.

2.4

Creating groups

Selected channels can be recorded as a group. Groups are simply lists of channels and can be channel selection used wherever a single channel can be entered. In this way, colour washes, stage areas or instrument types, for example, can be grouped together for quick and easy modifications. group number A group is created via the key <RECGRP>. OR

2.5

Intensity assignment

After a channel or group has been entered, the WHEEL can be used to set an intensity. Alternatively, the <AT> key can be used to assign an intensity level. Intensities in ISIS can be entered as follows: 50% would be entered as <5> 25% as <2><.><5> 100% (or Full On) is <AT><AT> 0% is 0. OR The <AT> key is not required for use of the WHEEL, <FF>, <00>, <+5%> or <-5%> keys, although it does not matter if <AT> is accidentally pressed prior to these keys. OR

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Quick Start Guide

2.6

Memory number selection

On single keypad systems, precede the memory number with the <MEM> key. On dual keypad systems, enter the memory number on the dedicated Memories keypad.

2.7

Recording memories
OR

To record the contents of the selected working field only, enter the memory number and use <REC>. To record the total desk Output, excluding any bypassed channels, use <SUM>. Assigning memories times When recording any memory, the default times will be associated to the memory. To specify memory Up and Down times, press the <UP> (or <DOWN>) key, enter the time (in seconds), then press <UP> (or <DOWN>) for a second time. If both times are to be changed to the same value, the keystrokes can be shortened by pressing the <UP> key, entering the time (in seconds), followed by the <DOWN> key.

2.8

Loading memories

Select the desired working field, then enter the desired memory number and press <LOAD>. Alternatively, the direct load window can be displayed by pressing <MEM> twice, the required OR memory selected with the wheel and confirmed with the <LOAD> key.

2.9

Sequential memory playback

Each playback has two sides: S for Stage, which is active, and P for Preset, which is effectively blind. The stage and preset halves of the playbacks are analogous with a two preset manual desk. In order to playback pre-recorded memories in sequential order, the <SEQ> button must be illuminated. Playbacks can be operated manually by moving the S and P fader pairs, or automatically by pressing the <GO> key. A running crossfade can be paused and un-paused by using <HOLD>.

2.10 Erasing working field contents


The content of a Working Field can be removed by pressing the <ERASE> key twice. If the content is a recorded entity (such as a memory or chaser), it is not deleted from the system memory and can be re-loaded when required.

2.11 Deleting
All deleting (permanent removal) is done from the relevant manager. For example: to delete a memory, use Memory Manager; to delete a group, use Group Manager.

2.12 Creating chasers


Select a submaster, press <CHASER> then press <F4 {NEW}>. Press <ADD> to create each new step, and then enter the channels, groups, or memories required and assign an intensity level. Chasers are started and stopped using the Flashkey associated with the submaster containing the chase, whilst the overall intensity level is set with the fader.

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Quick Start Guide

2.13 Creating effects


Select a submaster, press <effect> then press <F4 {NEW}>. Enter the channels, groups, or memory contents required in the effect in the order desired. The effect type can be changed by selecting <TYPE> and selecting from the list of effects. Effects are started and stopped using the Flashkey associated with the submaster containing the effect.

2.14 Output patch


To change the output patch, press <PATCH> to enter the Patch Screen. The syntax for patching is: channel number to DMX address at proportional level To patch to alternate DMX universes (lines), the dot syntax can be used to distinguish the required universe, instead of calculating the numerical DMX address. In this case, the DMX address is preceded by the DMX universe number, and separated with a dot. Press <PATCH> a second time or <F8> when complete.

2.15 Saving a show


The current show can be saved to disk. Use the Menu as shown, or the dedicated <TO DISK> key, enter a filename and description using the alphanumeric keyboard, and then press <F8 {OK}> to complete the operation. The save progress is shown on the monitor.

2.16 Shut Down


If the desk is to be turned off, it is important to shut down the software properly before turning off the power. A correct shutdown ensures that current show is properly updated and saved. The show is automatically restored on the next power-up.

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Turning On & Off

3. 3.1

TURNING ON & OFF Turning on the system: Startup

When the desk is turned on, the monitor displays the systems start routine: you can see all the ISIS files, and the current show, being loaded. After a normal start, the desk configuration is exactly as it was when the desk was last used submasters loaded, chases running, all memories intact.

3.2

Show Initialisation (clearing the desk)

It may be desirable to initialise the system when starting a new show clearing previous work from the desk. To initialise the desk, allow the system to start normally and then select <SHOW INIT> in the File option of the Menu. This allows areas of the desk to be selected for deletion.

Make the required selections using the cursor keys and <ENTER> and confirm with <F8 {OK}>.

Note: The Show Initialisation function is described in more detail in the chapter *System Setup*.

3.3

Turning off the system: Shutdown

The file structure of ISIS includes a directory on the internal hard drive called work. Most of the time this directory is hidden from the operator, but it is where all the data in the current session is stored.

When the system is properly shutdown, the work directory is updated and saved, so that when next using the desk, the show and the desk configuration are restored to the same condition as that at shutdown, and any errors are prevented.

It is very important to shut down the system properly.

examples of keystrokes
<MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F6 {SHUTDOWN}> Selects the Shutdown procedure from the File options of the menu. A WARNING IS ISSUED. A warning is given: This will stop all ISIS services - Are you sure? <F7 {YES}> Confirms the shutdown. All the files in the work directory are properly updated, saved, and closed. POWER DOWN The system can be safely switched off when the monitor displays the message Power Down.

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Areas of the desk: Working Fields

4. 4.1

AREAS OF THE DESK: WORKING FIELDS Introduction

The areas of the lighting desk that can be used to control channels such as a submaster or either side of the playback are called working fields. One of these working fields will be active, meaning that it has been selected by the operator.

You can think of the working fields as pages in a notebook. Just as you can write different things on each page of the notebook, you can have various content in each working field. In this analogy, the page that you are writing on is the active working field.

When you no longer need what is written on a page in the notebook, you can tear it out and throw it away. If you have more things to write, you can start working on a new blank page. Similarly, you can clear the content of a working field at any time to provide a clean working field. The working fields are like an unlimited notebook but more environmentally friendly!

The working field concept makes ISIS software very easy to use, yet extremely powerful. A recorded lighting state (a memory) created in any field can be loaded into any other field for playback or modification purposes, and field contents can be copied from one area to another.

4.2

The working fields

The table below indicates the working fields in ISIS software, although some hardware platforms do not have direct access to all of these areas from the control surface.

Selector Key --P1 S1 P2 S2 LIVE EDMEM

Working Field Submasters 1 to 96 Preset 1 Stage 1 Preset 2 Stage 2 Live Edit Memory / Edit Library

Not all hardware platforms have direct access to all of these working fields.

Basic functions such as channel selection, intensity allocation and recording & loading memories can be carried out in any of the working fields. However, each type of working field has additional functions associated with it as illustrated below.

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Areas of the desk: Working Fields


SUBMASTERS If a submaster field is selected, its fader must be raised for the contents to appear at the output of the desk although keeping the fader down is a useful way of creating scenes blind. Each submaster can be set in a particular mode (for example, responding to an audio input, or acting as a subtractive fader) and each has a flashkey associated with it. Submasters can also be used for creating and running chasers & special effects, or for running a list of memories (a cue stack).

PLAYBACKS (STAGE & PRESET FIELDS)


The Stage field is the active part of the playback: its contents are sent straight to the output of the desk. The Preset field contains the lighting state that will be used in the next crossfade. Using the Preset side of a playback, rather than the Stage side, is another easy way of plotting blind - particularly if the newly created blind state is to be played back as the next operation. The playback is also used for complex sequences of memories and other events.

LIVE
The Live field, as its name implies, is concerned with the output of the desk; but in this particular field any channels that are modified will be captured. Captured channels are sent directly to the output of the desk, and their output value cannot be altered by any other normal working field.

EDIT MEMORY / EDIT LIBRARY


The contents of this field are never sent to the output of the desk; it is a useful field for blind plotting. Edit Memory can also be used for modifying several memories or motion control libraries simultaneously, making the same changes to each memory or library.

4.3

Selecting a working field

All instructions entered by the operator are applied in the active working field: it is therefore important to select the required working field before using any other functions. All operations will be performed in the active working field until another field is selected.

The active working field determines which area of the desk will receive the commands made by the keypads and other controls on the desk.

To select any of the working fields, simply press the associated selector key: its LED will light to indicate that it is active. If the desk has a monitor connected, the content of the selected working field is displayed.

All operations of the channel and memory keypads, the special functions panel, and motion controller will be sent to the current working field, until a different field is selected.

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Areas of the desk: Working Fields

4.4

Clearing a working field

A working field can be cleared when its contents are no longer required. Clearing, or erasing, a field will not permanently delete any memories, chasers or effects that have been recorded: it will simply remove them from the selected working field. These contents will still exist in the desks memory, and can be re-loaded when required.

Other contents such as a lighting state that has not been recorded as a memory will not be available once the field has been erased. If they are required again, they must be re-entered.

To empty the contents of the selected working field, press the <ERASE> key twice while the field is selected.

examples of keystrokes

<ERASE> <ERASE> Clears the selected working field.

If the <ERASE> function is pressed by accident, pressing either the <CLEAR> or <F7 {CANCEL}> key will prevent the selected field from being cleared.

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Channel Control

5. 5.1

CHANNEL CONTROL Introduction

This chapter describes how to select channels and allocate intensities in the active working field.

The channel keypad works directly in the selected working field: if submaster 1 is selected, the channels will be sent to submaster 1. If Stage 1 is selected the channels will be sent there, and so on.

To see the content of a submaster, its fader must be raised to send its contents to the Output. Please also check that the Grand Master is raised to 100%, and the Blackout function is not activated - the LED in the Blackout key should be off.

The channel keypad and associated functions operate in the active working field.

5.2

Selecting channels

A channel is selected by typing the required number using the channels keypad. A list of channels can be created by using the <+> <-> <THRU> & <NEXT> keys. The last channel entered in a selection can be cleared by pressing the <CLEAR> key once; pressing <CLEAR> twice clears all channels from the keypad. Channels selected in the active working field are shown highlighted with a white background on the attached monitor, and can also be displayed on the LCD touchscreen (where available).

examples of keystrokes

<1> <THRU> <1><2> Selects the list of channels 1 to 12. <2><0> <+> <NEXT> <+> <NEXT> Selects channels 20 and 21 and 22. <5><0> <+> <PREV> <+> <PREV> Selects channels 50, 49 and 48. <CLEAR> Clears the last number entered in a selection. <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Clears the selected channels. <LAST> Re-selects the channel selection made before the keypad was cleared.

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Channel Control 5.2.1 Special channel selection tools


ISIS provides a number of additional channel selection functions, designed to make selection of a number of channels quicker and easier.

examples of keystrokes
<ALL> Selects all channels in the active working field that have an intensity (non-zero or visible channels). <1> <THRU> <1><0><0> <-> <ALL> Selects all channels in the range that have no intensity (in this example the range is 1 to 100). <ALL> <-> <1> <THRU > <1><2> Selects all the non-zero channels, except those in a particular range (here the range is 1 to 12). <1> <THRU-ON> <4><0> <THRU-ON> OR <ENTER> Selects all channels in the range that have an intensity. <1><0><0> <THRU-ON> <THRU-ON> Selects all non-zero intensity channels from 100 onwards. <INVERT> Swaps the current channel selection for all other non-zero intensity channels. <SOLO> Keeps selected channels at their respective intensities, and temporarily removes all other channels in the selected field from the Output. The solo function is cancelled by pressing <CLEAR> or <SOLO> for a second time.

5.3

Allocating intensities

A selected channel or list of channels can be given an intensity value by using the <AT> key and entering digits on the keypad, or directly by using the wheel. It is also possible to enter an intensity level using the keypad, and then use the wheel to adjust value.

Any number entered on the channels keypad without using the <AT> key is assumed to be a new channel number, so the previous channel selection is cleared automatically.

NOTES: ISIS uses a single-digit direct entry system when entering intensities from the keypad. Tens of percent are entered as a single digit (i.e. 50% is entered as just 5 and 47% is entered as 4.7). ISIS can emulate two-digit direct entry systems (i.e. 50% entered as 5 0, or 47% entered as 4 7) by holding down the <AT> key whilst entering the intensity.

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Channel Control
examples of keystrokes
<1> WHEEL Sets channel 1 to any level between 0% and 100% (FF). <1> <AT> <7> Sets channel 1 to 70%. <1> <AT> <7><.><3> Sets channel 1 to 73%. <1> <AT> <AT> Sets channel 1 to FF (100%). <1> <AT> <0> Sets channel 1 to 00 (zero). <RET> Returns the selected channels to the value they previously had before the intensity level was modified. The Return function cannot work after the selection has been cleared. <ERASE> <ERASE> Removes all channels from the selected working field.

The channel selection and intensity allocation methods work in tandem, so any combination of channels can be set to any intensity levels by any of the methods shown above. Thus ISIS offers the operator a much faster, simpler and flexible means of channel control.

5.3.1 Additional intensity functions


Some hardware platforms provide additional keys for manipulating channel intensities, designed to give even faster control. Not all functions are available on every type of desk.

examples of keystrokes
<1> <FF> Sets channel 1 directly to FF (100%) where available. <1> <00> Sets channel 1 directly to 00 (zero) where available. <1> <AT> <6><+5%> Sets channel 1 to 65% where available. <1> <AT> <6><-5%> Sets channel 1 to 55% where available.

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Channel Control

5.4

Advanced intensity modifications

Channel intensities can be modified proportionally to their current levels, either individually or as a list. Using these methods, a lighting state, or part thereof, can be proportionally modified without using the Grand Master or Override functions: this means that channels being output from other submasters are not affected.

Proportional modifications are made with the wheel or by adding or subtracting any percentage to the current levels by using the keypad.

examples of keystrokes
<1> <THRU > <1><2> WHEEL Proportionally increases the intensities of channels 1 to 12. Using the wheel, the original balance is retained, even when the channels all reach 100% or 0%. In this case, moving the wheel in the opposite direction will restore the relative differences in intensity. <2><4> <THRU> <2><8> <ENTER> <.> <5> Channels 24 to 28 have 5% added to their original intensities: do not use the <at> key. <1> <THRU > <6> <AT> <+> <5> The levels of channels 1 to 6 increase proportionally by 50% of their current intensities. <1><0><0> <AT> <-> <7> The level of channel 100 is decreased proportionally by 70% of its current intensity.

5.5

Copying channels and their intensities between the fields

Once channel intensities have been set in a working field (such as a submaster or playback), they can easily be copied to a different working field. This can be a very useful function.

examples of keystrokes
<SUB1> <COPY> <SUB2> <COPY> Copies the contents of submaster 1 into submaster 2. Note that the original contents of submaster 2 will be replaced by this operation. <ERASE> <ERASE> Removes the contents of submaster 1. This has moved the contents of submaster 1 to submaster 2. <SUB1> <COPY> <SUB2> <THRU> <SUB6> <COPY> Copies the contents of submaster 1 into submasters 2 to 6. Copy is described in detail in the chapter *Copy And Part Functions* in the ISIS Operators Manual.

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Channel Control

5.6

Testing channels

A function is provided to assist in lamp identification or fault finding. All used channels, or all channels in a selected range can be flashed in sequence automatically, or selected manually for as long as is required. During testing, the channels are sent directly to the Output, after the Grand Master value.

examples of keystrokes

<TEST> OR <MENU> <F3 (CHANNEL)> <F4 (TEST) Enters the channel testing facility.

<F1 {START}> ... <F2 {STOP}> Starts and stops the automatic testing. By default, each is sequentially flashed to 70% for 1 second.

<F3 {PREV}> OR <F4 {NEXT}> Selects and tests the previous or next channel to the point where the sequential testing was stopped. Using the Next and Previous functions in this way allows channels to be tested manually instead of to a sequential pattern.

< > < > <ENTER> <ENTER> Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the desired channel for testing.

<F8 {EXIT}> Stops the testing and exits the test facility.

The default intensity and the duration of the flash can be changed by the operator if required, by entering new values in the Intensity and Delay boxes in the test window.

5.7

Channel tracking

Channel tracking gives an overview of an individual channels usage. It lists all the groups, memories, chasers and effects where that channel is used, and its intensity within each memory. It is a useful way of finding stray channels at unusual intensities, or to see where a specific channel is used.

examples of keystrokes

<SELECT CHANNEL> Select the channel to be tracked.

<CTRACK> OR <MENU> <F3 {CHANNELS}> <F3 {INFO}> <F3 {CHANNEL TRACKING}> Displays the usage of the selected channel.

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Groups

6. 6.1

GROUPS Introduction

A list of selected channels can be defined as a group. Groups offer the convenience of controlling many channels as simply as if they were one single channel. In this way, colour washes, stage areas or instrument types for example, can be grouped together for quick and easy modifications. Once a group has been created it can be selected, allocated an intensity, or modified as two, three or four keystrokes instead of entering long lists of channel numbers. A group can be used in any working field where a single channel could be selected. Groups can also be used when creating chasers and effects.

6.2

Creating a group

Groups are convenient lists of channels defined by the operator and each show can have up to 999 recorded groups. Groups are created via the key <RECGRP>.

examples of keystrokes
<1> <+> <3> <+> <5> <+> <7> <+> <9> <REC GROUP> <1> <REC GROUP> OR <REC> Creates group number 1, consisting of channels 1,3,5,7 and 9.

Any combination of channel selections - as described in the chapter *Channel Control* - can be used to select the channels used for group creation.

6.3

Editing a group

Existing groups can be modified by changing the selected channels within the group and re-recording.

examples of keystrokes
<GROUP> <1> <ENTER> Selects the channels currently recorded in group 1. <+> <1><1> <+> <1><3> <+> <1><5> Adds channels 11, 13 & 15 to the selection. <REC GROUP> <1> Selects group 1 as the destination for recording. Since group 1 already exists, a confirmation message is displayed: Confirm override of destination <REC GROUP> OR <REC> Confirmation is made by repeating the record command and group 1 is modified.

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Groups

6.4

Displaying the group list

The list of groups, along with other lists such as memories and motion control libraries, can be displayed temporarily on any monitor at any time.

examples of keystrokes

<MON 1> <F5 {LISTS}> <F1 {GROUPS}> Displays the list of existing groups, showing numbers and titles on the monitor 1.

<MON 1> <F1 {DEFAULT}> Returns the monitor 1 back to the default display.

To permanently display the groups list, a monitor must be configured for this through the menu. This is described in the chapter *Groups* in the ISIS Operators Manual.

6.5

Selecting groups and allocating intensities

All channel selection methods described in the chapter *Channel Control* also work with group selections.

examples of keystrokes

<GROUP> <1> WHEEL Sets group 1 to any level between 0% and 100% (FF).

<GROUP> <1> <AT> <7> Sets group 1 to 70%.

<GROUP> <1> <AT> <0> Sets group 1 to 0 (zero).

<RET> Returns the selected group to its previously unmodified intensity level.

<GROUP> <1> <THRU> <8> <AT> <4><.><5> Sets groups 1 to 8 at 45%. Note that the <GROUP> key is not required to select the second group after a <THRU> command.

<GROUP> <1> <+> <GROUP> <5> <+> <4><0> <THRU> <8><0> <-> <5><0> <AT> <AT> Sets groups 1 and 5, and channels 40 to 80 (except channel 50) at FF (100%).

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Groups

6.6

Direct Load of groups

The methods described above for selecting groups are easy to use if the operator can remember the number of the required group! It is, of course, possible to display the groups list on a monitor but this information is not required all of the time: it would be far better to use the monitor for other purposes. ISIS offers a direct load function, which temporarily displays a list of existing groups and provides instant selection or intensity allocation of the highlighted group.

examples of keystrokes
<GROUP> <GROUP> Displays the list of existing groups, together with their titles. WHEEL OR < > Highlight the required group. <ENTER> OR <AT> <AT> Select the channels in the highlighted group with <ENTER>, or directly assign an intensity level.

Note: As a precaution, the direct load function is disabled when out of context.

6.7

Group Manager

There are several managers throughout the software which are convenient places for manipulating recorded entities such as groups, memories, chasers and effects. In the Group Manager, groups can be edited, named, copied, re-numbered and deleted.

examples of keystrokes
<F1 {GRP MNG}> Displays the Group Manager window; initially this displays a list of recorded groups

Group Manager Screen (Dialogue box 220)

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Groups 6.7.1 Naming a group in the Group Manager (Title)


It can be helpful to give each group a name, such as Red colour wash for ease of identification within the Group Manager and groups list.

examples of keystrokes
WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY In the Group Manager, use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight a group to be edited, or enter a number directly using the keyboard. <F2 {EDIT}> Selects the edit facility: the title can be added using the alphanumeric keyboard. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the title and exits the edit facility. <F8 {OK}> Exits the Group Manager. (Do not exit if other groups are to be named, copied, deleted, etc.)

6.7.2 Copying groups in the Group Manager


Groups can be copied in the Group Manager. A list of groups can also be copied with a delta function, which increments the new group numbers in steps defined by the operator.

examples of keystrokes
WHEEL OR < > In the Group Manager, use the wheel or the down arrow keys to highlight the group to be copied. Use <ENTER> to select a list of groups, if required.

<F7 {COPY}> Displays the copy dialogue box. TARGET Enter the new group number, or the first number if a list of groups is selected. DELTA Enter a delta offset value if required (see below). <F8 {OK}> Confirms the copy function and exits the dialogue box.

DELTA
Delta is an option when renumbering a list. Normally, the delta setting is 1, meaning that the new numbers will increase in increments of 1 from the first number. If the delta quantity is changed, the new numbers will increment by the value entered. Therefore if the delta is 2, the new numbers will skip every other number. If the delta is 10, the new numbers will increase in tens.

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Groups 6.7.3 Deleting groups from the Group Manager


Unused or unwanted groups can be deleted to make room for new ones.

examples of keystrokes
WHEEL OR < > Highlight the required group in the Group Manager. Use <ENTER> to select a list of memories, if required. <F3 {DELETE}> Selects deletion. A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Delete element(s) - Are you sure? <F8 {YES}> Confirms the deletion.

6.7.4 Renumbering groups in the Group Manager


When several groups have been deleted, or if the groups were created using non-consecutive group numbers, they can be re-numbered to clarify the group list.

examples of keystrokes
WHEEL OR < > ... <ENTER> In the Group Manager, use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight a group to be renumbered, or enter a number directly using the keyboard. Use <ENTER> to select a list of groups for renumbering. <F1 {RENUMBER}> Displays the renumber dialogue box. TARGET Enter the new group number or the first number if a list of groups is selected. DELTA Enter a delta offset value, if required. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the group re-numbering and exits the dialogue box. If the new numbers allocated are the same as any existing groups, a warning is given and the operation cancelled.

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Groups

6.8

Recovering deleted groups

If a group is deleted or changed, the original version can be recovered. If a group has been modified more than once, it appears on the recoverable list as often as it was changed.

The most recent deletion (or modification) is always displayed at the top of the recoverable list. In addition, all deletion times and dates are shown - so if the required group is the version that was deleted yesterday at lunch time, it is easy to find in the list!

Groups deleted by an initialisation routine cannot be recovered.

examples of keystrokes

<MENU> <F5 {TOOLS}> <F2 {RECOVER}> <F1 {GROUPS}> Enters the recover groups function from the tools menu.

WHEEL OR < > ... <ENTER> Select the group to be recovered. A list of groups can be created by using the <ENTER> key.

<F1 {RECOVER}> Selects the recover function.

If the group being recovered does not exist in the current show, it is immediately recovered. If it is a modified version, the operator can choose which course of action to take.

A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Header # already exists - Overwrite?

<F1 {CANCEL}> OR <F7 {NO}> OR <F8 {YES}> OR <F2 {ALL}> <F1> cancels the entire recovery procedure. <F7> prevents recovery of the group number given in the warning. <F8> confirms recovery of the group given in the warning and overwrites the existing version. <F2> allows all selected groups to be recovered without further warnings.

<F8 {OK}> Exits the group recovery utility.

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Submasters

7. 7.1

SUBMASTERS Introduction

The submasters are very flexible working fields. They can be used for creating lighting states, recording and playing back memories, chasers, effects, cue stacks, and used with audio and MIDI. Submasters are both easy to use and versatile.

If several different lighting states are stored in the submasters, it is easy to busk an unrehearsed show by mixing the submasters as required. Submaster contents may be part of a more structured show, or they may be used as a means of overriding channel intensities from other working fields.

When plotting channels into submasters, the contents of the submaster will only be seen at the Output if the submaster fader (and the Grand Master) is raised. The submaster level may also be subject to the value of the Submaster General fader.

Note: The behaviour of channels within the submasters will depend upon the precedence mode selected by the operator. A conventional spotlight has only an intensity attribute (only the brightness of the lamp can be adjusted from the control desk): this is termed a generic luminaire. Generic channels operate on highest-takes-precedence (HTP) basis: the working field contributing the highest intensity value for a given channel will be the one sent to the Output. A motion control device (such as a moving light or colour scroller) has many more parameters that can be adjusted from the control desk: this is termed an instrument. Parameters of an instrument operate by default on the latest-takes-precedence (LTP) principle: the last action performed by the operator is the value sent to the Output.

See the chapter *An Introduction To The LTP Mode* for more details. Full details of the precedence modes are given in the ISIS Operators Manual, in the chapter *HTP FTP LTP Operation*.

7.2

Submaster pages

ISIS software supports up to 96 submasters, however there are fewer physical faders on all standard hardware platforms. The available faders are used to control pages of submasters. Each of the 96 submasters can have a non-zero value at any time, but only one page of submasters can have physical control.

A different page of submasters is accessed by turning the submaster page.

The concept of submaster pages means that there is likely to be discrepancies between the positions of the actual submaster faders and their virtual values. As with all controls in ISIS, the value shown is white if it is the physical fader controlling the submaster level and red if it is the virtual value.

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Submasters
When there is a difference between the virtual level of a submaster and its connected physical fader, manual control of the submaster can be taken by moving the physical fader so that its level matches that of the virtual fader. When the match is made, the submaster value changes from red to white, showing that the physical fader is in control of the submaster level.

Instead of matching the physical fader to the virtual value, there is a function in the submaster configuration dialogue that sets the selected virtual fader to the value of the connected physical fader.

The faders function forces the virtual value to match the physical position of the selected submaster.

examples of keystrokes

<CONFIG> Enters the submaster configuration dialogue box for the selected submaster(s).

<F2 {FADERS}> Forces the virtual value of the selected submaster(s) to match the position of the physical fader.

7.3

Selecting submasters

When a submaster field is selected, all operations made on the keypads and other areas of the desk are sent to it. When a submaster is selected it is displayed by default on monitor 1.

If several submasters are selected, memories, chasers and effects can be loaded into all of the selected submasters simultaneously. However, intensities can only be modified in one submaster at a time. If more than one submaster is selected when intensity tools are used, the message select one submaster only is displayed.

7.3.1 Selecting one submaster


examples of keystrokes

<SUB1> Selects submaster 1.

<SUB5> Deselects submaster 1, selects submaster 5.

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Submasters 7.3.2 Selecting a list of submasters


examples of keystrokes
<SUB1> <THRU> <SUB10> <-> <SUB8> <+> <SUB12> Selects submasters 1 to 10, except submaster 8, and also submaster 12.

7.3.3 Selecting a list of submasters across two pages


So far, all submaster selections have been on one page. As all ISIS systems have 96 submasters, it is possible to select all submasters, or any combination, from 1 to 96. Any submaster selections using the <+> <-> and <THRU> commands can be made across the submaster pages.

7.4

Control in submasters

Any of the channel control manipulations described in the chapter *Channel Control* will work in any of the submasters, but only in one submaster at a time. If channels are to be modified in several different submasters, each submaster must be selected individually.

Channel intensities can only be modified in one submaster at a time.

Selected channels are not cleared before selecting a different submaster: these channel numbers will remain selected in the new submaster and are available for immediate control.

A new channel selection can be made by entering the channel numbers directly from the keypad. Alternatively, the selected channels can be cleared by pressing <CLEAR> twice, or by recording a memory. If the channel selection is cleared in error, it can be recovered by using the <LAST> key.

7.4.1 Channel selection and intensity allocation


Any submaster can be selected as the active working field, simply by pressing its selection button. Channels and intensities can then be set by using the keyboard and wheel.

When working in submasters, all the channel control manipulations demonstrated in the chapter *Channel Control* can be used.

examples of keystrokes

<SUB10> <1> <AT> <7><.><3> Sets channel 1 to 73% in submaster 10.

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Submasters 7.4.2 Adding and subtracting groups


Groups can be used in individual submasters in the same way as channels, using the same intensity allocation tools.

examples of keystrokes
<SUB9> <GROUP> <1> <+> <GROUP> <2> <AT> <5> Sets groups 1 and 2 to 50%, in submaster 9. <SUB10> <GROUP> <1> <THRU> <GROUP> <8> <AT> <4><.><5> Sets groups 1 to 8 at 45%, in submaster 10. <SUB11> <GROUP> <1> <+> <GROUP> <5> <+> <1> <THRU > <1><2> <-> <5> <AT> <AT> Sets groups 1 and 5, and channels 1 to 12, except channel 5 at FF (100%), in submaster 11.

7.4.3 Proportionally adding and subtracting memories


Memories can be proportionally added to, or subtracted from, existing submaster contents. In this situation, the memory is manipulated as if it were a list of channels, but unlike a group the balance within the memory remains, so the atmosphere of a lighting state is kept.

examples of keystrokes
<SUB1> <MEM> <1> WHEEL Proportionally increases or decreases memory 1 in submaster 1. <SUB2> <MEM> <1> <+> <MEM> <2> WHEEL Proportionally adds memories 1 and 2 in submaster 2. <SUB3> <MEM> <3> <LOAD> <MEM> <4> WHEEL Loads memory 3 into submaster 3, then proportionally adds memory 4 to it. <SUB4> <MEM> <1> <THRU> <1><0> <-> <MEM> <5> WHEEL Proportionally adds memories all memories between 1 and 10 (except 5) to submaster 4.

7.4.4 Combining channels, groups and memories in a submaster


Channels, groups, and memories can all be combined within a single submaster.

examples of keystrokes
<CHANNEL SELECTION> <+> <MEM> <7> WHEEL The selected channels and memory 7 are added to the existing contents of the active submaster. <CHANNEL SELECTION> <+> <GROUP SELECTION> <+> <MEM> <1> WHEEL The selected channels, groups and memory 1 are added to the existing contents of the active submaster.

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Submasters
If a memory is loaded directly into a submaster, it replaces any existing contents of that submaster. However, a selection of channels from an existing memory can be loaded into a working field without replacing any existing contents. In this way, selected channels from one memory can be added - at their recorded intensities - to the existing contents of the selected working field.

examples of keystrokes
<SUB12> Selects submaster 12, which already contains some channels with intensities. <6><0> <THRU> <7><0> Selects channels 61 to 70. <PLOAD> <MEM> <7> <PLOAD> Selects the Part Load function and adds the intensities of channels 60 to 70 in memory 7 to the existing contents of submaster 12.

7.5

Erasing the submasters

When the contents of a submaster are no longer required, or the submaster needs to be emptied to make way for new work, it must be erased.

Erasing removes the contents of the submaster and any times allocated to it, returning them to the default times. It also resets the submaster and flashkey mode to Normal.

If the content of the submaster is a recorded entity, such as a memory, chaser or effect, erasing removes it from the submaster but does not delete it from the system memory. After a memory has been erased from a submaster, it is still available in the memory list.

To erase the selected submaster (or group of submasters), the <ERASE> key must be pressed twice. This is to prevent accidental erasing. If the <ERASE> key is pressed once, its LED flashes as a warning. Pressing <CLEAR> cancels the erase command, and prevents the selected working field from being erased.

examples of keystrokes
<SUB1> <THRU> <SUB6> <ERASE> <ERASE> Erases the contents of submasters 1 to 6.

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Submasters

7.6

Submaster modes

Normally the submasters work by adding their contents on a highest takes precedence (HTP) basis to the Output when their faders are manually raised. However, ISIS submasters have different modes that enable lighting states to be manipulated in other ways.

AUTO
A submaster can be configured as an autofader. The contents of a submaster in this auto mode are added to the Output as an accurately timed fade at the press of its flashkey, instead of manually moving the fader.

INHIBIT
This mode is used to cut or boost selected channels that are at the Output from other working fields.

BYPASS
A submaster in this mode will bypass the Grand Master and Blackout level and be sent directly to the Output. Submasters in bypass mode are not included when recording a memory using the sum (record live) functions.

AUDIO/MIDI
The contents of a submaster can be made to respond to an input audio signal or MIDI channel.

Each submaster can be individually configured with any of these modes - and some functions, such as Auto and Inhibit, can work simultaneously.

In addition, when a submaster contains channels that are colour changers (scrollers) or moving lights, the submaster can be configured specifically for motion control parameters (such as control of colour or gobo). This is explained in detail in the chapter *Using Colour Changers & Moving Lights*.

7.7
Mode Normal Auto Audio MIDI Inhibit Bypass

The different submaster modes are summarised below.


Description Normal, manual, HTP Submasters become simple timed playbacks Submaster contents modulate according to an audio signal Submaster contents respond to a MIDI input Submaster level becomes a cut and boost function for the selected channels Submaster contents bypass all other areas and functions of the desk

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Submasters 7.7.1 Configuring the submasters


Submaster modes can be configured individually or as a group, using the submaster configuration dialogue box. They can also be individually configured to follow the level of the Submaster General fader, which is a virtual fader within the software.

Submaster Configuration Dialogue Box

examples of keystrokes

<CONFIG> Displays the submaster configuration dialogue box for the selected submaster(s). Options will be applied to all the selected submasters.

< > ... <ENTER> Use the cursor keys and <ENTER> to make the required submaster mode selection.

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the selections, and exits the configuration dialogue box.

Depending upon the hardware platform being used, some of the submaster modes can be directly selected from the mode keys located next to the lower row of submaster faders. This avoids the necessity of opening the configuration dialogue box. The mode chosen in this way is applied to all selected submasters.

examples of keystrokes

<AUTO> Directly activates Auto mode for the selected submaster(s).

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Submasters 7.7.2 Normal


Normal is the default mode for all submasters. The fader must be manually raised for the submaster contents to be sent to the Output at a level proportional to the fader value. If a submaster is configured to follow the Submaster General fader, the output is also proportional to that level. Submaster content is proportional to:

The intensity of the channel within the submaster; The level of the submaster fader; The level of the Submaster General fader; The level of the Grand Master fader.

If there same channel is in more than one submaster, it is sent to the output on a highest-takesprecedence (HTP) basis, subject to any submasters in Inhibit and Bypass modes.

Note: When a submaster is in Normal mode, the associated submaster information box on-screen shows the contents of the submaster - channels, memory, chaser or effect - and its fader level.

Submaster info box showing channels in submaster 1 and the fader level.

7.7.3 Auto
Auto mode changes the submaster from a manual fader into an automatic timed fader, executed either by pressing the associated flashkey or by movement of the submaster fader. If the submaster contains channels and groups, Auto mode uses the systems default times (usually 5 seconds). If the contents are a memory, the memory times are used. Separate up, down and wait times for the Auto mode can be set by the operator if required. For full details on setting times, please see the chapter *Recording & Loading Memories*. The times of a submaster in Auto mode can be changed, but the new times are lost when the submaster is erased. If the times are changed and the submaster contains a memory, the new times only apply while the memory is loaded in same submaster, unless the memory is re-recorded to keep the changes.

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Submasters
Auto mode is selected through the submaster configuration dialogue box, or by using the submaster <AUTO> mode key, where available.

examples of keystrokes

<AUTO> Selects Auto mode for the selected submaster. Auto mode can also be selected from the submaster configuration dialogue box.

<FLASHKEY> Activates the automatic fade. Pressing the flashkey again reverses the fade.

Note: When a submaster is in Auto mode, the associated information box on-screen shows the contents of the submaster - channels, memory, chaser, or effect - the virtual fader level, and the fade time duration.

A submaster info box showing channels in submaster 1 and the autofade duration of 5 seconds.

7.7.4 Bypass
Bypass is a simple but powerful feature of ISIS. When channels are in a submaster in Bypass mode, their intensities cannot be modified at the Output from any other working field, or even by the Grand Master or Blackout functions. It is only the level of the submaster that controls these channels. Bypassed channels are also ignored by the sum function when recording memories. For example, imagine that some lights need to be left on during plotting, but are not wanted in the recorded memories. Putting them in a Bypassed submaster is the ideal solution. This can be extremely useful for working lights, house lights, or illuminated music stands. As bypassed submasters are not affected by the Grand Master or Blackout functions, this can be a safe place for channels that must never be turned off, such as smoke machine or scroller power supplies, or discharge type luminaires. The channels in a Bypassed submaster are still proportional to the level of the submaster fader and so can be faded up and down manually, or by putting the submaster into Auto mode.

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Submasters
To avoid the bypassed submaster from being accidentally faded out, it can be set to full (or any level) by means of its virtual fader control. The output screen shows Bypassed channels in purple if there is an intensity value. If any channels in bypass mode are at zero, they are shown they are shown as - - . The double dash symbol indicates that the channels have been forced to zero due a special mode.
Note: When a submaster is in Bypass mode, the associated information box on-screen shows the contents of the submaster - channels, memory, chaser or effect - its fader level, and its mode: the word bypass in purple.

Bypass mode is selected through the submaster configuration dialogue box, or by using the submaster <BYPASS> mode key where available.

A submaster info box showing submaster 7 in Bypass mode, with the contents of memory 10.

7.7.5 Inhibit (sum correction)


Inhibit allows a submaster to work in a subtractive as well as additive way, acting on the channels it contains. The submaster itself does not contribute channels to the output of the desk, but it allows them to be increased or decreased proportionally at the Output if they are present from other working fields. This cut and boost effect allows the selected channels to be increased or decreased in value by 100% of their current intensity.

Note: Inhibit mode does not affect channels that are in bypass mode, or are captured in Live.

Selected channels in an inhibited submaster are indicated as II in the working field and displayed in yellow colour. The Output screen shows inhibited channels in yellow if there is an intensity value, otherwise the - - double dash symbol will appear. As the Inhibit function can increase or decrease channel intensities, setting the submaster fader at 50% will have no effect on the output level. The lower half of the submaster fader (from 50% to 0%) controls the proportional cut in channel intensity; the upper half (from 50% to 100%) sets the proportional boost in channel intensity.
Note: Channels can be decreased from their current value to 0% (a cut of 100%). Channels can only be increased in value to 100% of their current value.

If the submaster fader is down when Inhibit mode is selected, there is no immediate change to the Output. The submaster level is shown as 50% in red because its virtual fader has been forced to 50% by the action of selecting the Inhibit mode. This prevents the channels from suddenly changing to 0%.

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Submasters

A submaster in Inhibit mode must have its fader physically moved to the 50% position in order to collect control of the inhibited channels.

A submaster in Inhibit mode can be forced to the 50% setting, regardless of the physical position of the fader. This allows the inhibit action to be easily reset: any cut or boost at the output will be removed instantly. This is achieved by pressing <SHIFT> and the associated submaster flashkey together.

examples of keystrokes
<SHIFT> <FLASH #> Forces the Inhibit function of submaster 1 to 50%, regardless of the physical fader position. Fading the Inhibit submaster down from 50% (or up from 50%) proportionally fades its contents down (or up) at the Output, regardless of which other submasters and playbacks contain the same channels. Inhibit does not affect channels captured in Live or set in Bypass. Channels selected within an inhibited submaster can be set at any intensity, as it is only the level of the submaster fader that determines the output values of inhibited channels. This allows the channels to be entered into an inhibitive submaster either by loading a memory, a group, or by entering channels directly at an intensity of full (any intensity can be used, but full is quick and convenient). The Inhibit submaster can work in manual (normal) mode, but it is also possible to set an inhibited submaster to Auto mode. The results at the Output are the same, although the changes will be made in the times associated with the Auto mode.

Note: When a submaster is in Inhibit mode, the associated information box shows the contents of the submaster channels, memory, chaser or effect - its fader level, and the word inhibit in yellow.

A submaster info box showing submaster 8 in inhibit mode, with the contents of memory 11.

Inhibit mode is selected through the submaster configuration dialogue box, or by using the submaster <INHIBIT> mode key, where available.

7.7.6 Audio
Each submaster can be individually configured to respond to an input audio signal. This response can be set to correspond to the bass, mid-range, or treble frequencies, or to the average input signal. Channels in an Audio submaster must be given intensities: their intensity at the desk Output will modulate with the audio signal. The maximum intensity at the Output will be proportional to:

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Submasters

The channel intensities; The submaster level; The level of the submaster general fader (if configured); The audio input level as set in the setup menu; The audio input from the given piece of music at any time.

Audio mode is selected through the submaster configuration dialogue box, or by using the submaster <AUDIO> mode key, where available. The audio input must also be enabled in the General Configuration dialogue box.

examples of keystrokes
<MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F3 {GENERAL}> Displays the General Configuration dialogue box, giving access to all input options. < > <ENTER> Activate the audio input by checking the box. < > WHEEL Move the cursor to the audio input level. The level can be set between 0% and 100%. The wheel can be used to set the input level, or it may be entered directly from the keypad. The audio input and the attenuated level is visualised on-screen via bargraphs when an audio signal is present. The optimum level allows the signal to peak occasionally, but not persistently. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the operation and closes the dialogue box.

General Configuration dialogue box showing audio controls (Dialogue Box 866)

7.7.7 Configuring a submasters response to the audio input


Individual or groups of submasters can be configured for Audio mode; the options chosen will be made to all selected submasters.

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Submasters
examples of keystrokes

<CONFIG> Displays the submaster configuration dialogue box. <ENTER> < > <ENTER> Select Audio mode for the selected submasters. < > <ENTER> Drops down the audio input options.

AVERAGE
Responds to the average level of the audio signal, across all frequencies.

TREBLE
Responds to the treble of the audio signal (high frequencies, approx 4kHz)

MEDIUM
Responds to mid-range of the audio signal (approx 2kHz)

BASS
Responds to the bass of the audio signal (low frequencies, approx 200Hz)

< > <ENTER> Make the required selection from the list.

<F8 {OK}> Confirm the operation and exit the dialogue box.

Whenever a submaster in Audio mode is raised, and there is an audio input, the contents of that submaster are modulated in time to the music. This is the simplest way of using audio. It can also be used to much greater effect when used in conjunction with chasers and special effects. Please refer to the chapter *Chasers & Effects* for full details.

Note: When a submaster is in Audio mode, the associated information box shows the contents of the submaster channels, memory, chaser or effect - its fader level, and its mode: the word Audio in white.

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Submasters

A submaster info box showing submaster 9 in audio mode, with the contents of memory 12.

7.8

Flashkeys

Flashkeys, also known as bump buttons, are primarily used for momentarily flashing the contents of a submaster to full. However, flashkeys within ISIS can also be used for starting and stopping chasers and special effects. All flashkeys can be individually configured within ISIS to give different characteristics. The mode of each flashkey is indicated by an abbreviation displayed on-screen for each submaster.

Type Normal Solo On / Off Off Preset

Abbreviation Fla Sol O/F Off Pre

Description Flashes the submaster contents to full, subject to the Flash Master level Operates the same as in Normal mode, but kills all other channels The Flashkey becomes a toggle switch Disables the flashkey The output level of the submaster depends upon the physical value of the fader when the flashkey is pressed.

7.8.1 Configuring the flashkeys


Each submaster flashkey can be configured individually, or a list of submasters can be selected and the same flashkey mode given to all the selected submasters. They can also be individually configured to follow the level of the Flash Master level, which is a virtual fader within the software.

The flashkey modes can be selected from the submaster configuration dialogue box. The same dialogue box is also used to configure other submaster characteristics such as the priority and audio response.

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Submasters

Flashkey Settings in the Submaster Configuration Dialogue Box

examples of keystrokes

<CONFIG> Displays the submaster configuration dialogue box for the selected submasters(s). Options will be applied to all the selected submasters.

< > <ENTER> Use the cursor keys and <ENTER> to make the required flashkey mode selection.

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the selections, and exits the configuration dialogue box.

7.8.2 Normal
Normal is the default flashkey mode. When a flashkey is momentarily pressed, the contents of the submaster flash to 100% of their intensities within the submaster and proportionally to the level of the Flash Master level, if configured. If the flashkey is manually held down, the flash will remain on until the flashkey is released.

Note: If more than one flashkey is operated at a time, any shared contents will be seen on a highest takes precedence (HTP) basis.

7.8.3 Solo
In Solo mode, the submaster content is flashed in the same way as normal mode, but all other channels at the Output are simultaneously flashed to zero. When the flashkey is released, the previous output is restored.

Note: This excludes channels captured in the Live field, or in any submasters in Bypass mode, but does include all other submasters.

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Submasters 7.8.4 On / off


In this mode, the flashkey becomes a toggle switch, turning the submasters contents on and off. A red colour will indicate the flash position in the submaster information box on-screen: it will be red when the flash function is on.

Note: The ON level is proportional to the level of the Flash Master fader.

7.8.5 Off
Off disables the flashkey so that it is safe from accidental presses.

7.8.6 Preset
When a flashkey is momentarily pressed, the contents are sent to the Output at levels proportional to the submasters fader value, and proportional to the level of the Flash Master virtual fader, if configured.

This mode is more usually used for moving lights: please see the chapter *Using Scrollers & Moving Lights* for further details.

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Recording and Loading Memories

8. 8.1

RECORDING AND LOADING MEMORIES Introduction

A memory (also known as a cue) is a lighting state that is permanently recorded into the system memory, and it can be replayed whenever required. It may be a blackout, a state with channel intensities only, or it may include colour changers and moving lights.

Memories can be recorded and loaded in any working field. For example, if submaster 1 is selected, the memories will be created in submaster 1. If Stage 1 is selected, the memories will be created there and so on.

There are two basic methods for recording memories: the first, using the <REC> command, records the contents of the selected working field regardless of the position of its fader, the Grand Master fader, the Blackout function or the contents of the Live field. The second method, using the <SUM> command, records the intensities and parameters at the Output excluding the contribution made by any submasters in Bypass mode.

To record a memory as it appears live at the Output of the desk, the <SUM> command must be used. To record a memory blind, it must be created in a submaster with the fader at zero, the Preset side of a playback, the Stage side of a playback with its fader at zero, or in the Edit Memory working field, using the <REC> function.

Note: Some systems have a single keypad, operating on both channels and memories. In this case, memory numbers must be preceded with the <MEM> key.

8.2

Memory protection

The memory protect function is used to prevent unauthorised modifications to the current show. The function prevents memories from being recorded or changed, and also protects the current show as a whole: disk operations are prevented, it is not possible to delete any recorded entity, and changes to the desk configuration are not allowed.

Note: If memory protection is enabled, a red flashing key symbol is displayed on monitor 1.

By default, the memory protection is off, allowing memories to be created. Memory protection is set in the setup options of the menu.

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examples of keystrokes
<MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F7 {MEM PROTECT}> Displays the memory protection dialogue box.

Memory Protection (Dialogue box 830)

Enabling memory protection, by checking the ON option, means that no memories can be recorded.

A password is optional: if no password is entered, the memory protection is enabled and disabled simply by checking and unchecking the option in the dialogue box. If a password is required it can be any combination of letters and numbers, up to 10 characters.

Note that the password is CASE SENSITIVE. If the memory is protected with a word in capital letters, it cannot be un-protected by the same word typed in lowercase letters.

To set a password, enter the word before turning the memory protection status on. The password must be re-entered each time the protection status is changed.

Note: If a password is active and, for any reason, must be disabled, the word ADBADB (in capital letters and without spaces) can be used as a universal key.

8.3

Recording memories

The most common method for recording a memory is to use the <REC> function: this records the contents of the selected working field, regardless of the position of its fader, the Grand Master, or the Blackout function. If only one working field is being used, and it is in an active condition - its fader raised to full - then the contents of the working field and the Output will be the same. In that instance, either of the record functions <REC> or <SUM> can be used; but it is a good idea to get into the habit of using the two functions separately so that the correct one is used when necessary.

Any memory number between 0.1 and 999.9 can be used, but the total number of memories within the memory list cannot exceed a total of 1000 at any time.

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8.3.1 Recording the contents of a single working field: REC


For most situations, the lighting state to be recorded as a memory will be the content of a single working field; in this example, a single submaster. In this case, the <REC> function can be used.

examples of keystrokes

<SUB1> <MEM> <1> <REC> Records the contents of submaster 1 as memory 1.

<SUB4> <MEM> <.><1> <REC> Records the contents of submaster 4 as memory 0.1.

<SUB5> <MEM> <9><9><9><.><9> <REC> Records the contents of submaster 5 as memory 999.9

8.3.2 Recording the total output of the desk: SUM


The <SUM> function records the current Output of the desk, except for the contents of any submaster in Bypass mode (see the chapter *Submasters* for further information on submaster modes). This is an easy way of recording a snapshot of the desk in a What You See Is What You Get fashion. It is used when the required memory is the combined output of several working fields.

Note: When a memory has been recorded in this way, it is stored in the memory list, but is not loaded into any field. This is because the memory is a combination of all working fields of the desk.

examples of keystrokes

<MEM> <6> <SUM> Records the current Output of the desk as memory 6, excluding the content of any submasters in Bypass mode. Memory 6 is now in the memory list, but will not be seen in any working fields until it has been loaded (please see the section on loading, below.)

<SUB1 FADER 70%> <SUB2 FADER 80%> <SUB3 FADER 35%> <MEM> <7> <SUM> Assuming no other working fields are in use, records the proportional output of submasters 1 to 3 as memory 7. Memory 7 is now in the memory list, but will not be seen in any of the working fields until it has been loaded.

8.4

Memory times

Specific Up, Down, and Wait times can be applied to a memory or a submaster in Auto mode: these are called global times. Any time between one 10th of a second and 99 minutes 59 seconds can be entered. The Up and Down times can be the same or can have different values.

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Every memory can be recorded with its own set of times that are used in the playbacks in automatic mode, or in the submasters in Auto mode. If no times are entered by the operator when recording a memory, the default times are used. These are initially set as shown:

Time Wait Up Up Wait Down Down

Default Setting 0 seconds (cut) 5 seconds 0 seconds (cut) 5 seconds

The default times can, of course, be changed to suit the operators preference if a different time is preferred. This setting is made selecting Default Times from the Setup option of the menu.

Times can be entered by the operator in a variety of ways. The usual method is to allocate times in seconds, although minutes and tenths of seconds can also be input.

8.4.1 Up time
The up time is the time that applies to channels that are increasing in intensity, or incoming. In the playbacks, transitions are made by the contents of Preset replacing the contents of Stage. The up time is therefore applied to channels that have a higher intensity in the Preset than they do in Stage. The up time for an Auto submaster is the time taken for the virtual fader to be raised from zero.

examples of keystrokes

<UP TIME> (TIME) <UP TIME> Changes the up time only.

<REC> OR <REC> <REC> Records the memory. The record key must be confirmed with a second press if the memory already exists.

8.4.2 Down time


The down time is the time that applies to channels that are decreasing in intensity, or outgoing. In the playbacks, transitions are made by the contents of Preset replacing the contents of Stage. The down time is therefore applied to channels that have a lower intensity in the Preset than they do in Stage. The down time of an Auto submaster is the time taken for the virtual fader value to reach zero.

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examples of keystrokes

<DOWN TIME> (TIME) <DOWN TIME> Changes the down time only.

8.4.3 Wait time


The wait time is the time that applies to a delay at the beginning of a fade (the transition from Preset to Stage, or the fader movement for an Auto submaster). There can be separate up and down wait times.

examples of keystrokes

<WAIT> (TIME) <WAIT> Changes the wait time for incoming and outgoing channels.

8.4.4 Entering times in seconds


All times entered directly are interpreted by ISIS as seconds, up to a maximum of 999. Any entered number above 59 is automatically converted into minutes and seconds.

examples of keystrokes

<XTIME> <0> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to zero: this is called a cut or a snap.

<XTIME> <1><0> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 10 seconds.

<XTIME> <6><0> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 1 minute.

<XTIME> <9><0> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 1 minute, 30 seconds.

Note: The <XTIME> keypress in the examples can be the Up, Down or Wait time key.

8.4.5 Times in minutes


Fade times can be given in minutes or minutes and seconds, from 60 seconds to 99 minutes, 59 seconds. Times in minutes are entered as #.## for minutes and seconds, or ### (up to three figures) as seconds only, which ISIS automatically converts to minutes and seconds.

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examples of keystrokes
<XTIME> <1><.> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 1 minute. <XTIME> <1><.><3><0> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 1 minute, 30 seconds. <XTIME> <9><0> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 1 minute, 30 seconds.

Note: The <XTIME> keypress in the examples can be the Up, Down or Wait time key.

8.4.6 Times in 10th second


To add greater flexibility to shorter fade times, 10th seconds can be added to times up to 1 minute. Times can therefore vary between 0.1 second and 59.9 seconds, so times such as 2.5 seconds, or 47.6 seconds are possible. Times in 10th second are created in the format of #..# (seconds, point, point, 10th second).

examples of keystrokes
<XTIME> <7><.><.><5> <XTIME> Changes the selected time to 7.5 seconds

Note: The <XTIME> keypress in the examples can be the Up, Down or Wait time key.

8.4.7 Same up and down times


To create a straight forward crossfade, the same up and down times are used. The method for entering the same up and down time is to select one time direction, enter the time, and confirm the operation with the other time direction.

examples of keystrokes
<UP TIME> <4> <DOWN TIME> Changes both the up and the down times to 4 seconds. <UP TIME> <2><.><.><7> <DOWN TIME> Changes the up and down times to 2.7 seconds. <UP TIME> <2><.><4><5> <DOWN TIME> Changes the up and down times to 2 minutes 45 seconds.

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Recording and Loading Memories 8.4.8 Same up and down wait times
To put a pause on the beginning of a fade, the same up and down wait times must be plotted. The wait time is just a delay to the start of the fade, it does not create an automatic link or follow-on cue. To achieve that, an Autogo is required. The Autogo function is found in the Memory and Sequence Managers.

A delay is not normally necessary for memories that are replayed by an operator, but they are useful for delaying a follow-on cue.

examples of keystrokes

<WAIT> <2> <WAIT> Changes both the up and down wait times to 2 seconds.

<WAIT> <0><.><.><5> <WAIT> Creates a delay of 0.5 a second on the up and down times.

8.4.9 Separate up and down times


Many memories work better as split timed fades, meaning that the up and down times are different. When the up time is quicker, it can help to prevent a dip between the incoming and outgoing states. If the down time is quicker, a deliberate dip is created which can be useful when different stage areas are used, or to represent the passing of time.

examples of keystrokes

<UP TIME> <3> <UP TIME> <DOWN TIME> <7> <DOWN TIME> Changes the up time to 3 seconds and the down time to 7 seconds.

<UP TIME> <8> <UP TIME> <DOWN TIME> <2> <DOWN TIME> Changes the up time to 8 seconds and the down time to 2 seconds, creating a dip in the transition.

8.4.10 Separate up and down wait times


Separate delays can be given to the up and down times. The method is Wait - Direction - Wait (or the same direction again). In the previous examples, the same time direction key has been used to confirm the operation. With directional waits, either the wait, or the time direction key can be used to make the confirmation.

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examples of keystrokes

<WAIT> <UP TIME> <.><.><5> <UP TIME> Changes the wait up time to 0.5 a second.

OR

<WAIT> <UP TIME> <.><.><5> <WAIT> Changes the wait up time to 0.5 a second.

The memory must be recorded or re-recorded when the times have been changed.

8.4.11 All four times different


The wait up, up, wait down, and down times can all be different if required.

examples of keystrokes

<UP TIME> <7> <UP TIME> <DOWN TIME> <6> <DOWN TIME> <WAIT> <UP TIME> <2> <WAIT> <WAIT> <DOWN TIME> <4> <WAIT> The fade profile of this memory would be as follows: 2 second delay followed by the start of the up fade, 2 seconds into the up fade the down fade starts, 5 seconds later the up fade completes, and 1 seconds after that the down fade completes. Total crossfade length: 10 seconds.

8.5

Special times

Special times are a simple way of creating multi-faceted fade profiles. Some desks allow multi-part fades, but these are often limited to ten or fewer parts. The Special Times function within ISIS allows every single channel or parameter in a memory to have its own individual fade time.

If 2048 channels are in use, they could all have their own special time, ranging from a cut (zero seconds) to 99 minutes 59 seconds - thus creating a 2048 part cue!

As a safeguard, special times can only be programmed when the special times screen is selected. This prevents special times being given to channels that are still selected on the keypad instead of plotting global memory times.

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Special times, like global times, can be recorded at the same time as intensities, or added later to a recorded memory. Special times can be programmed by using the same up, down, and wait time keys described above, but the specific channels or parameters are selected prior to assigning the times.

When plotting special times, either the <UP TIME> or the <DOWN TIME> keys can be used regardless of the channel intensity or parameter value. This is because the special time is applied to a specific channel (or parameter) in a specific memory regardless of its actual value; so the direction of intensity change will depend upon the previous lighting state (which may not necessarily be sequential).

In the special times screen, there is only one column for fade times, and one column for wait times to demonstrate this.

8.5.1 Special times for channels


Any individual channel in any memory can have its own special time. Special times can also be given to lists of channels or groups.

examples of keystrokes

<STIME> Selects the special times display.

<1><1> <THRU> <2><0> <UP TIME> <4><5> <DOWN TIME> Gives channels 11 to 20 special times of 45 seconds.

<STIME> Returns the display to intensities.

<STIME> Selects the special times display.

<GROUP> <1> <UP TIME> <8> <DOWN TIME> Gives the channels that are in group 1 special times of 8 seconds.

<2><4> <UP TIME> <0> <DOWN TIME> Gives channel 24 a cut (zero seconds) as its special time.

<2><6> <WAIT> <3><0> <WAIT> <UP TIME> <2><0><.> <DOWN TIME> Gives channel 26 a special wait time of 30 seconds and a special time of 20 minutes.

<STIME> Returns the display to intensities.

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The example below demonstrates a memory with special times. Plot the memory and play it back by fading it from P1 to S1 by using the <GO> key.

examples of keystrokes

<1> <THRU> <5> <AT><AT> Sets channels 1 to 5 at full.

<STIME> <1> <UP TIME> <1> <DOWN TIME> Selects the special times display and gives channel 1 a special time of 1 second.

<2> <UP TIME> <2> <DOWN TIME> Gives channel 2 a special time of 2 seconds.

<3> <UP TIME> <3> <DOWN TIME> Gives channel 3 a special time of 3 seconds

<4> <UP TIME> <4> <DOWN TIME> Gives channel 4 a special time of 4 seconds

<5> <UP TIME> <5> <DOWN TIME> Gives channel 5 a special time of 5 seconds

<MEM> <9><0><0> <REC> Records this state as memory 900.

<STIME> Returns the display to intensities.

<P1> <MEM> <9><0><0> <LOAD> <GO> Loads memory 900 into preset 1 and starts the fade. Watch the Output screen: there are 5 different fade rates all within this one memory.

8.5.2 Special times for instrument parameters


In the same way that a special time can be given to a channels intensity, a special time can be assigned to one of the parameters of a moving light or colour changer.

Quite often this is likely to be a wait time on a parameter such as a gobo wheel, so that the gobo changes in the middle or the end of the instrument movement rather than at the beginning, or on the pan and tilt movement.

Note: For full details on parameter selection, please refer to the chapter *Using Scrollers & Moving Lights*.

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Recording and Loading Memories 8.5.3 Removing special times


Special times can be removed from selected channels and parameters from the special times screen.

examples of keystrokes

<STIME> Selects the special times display.

<3><2> <UP TIME> <F5 {RMOV ST}> <DOWN TIME> Removes any previously allocated special times from channel 32.

<3><3> <UP TIME> <F1 {DEFAULT}> Returns any allocated special times on channel 33 to the default times.

<STIME> Returns the display to intensities.

8.6

Loading memories

If a memory is recorded by using the <REC> function, it remains in the working field that it was created in, until that field is erased. When the field is erased, the memory still exists in the memory list, along with any memories that were created by using <SUM>, and can therefore be loaded into any working field at any time.

The memory can be replayed manually or automatically in a submaster, and when loaded into a playback, it can become part of a sequential memory list.

8.6.1 Loading a memory into one working field


Any memory can be loaded into any working field for playback purposes. Whether or not the loaded memory is seen at the Output will depend upon the chosen field, its mode, and the position of its fader.

examples of keystrokes

<SUB1> <MEM> <1> <LOAD> Loads memory 1 (which must have been previously recorded) into submaster 1. To see the memory on stage, the fader must be raised.

<P1> <MEM>< 3> <LOAD> Loads memory 3 (which must have been previously recorded) into the Preset side of Playback 1. To see the memory on stage, either move the faders manually, or press the <go> key.

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8.6.2 Loading a list of memories into a list of submasters


Loading lists of memories is sometimes called gang loading. In the ISIS software, gang loading is performed either with the Copy function, or by loading a pre-recorded bank.

examples of keystrokes

<MEM> <1> <THRU> < 6> <COPY> <SUB1> <THRU> <COPY> Loads memories 1 to 6 (which must have been previously recorded) consecutively into submasters 1 to 6: one memory is loaded into each submaster, producing a gang load effect.

Note: Gang loading replaces all previous contents of the affected working fields.

8.6.3 Direct Load of memories


ISIS offers a Direct Load function, which temporarily displays a list of existing memories and provides instant selection or intensity allocation of the highlighted memory.

examples of keystrokes

<MEM> <MEM> Displays the list of existing memories, together with their titles.

Error! Objects cannot be created from editing field codes.


Memory Direct Load window

WHEEL OR < > Highlight the required memory.

<LOAD> OR <AT> <AT> Directly load the highlighted memory in the current working field, or assign an intensity level.

Note: As a precaution, the Direct Load function is disabled when out of context.

8.6.4 Combining a memory with other working field contents


Memories, channels, and groups can be combined together to create new lighting states. They can be entered with a definitive intensity or, in the case of memories and channel selections from memories, proportionally to their recorded levels.

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examples of keystrokes

<MEM> <1> <AT> <AT> Adds memory 1 to the existing working field contents. If <LOAD> had been used instead of assigning an intensity level, the existing contents of the field would have been replaced by loading the memory.

<1> <THRU> <6> <+> <MEM> <2> <AT> <5> Adds channels 1 to 6 at 50% and memory 2 proportionally at 50% of its recorded intensity. By using + memory syntax, the memory is combined with the existing channel list.

<7> <THRU> <12> <+> <MEM> <3> WHEEL Adds channels 7 to 12 and memory 3 at any intensity level to the existing contents. The proportional balance of intensities within the memory is retained.

<1> <THRU> <6> <+> <GROUP> <2> <THRU> <5> <+> <MEM> <4> WHEEL The selected channels, groups, and memory 4 are added at any intensity level to the existing contents of the active field.

A selection of channels from existing memories can also be loaded into a working field without replacing any existing contents. In this way, some channels from one memory can be added - at their recorded intensities - to the existing contents of the selected working field.

examples of keystrokes

<SUB12> Selects submaster 12, which already contains some channels with intensities.

<6><1> <THRU> <7><0> Selects channels 61 to 70.

<PLOAD> Selects the Part Load function.

<MEM> <7><4><7> <PLOAD> Adds the intensities of channels 61 to 70 in memory 747 to the existing contents of submaster 12.

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8.7

Modifying memories

When a memory is loaded into a working field, it can be modified by changing the intensities, times, parameters, and so on.

A memory that has been modified flashes its number on the monitor (and in the displays on the desk surface) to warn that changes have been made to the memory, but these have not yet been saved. In this situation, there are several options available to the operator:

re-record it as the same memory complete with modifications; record it as a new memory; re-load the unmodified version of the memory.

8.7.1 Re-recording an existing memory


When a memory has been modified, it can be re-recorded to update it in the memory list simply by pressing <REC> twice.

examples of keystrokes

<REC> <REC> Re-records the modified memory in the active working field. It is not necessary to enter the memory number again before re-recording.

Note : If the memory is loaded into more than one working field, re-recording the memory in one field will cause the memory number to flash in the other fields. This is because the other working fields will still contain the unmodified memory. The flashing indicates that there is a difference between the memory loaded in the field and the current memory in the memory list.

8.7.2 Recording a modified memory as a new memory


When a memory has been modified, it can be re-recorded as a new memory. It is often easier to make new states by modifying a previous one, rather than starting each one from a blackout. In this case, when the old memory number is flashing, a new number is entered before recording.

examples of keystrokes

<CHANNEL / TIME MODIFICATIONS> <MEM> <8><0><0> <REC> Records the modified memory in the active working field as memory 800.

8.7.3 Re-loading a modified memory


When a memory has been modified but not erased from the working field, the original unmodified version can be re-loaded simply by pressing <LOAD> twice.

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examples of keystrokes
<LOAD> <LOAD> Re-loads the modified memory number into the selected field, recovering its unmodified state. It is not necessary to enter the memory number again before re-loading.

8.8

Copying memories using the keypad

Memories can easily be copied, which can increase the speed of a plotting session if there are many repeated states. When a memory is copied, the channels, intensities, parameter values, times and title are usually all copied, although the Part Copy function allows intensities or parameters or a channel selection from an existing memory to be copied.

examples of keystrokes
<MEM> <1> <COPY> <MEM> <1><0><1> <COPY> Copies memory 1 to memory 101. <MEM> <1> <COPY> <MEM> <2><0><1> <+> <MEM> <3><0><1> <COPY> Copies memory 1 to memories 201 and 301. <MEM> <1> <THRU> <5> <COPY> <MEM> <1><0><1> <THRU> <COPY> Memories 1 to 5 are copied sequentially into memories 101 to 105 (five separate memories are created). <MEM> <1> <THRU> <5> <COPY> <MEM> <1><0><1> <COPY> Copies the combined contents of memories 1 to 5 into memory 101. Any channels used in more than one memory will be copied at their highest plotted intensity.

8.9

Memory Manager

In the Memory Manager, memories can be copied, deleted, edited, named, and re-numbered. The Memory Manager can be accessed from the Managers option of the menu, or is displayed directly using the <MEM MNG> function key.

Picture of Memories Manager screen (Dialogue box 210)

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Recording and Loading Memories 8.9.1 Assigning Autogo to a memory


The Autogo function creates an automatic follow-on cue between the one memory and the next memory or event. If Autogo is selected for a memory, the next memory or event in the playback sequence will automatically start when the memory with the Autogo has completed its fade time, if operating in auto sequence in a playback.

When working in the memory editing dialogue box there is a check box for Autogo. Although the Autogo can be set in this way, there is also another, quicker way: using the Memories Manager.

examples of keystrokes
<F2 {MEM MNG}> Displays the Memories Manager. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the arrow keys to highlight a memory. If this memory is assigned as an Autogo, the following memory or event will become an automatic follow-on cue. <F4 {AUTOGO}> The select memory is assigned as an Autogo. <F8 {OK}> Exits the memories manager.

Note: Any number of memories can be forced into Autogo mode in this way.

For example, take memories 1, 2, 2.5, and 3. Memory 2.5 has a wait time of 3 seconds and there is an autogo on memory 2. The operator presses the <GO> key to play memory one. The next time the <GO> key is pressed, memory 2 is played and three seconds after it completes, memory 2.5 is played as a follow-on cue. The <GO> key must be pressed again to play memory 3.

8.9.2 Naming a memory in the Memory Manager (Title)


It can be helpful to give memories names, such as Scene one: forest, for ease of identification. The memory title is displayed within the memories manager, when a memory is loaded into a working field, and also when a playback display is selected as a monitor footer.

examples of keystrokes
<F2 {MEM MNG}> Displays the Memory Manager. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow keys to highlight the memory to be named.

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<F2 {EDIT}> Selects the edit facility. The title can be added using the alphanumeric keyboard.

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the new name and exits the edit facility. <F8 {OK}> Exits the Memory Manager. (Do not exit the manager if other memories are to be edited.)

8.9.3 Editing memory times and Autogo status


As well as entering a title, memory times can also be edited in the memory manager, and the Autogo status can be assigned.

examples of keystrokes

<F2 {MEM MNG}> Displays the Memory Manager.

WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow keys to highlight the memory to be changed.

<F2 {EDIT}> Type a title using the alphanumeric keyboard if required.

< > <ENTER> Select Autogo mode if required.

< > <1> <ENTER> Use the arrow key to select the wait up time box and enter a time of one second.

<7> <ENTER> Changes the up time to seven seconds.

<ENTER> <20> <ENTER> Leaves the wait down time unchanged and enters a down time of twenty seconds.

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the changes.

<F8 {OK}> Exits the Memory Manager.

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Recording and Loading Memories 8.9.4 Copying memories in the Memory Manager
Memories can be copied in the memories manager. The advantage of this method over the <COPY> function is that the memory list is automatically displayed, and a delta function can be used so that lists of memories do not have to increment in steps of one.

examples of keystrokes
<F2 {MEM MNG}> Displays the Memory Manager. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow keys to highlight the memory to be changed. Use <enter> to select a list of memories, if required.

<F7 {COPY}> Displays the copy dialogue box. TARGET Enter the new memory number, or the first number if a list of memories is selected.

DELTA Enter a delta offset value if required (see below).

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the copy function and exits the dialogue box.

DELTA
Delta is an option when renumbering the list. Normally, the delta setting is 1, meaning that the new numbers will increase in increments of 1 from the first number. If the delta quantity is changed, the new numbers will increment by the value entered. Therefore if the delta is 2, the new numbers will skip every other number. If the delta is 10, the new numbers will increase in tens.

8.9.5 Deleting memories from the Memory Manager


Sometimes after rehearsals, some memories are no longer needed. They can easily be deleted in the Memory Manager, and the ISIS software allows them to be recovered if they are needed later. (For more information, see section 8.10 Recovering deleted memories.)

examples of keystrokes
<F2 {MEM MNG}> Displays the Memory Manager. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow keys to highlight the memory to be changed. Use <enter> to select a list of memories, if required.

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<F3 {DELETE}> Selects the delete function. A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Delete element(s) - Are you sure?

<F8 {YES}> <F8 {OK}> Confirms the deletion process and exits the Memory Manager, if required.

8.9.6 Renumbering memories in the Memory Manager


If a lot of point memory numbers or non-sequential links have been used, or if memories have been deleted, it can be helpful to re-number memories to a more logical sequence.

examples of keystrokes

<F2 {MEM MNG}> Displays the Memory Manager.

WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow keys to highlight the memory to be changed. Use <ENTER> to select a list of memories, if required.

<F1 {RENUMBER}> Displays the renumber dialogue box.

TARGET Enter the new memory number, or the first number if a list of memories is selected.

DELTA Enter a delta offset value, if required.

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the memory renumbering and exits the dialogue box. If the new numbers allocated are the same as any existing memories, a warning is given and the operation cancelled.

8.10 Recovering deleted memories


When a memory is deleted, it is transferred to a recoverable memory list. When a memory is rerecorded, the previous version of the memory is also transferred to the same list. Because of this feature, it is possible to recover deleted memories, and also old versions of existing memories.

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The most recently deleted (or over-written) memory is always displayed at the top of the recoverable list, but all memories are date and time stamped at the point of deletion. In addition, all deletion times and dates are shown - so it is easy to find in the list!

Memories deleted by an initialisation routine cannot be recovered.

examples of keystrokes

<MENU> <F5 {TOOLS}> <F2 {RECOVER}> <F2 {MEMORIES}> Enters the recover memories function from the tools menu.

WHEEL OR < > ... <ENTER> Select the group to be recovered. A list of groups can be created by using the <ENTER> key.

<F1 {RECOVER}> Selects the recover function.

A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Header # already exists - Overwrite?

<F1 {CANCEL}> OR <F7 {NO}> OR <F8 {YES}> OR <F2 {ALL}> <F1> cancels the entire recovery procedure. <F7> prevents recovery of the memory number given in the warning. <F8> confirms recovery of the memory given in the warning and overwrites the existing version. <F2> allows all selected memory to be recovered without further warnings.

<F8 {OK}> Exits the memory recovery utility.

Note: There can be up to 1000 memories in the recoverable list, which may contain several versions of the same memory. This is why the recoverable memory list, unlike the actual memory list, will not be in numerically sequential order.

8.11 Using Edit Memory


The Edit Memory field has two functions: firstly to create new memories blind and secondly to make modifications to a list of memories in one quick operation.

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Recording and Loading Memories 8.11.1 Creating a new memory Blind in Edit Memory
New memories can be created with channel intensities, parameter values, global and special times in Edit Memory, without any of these modifications being seen at the Output.

examples of keystrokes

<EDIT MEM> <SET CHANNEL INTENSITIES> <MEM> <8><4><2> <REC> <EDIT MEM> Records the lighting state created in the Edit Memory field as memory 842. Any functions used for creating a lighting state can be used in the Edit Memory field.

8.11.2 Editing a list of memories


If modifications need to be made to a list of memories, such as changing the times, or setting a certain channel to a definitive value, the Edit Memory field can save a lot of time, as a whole list of memories are updated as a single operation instead of re-recording all the memories individually.

When a list of memories is loaded into Edit Memory, their numbers are displayed along the top of the working field monitor. Only one memory is displayed on-screen at a time: the contents of each memory can be viewed individually by using the <SHIFT> key in association with the left and right arrow keys to scroll through the list of loaded memories.

The number of the current memory is shown highlighted in the top part of the Edit Memory screen.

examples of keystrokes

<EDIT MEM> Enters the Edit Memory field and loads all memories between 1 and 6.

<SHIFT + > <SHIFT + > The loaded memories are displayed separately, and can be viewed individually in the Edit Memory field using the <SHIFT> key in conjunction with the left and right arrow keys.

<CHANNEL & TIME MODIFICATIONS> Make modifications to channels, parameters and times. The modifications are made to all the loaded memories simultaneously.

<REC> <EDIT MEM> Records the memories and exits the Edit Memory field.

Note: If a memory selection is made on the keypad before entering Edit Memory, this memory selection is automatically loaded when <EDIT MEM> is pressed.

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8.12 Memory tracking (conditional editing)


Conditional editing (if then ) is achieved with the Memory Tracking facility. This function opens a dialogue box where the required channel attributes to search for can be entered, along with the action to take when the test condition is found.

The Memory Tracking function provides a comprehensive range of test conditions. Channels to be tracked can be tested for one of the following conditions:

if the channel value is lower than x% if the channel value is higher than x% if the channel value is equal to x% if the channel value is different from x%

When the memory range is scanned, the tracked channels will be checked for this test condition. If the test is found to be true, a set action will be taken. The action is chosen by the operator, and is selected from one of the following options:

Set new value The channel intensity will be changed to a new value Increase absolute Increases the channel intensity to a definitive fixed value Increase relative Increments the channel intensity by a set amount Decrease absolute Decreases the channel intensity to a definitive fixed value Decrease relative Decrements the channel intensity by a set amount Send to Edit Memory The memory will be sent to the Edit Memory field for modification by the operator. This action will not make any automatic modification to the memory.

Memory Tracking can be configured to change all occurrences of the test condition, or the tracking can be set to stop at the first occurrence found. The selection is made from following options:

Process the range Stop when false

One other option that can be set is an important one: Zero is a value. This provides the operator with the option of selecting whether a channel intensity of zero (0%) should be included as True in the test condition.

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For example, if the tracking options were set to search for all intensities below 20% and change them to 40%, selecting the zero is a value option would include memories where the selected channel was at zero. If the option was not selected, these zero values would be ignored, and hence not modified.

The Memory Tracking function can be selected from the Tools menu, or is accessed directly using the <MTRACK> key where available.

examples of keystrokes

<CHANNEL SELECTION(S)> Select the channel(s) to be modified.

<MENU> <F5 {TOOLS}> <MEMORY TRACKING> Displays the Memory Tracking dialogue box.

Memory Tracking dialogue box

As an example, the Memory Tracking function could be used to search for channel 17 in memories 1 to 100. If its intensity is found at less than 60% in those memories, it can be changed to 70%: all the memories within the range are updated accordingly.

examples of keystrokes

<1><7> Selects the channel to be modified.

<MTRAK> Displays the memory tracking dialogue box.

< > <ENTER> Use the down arrows and <ENTER> key to navigate the dialogue box.

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The memory range in which to search must be set, as well as the test conditions and action to be taken. In this example, the following selections would be made.

Memories: from 1 to 100 Channel Value: lower than 60% Action: set new value of 70% Tracking: process the range Zero processed: not selected

<F8 (OK}> Confirms the selections and updates all the memories in the selected range.

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9. 9.1

PLAYING BACK MEMORIES & OTHER EVENTS Introduction

Memories can be recorded in the playback fields - but more importantly, they can be played back sequentially, or in any order. Using the playbacks in conjunction with the Sequence Manager makes for flexible and structured lighting replay.

The playback sequence is the ordered list of actions that will run in succession through the playbacks; usually this is a list of memories. The Sequence Manager allows the playback sequence to be manipulated and edited, allowing links and other events to be created and inserted. An event is created by the operator, and allows many different functions to be triggered simply by pressing the <GO> key. ISIS has two independent playbacks, although on the smaller operating platforms playback 2 is entirely virtual. This may seem a strange concept, but a virtual playback can be very useful - as it is safe from accidental manipulations.

9.2

The playback: Stage and Preset working fields

Each playback has two sides: S for Stage, which is effectively live (seen at the Output), and P for Preset, which is effectively blind (not seen at the Output).

Note: The following points are written on the basis that both playbacks have their fader pairs on the lower endstop of fader travel.

Each side of the playback is a working field in its own right, making a total of four playback fields. All channel and memory control manipulations described in previous chapters can be carried out in any of the four fields, but only those in S1 and S2 will be seen at the Output. Unlike submasters, only one playback field can be selected at a time. Selecting any playback field automatically de-selects a previous field. Using the intensity tools, channels, groups and memories can all be combined within a playback field. Once a lighting state has been created, it can be recorded, re-loaded and replayed in either playback at any time.

9.3

Memory links

The playback sequence normally lists memories in numerical order. A non-sequential memory number can be inserted into the sequence list if required: this process is called a Link. When a link is inserted in the playback, the sequence then continues numerically from the linked memory number.

9.3.1 Creating a link using the Link function


The Link function can be used to create a link between existing memories. This method is quicker than using the Sequence Manager.

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Some ISIS systems have a dedicated <LINK> key, other platforms can be configured so that the Link function is available on one of the available programmable keys. The Link function can also be accessed via the alphanumeric keyboard using the keystrokes /LK. A link created in this way can be performed in any working field.

examples of keystrokes

<MEM> <4> <LINK> Select the memory number to link from. <MEM> <1><0><1> <LINK> Select the memory number to link to.

A message is displayed confirming that the memory has been successfully linked in the playback sequence. In the example above, the sequence will jump from memory 4 to memory 101, then continue numerically until the last memory in the list.

If the sequence must return to memory 5 after memory 101, another link must be created after memory 101. Alternatively, an Alias type event could be used: see section 9.5.1 below.

9.3.2 Creating a link in the Sequence Manager


Links can also be created in the Sequence Manager. This is useful because the playback sequence can be viewed when inserting the link.

examples of keystrokes
<F3 {SEQ MNG}> Displays the Sequence manager. WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel or the down arrow to select the memory before the required event. The alphanumeric keyboard can be used to type in a memory number directly. <F1 {EVENT}> Enters the Editing Event dialogue box. <PREV> OR <SHIFT>< > OR <SHIFT-TAB> ON ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD Move the cursor to the Link box. <9><0><0> Enter the memory number to link to (900 in this example). <F8 {OK}> Exits the Editing Events dialogue box. The new Link event is displayed in the Sequence Manager.

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<F8 {OK}> Exits the Sequence Manager.

In the example above, the sequence will jump from memory 3 to memory 900, and then continue numerically. If the sequence must return to memory 4, another link must be created.

9.4

Intelligent Link

In more complicated shows, it may be required to have a special effect start and stop automatically, simply by the operator pressing the <GO> key. This is achieved by inserting an event into the playback sequence, either manually through the Sequence Manager, or by using the Intelligent Link function.

Intelligent Link can be used to link the contents, information and status of a submaster to the playback sequence, automatically creating and configuring the required event type. In this way, linking a submaster to the playback sequence becomes as simple as linking memories using the <LINK> key.

The Intelligent Link function can be used to:

Link a chaser to the playback sequence; Link an effect to the playback sequence; Link a cue-list/stack (chaser with individual step times) to the playback sequence; Link a memory controlled by a submaster to the playback sequence.

All information contained within a linked submaster field is automatically transferred to the playback list: content, fader value and submaster configuration are placed into an event. The event can be edited if any changes are necessary.

9.4.1 Creating an event using the Intelligent Link function


Before the Intelligent Link function is used, the operator must load the required submaster with the chaser, effect or memory to be linked. The submaster must contain a recorded memory, chaser or effect for the Intelligent Link function to be allowed.

Note that changing the recorded entity will also change the event: the chaser, effect or memory used is linked to the event.

In effect, the Intelligent Link function takes a snapshot of the content and settings of the selected submaster, and uses this information to create an event in the playback sequence. Therefore the submasters fader level and mode must be set by the operator, and a chaser or effect started if required, before the Intelligent Link function is used.

Note: It is necessary to save the content (effect/chaser/memory) of the selected submaster before using the Intelligent Link function.

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examples of keystrokes

<SUB1> <MEM> <9><9><9> <LOAD> Loads memory 999 into submaster 1.

<AUTO> <SUB1 FLASHKEY> Sets the submaster mode to Auto, and sets the output to FF.

<SUB1> <LINK> <MEM> <5> <LINK> Automatically creates an event in the playback sequence, linking submaster 1 after memory 5. All settings of submaster 1 are recorded in the event.

A MESSAGE IS DISPLAYED Confirmation is given: Submaster 1 linked after Cue 5.0

When the operator plays back the sequence, the event after memory 5 will load memory 999 in to submaster 1, set the submaster mode to Auto, and trigger the submaster. This will cause memory 999 to fade up in its recorded time to the Output all in a single press of the <GO> key.

Any existing contents of submaster 1 will be erased and replaced by this action.

The Intelligent Link function can also be used to link a chaser or effect running in a submaster to the playback sequence. See the chapter *Chasers & Effects* for further examples.

examples of keystrokes

<SUB2> <EFFECT> <9><9> <LOAD> Loads effect 99 into submaster 2.

<SUB2 FADER> <SUB2 FLASHKEY> Set the required fader level and start the effect.

<SUB2> <LINK> <MEM> <6> <LINK> Creates an event in the playback sequence, linking submaster 2 after memory 6. All settings of submaster 2 are recorded in the event.

A MESSAGE IS DISPLAYED Confirmation is given: Submaster 2 linked after Cue 6.0

When the operator plays back the sequence, the event after memory 6 will load effect 99 into submaster 2, set the virtual fader level and start the effect all in a single press of the <GO> key.

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Any existing contents of submaster 2 will be erased and replaced by this action.

Of course, the Intelligent Link function could be used to stop a chaser or effect running in a submaster if required. Simply stop the chaser or effect (or set the submaster fader to zero), and use the Intelligent Link function to create a new event in the playback sequence.

9.4.2 Editing an event created by the Intelligent Link function


Events created by the Intelligent Link function can be modified by editing the event in the Sequence Manager. Editing the event allows the submaster fader level and mode to be changed, the Autogo status to be set, and any loaded chaser or effect can be started or stopped.

examples of keystrokes

<F3 {SEQUENCE MANAGER}> Displays the Sequence Manager. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight the event to be edited. <F2 {EDIT}> Enters the edit facility for the selected event. <F2 {EDIT}> Displays the contents and settings of the selected event: make any required changes. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the changes and returns to the Sequence Manager. <F8 {OK}> Exits the Sequence Manager.

9.5

Events

When using either of the playbacks, there is a list of actions that will run in succession when the operator presses the <GO> key, or uses the playback fader pair. Normally, this playback sequence is the numerically ordered list of memories. In addition to this series of memories, ISIS allows other actions to be incorporated into the playback sequence: these are called an event. Events can be triggered manually by the <GO> key or by the playback fader pair, or triggered automatically by applying an Autogo to the preceding memory.

Each event can have multiple parts: a complete event might consist of two or more different event types. There are 10 pre-defined types of events: they are described in the sections below.

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Playing Back Memories & Events 9.5.1 Alias


An alias event is a reference to a single existing memory, which does not need to be within the range set in the playback configuration. An alias inserts one memory into the playback sequence, and then continues with the original cue list.

An alias has a different function to a link because a link inserts the remainder of the new cue list, whereas an alias merely refers to one memory. If a link were used to insert a single memory into the playback sequence, a second link would have to be created to link from the inserted memory back to the original cue list.

The difference between an Alias event, and a Link

Because an alias simply refers to one memory, rather than actually inserting it into the sequence, it is possible to replay an alias to a memory out of the range of the selected playback. If a playback is configured for memories 1 to 500, memory 600 could be included in the sequence as an alias, but not as a link. Similarly, an alias to memory 901 would be permitted, but a link is not possible.

Note: A memory must exist before it is inserted as an alias event.

9.5.2 Macro
The macro event simply inserts a pre-recorded macro into the playback sequence. A macro is any series of key manipulations that has been recorded by the operator: it could be used to load a submaster bank, for example.

For details on recording macros, please turn to the chapter *Macros and Learn Profile*.

Note: The macro must exist before it is inserted as an event.

9.5.3 Loop
A loop event will trigger a pre-recorded loop of existing memories into the playback sequence. The loop can run once, or repeat up to 99 times. For example, a loop containing 3 repetitions of memories 11.1 to 11.5 could be inserted between memories 80 and 81. Before a loop type event can be inserted in the sequence, the loop itself must be created.

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examples of keystrokes

<MENU> <F2 {MANAGER}> <F5 {LOOPS}> Enters the Loop Manager from the menu.

<F4 {NEW}> Selects a new loop.

<LOOP#> <F8 {OK}> Enter the new loop number (loop 1, for example).

<F2 {EDIT}> Select the new loop for editing.

TITLE Enter a title for the loop using the alphanumeric keyboard.

CYCLES Enter the number of repetitions.

<F8 {OK}> To confirm the changes and return to the Loop Manager.

<F5 {CONTENT}> Display the contents of the loop (this will be empty for a new loop).

<F2 {ADD}> To add contents to the loop.

<MEM #> <ENTER> <MEM #> <ENTER> Enter the first and last numbers of the memory range to loop.

<F8 {OK}> Confirm the selections and return to the Loop content dialogue box.

<F8 {OK}> <F8 {OK}> Exit the Loop content dialogue box and the Loop Manager.

When a loop event is triggered from the playback sequence, the memories contained within the loop will be repeated for the number of times specified, either manually of automatically. It is, however, possible to exit a running loop at any point and continue with the list of memories in the playback sequence by pressing <SHIFT> and <GO> together.

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Playing Back Memories & Events 9.5.4 Wait


A wait type event is simply a delay between other event types (see multi-part events, below). If an event is in Autogo mode, it is quite likely that a delay between it and the preceding memory will be required to get the timing correct.

9.5.5 Enable/Disable Move In Black


An event can be used to include setting the Move In Black function. This can be useful in the playback sequence, as the operator can trigger the change in mode by using the <GO> key. It becomes especially important during a complicated show.

The Move in Black function is specifically for motion control instruments, and is used to automatically pre-set parameters to their next used settings, if the fixture intensity is zero (off). ISIS looks ahead through the playback sequence, following any links or events, until a change in parameter values is located. If the instrument intensity is zero, the parameters are automatically adjusted so that the settings are correct when the memory containing the fixture is reached. This prevents unwanted changes during a crossfade, as parameters are pre-set while the fixtures are dark.

The operator can select a Move in Black mode where all parameters are changed in this way. This is referred to as All Off in the events creation dialogue box. Alternatively, a Move In Black mode where only unconnected parameters are pre-set to their next recorded values can be chosen. This is referred to as Unconnected in the events creation dialogue box.

Sometimes, however, it is required to see the changes happen on-stage during a crossfade, or for the operator to choose the exact instant to execute a change in the parameters. In this case, the Move In Black function must be disabled. The automatic Move In Black function can be turned off by way of an event inserted into the sequence: this option is referred to as Stop Move In Black look ahead.

The Move In Black function is described in more detail in the chapter *Using Moving Lights & Scrollers*.

9.5.6 Load submaster


This event will load a selected submaster with a recorded memory, chaser or effect. Any previous content will be erased. The event can also be used to set the virtual fader level of the submaster and to set the configuration.

If the submaster is loaded with a chaser or effect, the event can also start the special effect running. If the submaster is in Auto mode, the memory or special effect will fade in to the virtual fader level.

Note: The load submaster event is automatically created by the Intelligent Link function.

9.5.7 Control submaster fader & flash


These events can set the virtual fader value and configuration of a submaster, and set the status of the flash button. These events do not affect the content of the selected submaster.

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9.6

Sequence Manager

The Sequence Manager can be selected from the Managers option in the menu, or more directly by pressing the default <F3 {SEQ MAN}> function key. The manager shows the ordered playback sequence, and allows events to be created and edited.

The Sequence Manager window (Dialogue box 406)

The Sequence Manager also allows the operator to set the Autogo status of each memory or event, and provides a link to the Memory Manager, should memory times or titles need to be modified.

9.6.1 Creating an event


Events are created in the Sequence Manager, and can include any of the event types previously described. All event types are configured from the same dialogue box, the only difference is in which options can be changed for each type.

Events are always inserted immediately after the selected memory in Sequence Manager.

The example below demonstrates the creation of an alias type event.

examples of keystrokes

<F3 {SEQ MNG}> Displays the Sequence Manager.

WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel or the down arrow to select the required insertion point. The event is inserted after the selected memory. The alphanumeric keyboard can be used to type in a number directly.

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<F1 {EVENT}> <F1 {NEW}> Enters the Sequence Event dialogue box, used to create the event.

<ENTER> Displays the event type drop-down menu.

<ENTER> Selects Alias from the options.

< > <MEM#> <ENTER> Enter the number of an existing memory to insert in the sequence as an alias.

< > <ENTER> Check the Autogo box (if required).

<F8 {OK}> Exits the Sequence Event dialogue box.

<F8 {OK}> <F8 {OK}> Exits the Editing Event dialogue box and the Sequence Manager.

9.6.2 Creating a multi-part event


Each event can contain up to 10 parts, each part being created from one of the available event types. By creating a multi-part event, it is possible to trigger a whole series of functions and actions from a single press of the <GO> key.

To create a multi-part event, the <F1 {NEW}> function in the event editor is used to add each part in turn. Each part of the event can be assigned an Autogo to make them run automatically, or they can be triggered independently by the operator.

For example, an multi-part event could consist of a loop event followed by a wait event, followed by a macro event. The sequence would then continue according to the sequence list.

9.6.3 Naming an event (Title)


It can be helpful to give each event a title, such as Run loop 4 and macro 1, for identification. The event title can be entered whilst the event is being created, or it can be added at a later point.

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examples of keystrokes

<F3 {SEQ MNG}> Displays the Sequence Manager.

WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow to select the required event.

<F2 {EDIT}> Displays the event for editing.

<PREV><PREV><PREV> OR <SHIFT>< > OR <SHIFT-TAB> ON ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD Move the cursor to the Title box.

TITLE Use the alphanumeric keyboard to enter the title.

<F8 {OK}> <F8 {OK}> Exits the Editing Event dialogue box and Sequence Manager.

9.6.4 Editing or deleting part of an event


Each part of an event can be edited or deleted by the operator, using the same dialogue box used when creating the event.

examples of keystrokes

<F3 {SEQ MNG}> Displays the Sequence Manager.

WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow to select the required event.

<F2 {EDIT}> Displays the event for editing.

WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel, the down arrow, or keyboard to select the event.

<F2 {EDIT}> <F8 {OK}> The settings of the highlighted event type are displayed and can be changed.

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OR <F3 {DELETE}> <F8 {OK}> The highlighted event type is deleted. <F8 {OK}> <F8 {OK}> Exits the Editing Event dialogue box and Sequence Manager.

9.6.5 Deleting an entire event


An entire event is deleted from the Sequence Manager: deleted events cannot be recovered.

examples of keystrokes

<F3 {SEQ MNG}> Displays the Sequence Manager.

WHEEL OR < > <ENTER> Use the wheel or the down arrow to select the required event. Use <ENTER> to select a list of events, if required.

<F3 {DELETE}> Select deletion.

A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Delete sequence event(s) - Are you sure?

<F8 {YES}> <F8 {YES}> Confirms the deletion and exits the Sequence Manager.

9.7

Playback modes

Each playback can be set to operate in one of three ways, depending upon the status of the <SEQ> key found next to each playback.

9.7.1 Non-sequential
In non-sequential mode, the playback will repeatedly fade between the two states that are loaded in the Stage and Preset fields. If one of the fields is empty, the fade will alternate between one lighting state and a blackout. The lighting states do not have to be recorded memories: they could just be channel selections that were created in the playback field.

Alternatively, any memory number can be manually selected and loaded into the Preset as required, so that the sequence of playback is always changing. In this mode MAN is displayed on any monitor that is showing the associated playback display.

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examples of keystrokes

<SEQ> (PLAYBACK 1) Selects non-sequential mode for playback 1. The LED in the <SEQ> key is off when in non-sequential mode, and MAN is shown on any monitor showing the playback 1 display.

9.7.2 Sequential
Most theatrical shows which are strictly rehearsed will require sequential playback of memories and events - either manually or automatically. When sequential mode is selected, the memories are played back in numerically sequential order, including any point-cue numbers (such as memory 27.5), but subject to any links or events that have been programmed in the Sequence Manager.

Each time the faders are moved full travel, or the <GO> key is pressed, the contents of Preset are transferred to Stage. The previous contents of Stage are removed from the playback and the next memory in the sequence is automatically loaded into the Preset field when the fade completes.

When in sequential mode, the LED in the <SEQ> key is lit (but not flashing) and MAN SEQ is displayed on any monitor showing the associated playback display.

examples of keystrokes

<SEQ> (PLAYBACK 1) Selects sequential mode for playback 1. The LED in the <SEQ> illuminates, and MAN SEQ is shown on any monitor showing the playback 1 display.

9.7.3 Autogo-Sequential
It is possible to put the whole playback into an Autogo mode and run the whole playback sequence automatically. In this situation, it is as if the operator had put an autogo on every single memory and event in the sequence.

This mode is useful for performances that run strictly to time (for example, to a music track), or for an exhibition. When in Autogo-sequential mode, the LED in the <SEQ> key is flashing and AUTO SEQ is displayed on any monitor showing the associated playback display.

examples of keystrokes

<SHIFT> <SEQ> (PLAYBACK 1) Selects Autogo-sequential mode for playback 1. The LED in the <SEQ> flashes, and AUTO SEQ is shown on any monitor showing the playback 1 display.

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9.8

Using the playback with manual fades

Either playback can be operated manually by moving the fader pairs. Manual fades can be made in sequential or non-sequential mode. Manual fades are timed and profiled by the operator each time they are played: the look of the fade follows the fader movements.

If both faders are moved together at an even pace, a straight crossfade results. If one fader is moved before the other, a split crossfade occurs. If the preset fader only is moved, the content of the Preset field are added to the Stage, as a Pile. If only the Stage fader is moved, the Stage content is removed from the playback, thus resulting in a blackout (unless there is some output from other working fields or the Stage fader to Preset option is enabled).

Careful manipulation of the faders can result in a profiled fade where the fade rate changes throughout its duration. For example, the crossfade could be started slowly and increased in speed as the fade progresses.

Many operators prefer working in this way, and the use of high quality faders ensures maximum response from this method.

9.8.1 Continuing a manual fade automatically


A fade that is started manually can be taken over automatically by pressing the <GO> key at any point during the fade. When this occurs, the system calculates the remaining fade time relative to the position of the faders, and uses that as the automatic fade time.

For example, if a memory has a time of 10 seconds and the <GO> key is pressed when the faders are exactly half-way through their travel, the fade will automatically complete in 5 seconds - half of the original fade time.

Both faders must be returned to one of the end-stops before the next memory can be played back manually.

9.9

Using the playback with timed fades

Playbacks can be operated automatically by pressing the <GO> key. Auto fades can be made in sequential or non-sequential mode.

An automatic fade transfers the contents of the Preset to the Stage field, following the fade times of the memory, or using the default times if none were plotted. The times used in an auto crossfade are those of the memory in Preset. The previous contents of Stage are removed from the playback and the next memory in the sequence is automatically loaded into the Preset when the fade completes.

Using auto fades ensures that the look of the transition is the same for every performance, and helps to tie the lighting change in with action or music.

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Each time the <GO> key is pressed, the contents of Preset are transferred to Stage. If <GO> is pressed a second time, while a fade is still running, the incoming memory changes to the next in the list, and the combination of the first and second (unfinished) fades are faded out in the times recorded in the third memory.

examples of keystrokes
<P1> <MEM> <1> <LOAD> Loads Memory 1 into the Preset field of playback 1. <GO> Starts a crossfade into memory 1. <GO> WHEN MEMORY 1 IS COMPLETE Performs a crossfade into memory 2. <GO> BEFORE MEMORY 2 IS COMPLETE Stops the progress of the fade from memory 1 to memory 2. Starts a crossfade from this unfinished state in to memory 3, in the global times of memory 3. This Multiple Go command has no limit to the number of fades that can be executed.

9.9.1 Pausing a running fade


A running auto crossfade can be paused and resumed as required. Alternatively, after the pause, the next memory in the list can be played instead. Crossfades are paused using the <HOLD> key: if a fade is paused in this way, the LED in the <HOLD> key flashes to indicate this.

examples of keystrokes
<P1> <MEM> <1> <LOAD> <GO> Starts a crossfade into memory 1. <HOLD> BEFORE MEMORY 1 IS COMPLETE Pauses the progress of the fade into memory 1. The LED in the <HOLD> key flashes to indicate the pause. <HOLD> Resumes the progress of the fade into memory 1. <GO> Starts a crossfade into memory 2. <HOLD> BEFORE MEMORY 2 IS COMPLETE Pauses the progress of the fade into memory 2. <GO> Starts a crossfade into memory 3, from the unfinished state of memory 2.

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Playing Back Memories & Events 9.9.2 Continuing an automatic fade manually
A fade that is running automatically following its memory times, can be completed manually to change its look, or to alter its timing.

examples of keystrokes
<P1> <MEM> <1> <LOAD> <GO> Starts a crossfade in to memory 1. <HOLD> BEFORE MEMORY 1 IS COMPLETE Pauses the progress of the fade into memory 1. <PLAYBACK FADERS> Manually move the playback fader pair. There will be no change to the output of the playback until the position of the faders matches the elapsed progress of the fade (shown on-screen). Once the position of the faders has collected the progress of the fade, the fade is under manual control. Any pending wait times are not included in the manual fade: the lighting state will change as soon as the fade is collected.

9.9.3 Cut
Cut is a function that either instantaneously completes a running fade, or immediately loads the memory that is in Preset directly into Stage, thus turning it from a timed fade into a snap.

The Cut function immediately transfers the contents of Preset to Stage.

9.9.4 Pile
In normal operation, the playback is a crossfade device. The lighting state that is in Stage is completely replaced by the next memory when the crossfade is executed. Sometimes, it is desirable to add the next memory to the one on stage, rather than replacing it. In this case, the Pile function can be used instead of the Go command.

The Pile function can be used again before a previous pile has completed, in a similar way to the <GO> key, but in this case the playback is limited to 10 Multiple Piles rather than the unlimited Multiple Go.

9.9.5 Go back
A fade in progress can be reversed, or the memory list can be played in reverse order by using the <BACK> key. The Back command can also be used in conjunction with <CUT> and <PILE>. When the beginning of the memory list is reached, the first memory remains in the Preset field, and there is nothing in Stage.

9.9.6 Jump
Jump allows the memory currently loaded in the Preset field to be manually incremented through the playback sequence, taking into consideration any links and events. If a cue in a sequence has been missed, using <JUMP> is a simple way of lining up the next required memory in Preset, without having to select the Preset field and load the required memory.

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Playing Back Memories & Events 9.9.7 Back Jump


As its name implies, this command is the reverse of the Jump function. Back Jump allows memories and events to be re-loaded into the Preset field in reverse order.

If an automatic crossfade has been started by mistake, the Back Jump command is a simple way of correcting this error. Using Back Jump during a crossfade, the first memory remains on Stage and the crossfade contents are faded back out without having to select the Preset field and load the required memory.

This operation produces a different result from that using the <BACK> key. It is especially useful when a Multiple Go has been initiated by mistake. examples of keystrokes <P1> <MEM> <1> <LOAD> <CUT> Loads Memory 1 into the Preset field of playback 1. Memory 1 is Cut to Stage; memory 2 will be loaded into Preset. <GO> <GO> A crossfade into memory 2 is started. Before this is complete, a crossfade into memory 3 is begun. We now have a running crossfade between the contents of Stage (a mix of memories 1 and 2) and the contents of Preset (memory 3). <BJUMP> When Back Jump is pressed, memory 2 is re-loaded into the Preset. The running crossfade completes, but as the Preset now contains memory 2, the result is a crossfade from the current contents of Stage into memory 2. The status of the crossfade into memory three is faded out during this operation. Memory three is loaded into the Preset field when the crossfade is complete.

9.9.8 Modifying the speed of an automatic fade


The rate of a crossfade can be modified to speed up or slow down the fade, if the plotted times are not suitable. The Speed function can be used to modify the fade times before a crossfade is started, or it can be used live to change the fade rate in real time.

In both cases, the playback speed function is assigned to the wheel. Recorded memory times can be modified proportionally between 5000% (fastest) and 2% (slowest). examples of keystrokes <GO> Starts a crossfade <SPEED> WHEEL The <SPEED> key of the playback is pressed to assign the function to the wheel. Moving the wheel upwards speeds up the fade, moving it downwards slows down the fade.

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Speeds modified in these ways are displayed in two ways: as a modification factor (in percentage terms), and as real-time duration. This information is displayed in the top line of the playback field screen, and in the playback footer display when selected.

Alternatively, if the required new speed is a known finite quantity, as opposed to a variable rate change, the time of the memory currently loaded in the Preset can be changed by use of the time function keys. examples of keystrokes <DOWN TIME> <1><2> <DOWN TIME> Changes the down time of the state in Preset to 12 seconds. If this change is temporary, the memory should not be re-recorded.

9.9.9 Exiting a running loop


When a loop event is triggered from the playback sequence, the memories contained within the loop will be repeated for a specified number of times, either manually of automatically. It is possible to exit a running loop at any point and continue with the list of memories in the playback sequence. examples of keystrokes <SHIFT> <GO> Exits a running loop.

9.10 Autogo
Part or all of a sequence list can be made to Autogo - self execute without operator intervention. For selected parts of the memory list to autogo, the autogo function is allocated to the memories concerned, in either the Memory or Sequence Manager. For the whole sequence list to autogo, the playback itself can be put into Autogo mode.

9.10.1 Autogo playback


An autogo playback means that the whole playback sequence will be automatically replayed, each fade beginning as soon as the previous one has competed, subject to any wait times. The operator only needs to press the <GO> key once to activate the whole sequence.

This can be used as an easy way to operate a whole sequence within a show that is strictly timed, or to provide continuously changing ambient lighting throughout the day for public areas such as foyers or bars.

Autogo for each playback is selected by using the <SHIFT> key, because the autogo playback function is shared with the <SEQ> key. The sequence will stop running when the last memory is reached, or it can be manually stopped by pressing <SEQ> to deselect the autogo mode. Alternatively, a link can be created between the last memory in the sequence and the first (or any other) so that the sequence runs in continuous cycles.

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Playing Back Memories & Events 9.10.2 Autogo memory or event


Autogo is used for chaining two or more memories (or events) together to create an automatic followon cue. The Autogo is assigned to the memory before the follow-on cue. examples of keystrokes <F2 {MEM MNG}> OR <F3 {SEQ MNG}> Displays the Memory Manager or the Sequence Manager. WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Select the memory or event prior to the required follow-on. Use <ENTER> to select a list of memories and events, if required. <F4 {AUTOGO}> Assigns the highlighted memory(s) and event(s) an Autogo. <F8 {OK}> Exits the manager.

The Autogo function can also be set for each memory in the memory editing dialogue within the Memory Manager.

9.11 Displaying the playback status


When working in sequential mode, the playback status is automatically updated as each memory or event is replayed. If a playback display is selected as a footer in the Screen Display configuration, the sequence is shown on the monitor. The difference between this playback sequence display and the other memory lists is that the playback display follows the playback sequence, rather than numerical order of the memories. Most of the time the memories will be in numerical order, but the scrolling memory list shows the insertion of non-sequential links, and events. This allows the operator to see at a glance the memory currently on Stage, the memory loaded in Preset, and the following memories, complete with links, events, autogos, and fade times.

A playback display footer showing autogos, links and events.

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To display the playback sequence, the Display Configuration must be changed: this selection can be made via the Setup Menu. The required playback must be selected as one of the monitors footer for it to be displayed on-screen.

Display Configuration settings (Dialogue Box 810) examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F4 {SCREEN CONFIG}> Displays the Screen Configuration dialogue box. < > <ENTER> Use the arrow keys to move to the footer section of the required monitor. Use <ENTER> to display a drop-down list of available footer options. < > <ENTER> Use the arrow keys and <ENTER> to make a selection. The playback sequence can be displayed by selecting one of the options given below.

Option Xf1 Full Xf2 Full Xf1 Half Xf2 Half

Display Playback 1 in a full size footer (upper & lower areas) Playback 2 in a full size footer (upper & lower areas) Playback 1 in a half size footer (upper or lower areas) Playback 2 in a half size footer (upper or lower areas)

<F8 {OK}> Confirms the selection.

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Chasers & Effects

10.

CHASERS & EFFECTS

10.1 Introduction
A chase is a sequence of changing lighting states. Chasers are easily programmed on ISIS, and provide the operator with a convenient and accurate way to repeatedly run a cycle of lighting states.

An effect is used to apply a pre-programmed pattern to a list of channels. Each effect type is easily adjustable in terms of speed, direction and intensity. Effects can be used to produce a firelight flicker, lightning, or a ripple effect, for example.

A chaser is a sequence of lighting states that are defined by the operator. Values are entered for each channel or parameter in every step. An effect applies a pre-defined pattern to a list of channels that are provided by the operator. Intensities are not entered for each channel: they obey the selected effect type.

So, there is a difference between a chaser and an effect within ISIS, although they can both be considered under the term of special effects. Chasers and effects can be repeated indefinitely, for a given number of cycles, or set to music through the audio input.

There is a specific type of effect used to create changes for moving light instruments; this is covered in the chapter *Effect Generator* in the ISIS Operators Manual.

Using chasers or effects in ISIS is quick and simple, as they are created, recorded and played back in one of the submaster working fields. Once a chaser or effect has been recorded, it can be replayed manually, used with automatic timings, or incorporated into the sequential playbacks by using the Intelligent Link function.

10.2 Creating a chaser


To create a chaser it must first be loaded in its empty form into a submaster. Then, each lighting state or step is created, and the channel, intensity, parameter and time elements can be added and changed. Once a chaser has been created, it can be started by pressing the submasters flashkey.

All of the channel and intensity tools can be used when creating chasers. In addition to channels, group and memory contents can be given intensities in chaser steps. A few examples are given below.

Groups and Memories can be included in chaser steps, at a proportional intensity level.

When a chaser is loaded into a submaster, the working field display looks very different from the normal channel intensities screen. Although the screen appears unfamiliar, it is in fact showing the contents of the submaster, which just happens to be a chaser.

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What is shown is a list of the chaser steps and their contents, rather than all the channels. This gives a good visualisation that a chaser is loaded.

The working field screen with a chaser loaded in submaster 2.

Each step of a chaser can contain a single channel or a number of channels, and each channel can have a separate intensity if required. Steps can also be left empty, creating a chaser with an uneven rhythm. Duplicated steps can be used to create a longer period for a particular lighting state, but it will be shown in section 10.11 below that the time-per-step value can be changed for each step.

A few simple examples will demonstrate how a chaser is created and modified.

10.2.1 A simple 1 channel per step chaser


This simple example demonstrates the fundamentals of creating a chaser in a submaster, adding the required steps, and assigning channel intensities. examples of keystrokes <SUB2> <CHASER> <F3 {NEW}> Loads a new (empty) chaser into submaster 2. <SUB 2 FADER> Raise the fader to see the chaser being created step by step, if required. <1> <AT> <AT> Step 1 of the chase is channel 1 at full. <ADD STEP> <2> <AT> <AT> Step 2 is channel 2 at full. <ADD STEP> <NEXT> <AT> <5> Step 3 is channel 3 at 50%.

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<ADD STEP> <NEXT> WHEEL Step 4 is channel 4 at any intensity set by the wheel. <SUB 2 FLASHKEY> <SUB 2 FLASHKEY> The flashkey parks the chaser ready to start, then starts the chaser running. It can be viewed and modifications made to the speed, direction and so on, as described in the following sections. <REC> The chaser is recorded: the next available chaser number is allocated.

10.2.2 A chaser using combinations of channel intensities in each step


Each step can contain more than one channel, and each channel can be assigned its own intensity level. This flexible approach allows an extremely customised chase to be created. examples of keystrokes <SUB4> <CHASER> <9><9> <LOAD> Loads chaser 99 (previously unrecorded) into submaster 4. Here, the operator has designated a specific chaser number to be used. <SUB 4 FADER> Raise the fader to see the chaser being created step by step, if required. <1> <THRU> <5> <AT> <AT> Step 1 is channels 1 to 5 at full. <ADD STEP> <1> <THRU> <5> <AT> <AT> Step 2 is channels 1 to 5 at full the same as the previous step.

<ADD STEP> <7> <AT> <7> <9> <AT> <AT> Step 3 is channel 7 at 70% and channel 9 at 100%. <ADD STEP> <GROUP> <2> WHEEL Step 4 is group 2 at an intensity set by the wheel. <ADD STEP> <MEM> <8><8> <AT> <5> Step 5 is memory 88 at an intensity of 50% <ADD STEP> <1> <+> <2> <AT> <7> <GROUP> <3> <AT> <2> <MEM> <6> WHEEL Step 6 is a mixture of channels, groups, memories and intensities. <SUB 4 FLASHKEY> <SUB 4 FLASHKEY> The flashkey parks and then starts the chaser running.

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<REC> Chaser 99 is recorded. Note: The <STEP> keys can be used to step forward and backward through the chaser steps manually whilst the chaser is being created. Channels can be added to and removed from the highlighted step, or their intensities can be modified.

10.2.3 Using existing memories in chaser steps


ISIS offers two ways to include a memory in a chaser: the first method of assigning an intensity has been demonstrated in the example above. However, a memory can also be added in a chaser step by using the Part Load function.

By using Part Load, all memory information is included in the chaser step, including parameter settings for moving light instruments or colour scrollers. The Part Load function also allows the operator to select which channels or parameters are loaded from the memory into the chaser step.

Note: Once a memory has been inserted into a chaser, both remain independent: changing the contents of the memory will not change the contents of the chaser. There is no permanent link between chaser steps and memories.

Suppose a step is required, created out of an existing memory: memory 1. example of keystrokes <SUB5> <CHASER> <F3 {NEW}> Loads a new (empty) chaser into submaster 5. <SUB 5 FADER> Raise the fader to see the chaser being created step by step, if required. <MEMORY> <1> <PLOAD> <MEMORY> <1> <PLOAD> Memory 1 is loaded into the selected step. All information of each instrument (intensity and parameters) is loaded into the step.

Note: The normal Part Load functions remain available during this operation. If a specific part of a memory is needed, first select the channels and then use the Part Load function.

10.3 Creating an effect


To create an effect, it must first be loaded in its empty form into a submaster. The channels required in the effect can then be entered, an effect type chosen, and other settings made. Once an effect has been created, it can be started by pressing the submasters flashkey.

The type of effect is chosen when creating the effect, although it can be changed later if necessary. A simple example will demonstrate how an effect is created and modified.

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examples of keystrokes <SUB1> <EFFECT> <F3 {NEW}> Loads a new (empty) effect into submaster 1. TYPE The Effect Type dialogue box is automatically displayed.

WHEEL OR < > <ENTER> OR USE THE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Select the effect type from the list by using the wheel or the arrow keys, and pressing <ENTER> or <F8 {OK}> to confirm. Channel intensities and patterns depend upon the effect type selected. The alphanumeric keyboard can be used to directly type in an effect type. <CHANNEL LIST> <ENTER> Enter a list of channels to be included in the effect: a channel can be included more than once. The effect will operate on the channels in the order they are entered. <SUB1 FLASHKEY> The flashkey starts the effect running. It can be viewed and modifications made to the speed, direction and so on, as described in the following sections. <SUB1 FADER> Raise the fader to see the effect at the output.

10.3.1 Effect types


There are 20 different pre-defined effect patterns which can be selected when creating a new effect, or changed by using the <TYPE> command. These patterns are used as the building blocks for effects. Attributes such as speed, direction, and so on can still be altered with some of the effect types.

The available effect types are listed below:

Effect Type Type 1

Description Basic effect Similar to a basic chaser in which each channel entered is played sequentially.

Type 2

Basic effect with audio speed control As type 1, but the step changes in time with an audio input.

Type 3

Symmetrical effect Like a chaser, but the effect starts from both ends of the channel list simultaneously.

Type 4

Symmetrical effect with audio speed control

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As type 3, but the step changes in time with an audio input.

Type 5

Build effect Starts at one end of the channel list and progressively adds all the other channels one by one.

Type 6

Build effect ,VU meter bass response A build effect, but the build progress varies depending upon the strength of the bass frequencies of an audio input.

Type 7

Build effect ,VU meter mid-range response As type 6 but responding to mid-range audio frequencies.

Type 8

Build effect ,VU meter treble response As type 6, but responding to treble frequencies.

Type 9

Build effect ,VU meter full range response As type 6 but responding to the average audio input.

Type 10

Wipe effect Starts like a build, progressively adding all the channels, but when they are all on, it progressively subtracts them again.

Type 11

Turning group Starts with one channel, adds the second, then adds the third but simultaneously removes the first. When the fourth is added, the second is subtracted, etc.

Type 12

Waving group Similar to a turning group, except that the channel intensities increase progressively with each step. The fade type is set to crossfade, and a wave effect is created.

Type 13

Audio wave As type 12, but the step changes with the audio input.

Type 14

Individual flickering A A random flicker effect, where each channel is independent of all the others and can have any intensity.

Type 15

Individual flickering B As type 14, but utilising a second random generator.

Type 16

Individual random triggering

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A random effect, but channel levels are either off or full.

Type 17

Global flickering Another flicker generator, but all the channels in the list have the same intensity at any one time.

Type 18

Flash effect A lightning simulator. All channels have the same intensity at any one time.

Type 19

Fire effect A A fire simulator. The channels are subjected to global flickering to emulate a typical fire flicker.

Type 20

Fire effect B As type 19 but utilising a second random generator.

Type 21

Effect generator for motorised luminaires A special type of effect, designed for moving light instruments. See the chapter *Effect Generator* in the ISIS Operators Manual for details.

10.4 Recording chasers & effects


Once a chaser or effect has been created, it should be recorded. This allows the chaser or effect to be re-loaded into another working field, and included in the sequential playback by using the Intelligent Link function. Recorded chasers and effects can also be included in submaster banks.

Recording a chaser or effect is very simple: once it has been created, press <REC>.

If a chaser or effect is modified, such as altering the speed, it should be re-recorded. This will save the changes made and ensure that the chaser or effect looks the same if it is loaded in another working field. Re-recording a chaser or effect requires the <REC> key to be pressed twice.

10.5 Loading chasers & effects


Once a chaser or effect has been recorded, it can be loaded into any other submaster field and can also be included in submaster banks. Only one chaser or effect can be loaded into each single submaster, but all the submasters can contain chasers or effects simultaneously.

The same rules apply to loading chasers and effects in submasters as to loading memories. If more than one submaster is selected for the load function, the chaser or effect is loaded into all of the selected submasters.

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examples of keystrokes <SUB1> <CHASER> <1> <LOAD> Loads chaser 1 into submaster 1. <SUB2> <THRU> <SUB8> <EFFECT> <1><0> <LOAD> Loads effect 10 into submasters 2 to 8. All eight submasters will have the same contents.

Note: Loading a chaser or effect replaces all previous contents of a submaster.

10.5.1 Direct load of chasers & effects


In the same way as groups and memories, chasers and effects can be loaded into a working field by using the Direct Load function. In this way, a temporary list of recorded chasers or effects is displayed on the monitor - from which the operator can load the required entity. example of keystrokes <CHASER> <CHASER> Displays the list of existing chasers, together with their titles.

Chaser Direct Load window WHEEL OR < > Highlight the required chaser. <LOAD> Directly loads the highlighted chaser in the current working field.

Note: The Direct Load function is disabled when out of context.

10.6 Chaser & effect settings


In the examples given above, chasers and effects were created in their simplest form, with no regard to the speed, direction or fade type. They will have used the default settings shown below.

Setting Speed Direction Fade type Mode Cycles

Default Value 1 second per step Forward Cut (snap) Positive Infinite

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These settings can be changed by the operator, to customise the special effect. However, speed, direction, fade type and mode are not available for all types of effect. For example, there cannot be a direction for a flicker effect. These functions are automatically disabled if they are not compatible with the effect type selected.

10.6.1 Speed
The default time of 1 second per step means that the chaser or effect will change once every second. This speed (sometimes called rate) is variable from 0.1 second to 60 minutes.

The Speed function affects all steps equally: it is the global rate of the chaser or effect. Note that chasers can have an independent time for each step, in which case the Speed function can adjust the time for each step proportionally. Chasers with individual step times are discussed in section 10.11.

Speed can be changed whilst the chaser or effect is running.

The Speed control is assigned to the fader wheel by pressing the <SPEED> key in the Special Effects area of the desk, or by pressing SPEED on the touchscreen. Moving the fader wheel upwards will increase the speed and downwards will decrease it. Once the value has been set, the wheel should be re-assigned to intensity control by pressing <SPEED> or SPEED a second time.

10.6.2 Direction
The direction of a chase or effect is the order in which the steps are replayed. The direction can be changed to alter the appearance of a chaser or effect. Direction is changed using the <DIR> key, and can be changed whilst a chaser or effect is running. The current direction is shown next to Dir in the information bar at the top of the working field monitor.

Direction can be changed whilst the chaser or effect is running. Certain effect types (such as flickers) cannot have direction modifications.

The available directions are listed below: the default direction is forwards.

Setting Forwards

Display >

Value Chasers run from the first step, down the list to the last step, then starts again at the beginning. Effects run through the channel list to the last channel, then starts again at the beginning.

Backwards

<

The direction is reversed so that chasers run from the last step, up the list to the first step, then starts again at the bottom. Effects run from the last channel in the list back to the first channel, then starts again at the end.

Bounce

<>

The chaser or effect runs forwards from beginning to end, then backwards from end to beginning, then forwards again, and so on.

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Chasers & Effects 10.6.3 Fade type


The fade type is the profile, or attack envelope, used to move between the steps of a chaser or effect. Fade type can be changed to provide a different transition between the steps of a chase or the channels of an effect. Fade type is changed using the <FADE> key, and can be changed whilst a chase or effect is running. The current fade type is shown next to Fad in the information bar at the top of the working field monitor.

Fade type can be changed whilst the chaser or effect is running. The available fade types are listed below: the default type is cut.

Setting Cut (or square) Triangle Sawtooth 1 Sawtooth 2 Crossfade

Display

Value The step changes suddenly each time the step time expires. The channels going up and down in intensity snap as each step changes. Channels in each step fade up and down for the duration of the step time, meaning there are always channels changing in intensity. Incoming channels snap in at the start of the step, then fade out over the duration of the step. Incoming channels fade up for the duration of the step, then snap out. Channels crossfade between steps: step two will fade in as step one fades out. No change in intensity is seen if a channel is at the same value in consecutive steps

10.6.4 Mode
Mode describes the action of the chaser or effect on the channels in each step. The mode can be changed to produce a different look to the special effect. Mode is changed using the <MODE> key in association with the function keys, and can be changed whilst the chase or effect is running. The current mode type is shown next to Mod in the information bar at the top of the working field monitor.

Mode can be changed whilst the chaser or effect is running. The available modes are listed below: the default mode is positive.

Setting Positive Negative Audio Positive Audio Negative MIDI

Display + +Audio -Audio

Value The default mode sets the channels in each step to their intensities, while other channels in the other steps are turned off. The negative mode turns the channels in the current step off, while all the other steps are on. The chaser becomes inverted in terms of intensities. The audio mode can be selected from positive and negative, which are identical to the positive and negative modes described above, but in audio mode the step changes not according to time per step, but to the beat of an audio input. In this case, the <SPEED> control adjusts the audio response level: the value is displayed next to LVL in the information bar at the top of the working field monitor.

MIDI

Steps will change in response to MIDI triggering. For details, please refer to the chapter *MIDI CONTROL* in the ISIS Operators Manual.

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Details of setting up the audio input are given in section 10.12 in this chapter.

10.6.5 Cycles
The default number of cycles is infinity, which means that the chaser or effect will run continuously until it is manually stopped. The Cycles function enables an absolute quantity of repetitions to be programmed, so that the chaser or effect has a limited time to run.

The number of cycles can be adjusted between 1 and 999, or set to infinity. The number of cycles is changed using the <CYCLES> key, and can be changed whilst a chase is running.

Cycles can be changed whilst the chaser or effect is running.

10.6.6 Viewing channel intensities as bargraphs


When working with chasers or effects, it can be useful to change the display mode for channel intensities from the normal numeric mode to bargraphs. The bargraphs option displays the intensity of each channel pictorially, meaning that the action of the special effect can be visualised more easily.

Note: The bargraphs facility is a toggle function found in the Setup menu it may be worth creating a macro for it!

examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F5 {DISPLAY FORMAT}> Enters the Display Format dialogue box from the Setup option of the menu. < > ... <ENTER> Move the cursor to the Bargraphs check box and make the selection. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the changes and exits the dialogue box.

10.7 Chasers with moving lights


Chasers are a quick and simple way of making moving lights move! Chasers avoid some of the subtleties of using moving lights in the playbacks and are ideal for creating simple repetitive movements or colour changes.

This section shows how to incorporate some of the moving light functions into chasers, but full details of these functions and how to use them extensively is given in the chapter *Motion Control Use*.

Chasers offer a quick way to make moving lights move - but are not the best method for creating movements: for this it is better to use dedicated effects. See *Effect Generator* in the ISIS Operators Manual for more information.

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examples of keystrokes <SUB6> <CHASER> <F3 {NEW}> Loads a new (empty) chaser into submaster 6. <SUB6 FADER> Raise the submaster fader to see chaser being created, step by step. <CHANNEL SELECTION, INTENSITY, PARAMETER MODIFICATION> Sets channel intensities and motion control elements. The moving light positions can be from pre-recorded motion control libraries, or memories. <ADD STEP> Adds the second step of the chaser. <CHANNEL SELECTION, INTENSITY, PARAMETER MODIFICATION> Sets channel intensities and motion control elements. <ADD STEP> Adds the next step of the chaser. <CHANNEL SELECTION, INTENSITY, PARAMETER MODIFICATION> Sets channel intensities and motion control elements. <SPEED> <DIR> <FADE> <MODE> These functions are used to refine the chaser. <REC> Records the chaser.

Note: Be careful with the speed control with moving lights: the chaser can run faster than moving light motors. If the instruments appear to be switching rather than moving properly, try slowing down the speed.

10.7.1 Viewing the One Step screen


Working with motion control instruments within the conventional chasers display - showing all the steps and the channels that they contain - is not very useful when the chaser is being created. In this case the chasers screen can be changed from displaying all steps to only one step in which case all the parameter values can be displayed. The one step screen can also be used with intensity-only chasers if it is preferred, but it is particularly useful when working with moving lights.

Note: This facility is a toggle function found within the Setup menu it might be worth creating a macro for it!

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examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F5 {DISPLAY FORMAT}> Enters the Display Format dialogue box from the Setup option of the menu. < > ... <ENTER> Move the cursor to the One Step check box and make the selection. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the changes and exits the dialogue box.

10.7.2 Viewing instrument parameters in a monitor footer


ISIS offers the operator extremely flexible screen configurations, with each monitor being divided into a main section, and two footer areas. The information displayed in each area can be defined, and changed, as required.

When working with moving lights, it may be useful to display the instrument parameters directly on one of the footers. In this case, it is not necessary to use the one step screen described above. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F4 {SCREEN CONFIG}> Enters the Screen Configuration dialogue box. < > <ENTER> Use the down arrow to move the cursor to one of the Footer fields of the required monitor, and display the available options by pressing <ENTER>. < > <ENTER> Select one of the Parameter options. <F8 {OK}> When the selection is correct, <F8 {OK}> applies the selections and exits the dialogue box. If anything is wrong or uncertain, press <F7 {CANCEL}> to exit the dialogue box without making any changes.

Note: Screen configuration is discussed in more detail in the chapter *System Setup*.

10.8 Pausing a special effect & manual control


When a chaser or effect is running, it can be paused at any point by using the <PAUSE> key. The current step will be held indefinitely, until it is resumed by a second press of the key. When a chaser or effect is paused, the two <STEP> keys can be used to manually step forward or backward through the steps.

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examples of keystrokes <PAUSE> Pauses a running chase or effect at the current step. <STEP > OR < STEP> Manually moves through the steps. <PAUSE> Resumes a paused chaser or effect from the current step.

Note: To park (or stop) a running chaser press <SHIFT + FLASH>.

10.9 Autofade: times for chasers & effects


So far, chasers or effects have been operated entirely manually: using the submaster flashkey to start and stop each chaser. However chasers and effects can be given fade times and, because they are loaded into submasters, the submaster can be set to Auto mode.

In this case, the flashkey will start the chaser or effect running and fade its levels up in the up time entered. Pressing the flashkey a second time makes the chaser or effect fade out in the downtime entered, and stop running when the fade out is complete.

The times are only applied to a chaser or effect if the submaster is in Auto mode. If the submaster is not in Auto mode, no times are obeyed: the chaser or effect starts and stops manually by use of the associated flashkey.

Note: It is not possible to use Auto mode if the submaster is in Audio mode.

10.9.1 Up and down times


A special effect is started as soon as the flashkey is pressed and playback of the steps obeys the speed value, but at the beginning and end of the chaser or effect, channel intensities fade up or down according to the times set.

10.9.2 Wait time


The wait time for a chaser or effect is a delay at the beginning of the effect, once the flashkey has been pressed. Separate wait up and wait down times cannot be plotted - because for special effects there is no such thing as a wait down.

10.9.3 Sustain time


When a chaser or effect is running, the time it takes between the completion of the fade up to the start of the fade down is called the sustain time, and this is calculated automatically by ISIS when Auto mode is selected. This calculation considers the up & down times, the time per step, and the cycles.

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Sustain time = (no of cycles x no of steps x time per step) - (up time + down time) Global time = up time + sustain (wait down) + down time The diagram shows the different time elements associated with chasers and effects in Auto mode.

Points on the graph are explained in the tables below.

Time Up Time Down Time

Period C to E G to I

Time Wait Time Sustain Time

Period A to C E to G

Point A B C E G I

Description Flashkey is pressed to start the sequence Wait Up delay before fade up of intensities Start of the fade up of intensities End of the fade up period Start of the fade down period, intensities start to decrease End of the fade down period, sequence stops automatically and resets

D F H B

If flashkey pressed, jump to H If flashkey pressed, jump to G If flashkey pressed, jump to I If flashkey pressed, jump to I

10.9.4 Setting chaser and effect times


The up, down and wait times in a chaser or effect are set in the same way as the times for memories. Once the times have been changed, it is advisable to re-record the chaser or effect.

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examples of keystrokes <SUB13> <CHASER> <2> <LOAD> Loads chaser 2 into submaster 13 <AUTO> Sets the submaster to Auto mode. <UP> <7> <UP> <DOWN> <1><5> <DOWN> Sets the up time at 7 seconds and the down time at 15 seconds. <REC> <REC> Re-records the chaser. <SUB 13 FLASHKEY> When the flashkey is pressed to start the chaser, the chaser begins but it takes 7 seconds to reach full intensity. If the flashkey is pressed again, once the chaser is running at full intensity, the channels fade out over 15 seconds. When the intensities are all at zero, the chaser stops running and sets itself back to Park ready to run again.

Note: If the up time has not completed when the flashkey is pressed to start the down fade, the channels never reach full intensity - the sustain time is skipped.

10.9.5 Parameter times in chasers


Parameters in chasers obey the time-per-step speed setting. However, the actual parameter change is dictated by the fade type setting, and the type of parameter being used. The table below summarises the action of parameters in chasers.

Chaser Fade Type Triangle Crossfade Cut Sawtooth

Fade-type Parameres Parameter will fade for the duration of the step.

Jump-type Parameters Parameter will change in the middle of the step.

Parameter will change at the beginning of the step, the time-per-step value acting as a pause between steps, rather than a step timing.

10.10 Changing the flashkey mode


So far, the submaster flashkey mode operates as a start-stop button. This mode can be changed to start-pause or start-step independently for each submaster. These modes are described below: the default mode is start-stop.

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Setting Start-Stop

Description This mode can be considered as normal. The special effect is started the first time that the flashkey is pressed, and stopped and reset the second time that it is pressed. In this mode, the chaser or effect is reset and parked so that the next time it is used, it begins on the first step. Begins the special effect as normal. However the second time the flashkey is pressed it stops running, and remains on the current step, with that step still live: it is not parked. If the flashkey is pressed again, the special effect resumes from the point of the pause Starts the special effect as normal. The second operation of the flashkey pauses it and subsequent presses manually change the step. This method allows the operator to be in full control of the step changes. Steps change to a manual rhythm determined by the operator and are not influenced by time per step or audio input

Start-Pause

Start-Step

The flashkey effects mode is set in the Submaster Configuration dialogue box, and applies to all selected submasters.

Submaster Configuration dialogue box: Special effect flashkey mode

Note: To park (or stop) a running chaser or effect press <SHIFT + FLASH>.

10.11 Chaser with individual step times Cue Stacks


The time-per-step (T/S) of a chaser is the time taken from the start of the first step to the start of the second step: it is the rhythm of the effect. By default the step time is one second. It was demonstrated in section 10.6.1 above how the Speed function could be used to change the rate of a chaser, by increasing the time per step equally for all steps. However, ISIS also allows the operator to assign an individual step time to each step of a chaser. This provides finer control over the look of a chaser. The Speed function can still be used to change the chasers rate, but it affects all steps proportionally. If the fade type is set to Crossfade, a chaser with individual step times allows multiple crossfades to be created. If memories are used to create the chaser steps, the action of the chaser is similar to that of the playbacks. This action is sometimes referred to as a stack or cue-list.

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Chasers & Effects 10.11.1 Setting individual step times

A chaser with individual step times is created in the same way as a conventional chaser in ISIS, however each step is assigned an individual time using the <SHIFT> key in association with the wheel. example of keystrokes <SUBMASTER 24> <CHASER> <1><0> <LOAD> Chaser 10 is loaded in submaster 24: the first step is automatically selected. <CHANNELS / INTENSITIES> Enter the channels and intensities for the first step. <SHIFT + WHEEL> The step time for this step is set by holding <SHIFT> and using the wheel. <CREATE OTHER STEPS AS REQUIRED> Use the <ADD STEP> function to create additional steps. Set each step time by holding <SHIFT> and using the wheel. <REC> The chaser is recorded.

The Speed function can still be used to change the overall rate of the chaser. In this case, the function will affect the time of each step equally, maintaining the proportional difference between step times.

10.11.2

Using a chaser with individual steps

Using a chaser with individual steps is identical to a standard chaser. However, use of the submaster flashkey becomes more important. The flashkeys have 3 different modes for chasers:

Start - Stop Start - Pause Start - Step

For a chaser with individual step times, the StartStep mode can be considered as the Start button of a playback list. Each time the flashkey is pressed, the chaser moves to the next step. Depending on the fade type of the chaser, different fades between steps are possible. If Crossfade mode is selected, then the chaser will act as a crossfade between two steps.

The flashkey mode is set in the Submaster Configuration dialogue, as described above.

Important: To park (or stop) a running chaser press <SHIFT + FLASH>.

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10.12 Responding to an audio input


If the mode of a chaser or effect is set to Audio+ or Audio-, the step will change in response to an audio input. The point of each step change is not necessarily a steady rhythm: it changes when the audio input crosses a user-definable threshold level.

The higher the threshold level the fewer the audio trigger points, and so the slower the step change. The trigger point is on the up slope of the audio signal, the down slope has no effect (please see diagram).

Note: An audio mode chaser will only run when there is an audio source connected and audio has been enabled in the Setup menu.

The threshold level is changed by using the special effect Speed function. When a chaser or effect is set to either of the Audio modes, the T/S box changes to LVL and displays the current trigger level. To get the best results from audio chasers and effects, it is likely that this threshold level will be different for each piece of music used. For that reason, when a chaser or effect is working well with one piece of music, it should be recorded to include the threshold level and a new chaser or effect created for another piece of music. (These can be copies of the initial chaser or effect with just a minor modification to the threshold level). examples of keystrokes <SUB14> <CHASER> <3> <LOAD> Loads chaser 3 into submaster 14. <MODE> <F3> Changes the mode to Audio+. <SUB14 FLASHKEY> Starts the chaser. <SPEED> WHEEL Adjusts the threshold level. <REC> <REC> Re-records the chaser when it is working well with the audio input.

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If there is no response to the audio signal, check that audio is enabled in the General Configuration options from the Setup menu.

10.12.1

Enabling the audio input

For audio effects to work, the audio input must be enabled and supplied with a good input level. The audio input is configured in the General Configuration dialogue box. It is best to configure the audio with the actual piece of music that will be used. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F3 {GENERAL}> Displays the General Configuration dialogue box, giving access to all input options. < > <ENTER> Activate the audio input by checking the box. < > WHEEL Move the cursor to the audio input level. The level can be set between 0% and 100%. The wheel can be used to set the input level, or it may be entered directly from the keypad. The audio input and the attenuated level is visualised on-screen via bargraphs when an audio signal is present. The optimum level allows the signal to peak occasionally, but not persistently. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the operation and closes the dialogue box.

10.13 Modifying chasers & effects


Any existing chaser or effect can be loaded and modified at any time. The modifications remain in the selected submaster until the submaster is erased. The next time the chaser or effect is loaded it will revert to its last recorded version. Of course, after the modifications, the chaser or effect can be rerecorded, or recorded as a new entity.

When a chaser or effect is modified, its number flashes to indicate that the changes made have not been recorded, in the same way that a memory number flashes when a memory has been modified.

10.13.1

Changing speed, direction, fade type and mode

The speed, direction, fade type and mode can be changed as described in previous sections above. Each function can be changed while the chaser is running, if required.

Not all modifications are allowed on all effect types; direction, for example, cannot be changed on flickers.

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Chasers & Effects 10.13.2 Adding or deleting channels from chaser steps

During the course of creating a chaser, or later during modification, it may be necessary to add or remove channels from steps. Channel intensities can be modified, or the contents of an entire step can be removed. examples of keystrokes <SUB15> <CHASER> <4> <LOAD> Loads chaser 4 into submaster 15. <SUB15 FADER> Sends the chaser contents to the Output for visible modification, if required. <STEP > Moves the cursor to the required chaser step. <1><3> <AT> <6> Adds channel 13 at 60% to the selected step. All channel intensity methods can be used for setting intensities in chaser steps. <STEP > <4><7> <AT> <0> Removes channel 47 from the selected step.

10.13.3

Adding or deleting chaser steps

During the course of creating a chaser, or later during modification, it may be necessary to add or remove entire steps from chasers. examples of keystrokes <SUB15> <CHASER> <5> <LOAD> Loads chaser 5 into submaster 15. <STEP > Moves the cursor to the required chaser step. <ADD STEP> Adds a step after the selected one. The step is empty until channel modifications are made. <STEP > Moves the cursor to the required chaser step. <DEL> <DEL> Pressing <DEL> once deletes the contents of the step but not the step itself. Pressing <DEL> a second time deletes the whole step and subsequent steps are re-numbered accordingly.

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Chasers & Effects 10.13.4 Adding or deleting channels from an effect

Channels can be added to, or subtracted from, the channel list of an effect by using the <+>, <->, <NEXT>, <PREV> and <THRU> keys. examples of keystrokes <SUB12> <EFFECT> <5> <LOAD> Loads effect 5 into submaster 12. <+> <1><2> <-> <1><3> <ENTER> Adds channel 12 and removes channel 13 from the effect. The effect operates on the channel list in the order they are entered.

10.13.5

Changing the effect type

The effect type can not be changed when the effect is running. A running effect must be stopped before the type of effect can be selected. examples of keystrokes <TYPE> Displays the Effect Type dialogue box.

WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Select the effect type from the list by using the wheel or the arrow keys, and pressing <ENTER> or <F8 {OK}>. Channel intensities and patterns depend upon the effect type selected.

10.13.6

Re-recording an existing chaser or effect

When modifications have been made to a chaser or an effect, its number flashes to warn that the modifications have not been saved. The changes are kept whilst the chaser or effect remains loaded, but once the submaster is erased the modifications will be lost unless it is re-recorded.

To re-record the chaser or effect with the same number, press <REC> twice. This action will make the modifications permanent.

10.13.7

Recording modifications as a new chaser or effect

A modified chaser or effect can be recorded as a new entity. Often it is quicker to make a new special effect based on an existing one rather than by building it from scratch.

When an existing chaser or effect has been modified it can be given a new number and recorded. The new number replaces the original one in the selected submaster, but the original entity still exists and can be reloaded into any submaster when required.

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examples of keystrokes <CHASER> <1><7> <REC> Records a modified chaser in the currently selected submaster as chaser 17.

10.14 Chaser & Effect Managers


The Managers can be accessed from the Managers menu, or more directly from the Chaser or Effect keys followed by <F1 {MANGER}>. In the manager, chasers or effects can be copied, deleted, edited, named, and re-numbered in a similar fashion to memories and groups.

10.14.1

Viewing the chasers or effects list

The relevant list is automatically displayed whenever the manager is selected. examples of keystrokes <CHASER> <F1 {MANAGER}> Displays the Chaser Manager. Initially a list of recorded chasers is displayed. However, chasers can be created, edited, copied, and deleted in the chasers manager.

Chaser Manager (Dialogue box 230)

10.14.2

Editing chasers & effects (title and times)

A title can be added for ease of identification in the manager and in the lists, and global times can be added. These times are the fade in and fade out times, and only work when the submaster containing the chaser or effect is in Auto mode. examples of keystrokes <EFFECT> <F1 {MANAGER}> Displays the Effect Manager.

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WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight the chaser to be edited.

<F2 {EDIT}> Displays the Effect Header information: type a title and set the times, if required. <F8 {OK}> <F8 {OK} Confirm the changes and exit the dialogue box.

Editing an effect

Note: The effect header dialogue box contains all information about the effect, but only the parts in the highlighted boxes, such as title and times can be edited in this way.

10.14.3

Renumbering chasers & effects

Just like memories and groups, chasers and effects can be re-numbered if they have been created out of numerical sequence, or some items have been deleted. examples of keystrokes <CHASER> <F1 {MANAGER}> Displays the Chaser Manager.

WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight a chaser to be renumbered, or enter a number directly using the keyboard. Use <ENTER> to select a list of chasers or effects for renumbering. <F1 {RENUMBER}> Enter the new number into the Target box. If more than one chaser is being renumbered, a delta offset can also be entered. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the renumbering operation.

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Chasers & Effects 10.14.4 Copying chasers & effects

Chasers or effects can be copied in the relevant manager. <EFFECT> <F1 {MANAGER}> Displays the Effect Manager. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight an effect to be copied. Use <ENTER> to select a list of effects for copying. <F7 {COPY}> Enter the new number into the Target box. If more than one effect is being copied, a delta offset can also be entered. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the copy operation.

10.14.5

Deleting chasers & effects

If a special effect (or list of special effects) is no longer required, they can be permanently deleted. Deleted chasers and effects CANNOT be recovered. examples of keystrokes <CHASER> <F1 {MANAGER}> Displays the Chaser Manager.

WHEEL OR < > OR USE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel or the down arrow to highlight a chaser to be renumbered, or enter a number directly using the keyboard. Use <ENTER> to select a list of chasers or effects for renumbering. <F3 {DELETE}> Selects the delete function. A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Delete element(s) - Are you sure? <F8 {OK}> OR <F7 {NO}> Confirms or cancels the deletion.

IMPORTANT: Deleted chasers and effects CANNOT be recovered.

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10.15 Intelligent Link for chasers & effects


Chasers and effects can be incorporated into the playback sequence, and run by the operator with a simple press of the <GO> key. In this way a complicated playback list can be built up with the integration of different events.

Using the Intelligent Link function, all information and status of a submaster can be linked automatically to the playback list by means of an event. The event can easily be edited if changes are necessary.

10.15.1

Creating an event using the Intelligent Link function

Before the Intelligent Link function is used, the operator must load the required submaster with the chaser or effect to be linked. The submaster must contain a recorded chaser or effect in order for the Intelligent Link function to be allowed.

In effect, the Intelligent Link function takes a snapshot of the content and settings of the selected submaster, and uses this information to create an event in the playback sequence. Therefore the submasters fader level and mode must be set by the operator, and the chaser or effect started if required, before the Intelligent Link function is used. examples of keystrokes <SUB1> <CHASER> <1> <LOAD> Loads chaser 1 into submaster 1. <SUB1 FADER> <SUB1 FLASHKEY> Start the chaser and set the required fader level. <SUB1> <LINK> <MEM> <6> <LINK> Automatically creates an event in the playback sequence, linking submaster 1 after memory 6. All settings of submaster 1 are recorded in the event. A MESSAGE IS DISPLAYED Confirmation is given: Submaster 1 linked after Cue 6.0

When the operator plays back the sequence, the event after memory 6 will load chaser 1 in to submaster 1, set the virtual fader level and start the chaser running all in a single press of the <GO> key.

Existing contents of the submaster will be erased and replaced by this action.

Of course, the Intelligent Link function could be used to stop a chaser or effect running in a submaster if required. This is achieved using the same method demonstrated above, but making sure that the chaser is stopped with the flashkey and/or the fader is returned to zero before the Intelligent Link function is used.

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Chasers & Effects 10.15.2 Editing an event created by Intelligent Link

Events created by the Intelligent Link function can be modified by editing the event in the usual way. This allows the submaster fader level and mode, Autogo setting of the event and the chaser or effect status to be changed.

Please see the chapter *Playing Back Memories & Events* for further details.

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The Live Working Field

11.

THE LIVE WORKING FIELD

11.1 Introduction
Live is another working field: it is like a special submaster but without a physical fader. Memories can be created and loaded in it and channels or moving light parameters can be manipulated.

The Live field is special because any channels or parameters that are manipulated are captured in the field, preventing other working fields from affecting their values. The captured levels can be released when they are no longer required in the Live field by a number of subtle, and not so subtle, methods.

Channels in Live take precedence over other submasters and playbacks, but are conditional to the value of the Grand Master, and the Blackout function.

11.2 Capturing channels and parameters


Whenever a channel or parameter is manipulated in the Live field, it becomes captured. Further manipulations on captured channels or parameters can take place in Live, but no other fields can control channels or parameters that have been captured. Captured intensities remain constant before the Grand Master.

Live over-rides all other working fields, except a submaster in Bypass mode. Live is proportional to the Grand Master, Auditorium, Blackout, and Override values.

Live is useful when certain channels or parameters should not change. Parameters can be captured to prevent modification of important functions. For example, a reset parameter can be captured in Live mode, or the fan speed of a colour scroller captured at a quiet level.

The Live field is selected by pressing the <LIVE> key. While Live is selected, any channels or parameter values that are modified will be captured. Live is deselected either by pressing the <LIVE> key again to return to the previously selected field, or by selecting any other working field.

If any channels or parameters are captured in Live their values are shown in red, and a red C is shown in the information strip at the top of the working field.

11.2.1 Intensities
All channel and intensity tools described in the chapter *Channel Control* can be used to capture channels in Live. Once channels have been selected, they must be assigned an intensity to capture them in Live.

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The Live Working Field 11.2.2 Parameters


Once a parameter of an instrument is selected and modified in the Live field, it becomes captured. The selection and adjustment of parameters is explained in the chapter *Using Instruments*, but below is a simple example of how to capture a scroller fan speed in Live. Full details of selecting and adjusting parameters are given in the ISIS Operators Manual.

The example below works with channel 81, which has been defined as a scroller with parameter 1 = colour, parameter 2 = fan speed. examples of keystrokes <S1> <8><1> <AT> <7> <COLOR> WHEEL <F8 {OK}> Sets channel 81 to 70% in Stage and changes its colour by using the wheel. Use the function key <F8 {OK}> to exit the colour function once the value has been set. <LIVE> <8><1> <COLOR> <F3 {SPD}> WHEEL <F8> <LIVE> Selects Live, allocates the fan speed parameter to the wheel by using <COLOR> and <F3 {SPD}>, and then sets the fan speed. The Live field is then de-selected.

Note: The fan speed parameter may be assigned to any of the function keys F3 to F7, depending on the number of parameters the colour changer has.

In this example, the intensity and colour are set in the Stage field, and can therefore be modified at any time. The fan speed setting is captured in Live and can only be further modified in Live, or in a submaster in bypass mode.

Note: Colours can also be selected by frame number, from a list of colour names, or by using the parameter encoder wheels. Please see the chapter *Using Instruments* for more details.

11.3 Releasing captured channels and parameters


When captured channels and parameters are no longer required in Live, they must be released via the Free command before they can be controlled by other working fields.

There are 3 ways of using the Free command: FREE method Free Instantly Free to the Wheel Free to the Playback Action Immediately frees captured channels. Their intensity will snap to zero if they are not in use, or to the highest output level from other working fields. Releases captured channels to the wheel. They can be manually faded to match the output value from other working fields. Releases captured channels to one of the playbacks. No change in intensity will occur until the next crossfade or pile is executed.

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If only some of the captured channels or parameters are selected, only the selection will be released by Free operations. If no channels or parameters are selected, all the captured channels and parameters are released together.

Live does not have to be selected for Free to work: <FREE> can be used at any time.

11.3.1 Free Instantly (Free Free)


Pressing the <FREE> key twice is the easiest way of releasing captured channels. The Live field does not have to be selected to use the Free function. In this case, the channels and parameters are released instantaneously and their levels will snap to their highest level in any other working field.

This method is useful in focusing and rehearsal situations, but perhaps not acceptable for performance situations. The <FREE> key, like <ERASE>, must be pressed twice in order to avoid accidents! examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL / PARAMETER SELECTION> Selects a list of channels and parameters to be released. <FREE> <FREE> Releases the selected captured channels and parameters only. OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Clears any selection on the keypads. <FREE> <FREE> Releases all captured channels and parameters.

11.3.2 Free to the wheel


Transferring the captured channels to the wheel allows them to be manually released. They are faded until they reach their highest value in any other working field contributing to the Output.

The wheel can be moved in either direction and the channel levels will increase or decrease as required. The wheel is working not to set a finite level, but to change the difference in levels. The direction of wheel movement is the operators choice, and can even be changed half way through the operation.

For example, if some channels are captured at 50% in Live but they are at intensities ranging from 20% to 80% in the S1 field, the wheel can be moved in one direction only but the intensities will increase or decrease to match their levels in S1.

When the levels have been matched, they change from red to white on the monitor to indicate that they are no longer captured in Live but have been transferred to the field contributing to the Output.

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The Live Working Field


Note: Each time a channels intensity is matched in this way, it is automatically cleared from the selection, so when all channels are matched, the error message Empty channel list is given because there are no longer any channels selected and under control by the wheel.

examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL / PARAMETER SELECTION> Selects a list of channels and parameters to be released. <FREE> <F3 {WHEEL}> WHEEL Releases the selected captured channels and parameters only, at the rate wheel movement. OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Clears any selection on the keypads. <FREE> <F3 {WHEEL}> WHEEL Releases all the captured channels and parameters, at the rate of wheel movement.

11.3.3 Free to the playback


In a performance situation, it can be useful to transfer captured channels and parameters to the active playback. When transferred, there is no change to the levels of the captured channels until the next fade is executed. At that moment, the levels change to those of the state in Preset, in the times of that fade. Captured channels can be transferred to either playback in this way.

Note: Channels captured in Live that have a value in a submaster will snap to their values using this mode. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL / PARAMETER SELECTION> Selects a list of channels and parameters to be released. <FREE> <F1 {>S1}> <GO> Transfers the selected captured channel levels only to S1.These channels will fade to their levels in the incoming memory in its fade times. OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Clears any selection on the keypads. <FREE> <F1 {>S1}> <GO> Transfers all captured channel levels to S1. These channels will fade to their levels in the incoming memory in its fade times.

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Note: The <F2 {>S2}> function key can be used to free the channels to the second playback.

11.4 Loading memories in Live


Memories can be loaded into the Live field in the same way that they can be loaded into any other field. When a memory is loaded in Live, all channels are captured at the levels in the memory. This includes capturing all the zero intensity channels at zero.

Channels captured at zero are displayed with a red double dash (--) symbol as an intensity. In this case, to make intensity changes these channels must be further modified in Live, or in a submaster in Bypass mode. No other manipulations will have an effect at the output. examples of keystrokes <LIVE> <MEM> <1> <LOAD> Memory 1 is loaded in Live: all channels are captured, no matter what their intensity.

Important: Loading a memory in Live will capture the intensity values of ALL channels, even those at 0%.

11.5 Recording memories in Live


When intensities and parameters have been set in Live, they can be recorded as a memory using the same methods for recording in other working fields. The channels and parameters in the new memory remain captured in Live until they are released with the Free function. Channels that have zero intensity are not captured by this method.

Remember that the Live field is before the Grand Master value, so there is a difference between recording in Live with <REC> and recording in Live with <SUM>. examples of keystrokes <LIVE> <CHANNEL MANIPULATIONS> <MEM> <9><2><1> <REC> A lighting state in the Live field is created, and recorded as memory 921, regardless of the position of the Grand Master fader. <LIVE> <CHANNEL MANIPULATIONS> <MEM> <9><2><2> <SUM> A lighting state in the Live field is created. This state along with contributing channels from other fields is recorded as memory 922, proportional to the Grand Master fader. Memory 922 is not loaded in any field, but exists in the memory list. However, channels and parameters that were manipulated in Live remain captured.

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11.6 Erasing Live

Erasing Live is not normally a recommended operation.

The nature of the Erase function means that all channels are interrogated momentarily by the function, so if the operator proceeds with an erase operation, ALL channels will be captured at zero.

No further manipulations will affect the Output, except a submaster in Bypass mode. For this reason a warning message is displayed on-screen, requiring confirmation of the Erase. examples of keystrokes <LIVE> <ERASE> The Erase function is begun in the Live field A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Are you sure? - All channels will be captured at zero. <F7 {NO}> OR <F8 {YES}> F7 cancels the operation. There is no change to the Output, or to the contents of Live. F8 confirms the operation and the Live field is erased: all channels are captured at zero.

Using the Erase function in Live will capture ALL channels at 0%. Further modification will not be possible in any other normal working field.

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12.

USING COLOUR CHANGERS & MOVING LIGHTS

12.1 Introduction
ISIS software allows multi-parameter DMX devices such as moving lights and colour changers to be controlled from a single control channel. A device such as this is called an instrument.

When a scroller or moving light channel is selected, immediate control is given not only to the lamps intensity, but also to the other parameters of the instrument, such as colour, position, focus and gobo. Scroller colours can be selected by frame number, colour name, or by manually searching through the gelstring.
Note: Defining a channel as a scroller or moving light and an introduction to setting up the instrument is described in the chapter *Setting Up Scrollers & Moving Lights*.

12.2 Instrument parameter groups


Within each instruments definition, each parameter is allocated to one of four different parameter groups. These parameter groups are used to divide the various parameters of the instrument into logical categories.

12.3 12.6 12.9 12.12 12.15

Group A B C D

12.4 12.7 12.10 12.13 12.16

Name Azimuth Beam Colour Diverse

12.5 12.8 12.11 12.14 12.17

Typical Contents Movement parameters: pan and tilt Beam parameters: shutter, iris, focus, gobos, prisms Colour parameters: cyan, yellow & magenta mixing, colour wheels Other parameters: reset, motor speeds

The groups are used to selectively enable and disable control of the instruments parameters. There are no rules as to which parameters are included in which groups; the groups are for operator convenience.

When an instrument is selected for the first time, no parameter groups are selected - therefore only the intensity can be modified. Manipulations of the trackball or parameter wheels will not have any effect on the value of parameters when they are not selected.

The parameter groups can be selected individually, or in any combination. When a parameter group is selected, the parameters contained become active and can be modified: the trackball and encoder wheels become live and the selected parameters will change in value when the wheels are moved.

Intensities can be given to instruments of all definition types simultaneously, and different types of fixtures can be moved together using the trackball, or encoder wheels. However, only instruments of the same definition can have other parameters modified at the same time.

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12.18 Controlling colour changers


Allocating a definition incorporates all parameters of an instrument into a single control channel. Only this one channel number needs to be entered to enable control of intensity, colour, and any other parameters such as fan speed or velocity. When a colour changer channel is selected, its intensity can be controlled in the normal ways, and its other parameters are ready for use as required.

Whenever a colour changer channel is selected, whether or not it has an intensity, the colour and other associated parameters can be modified. If a list of channels is selected, colour and other parameters can only be modified if all instruments are of the same definition type.

Note: The only exception to this is when loading and manipulating pre-recorded motion control libraries. All the red colours from different colour changer and moving light types can be grouped together into the Red wash motion control library. See the section *Overview of Motion Control Libraries* below for more information.

There are three methods for selecting the colour of a scroller: they are dependent upon the instrument definition and operator preference.

12.18.1

Intensities

The intensity parameter is assigned to the fader wheel and channel control keypad. It is controlled in the same way as controlling the intensity of any standard channel in any working field.

If only the intensity is being modified, the list of selected channels can contain instruments of all types to be modified simultaneously: standard channels, colour changers, and moving lights.

12.18.2

Continuous colour selection (Free mode)

The colour of a selected scroller can be changed to any part of the gelstring either by turning the associated rotary encoder wheel, or by temporarily allocating the colour parameter to the wheel. This method of selecting the colour can be used for any colour changer definition.

Some colour changer definitions have been defined with the colour parameter having only a single linear step, as opposed to a fixed number of colour positions, and this is the only method that can be used to select the colour of these devices. examples of keystrokes <1> Selects channel 1 (which has been defined as a colour scroller). <COLOUR> WHEEL The <COLOUR> key assigns the Colour function to the fader wheel. Move the wheel in either direction to move the colour scroll forwards or backwards. Any part of the gelstring can be selected in this way, whether or not it is a whole colour frame. <COLOR> OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Press <COLOUR> (or <CLEAR> twice) to release the Colour function from the fader wheel. This must be done before another channel selection can be made.

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The colour parameter can also be accessed from a rotary encoder wheel, where available. <1> Selects channel 1 (which has been defined as a colour scroller). <C GROUP> <ENCODER WHEEL> Activates the C Group (colour) parameters on the encoder wheels. A colour can now be selected using the encoder wheel. Alternatively, the encoder wheel can be enabled by using the <SHIFT> key when first moving the encoder wheel. In this case, the C Group parameters do not need to be enabled. <SHIFT + ENCODER WHEEL> Directly connects the encoder wheel to the output without the C Group (colour) parameters being activated.

12.18.3

Colour selection by frame number

Most colour changer definitions have been created with a discrete number of steps defined in their colour parameter. These steps correspond to the number of frames in the colour changer and mean that frames can be chosen directly. The Colour function is used to select a frame number, and is persistent - allowing frame numbers to be selected without having to press <COLOUR> prior to each one. When the Colour function is no longer required, it must be deselected. In addition to entering a frame number directly, the colour can also be changed by using the <NEXT> and <PREV> keys. examples of keystrokes <1> Selects instrument 1 (which has been defined as a colour changer). <COLOUR> <3> <ENTER> Frame number 3 is selected from the gelstring. Colour numbers must be selected with two digits, so for numbers less than 10 the number must be confirmed with <ENTER>. <NEXT> Selects colour 4. <COLOUR> OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Press <COLOUR> (or <CLEAR> twice) to release the colour function from the fader wheel.

12.18.4

Colour selection by name

A useful feature in ISIS is the ability to select a colour frame by its name - names are assigned to steps in the device definition.

The Colour List function is available directly on some hardware platforms. Alternatively, the function keys can be used to display the list of colour steps.

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12.19 Parameters
examples of keystrokes <1> <COLOUR> <F2 LIST> Selects instrument 1 (which has been defined as a colour changer) and displays the list of frames.

The List of Steps (frames) for a colour changer WHEEL OR < > ... <ENTER> OR USE THE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel, the down arrow key or keyboard to highlight a colour. Use <ENTER> to select the highlighted colour. <COLOUR> OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Press <COLOUR> (or <CLEAR> twice) to release the Colour function from the fader wheel.

12.19.1

Adjusting additional parameters

When the Colour function is selected, the function keys are loaded with all of a colour changers parameters. Which function is assigned to which key depends upon the device definition. examples of keystrokes <1> <COLOUR> Loads the available instrument parameters of channel 1 (which has been defined as a colour changer) on to the function keys. <F3 {SPD}> WHEEL The parameter loaded to key F3 is selected (in this example fan speed). The wheel is used to change the value of the selected parameter. <COLOUR> OR <CLEAR> <CLEAR> Press <COLOUR> (or <CLEAR> twice) to release the Colour function from the fader wheel.

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Any additional parameters can also be modified by the rotary encoder wheels, where available. <1> Selects instrument 1 (which has been defined as a colour changer). <D GROUP> <ENCODER WHEEL> Activates the D Group (diverse) parameters on the encoder wheels. A parameter can now be adjusted using the encoder wheel.

Alternatively, the encoder wheel can be enabled by using the <SHIFT> key when first moving the encoder wheel. In this case, the D Group parameters do not need to be enabled. <SHIFT + ENCODER WHEEL> Directly connects the encoder wheel to the output without the parameters being activated.

Tip! For a parameter such as fan speed, which needs to be set at an inaudible level, this manipulation can be carried out in LIVE in order to capture the parameter value.

12.19.2

Adjusting colour frame alignment and adding frame names

When the colour parameter of a scroller is created in the instrument definition, the step values are calculated automatically. In most cases these default values turn out to be correct, but occasionally the steps need to be slightly modified to trim the colour positions to completely cover the light beam. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F3 {CHANNELS}> <F5 {MOTION CONTROL}> <F1 {DEFINITIONS}> Displays the List of Instrument Definitions. WHEEL OR < > OR USE THE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel, the down arrow key, or the keyboard to highlight a definition number. <F2 {PARAM}> Displays the list of parameters of the selected definition. WHEEL OR < > OR USE THE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel, the down arrow key, or the keyboard to highlight the colour parameter. <F5 {STEPS}> Displays the steps contained in the selected parameter.

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The Parameter Steps Adjustment dialogue box ENABLE DMX SELECTION & SELECT DMX ADDRESS If the changes are to be seen live on a particular instrument, the DMX selection option must be enabled. The DMX address of the specific instruments colour parameter must also be entered. Use <ENTER> to enable the DMX selection. Use the down arrow to select the DMX address box and enter a number from the keypad.

The left-hand column of figures in each section is the step number and cannot be changed.

The next column(s) of figures are the values for each step. The default values are shown, but they can be changed with the fader wheel. If the DMX selection option has been enabled, any changes made with the wheel will be seen on the instrument. If the steps have two numbers associated with them, these are the start and end of each step, and both may need to be trimmed to suit the current gelstring. If the steps have only one number shown, these are the central position of each colour frame. The final column in each section is blank by default, but a 4 character name can be given for each step, if required. Step names are useful because they can be displayed on-screen instead of the parameter value, and allow the colour frame to be identified when using the colour list function. <F8 {OK}> When the steps adjustment is complete and any required names entered, confirm the modifications and exit the dialogue box.

12.20 Initialising moving light instruments ready for use

Before moving light instruments can be used, they may require initialising. The initialisation procedures will not be required by all moving lights in order to operate correctly, and are generally only required for instruments with a large number of parameters.

The values used for initialising each type of instrument are stored in the instruments definition, but these values can be changed even when the instrument is patched and in use. For details on changing the initialisation values, please see the ISIS Operators Manual.

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12.20.1

Opening the instrument using Open

When first using a moving light, some may need several parameters moving or opening just to see the light beam. The Open function provides a quick solution to this problem - a single keypress sets the parameters of the selected instruments to their open values. The open value of each parameter is set in the instruments definition. This is the value at which light is able to pass uninterrupted through the parameter. The open value can be changed even when the instrument is patched and in use. Open can be used selectively on the parameter groups of the instrument: only the selected parameter groups will be set to their open values. This can be useful if only the colour and gobo settings need to be opened, for example, but not the pan and tilt settings. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select the channels to be opened. <PARAMETER GROUP SELECTION> Select the parameter groups to be opened. If all parameters need to be opened, all four parameter groups should be selected. <MCLIB> <F5 {OPEN}> Sets the selected parameters of all selected channels to their open values.
Note: Some hardware platforms have direct access to the Open function via a dedicated key or the touchscreen.

12.20.2

Resetting the instrument using Reset

Some parameters have been programmed with a non-zero reset value. This is the value at which the instrument starts the built-in reset routine for calibration or maintenance functions.

Some instruments may need several parameters set at a specific value in order to trigger the reset function of the fixture. The Reset function provides a quick solution to this operation - a single keypress sets all the parameters of the selected instruments to their reset values.

The reset value for each parameter is programmed in the instruments definition, but is one of the options that can be changed even when the instrument is patched and in use. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select the channels to be reset. <PARAMETER GROUP SELECTION> Select all parameter groups for reset. <MCLIB> <RESET> Sets the parameters of all selected channels to their reset values. Note: Some hardware platforms have direct access to the Reset function via a dedicated key or the touchscreen.

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Using Colour Changers & Moving Lights 12.20.3 Ignition of the instrument lamp using Ignit

Some parameters have been programmed with a non-zero Ignition value. This is the value at which the fixtures lamp ignites (or strikes).

Some instruments may need several parameters set at a specific value in order to trigger the lamp on function of the fixture: the Ignition function provides a quick solution to this operation. The ignition value for each parameter is programmed in the instruments definition, but is one of the options that can be changed even when the instrument is patched and in use. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select the channels to be ignited. <PARAMETER GROUP SELECTION> Select all parameter groups for ignition. <MCLIB> <F7 {IGNIT}> Sends all selected parameters of all the selected channels to their ignition values. Note: Some hardware platforms have direct access to the Ignition function via a dedicated key or the touchscreen.

12.21 Controlling moving light instruments


When a moving light channel is selected, its intensity can be controlled in all the normal ways with the keypad and wheel, and its other parameters are ready for use as required. Only a single channel number is entered by the operator to gain control of the instrument: there is no need to remember the order of the instruments parameters in its DMX allocation table.

Intensities can be given to instruments of all definition types simultaneously, and different types of fixtures can be moved together using the trackball or encoder wheels. However, only instruments of the same definition can have other parameters modified at the same time.

Once the instruments parameters have been set they can be recorded in memories, or into Motion Control Libraries which allow parameters from the four control groups - (A)zimuth, (B)eam, (C)olor, (D)iverse - to be loaded simultaneously to different instrument types.

12.21.1

Intensities

The intensity parameter is assigned to the fader wheel and channel control keypad. The intensity parameter of an instrument is controlled in the same way as controlling intensities of any standard channels in any working field.

If only the intensity is being modified, the selected channel list can contain instruments of all types to be modified simultaneously: standard channels, colour changers, and moving lights.

Intensities can be given to instruments of all definition types simultaneously.

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12.21.2

Azimuth - making the instruments move

To make an instrument move, the A Group of parameters must be enabled. This assigns the azimuth parameters (pan and tilt) to the trackball and rotary encoder wheels.

When an instrument and its A group is selected, movement of the trackball will move the instrument. Ideally, the instrument should move in the same direction as trackball movements. However this is not always possible with moving body instruments because of their 360 pan.

Instruments can be moved singularly, or as a list of channels: any number of instruments of different definition types can be moved simultaneously. It may be useful to record similar instrument types together into groups, so that they can be selected quickly. See the chapter *Groups* for information on creating and using groups.

Pan and Tilt can be changed for instruments of all definition types simultaneously.

Once the instrument positions are set they can be used directly from the submasters, recorded in a Motion Control Library (MCLib), or recorded into a memory. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select instrument(s) and assign intensity. The instrument may need to be opened to see the light. <A GROUP> Enables the Azimuth group for the selected instrument(s). When the group is selected, it is highlighted in white on the parameters screen and the LED in the <A GRP> key lights up (or blinks if fixtures with different definitions are selected). <TRACKBALL> Use the trackball to move the instrument light beam. OR <ENCODER WHEELS> Use the rotary encoder wheels to move the instrument light beam. One wheel is used for pan, the other for tilt movements.

Remember, instruments may not necessarily move in the same direction as the trackball, depending upon where and how they are rigged. Please refer to the chapter *Setting Up Scrollers & Moving Lights* for further information to correct this.

12.21.3

Adjusting other parameters

When an instrument is selected for the first time, no parameter groups are enabled, and only the intensity can be modified. Accidental manipulations of the trackball or digital encoder wheels will not have any effect on the value of a parameter when its group is not selected.

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The parameter groups can be selected individually, or in any combination. When a parameter group is enabled, the parameters contained become active and can be modified: the trackball or encoder wheels become live and the selected parameters will change in value when the wheels are moved.

When a parameter group is enabled, the parameters in that group are highlighted in white on the parameters screen in the same way as selected channels, and the LED in the parameter group key lights up (or blinks if channels with different definitions are selected).

Parameters in the A group are always assigned to the trackball, but are also available on the encoder wheels. Parameters in other groups are automatically assigned to the digital encoder wheels when the group is selected. The last parameter group selected will be active on the encoder wheels.

As the instrument may well have more parameters than available encoder wheels, the wheel page must be turned to access the remaining parameters on the encoder wheels. This is achieved by using the <PG+> and <PG-> keys to turn the parameter wheel page. The parameters currently assigned to the encoder wheels can be identified on the parameters screen as they are displayed with a red background (and wheel number where space allows). On some hardware platforms, the parameter abbreviations are shown in LED windows next to the digital encoder wheels. For platforms without encoder wheels, the parameters can be individually assigned to the wheel. The <PG+> and <PG-> keys are then used in the same way, selecting which parameter is assigned to the wheel. In this case, only one parameter (in addition to pan and tilt) can be modified at a time. examples of keystrokes <ALT + PARAM> Assigns the wheel to parameter control. The wheel can also be assigned to parameter control from the function keys. <PG+> <PG-> Selects the active parameter. WHEEL Modifies the active parameter. <ALT + PARAM> Returns the wheel to intensity control.

Alternatively, the Unfold function can be used to assign the parameters of the instrument to the submaster faders: this allows multiple parameters to be adjusted simultaneously. Please see section 12.24 below for further details on the Unfold function.

Several instruments of the same definition type may have their parameters adjusted simultaneously, but it is not possible to control the parameters of different instrument types together (with the exception of azimuth parameters). If instruments of more than one definition type are selected, the LEDs in the parameter group keys flash to warn that a contradictory selection has been made. Once instruments have been used and de-selected, ISIS remembers which parameter(s) and groups were last used, so that the next time that the instruments are selected, the same parameter selection is made.

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If a channel is deselected, ISIS stores the settings of the parameter groups and also the last wheel page selection. These are automatically restored when the channel is recalled.

Specific parameter configuration and selection The parameters of an instrument can be configured to the operators preference, allowing both the resolution and encoder wheel position to be defined. These settings are made for each parameter in the instruments definition.

It is also possible to make a specific selection of parameters from within a parameter group, without enabling all group parameters. This can be useful when loading or re-recording a Motion Control Library, or part-loading or part-recording a memory.

12.21.4

Encoder wheel resolution

Each parameter is allocated a resolution factor when the definition is first created. The encoder wheel resolution is determined by this value. By default, the resolution value is 0, meaning that the encoder wheel is in fine mode. This allows very detailed setting of the parameter. Some parameters are given a non-zero resolution factor in the definition, to make parameter adjustment faster on the encoder wheels. This is especially useful for 16-bit parameters, which have a wide range of values, and can take a long time to change. If the resolution value is changed in this way to put the encoder wheel into a coarse mode, the default fine mode can be temporarily selected by holding <ALT> in association with the encoder wheel movement.

12.21.5

Selecting groups or individual parameters

For simple positioning purposes, selecting whole parameter groups as described above is quick and easy. If a parameter group is already selected, pressing the parameter group key again deselects the group. When it comes to more advanced operations, such as loading Motion Control Libraries or assigning special times, it can be useful to select parameters individually. examples of keystrokes <SHIFT> <B GROUP> Displays a list of the parameters within the selected group.

The Parameter Group window, giving a list of parameters within the selected group

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WHEEL OR < > ... <ENTER> Use the wheel or the down arrow key to highlight a parameter from the list. Use <ENTER> to select and deselect the parameters. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the selection and exits the parameter dialogue box.

When individual parameters are selected in this way, the LED in the parameter group from which they belong will flash. Individual parameters can be included in the recording of Motion Control Libraries, copied with the Part Copy function, or assigned special times in the special times screen.

12.21.6

Direct selection of an individual parameter

When it comes to quick operations, such as modifying one colour, it can be useful to directly select one individual parameter without having to select from the parameter groups. This is possible in ISIS by using the <SHIFT> key in association with a specific encoder wheel. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Selects the required instrument(s). <SHIFT + ENCODER WHEEL> Selects the specific parameter assigned to the selected encoder wheel. This encoder wheel becomes live, even if the parameter group containing the parameter is not selected. Note: Once the instrument has been used and deselected, ISIS remembers which parameters were last used, so that the next time the instrument is used, the same parameter selection is made.

12.22 Viewing parameters


It is often useful to view the values of an instruments parameters, rather than the standard channel intensities screen. This can be especially useful when names have been given to the steps of a parameter. In certain circumstances (depending upon the system monitor configuration) it is possible to view intensities and parameters simultaneously.

12.22.1

Viewing the parameters display

To swap between intensity display and parameter display on all monitors, the <PARAM> key is used. This is a toggle function and will swap the screens between the two modes.

Note: The Screen Configuration section in the *System Setup* chapter gives further options for displaying parameters as monitor footers, or on a separate monitor display.

12.22.2

Viewing the parameter source

When several working fields are controlling moving lights, the actual Output values could be a mix from several different fields. Whenever there is any doubt about which parameters are controlled from which fields, the parameter source can be viewed on the output screen instead of the parameter values.

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Viewing the source can be helpful when working with multiple fields, masking parameters and disconnecting parameters. The function is available via the default F5 function key. examples of keystrokes <PARAM> Displays the motion control parameters on-screen, if required. <F5 {PRM SRC}> Toggles between parameter values and their source.

Note: The field contributing the intensity value is always shown when the output screen is displaying channel intensities: it is displayed in the grey information bar, below the channel intensity value.

12.23 The Home position


Each instrument can have its own Home position programmed. This is a set of parameter values which provides a convenient starting position for the operator. For example, the Home position could consist of the Open values, with a medium focus and positioned centre stage. The Home position can also include colours or gobos if required.

Each time the instrument is to be used in a new working field, memory, or chaser, plotting can begin from the Home position for convenience. Each instrument can have only one Home position, although this can be changed at any time as required.

12.23.1

Recording the Home position

When an instrument is first used, it has no home position recorded. If the Home function is used before positions have been set, the parameters are given values of zero. It is a good idea to create the Home position before the beginning to program the show. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL & PARAMETER SELECTION> Select channels and parameters. <HOME> <REC> <REC> OR <F3 {RECORD}> Records the current values of the selected instruments parameters as the Home position. Note: If only some parameters are selected, only those selected are recorded into the Home position. If no parameters are selected, they are ALL included in the Home position recording function.

12.23.2

Loading the Home position

The Home position is loaded into the selected working field in a similar way to loading memories. The only difference is that the required parameters of the required instruments must be selected before loading.

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examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL & PARAMETER SELECTION> Select channels and parameters. <HOME> <LOAD> OR <F4 {LOAD}> Loads the Home position of the selected parameters of the instrument into the current working field.

Note: If only some parameters are selected, only the selected ones are loaded with the Home values. If no parameters are selected, they are ALL loaded.

12.24 Controlling parameters on the faders using Unfold


The Unfold function in ISIS allows the operator to control individual parameters of an instrument using the submaster faders. This can make control of automated luminaires faster than ever before. The Unfold function places a single parameter on to each submaster, up to the maximum number of available submasters. Unfold works with single instruments, or groups of instruments sharing the same definition.

Note: The Unfold function will set each parameter value for a group of instruments to the same definite value: there is no delta change. To maintain a delta difference between instruments, the encoder wheels must be used.

12.24.1

Activating Unfold and selection of parameters

When an instrument is unfolded, any previous parameter selection remains. Changing the selection of active parameters can be done in the normal way with the A/B/C/D group keys, or via the submaster field selection keys. Each selection key acts as a toggle selector. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select moving light channels. <F6 {UNFOLD}> Unfolds the instruments parameters onto the submaster faders. <PARAMETER SELECTION> Select the required parameters, either by the parameter groups or individually using the submaster field selection button.

12.24.2

Visualisation of parameters on the faders

In Unfold mode, the submaster footers will change to display the parameter information for each submaster fader. Unfold mode can be easily identified by the submaster footers, which will turn blue when Unfold is active.

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Submaster footer display in Unfold mode

12.25

The following information is given for each submaster fader in Unfold mode: Fader Number Fader Value (00 to 100%) Parameter controlled by the fader (parameter abbreviation) Parameter Value (00 to 255 for 8-bit parameters, 00 to 65536 for 16-bit parameters)

12.26 12.27 12.28 12.29 12.30 12.31 12.32 12.33

The fader number will have a white background if the parameter is selected (active). If the fader is not currently connected to the value in the working field, then the fader value will be displayed in red. This is a virtual value, and the fader must be physically moved to match the virtual value before the parameter can be controlled by the fader.

12.33.1

Using Unfold with multiple instruments

Controlling several instruments of the same definition type works differently with Unfold than using the encoder wheels. When modifying a parameter of several instruments with an encoder wheel, any difference between the parameter start values is maintained.

However, in Unfold mode, the first instrument in a selection of channels will be the leader of the others. The first instrument in a range of instruments is the one with the lowest channel number. Once a parameter from this leader instrument is connected to the Output, the same parameter of each selected instrument will be given the identical value. If only a delta parameter change is required, it is necessary to use the motion control encoder wheels.

This way of working has advantages when a group of instruments all require the same parameter value. It is also useful when a parameter needs to be corrected in the Live field. For example, all moving lights could be set to the same colour simultaneously.

Note: Unfold can only be used with instruments of the same definition.

12.34 Additional motion control functions


When using multi-parameter instruments, there are a number of useful functions available from the motion control keypad or touchscreen. Functions such as Home, Open, Reset and Ignition have already been demonstrated: other functions are described below.

12.34.1

Grab

The current Output values of selected parameters can be copied into the current working field using the Grab function. In this way, if a position has been set in a submaster or playback field, the settings can be grabbed from the Output. Modifications of the instrument in a new working field are made from a starting point of current Output, rather than from zero values.

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examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> <PARAMETER SELECTION> Select the parameters to be grabbed from the DMX output buffer. <GRAB> Grabs the current Output values of the selected parameters, and copies them into the active working field.

Note: Grab copies the current Output values only to selected parameters.

12.34.2

Sending working field content directly to the Output

The parameter values of all instruments contained in a working field can be sent directly to the Output at any time. This is achieved by pressing <SHIFT> together with the fields selector key. examples of keystrokes <SHIFT + SUBMASTER 1 FIELD KEY> Selects submaster 1 and sends its parameter values directly to the Output. <SHIFT + S1 FIELD KEY> Selects Stage 1 and sends its parameter values directly to the Output.

12.35 Recording memories containing instruments


When instrument intensity and parameter values have been set, they can be recorded into memories using the same methods used for recording memories that contain only generic channels. examples of keystrokes <1> <AT> <8> <A GROUP> <B GROUP> <C GROUP> <D GROUP> Set channel 1 (which has been defined as a moving light) to 80% in the selected working field and selects the four parameter groups. <PARAM> Displays the parameters screen. <TRACKBALL> <ENCODER WHEELS> Set the pan and tilt position of the instrument using the trackball. Set other parameters via the rotary encoder wheels. The <PG+> and <PG-> keys can be used to assign other parameters to the encoder wheels. <MEM> <1> <REC> Records the state in the current working field as memory 1. OTHER CHANNEL MANILUPATIONS Add further channels to the state. <MEM> <2> <SUM> Records the total Output, including colour changer and moving light parameters, as memory 2.

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Motion control instruments can also be recorded into Motion Control Libraries, which is particularly useful for manipulating several definition types simultaneously. Please see section 12.38 below for further information.

12.35.1

Behaviour of parameters with respect to memory times

In the playbacks, intensity changes and azimuth movements always follow the memorys global or special times. Other parameters behave differently, depending upon the instruments mode and the type of parameter.

Parameters will follow the memorys global fade times if they have been defined in the instruments definition as fade-type parameters. Parameters set to jump-type (such as stepped colour or gobo wheels) will jump to their new positions at 5% of the fade completing. These changes can be altered by allocating special times to the parameters.

12.35.2

Special Times for motion control parameters

In the same way that a special time can be given to a channels intensity, it is possible to allocate a special time to an instruments parameters. Special up/down times only work on fade type parameters such as pan, tilt, and continuous dichroic colour changing mechanisms, although any parameter can have a special wait time.

Special times for parameters are assigned in the special times screen. If no parameters are selected, the special time is applied to the channels intensity only; if parameters are selected, the special time is applied to the selected parameters only. examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL / PARAMETER MODIFICATION> Create the lighting state. <CHANNEL SELECTION> <UNSEL> Deselects all selected parameters of the current instrument. <STIME> Selects the special times display. <A GROUP> <UP> <1><5> <DOWN> Selects the A Group parameters and assigns a special time of 15 seconds. <A GROUP> <SHIFT> <C GROUP> Deselects the A group and displays the C group parameters list. WHEEL OR < > <ENTER> Use the wheel or the down arrow key to highlight a parameter from the list. Use <ENTER> to select and deselect the parameters. <UP> <7> <DOWN> Assigns a special time of 7 seconds to the selected parameter(s).

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<UNSEL> <PG+> <SHIFT + ENCODER WHEEL> Deselects all parameters. Assigns the next page of parameters to the encoder wheels. Use <PG+> or <PG-> to find the required parameter and directly select it by holding <SHIFT> and turning the relevant encoder wheel. <WAIT> <6> <WAIT> <UP> <3> <UP> Allocates a special time of 3 seconds to the selected parameter, and a special wait time of 6 seconds. <MEM> <8><7><3> <REC> Records the state with special times as memory 873.

<STIME> Deselects the special times screen. When a special time has been plotted to a channels intensity, the channel number is displayed in light blue colour on the intensity and parameters screens. When a special time has been plotted to a channels parameters, the instruments label m or c is displayed in light blue colour on the intensity screen. On the parameters screen, a letter t in light blue colour is inserted between the intensity value and the first parameter.

12.35.3

Removing special times

Special times can be removed from selected channels and parameters from the special times screen. examples of keystrokes <STIME> Selects the special times display. <3><2> <UP TIME> <F5 {RMOV ST}> <DOWN TIME> Removes any previously allocated special times from channel 32. <STIME> Returns the display to intensities.

12.36 Move in Black (automatic parameter preset)


Moving light instruments will often change position and other settings many times during a show. Traditionally, the operator has had to plot a supplementary positioning memory preceding each memory containing a new setting. ISIS saves this time-consuming task by introducing the Move in Black function. This facility is used to automatically pre-position all parameters before each instrument is used. Move in Black continually tracks the memory sequence internally to locate the next point at which each instrument is used, and pre-sets the parameters that it finds (except intensity).

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Changes are only made when the intensity of each instrument is zero (beam off), and are executed after the fade down of the last memory to use the parameter. The next memory to use the parameter will fade up with the required settings already in place.

The Move in Black function can be set to operate automatically for all recorded memories within the memory sequence, or it can be set individually via an event.

12.36.1

Intensity off (MIB AO) mode

In this mode, the move will automatically be made at the end of a crossfade, once the intensity is zero (off). Changes will be applied to all parameters of a fixture. ISIS looks ahead through the sequence of memories to determine which parameters have changes plotted. Any changes will be applied automatically after the current memory is removed from the Stage field. The change will take into account the delay and speed values set for each parameter in the instrument definition. Note: Because the Move in Black function pre-sets parameter values when the instrument intensity is zero, it will have no function if consecutive memories use the fixture - despite the parameters having different values. This is because there is no dark period between the memories in which to change the parameters.

The Move in Black mode is selected in the Setup menu. It applies to all operations in the current show until it is disabled by the operator or via an Event in the sequence. examples of keystrokes: <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F6 {GENERAL}> Selects the General Configuration options from the Setup menu. < > <ENTER> Use the arrow key to navigate to the Auto move in black field. Press <ENTER> to display the drop-down list of options. < > <ENTER> Select Intensity off as the Move in Black mode: all parameters will now be pre-set automatically. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the changes and exits the General Configuration dialogue box.

The current Move in Black mode is indicated at the top of the Output screen: in this mode the text MIB AO will be displayed.

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12.37 Instruments in Chasers and Effects


Moving lights and colour changers can be easily incorporated into chasers and effects. Complex patterns can be created with chasers, but only the intensity parameter is used in effects. One of the quickest ways of creating moving light chasers is to load previously recorded Motion Control Libraries into chaser steps.

As a rule, it is probably better to keep the chasers relatively simple as they will be easier to plot and, more importantly, easier to modify if each step is only changing a few parameters, or there are only a few steps in the whole chaser.

A simple moving light chaser can be programmed by creating steps containing different values for an instruments parameters. Creating effects with moving lights is much easier because only the intensity parameter is used by the effect. In fact effects with moving lights are just the same as those with generic channels. Basic use of moving lights in chasers is explained in the chapter *Chasers & Effects*.

Note: More complex patterns and effects can be created by using the Effect Generator built in to the ISIS software. Please see the chapter *Effect Generator* in the ISIS Operators Manual for further explanation.

12.38 Overview of Motion Control Libraries


Moving light parameter settings can be recorded into Motion Control Libraries. A library, or MCLib, is similar to a memory because it stores the settings of each parameter of an instrument recorded into it. These settings can be selectively loaded when required, or linked to memories.

MCLibs can be useful if instruments are to be matched with other moving lights or colour changers to create complete colour washes.

Motion Control Libraries are the only way of changing the parameters of several different instrument types simultaneously.

examples of keystrokes <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select the list of instruments to be included in the library. <C GROUP> Selects the colour group of parameters. <MCLIB> <1> <REC> Records the C group of parameters of all selected instruments into Motion Control Library 1.

Pre-recorded motion control libraries can be loaded into working fields and recorded into memories, or even loaded into chaser steps as required.

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examples of keystrokes <FIELD SELECTION> <CHANNEL SELECTION> Select the instruments to be loaded from the library into the active working field. <C GROUP> <D GROUP> Select the parameter group(s) to be loaded from the library. <MCLIB> <1> <LOAD> Load the values of the selected parameters of the selected instruments.

Whenever a MCLib is loaded and then recorded in a memory, a link is created between the library and the memories that use it. In this way, a whole list of memories can be modified just by changing and re-recording the library position.

12.39 Information about libraries and linking memories


Please turn to the chapter *Motion Control Libraries* in the ISIS Operators Manual for full details on libraries and on linking and unlinking memories.

12.40 Summary
The integrated motion control facilities of ISIS allow moving lights and colour changers to be controlled easily and logically in the same fashion as generic lighting. An operator does not need to be particularly conversant in the philosophy of dedicated moving light control consoles in order to control DMX instruments.

Control of moving lights is made by a trackball and dedicated rotary controllers on most hardware platforms, or by a trackball and the wheel on other platforms. Parameters are assigned to the encoder wheels on a number of pages; the page must be turned to access all parameters of a fixture. In addition, instruments of the same type can be controlled by the submaster faders in Unfold mode.

The attributes of a moving light are split into four parameter groups (plus intensity) for operator convenience. Each group must be enabled before a parameter it contains can be modified. The parameters screen displays all parameters of motion control instruments. It can be accessed by using the <PARAM> key.

Pan, tilt and intensity settings can be made to any selection of instruments. Other parameters can only be modified simultaneously on instruments of the same definition. A selection of different type instruments can only be modified simultaneously by using a motion control library (MCLib).

Motion Control Libraries can also be used in memories and chasers. If a MCLib is updated, all the memories and chaser steps that use it are automatically updated too.

Each instrument can be assigned a Home position, which is a convenient setting for the operator to recall when using the fixtures. In addition, there are settings for special functions such as Open, Reset and Ignition. The Move in Black function allows instruments to be automatically pre-set prior to their use in the playback sequence.

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The sequence for manipulating moving lights is indicated below:

Select the instruments; Display the parameters screen (if required); Select the parameters; Modify the parameter settings.

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Output Patch

13

OUTPUT PATCH

13.1 Introduction
A patch is used to configure how the control channels manipulated on a lighting desk relate to the outputs of dimming equipment, and also to connected colour changers and moving lights. Traditionally, this was achieved by physically connecting the output of each dimmer to one of the available outlets in the auditorium, using a patch cable. This type of arrangement is usually called a hard patch. The concept of a patch on the lighting control desk is to set this configuration by using the DMX output information that is sent from the desk. A channel on the desk can be patched to a different numerical DMX address by the software; this is usually called a soft patch. By setting the patch on the lighting desk in this way, it is also possible to assign a specific dimmer law the fade profile of each channel, and allocate a proportional factor. Normally, and after a desk initialisation, the patch settings of the desk will be one-to-one: that is, channel 1 will control DMX address 1 (usually dimmer 1), channel 2 will control DMX address 2, and so on. Of course, each DMX address can belong to a dimmer, a scroller, or a moving light. To learn and use the basic functions of ISIS calling up channels, recording memories, generating chasers it is not necessary to create a patch; the default one-to-one patch can be used. However, it is often the case that devising a patch is the first thing required before any lighting can take place.

13.2 Patch operations


The output patch sorts which desk channels (or instrument numbers) are connected to which DMX outputs: usually dimmers, but also the parameters of other DMX driven devices. The default patch is when the channel numbers are the same as the output numbers, with standard linear dimmer laws and a proportional factor of 100%: this is the one-to-one patch. The output patch can be visualised on-screen in ISIS at any time. Within the output patch screen, desk channel numbers are displayed in beige, and the DMX output numbers in pale red. The proportional output factor is displayed in white beneath the dimmer (DMX) number, and the applied dimmer law (if other than the standard linear law) in yellow next to the proportional factor.

The output patch screen, 1:1 patch

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Output Patch 13.2.1 Viewing the output patch screen


The output patch can be viewed on the monitor by selecting it through the menu, or by pressing the dedicated <PATCH> key, where available. The operator can exit the patch by selecting any working field, or by pressing <PATCH> a second time.

Higher channel or dimmer numbers can be shown in the output patch screen by using the cursor keys. examples of keystrokes <PATCH> OR <MENU> <F3 {CHANNELS}> <F1 {OUTPUT PATCH}> <F1 {PATCH}> Enters the output patch screen; the output patch is displayed as channels to dimmers by default.

<PATCH> OR <F8> OR ANY OTHER WORKING FIELD KEY Exits the output patch screen.

13.2.2 Displaying channels to dimmers & dimmers to channels


The output patch screen can be displayed in two ways: channels to dimmers, or dimmers to channels; the display mode can be changed at any time to suit the preference of the operator. An easy way of thinking about patching is to decide which desk channels should be connected to which DMX outputs. This is known as channels to dimmers patch, and is the mode used each time the patch is displayed. Some operators find it easier to think the other way around: which dimmer (or DMX address) should be connected to which channel. This is called dimmers to channels patch. ISIS allows the default screen display to be reversed, so that the display is dimmers to channels, rather than channels to dimmers. Operationally, the system is the same, it is just the display that has changed. Displaying dimmers to channels can be helpful when inspecting the moving light patch. examples of keystrokes <PATCH> <F1 {CH-DIM}> Enters the patch and toggles the screen display to dimmers to channels.

Note: This feature is a toggle function: repeated use of the <F1> key will swap between the two displays.

13.2.3 Deleting the output patch


If a complicated patch is required, it can be easier to start with all DMX outputs disconnected from the desk control channels. This is called deleting the patch. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F3 {CHANNELS}> <F1 {OUTPUT PATCH}> Selects the output patch options from the Channels menu.

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<F2 {DELETE}> Deletes the patch - channels on the desk will not control any DMX outputs. A WARNING IS ISSUED: A warning is given: The patch will be deleted Are you sure? <F8 {YES}> Confirms the operation.

13.2.4 Patching a single channel to a single dimmer


The most common patch requirement is to patch one channel to a single dimmer (DMX) number. examples of keystrokes <PATCH> Enters the output patch screen. <1> <DIMMER> <1> <0> <0> <AT> <AT> Patches desk channel 1 to dimmer (DMX) 100. <PATCH> OR <F8> Exits the patch.

13.2.5 Patching one channel to several dimmers


A single channel can be used to control more than one dimmer (or DMX address). examples of keystrokes <PATCH> Enters the output patch screen. <DIM> <1> <THRU> <1><0> <ENTER> <2> <AT> <AT> Patches desk channel 2 to dimmers 1 to 10. Channel 2 now controls ten dimmer channels (or DMX addresses).

A single channel can also control a non-consecutive range of dimmers (DMX addresses). examples of keystrokes <4> <DIM> <1> <+> <3> <+> <5> <AT> <AT> Patches desk channel 4 to dimmers 1, 3 and 5. <PATCH> Exits the output patch screen.

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Output Patch

13.2.6 Erasing a range of channels and their patched outputs


When patching, it can be useful to remove the current settings for a range of channels. This can be achieved by using the Erase function. examples of keystrokes <PATCH> Enters the output patch screen. <1> <THRU> <1><0><0> <ERASE> <ERASE> Removes channels 1 to 100, and their patched outputs. Channels 1 to 100 no longer control any dimmers (DMX addresses).

13.3 The Dot Patch syntax for multiple DMX universes


A single DMX cable can be used to control up to 512 channels (or addresses). However, as ISIS is able to control many more channels than this, several DMX lines or Universes may be required. For example, if 8192 DMX addresses were used, this would equate to a total of 16 DMX universes.

It soon becomes impractical to manage this quantity of DMX addresses in the conventional way, by using numbers 1 to 8192. ISIS solves this problem elegantly by introducing the Dot Patch syntax. This allows the operator to patch by DMX universe, rather than the traditional definite DMX address.

Patching using Dot patch becomes much simpler, as the operator only needs to know the address of the unit required (1 to 512), and the DMX universe (cable) it is connected to.

examples of keystrokes <PATCH> Enters the output patch screen. <1> <DIM> <4><.><1><0><1> <AT> <AT> Patches channel 1 to address 101 of the fourth DMX universe, or traditionally DMX address 1637 (512+512+512+101 = 1637).

It is not necessary to use the dot patch syntax for the first DMX universe (although both methods are accepted), and the traditional method of patching is still possible.

Note: Setting the Display Mode to Display patch by DMX lines becomes extremely useful when working with the Dot Patch method.

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Output Patch

13.4 Proportional output factor


The proportional factor in the output patch is an output limit, or scaling factor.

When the proportional factor is set to FF, the output will be full when the channel is full. If the factor is set to 90%, the output will only be 90% when the channel is full. This difference is usually invisible to the user, but can be seen by comparing the Output screen with the DMX output screen.

Limiting the output to about 97% makes negligible difference visibly, but can make a huge difference to lamp life. In the extreme, the proportional factor could be used for low voltage lamps, although the use of electronic dimmable transformers is recommended instead. examples of keystrokes <PATCH> Enters the output patch screen. <1> <AT> <9> <.> <5> Changes the proportional factor of channel 1 to 95%. <1> <DIM> <7> WHEEL Patches channel 1 to dimmer 7 at a proportional factor set by the wheel. <DIM> <2> <AT> <9> Changes the proportion of dimmer 2 to 90%. The <DIM> key must be used to distinguish between dimmers (DMX addresses) and channels. <1> <DIM> <1><0><0> <AT> <8> Patches desk channel 1 to dimmer 100 with an output proportion of 80%.

13.5 Dimmer laws


A dimmer law changes the characteristics of the look of a fade to suit different instruments or preferences. There are several dimmer laws (or curves) in ISIS, all but one of which are fully editable.

The default law, number 0, is linear. The input/output ratio is consistent across the curve, so the curve is in fact a straight line.

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Output Patch
The other laws are illustrated below.

U%

U%

U%

100

100

100

50

50

50

DIMMERS LAW LINEAR 220 V C%


0 50 100

DIMMERS LAW LINEAR 110 V C%


0 50 100
0 50

DIMMERS LAW CURVE FLUO C%


100

CONTROL SIGNAL

CONTROL SIGNAL

CONTROL SIGNAL

0 - Linear The default law, input/output ratio is completely proportional. (This law cannot be edited)

1 - 110V Limits the output voltage to approximately half the normal level. Can be used for 120V lamps.

2 - Fluorescent 220V Gives a kick start at the lower end of the curve to make fluorescent sources match tungsten sources following a linear law. Note: Dimmable ballasts must be employed.
U%
100

U%

U%

100

100

50

50

50

DIMMERS LAW PRE - HEAT C%


0 50 100

SQUARE DIMMER LAW C%


0 50 100
0 50

DIMMER LAW TV 1 C%
100

CONTROL SIGNAL

CONTROL SIGNAL

CONTROL SIGNAL

3 - Preheating 220V Keeps lamps warm by trickling a few volts at all times. Can smooth fades at low percentages.
U%
100

4 - Square Law 220V Simulates old analogue dimmers.

5 - Television 1 - 220V As defined by international television committees.

U%

U%

100

100

50

50

50

DIMMER LAW TV 2 C%
0 50 100 0 50

DIMMERS LAW LINEAR 220 V C%


100 0 50

DIMMERS LAW ON / OFF CONTROL C%


100

CONTROL SIGNAL

CONTROL SIGNAL

CONTROL SIGNAL

6 - Television 2 - 220V An alternative TV law.

7 to 8 & 10 to15 - Spare User definable laws (by default these are linear).

9 - On/Off 220V (HMI) Non-dim (on/off): when the input reaches 10%, the output jumps from 0 to 100%, acting like a switch. Note: This does not bypass the dimmer circuit.

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Output Patch 13.5.3 Allocating a dimmer law


A dimmer law is selected simply by adding its number during the patch functions. A dimmer law can also be assigned to a channel after it has been patched. The Dimmer Law function in the output patch screen opens the Dimmer Law List dialogue box. A dimmer law can be selected with the wheel, or it can be entered directly from the desk. examples of keystrokes <PATCH> Enters the output patch screen. <1> <DIM> <1><0><0> <AT> <AT> <F2 {DIMLAW}> <2> <F8> Patches desk channel 1 to dimmer 100 and assigns dimmer law 2 which is Fluorescent 220V. <F2 {DIMLAW}> opens the Dimmer Law List dialogue box: scroll with the wheel to assign another dimmer law. <5> <F2 {DIMLAW}> <3> <F8> Allocates dimmer law 3 which is Preheating 220V to channel 5 without changing the channel/dimmer patch, or output proportion.

Note: Patch, proportion and dimmer laws can all be allocated within one operation by combining functions.

13.5.4 Editing a dimmer law


Any of the dimmer laws (except Linear) can be edited to modify the fade profile. This can be useful if none of system dimmer laws are suitable. The spare laws are linear by default but are included specifically for user editing. The Dimmer Law List dialogue is available through the output patch functions of the Channels menu. Full instructions for editing a dimmer law are given in the ISIS Operators Manual.

13.6 Returning to the one-to-one patch


The one-to-one patch is the default setting. Each channel is connected to the DMX output with the same number, the default law is assigned and all proportional factors are set to 100% (FF). This is useful after a show has finished and default output is required to all the DMX channels. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F3 {CHANNELS}> <F1 {OUTPUT PATCH}> Displays the output patch options from the Channels menu. <F3 {ONE-TO-ONE}> Restores the one-to-one default patch. A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Set Patch one to one Are you sure? <F8 {YES}> Confirms the operation.

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Show Management

14

SHOW MANAGEMENT

14.1 Introduction
The current show data is stored on a hard drive; each show can be saved independently with all of its settings and information intact. This allows a new show to be created and saved without having to delete any existing work. Shows can be fully loaded from the hard drive whenever they are required. ISIS also offers the facility to selectively load information from a show file into the current show.

Shows can also be saved to floppy disks as a portable copy of the show and an emergency back-up. If the show tours to another venue with an ISIS control system, the floppy disk can be used to transfer the show from the original desk to the new one. ISIS also incorporates support of the USITT ASCII data exchange format for show information. This means that a show created on an ISIS system can be exported to another manufacturers desk, provided it supports this standard format. Shows created on the VISION 10 system using software prior to ISIS can also be imported into ISIS, allowing the operator to recover older show information. In addition to file storage on disk, ISIS provides printing options for hard paper copies of shows.

14.2 Saving to disk


Once a show has been plotted, or perhaps at convenient points during programming, the work should be saved as a show with its own unique name. Saving a show also provides a first-line backup in case of the work directory becoming corrupted or losing data due to incorrect shutdown. Although these situations are unlikely, no computer is 100% reliable!

When a show is saved, the size of the show file depends upon how many channels, memories, chasers, and so on have been used. The limit to the quantity of shows that can be stored at any one time is dependent only on the size of the hard drive.

14.2.3 Saving a new show


Although the current show is stored in the work directory until it is replaced, it is always recommended to store it with its own name on the hard drive. If the show needs to be transferred to another control desk, or a PC for off-line editing, it should also be stored separately on floppy disks. When a show is saved, it is given a short abbreviated name which the system uses for filing, but it can also be given a show name of up to 20 characters which operators may prefer. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F3 {TO DISK}> Displays the To Disk dialogue from the File options of the menu. SRV/DSK The directory or disk used to save the show can be selected (if required). The default directory (no name entered) is suitable for saving most shows.

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ABBR Enter an abbreviated show name, up to 8 characters long. NAME Enter the show title, up to 20 characters long. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the names and saves the show.

Saving a new show (Dialogue box 120) The abbreviation is limited to 8 characters and is the name that the lighting desk uses in its file management. Most keyboard characters can be used in the abbreviated name, but be careful as it is case sensitive: it is possible to have two different shows called show1 and SHOW1.

Note: It is considered computer etiquette to use lower-case only for directory and file names. Adopting this method will avoid confusion such as the above example.

The show name is the identity more likely to be of use to operators: when a show is first saved, and subsequently loaded, this name appears at the top of monitor 1. Any keyboard characters can be used and this name has no impact on the internal file management so upper or lower case lettering can be used as preferred.

When the Save function is confirmed, the contents of the work directory are copied into the new show file. When work is resumed on the desk, it is carried out in the work directory; the show is safely stored until it is next saved manually.

14.3 Loading a show


A saved show can be loaded whenever it is required. Loading a show will copy the saved information into the work directory for modification.

Loading a show will replace the contents of the work directory with the selected show. Any modifications made to the show in the work directory will be lost. The current show should first be saved, if changes are to be retained.

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Show Management

examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F2 {FROM DISK}> Displays the From Disk dialogue box. WHEEL OR < > OR USE THE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel, the down arrow key , or keyboard to highlight a show for loading. <F8 {FULL}> The selected show will be fully loaded and the current data replaced. A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Loading show (show name) - Are you sure? <F8 {YES}> Confirms the selection and fully loads the show.

14.3.3 Selectively loading information from a show


ISIS allows the operator to load a selection of information from a previously saved show into the current show. This operation will not replace the contents of the work directory, but will add to it. For example, selective (or partial) loading allows a patch to be imported from previous work, or a list of chasers or effects to be loaded into the current show.

The operator can select from 3 methods of selective loading, depending on the result required. ADD AND OVERWRITE The information to be loaded is added to the current show, but any existing elements are replaced. For example, importing the list of chasers 1 to 10 would overwrite any chasers within that range that exist in the current show. ADD AND KEEP The information to be loaded is added to the current show, but any existing elements are retained. For example, if chaser 3 exists in the current show, it will not be replaced. REPLACE The information selected will overwrite the entire element list. For example, loading memories will completely replace the current memory list with new information.

In addition to these selective loading methods, memories, submasters, groups, banks and motion control libraries can be merged with existing show information, rather than simply overwriting the current data.

The selective load function is activated by highlighting a show in the From Disk window, as described above, and then pressing <F1 {SELEC.}> instead of the <F8 {FULL}> option. Examples of the selective load operation are given in the ISIS Operators Manual.

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Show Management

14.4 The Show Manager


Existing show files can be renamed, copied, or deleted in the Show Manager, to assist in the management of show storage. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F1 {MANAGER}> Displays the File manager: a list of existing show files is shown.

The Show Manager (Dialogue box 160) WHEEL OR < > OR USE THE ALPHANUMERIC KEYBOARD DIRECTLY Use the wheel, the down arrow key, or the keyboard to highlight a show.

14.4.3 Renaming a show in the Show Manager


Sometimes it is necessary to rename an existing show file: both the show title and the directory name can be changed. Remember that the name is case-sensitive: if it is saved in capital letters, it must be loaded in capital letters. examples of keystrokes <F1 {RENAME}> Displays the Rename Show dialogue box. SRV/DSK The directory or disk used to save the show can be selected if required. ABBR Enter an abbreviated show name, up to 8 characters long. NAME Enter the show title, up to 20 characters long. Alternatively, the List function can be used to select a new show name and abbreviation. The show selected in this list will be overwritten with the selected show.

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Show Management
<F8 {OK}> Confirms the operation and executes the renaming.

14.4.4 Deleting a show in the Show Manager


If a show is never needed again, or has been archived to floppy disk, it can be deleted in the File Manager to regain space on the hard drive. examples of keystrokes <F2 {DELETE}> The selected show is to be deleted. A WARNING IS ISSUED A warning is given: Delete show(s) Are you sure? <F8 {OK}> Confirms the deletion.

Note: A list of shows can be selected from the File manager prior to the delete operation: select shows from the manager using the <ENTER> key. The highlighted shows will all be deleted in a single operation.

14.4.5 Copying a show in the Show Manager


An existing show can be copied with a new abbreviation and/or name. This can be useful if a few changes need to make to a show without losing the original version, or to have a second copy of the show as a back-up. Shows can also be copied to a different directory if required. examples of keystrokes <F3 {COPY}> Displays the Copy Show dialogue box. SRV/DSK The directory or disk used to save the show can be selected if required. ABBR Enter an abbreviated show name, up to 8 characters long. NAME Enter the show title, up to 20 characters long. Alternatively, the List function can be used to select a show name and abbreviation. A show selected in this list will be overwritten. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the operation and executes the copying.

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14.5 Creating a backup on floppy disk


So far, all saving has been made on the internal hard-drive of the system. For most purposes, this is perfectly acceptable, but some operators are happier to have a separate copy on a floppy disk. Floppies can also be used for library storage or transferring the show to another ISIS system or to a PC for off-line editing. ISIS show files are fairly large, so they are automatically compressed when they are saved to a floppy, and decompressed when loaded on another ISIS system. This compressing and decompressing routine is invisible to the user. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F4 {FLOPPY}> Displays the floppy disk menu options. <F3 {SAVE ADB SHOW}> Selects the floppy disk backup function (save to floppy). A list of shows similar to the From Disk dialogue box is displayed, showing the shows currently saved. wheel or < > or use the alphanumeric keyboard directly Use the wheel, the down arrow key, or keyboard to highlight a show. <F1 {SAVE}> The selected show is to be saved to floppy disk. OR <F2 {WORK}> The show information currently in the work directory is to be saved to floppy disk. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the backup procedure and calculates the amount of data to be saved. A list of files being processed is displayed. INSERT FLOPPY 1/1 Insert a floppy disk into the drive. A complex show may require more than one disk and the quantity required is shown here. <F8 {OK}> Starts saving the show data to floppy disk(s). A message is shown if further disks are required. SAVE IS COMPLETE This message is shown when the last disk is finished. <F8 {OK}> <F8 {OK}> Exits the Save to Floppy dialogue box and the Save dialogue.

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14.6 Restoring a backup from floppy disk


A show file saved to a backup floppy disk can be loaded back into the desk that it was created on, or any other system running ISIS software. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F4 {FLOPPY}> Displays the floppy disk menu options. <F2 {LOAD ADB SHOW}> Selects the floppy disk load function; the Load Show dialogue box is displayed. INSERT FIRST ISIS FLOPPY Insert the floppy disk containing the show, or the first disk if there is more than one floppy disk. <F1 {READ}> The read function can be used to display the shows abbreviation, to ensure the correct floppy disk backup has been selected. The abbreviation is displayed at the top right of the dialogue box. SERVER/DISK The show saved on the floppy disk can be loaded into a specific directory on the hard disk if required. <F8 {OK}> Starts the load from floppy procedure. The progress is displayed on-screen. Insert the next floppy disk when prompted if the backup set spans more than one disk. RESTORE COMPLETE This message is shown when the last disk is finished. <F8 {OK}> Exits the dialogue box.

Note: Once the show has been restored, it is listed in the File Manager. The show is not loaded by default, so the From Disk function must be used to select the restored show file.

14.7 Printing
All, or any part, of a show can be printed, and there are numerous print options. The configuration and setup of the system (number of channels, DMX outputs, monitors, etc.) can also be printed.

Before any information is printed, the type of printer connected must first be selected in the Printer Manager.

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examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F5 {PRINT}> <F2 {PRINT MANAGER}> Displays the Printer Manager. <F4 {PRINTER}> Displays a list of printer types available: the correct printer type should be selected. <F8 {OK}> Exits the Printer manager. Once the printer has been set up, it is possible to select from an extensive list of options what is to be printed. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F5 {PRINT}> <F1 {PRINT WHAT}> Displays the printing dialogue. < > <ENTER> Use the arrow keys to move the cursor around the screen and <ENTER> to select the print options. If there is a cross in a box, the selection is made and the option will be printed.

Selecting print content (Dialogue box 141) <F8 {OK}> Prints the selected information. Selected options are printed as a list, showing all existing items between a range of values. By default the range is set to maximum, but can be changed by editing the From and To boxes. The printed list will include titles, and creation date and time for each item. If Contents is selected, detailed content of each item is printed. Printing a memorys contents, for example, will include channel intensities, parameters, special times, as well as the global times and titles as shown in the memory listing. If Recoverable is selected, a separate list of recoverable items is printed. When printing the patch, information can be sorted either by channels to inputs or inputs to channels. The dimmer law assigned to each channel can also be included. Patch information can include generic (Intensity) channels and other DMX instruments.

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System Setup

15

SYSTEM SETUP

15.1 Introduction
Before using an ISIS system for a new show, it may be necessary to configure the monitor displays, clear any old show information, and configure the hardware controls and software settings to the operators requirements. ISIS is completely user-configurable and allows software options to be hidden from the operator, preventing inexperienced users from modifying settings. User profiles can also be added to save preferred configurations for any number of operators.

15.2 Screen configurations


ISIS supports up to four local monitors, depending upon the desk hardware, and four additional network monitors. All monitors can be customised to the operators preference and the screen configuration options provide an ergonomic and enhanced visual user interface.

Monitor 1 (the default working field monitor) offers fewer possibilities within the configuration menu, but systems with a single monitor can take advantage of a number of display possibilities and functions.

Each monitor contains a main Contents display, and a Footer display, and these can be selected from a number of options. In addition, the display format can be changed to suit specific requirements.

Monitor contents and display format are altered from the Setup menu. examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F4 {SCREEN CONFIG}> Allows screen contents and settings to be configured. <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F5 {DISPLAY FORMAT}> Allows the format of the displayed information to be changed.

15.2.1 Display contents


The default content is channel intensity information, displayed in percentage format: this can be changed in the Screen Configuration dialogue. The number of channels displayed depends upon the footer configuration.

15.2.2 Display footers


The lower section of the display the footer can be used to display specific information, or it can be turned off to allow more channels to be displayed on the monitor.

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The footer itself is divided into two sections upper and lower and each can be configured independently. The amount of screen space required by each section of the footer varies according to the selected option. Note: Not all combinations of footers are allowed and some footers are not available on monitor 1.

The table below indicates the available options for display in the footers,

Selection Parameters Output DMX Output Submasters Playback 1 Playback 2

Type Full / Half Full / Half Full / Half Full / Half Full / Half Full / Half

Description Displays motion control parameters Displays channels in the Output screen Displays the DMX output values Displays the configuration and status of 12, 24 or 48 submasters Displays the sequence list for playback 1 Displays the sequence list for playback 2

Configuring the monitor footers (Dialogue box 810)

Note: If parameter mode is selected from the desk, parameter footers do not appear. If the Output mode is selected from the desk, output footers do not appear.

15.2.3 Display modes


The operator can choose the mode of each monitor. If the Extended Mode option is chosen in the Screen Configuration dialogue box, the selected monitor becomes an extension of the previous screen.

If the Parameters mode is picked, the selected monitor shows the parameters display. This allows a multi-screen system to have some displays in channel mode and other displays in parameter mode.

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System Setup

Setting screen 3 to Parameter mode

15.2.4 Paging monitor displays


The cursor (arrow) keys can be used to page the display up and down, but they only work on one monitor at a time. The active monitor can be selected by using the relevant <MON> key, or from the Screen Configuration dialogue.

The cursor keys can be used directly to turn the page of the active monitors main contents, or by using <SHIFT> and the cursor keys the footer displays can be paged.

Note: If the Autopaging options are enabled in the Display Format dialogue, the page containing the selected channel is automatically displayed. If autopaging is not active, the display must be manually changed using the cursor keys.

15.2.5 Display formats


The Display Format dialogue offers further display options, which affect how information is displayed rather than the display content.

The display mode can be selected independently for both the working field monitor and the Output monitor. This allows, for example, only channels with an intensity (non-zero) to be displayed on the Output screen, and all patched channels on the working field screen. example of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F2 {DISPLAY FORMAT}> Enters the Display Format dialogue box. <ENTER> < > ... SELECT ALL PATCHED <ENTER> <F8 {OK}> Changes the working field monitor format to display only patched channels.

Note: The Condensed option displays non-zero channels in numerical order across the screen. This can be useful when controlling larger lighting rigs.

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System Setup 15.2.6 Single screen operation


By combining the display elements it is possible to have workable information compiled on a single screen. The contents can be selected by the operator for a specific application.

An example single-screen configuration The screenshot above illustrates an ISIS system displaying 80 channels, the parameters of 4 instruments, and 12 submasters. If the Output is needed, one press of the <OUT> key will change the display to the Output screen.

15.3 Show Initialisation


When work begins on a new show, it is usually better to remove the old show information and begin again from a clean, empty condition: this is called show initialisation.

If any information from the existing show is required, it is much better to perform an initialisation, and then load the required details with a Partial Load function. This helps ensure that the working data does not become corrupted by continually editing the same show.

Note: Partial Loading is explained in the chapter *Show Management*.

The Show Initialisation function, found in the File options of the menu, allows the operator to select from a number of pre-determined initialisation options, or create a customised selection. The available options are listed in the table below.

Mode Full Init Show Submasters User Defined

Description Returns the ISIS system to its default settings. Retains instrument definitions & channel allocations only. Clears submasters and deletes any Banks only. Clears the selected items only.

Startup Keystrokes Cold start Warm Start Hot Start" ALT + C ALT + W ALT + H

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example of keystrokes <MENU> <F1 {FILE}> <F7 {SHOW INIT.}> Displays the Show Initialisation dialogue box.

The Show Initialisation window showing a pre-defined initialisation selection (Dialogue Box 195) <ENTER> Displays the drop-down list of pre-defined initialisation options. WHEEL OR < > ... <ENTER> Use the wheel or the down arrow key to highlight an option, and select with <ENTER>. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the selection and performs the required initialisation procedure.

Note: The cursor keys and <ENTER> can be used to make a user-defined selection from the dialogue box.

The pre-defined initialisation options can also be performed when the system is started, as the ISIS software is loaded. This is achieved by holding down a combination of keys on the alphanumeric keyboard; the keys are given in the table above. The required keys must be pressed at the beginning of the loading sequence of the ISIS software, and held until a message confirming the specific start action is displayed.

Note: After any type of initialisation, a saved show can be loaded from the hard-drive, or restored from a floppy disk.

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15.4 Fader configuration and the Manual Table function


ISIS software allows the submaster faders to be configured in a number of modes, allowing them to be used for other purposes, not just submaster control.

For example, the faders can be used to control moving light parameters using the Unfold function, individual channel intensities, or as extra faders for controls such as the Auditorium group, Audio level, Submaster General level and Effect Speed. This can be useful for smaller hardware platforms which dont have physical controls for these functions.

15.4.1 Direct channel control


The submaster faders can be used to directly control channel intensities. Working in this mode is similar to using a manual lighting control desk, where each luminaire corresponds to one fader on the desk. This provides a very simple way for controlling the lighting rig, and once the channel levels have been set in this way, they can be recorded as memories.

As there are only a limited number of submasters on all hardware platforms, the faders are used to control a certain number of channels at one time, then another range is assigned by pressing a key. In this way, the faders can be used to control all of the channels available.

The direct channel control mode is available directly from all platforms by using the alphanumeric keyboard. Some platforms have a dedicated key for this function.

Note: The function can be assigned to a key on the desk by using the Function Assign facility. This is described in the chapter *Macros* in the ISIS Operators Manual.

example of keystrokes <SM/CH> OR <S> Toggles the faders between submaster control and direct channel control. Channels controlled by the faders are displayed on the monitors in green. FADERS Use the faders to control channel intensities in the current working field. <DOWN> <UP> OR <SHIFT + 1-24> <SHIFT + 25-48> Assigns the next range of channels to the faders. <SM/CH> OR <S> Toggles the faders between direct channel control and submaster control.

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System Setup 15.4.2 Moving light parameter control


The submaster faders can be used to directly control moving light parameters, by using the Unfold function. This offers a convenient way of selecting and setting parameter values, and can be extremely useful on platforms that do not have digital encoder wheels. example of keystrokes <F6 {UNFOLD}> Toggles the faders between submaster control and parameter control for the selected channel(s).

Note: The selected channels must be defined as moving lights or colour scrollers for this function to have any effect. For further information, please see the ISIS Operators Manual.

15.4.3 Extra fader control


The submaster faders can be assigned to control virtual levels. This facility offers direct control over these settings and is useful for hardware platforms that do not have the required physical fader. The table below lists the available controls that can be assigned.

Fader Audio Auditorium DmxIn SmFlash SmGeneral EffectSpeed

Description Controls the Audio Input level found in the General Configuration dialogue. Controls the Auditorium group level. Controls the DMX Input level found in the General Configuration dialogue. Controls the Submaster Flash level. Controls the Submaster General Master level. Controls the Speed of a selected chase or effect.

example of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F2 {MANUAL TABLE}> Displays the Manual Table Configuration dialogue box. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow key to highlight the required group of physical faders. <F1 {SPECIAL}> Displays the Extra Faders Edit dialogue box. < > ... <ENTER> Use the arrow keys and <ENTER> to assign the required function to each fader. <F8 {OK}> Confirms the operation and changers the fader assignment. <F4 {RENUMBER}> <F8 {OK}> Renumbers the remaining submaster faders and exits the Manual table Configuration facility.

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15.5 Profiles
ISIS is a very powerful software, offering advanced control of a lighting system and complete customisation of many functions and settings. However, it can appear complex to the untrained operator.

overcome this and to prevent the inexperienced user from changing certain configuration settings ISIS provides a system of configurable profiles. A profile can be used to prevent access to certain functions and settings. This allows the system to be setup and configured as necessary, and then access to critical functions removed.

Profiles can also be used to create customised settings for a number of operators - each of who have their own preferences and favourite settings, or to produce configurations for different types of events such as theatre mode or live music mode.

A profile allows custom configurations to be stored and quickly recalled.

The Profile Manager allows profiles to be created, edited, copied and deleted, and also selects which profile is active. Profiles can be imported and exported to floppy disk from the Profile Manager, and they can also be locked with a password. The Profile Manager is found in the Setup options of the menu. example of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F1 {PROFILE CONFIG}> Displays the Profile Manager; initially this displays a list of existing profiles.

The active profile is indicated by a tick in the current (Cur) column.

15.5.1 Selecting a profile


The active profile is selected from the Profile Manager, and can be changed at any time. example of keystrokes WHEEL OR < > In the Profile Manager, use the wheel or the down arrow key to highlight the required profile. <F2 {USE}> Activates the selected profile; configuration of the ISIS software is immediately changed. <F8 {OK}> Exits the Profile Manager.

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System Setup 15.5.2 Creating and editing profiles


A number of pre-defined profiles are provided in the ISIS software, although it is a simple matter to create a new profile or edit an existing one. See the chapter *System Setup* in the Main ISIS Operators Manual

15.5.3 Locking and unlocking a profile


Profiles can be locked with a password, preventing them from being modified. Locked profiles can still be used, and can still be exported to floppy disk. When a profile is locked, the operator is unable to change ISIS settings in the setup menu as listed below.

Locked items General Screen Config Display Format Keys Function Manual Table Default SM Config

Description Desktop configuration such as desk inputs and Move in Black Monitor contents Monitor display settings Assigning functions to keys on the hardware platform Modifying the fader modes Modifying the default submaster configuration details

example of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <F1 {PROFILE CONFIG}> Displays the Profile Manager; initially this displays a list of existing profiles. WHEEL OR < > Use the wheel or the down arrow key to highlight the required profile. <F6 {OTHERFCT}> <F3 {LOCK}> Displays the Profile Password dialogue box. PASSWORD Use the alphanumeric keyboard to enter the password. The password is CASE SENSITIVE. <F8 {OK}> Exits the Profile Manager.

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Touchscreen Control

16

TOUCHSCREEN CONTROL

16.1 Introduction
Certain hardware platforms offer an LCD touchscreen, providing access to ISIS functions as well as displaying additional information. The touchscreen can be set in any one of five display modes at any time, each of which has its own application.

16.2 Touchscreen setup and operation


Once operation of the touchscreen has been mastered, it offers an extremely quick way to select functions and items. Using the touchscreen is extremely simple and requires only minimal configuration.

16.2.1 Configuring the touchscreen


The touchscreen can be configured through the setup options of the menu, or via the dedicated <LCD> key where available. The contrast setting and the backlight and click modes can be adjusted.

examples of keystrokes <MENU> <F7 {SETUP}> <TOUCHPANEL> Displays the Touchscreen Configuration dialogue box. <F8 {OK}> Closes the dialogue, once the required settings have been made. By default, the backlight is set to switch off automatically after 30 seconds of inactivity, although this time period is adjustable. It is also possible to turn the backlight on continually, or to switch it off altogether. In addition to setting the LCD contrast via the Touchscreen Configuration dialogue, it can also be adjusted directly by using the <ALT> key in association with the wheel.

examples of keystrokes <ALT + WHEEL> Adjusts the LCD contrast.

16.2.2 Selecting touchscreen modes


The touchscreen can be used to display a variety of information and functions, and can be changed at any point by the operator. Mentor offers dedicated keys to change the display mode; these are located next to the touchscreen. Other hardware platforms require the LCD mode functions to be assigned to other keys. Note: Assigning a function to a key is explained in the chapter *Macros & Learn Profile*.

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Touchscreen Control
The available touchscreen modes are described below. Mode LCD 0 LCD 1 LCD 2 LCD 3 LCD 4 Type Dynamic Static XFade Output Field Description Touchscreen functions change relative to the operators use. A number of functions are permanently displayed. The sequence of playback 1 is displayed. Channel intensities at the Output are displayed. Channels in the working field can be selected and intensities displayed.

16.2.3 Selecting functions and other items.


Functions and other items displayed on the touchscreen are selected by pressing the associated touch-key. An item is selected when it is shown in inverse colour, pressing a selected item a second time will remove the selection.

16.3 First touch


By default, the LCD backlight is automatically switched off when the touchscreen has not been used for a period of time; this is designed to prolong the life of the light. The backlight will be switched on when the touchscreen is pressed by the operator. This first touch has no function, and will not select any options on the touchscreen display it will only switch on the LCD backlight. A Unsel Home B Off Open C Grab Ignit D Fill UnLink Reset A Unsel Home B Off Open C Grab Ignit D Fill UnLink Reset

Macro list

Group list

Chaser list

Effect list

Memory list

Macro list

Group list

Chaser list

Effect list

Memory list

Non-active LCD touchscreen (example contents)

Active touchscreen after first touch

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16.4 Static mode (LCD1)


When the touchscreen is set to Static mode, a number of functions remain permanently displayed. These have been selected to present the operator with the most useful options, and to provide access to those functions not directly available on all hardware platforms. A Unsel Home B Off Open C Grab Ignit D Fill UnLink Reset

Macro list

Group list

Chaser list

Effect list

Memory list

Touchscreen display in Static mode The touchscreen can be used for selecting parameter groups, and certain motion control functions. Selecting one of the list options displays the Direct Load function for the selected entity, if it is applicable. Selecting any of the macro, group, chaser, effect or memory options changes the touchscreen to the relevant display, as indicated below.

16.4.1 Macro display


Selecting the macro option changes the display as shown below. A selected macro can be run directly from the touchscreen, or assigned to a key on the desk. The Macro Manager can also be entered from the touchscreen. Macros that have recorded contents are indicated with an asterisk ( ), and the operator can select condensed mode if only recorded macros are to be displayed. 1 5 9 13 17 21 2 6 10 14 18 22 3 7 11 15 19. 23 Home Macro display mode A selected macro can be recorded in live mode, by pressing the LEARN function. All subsequent actions made by the operator will then be recorded in a macro, until LEARN is pressed for a second time or the stop macro command is made. The ESC function returns the touchscreen display to the Static mode. 4 8 12 16 20 24 End ESC Mac Mgr All Condens Ass. Key Run Learn

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Touchscreen Control 16.4.2 Group & memory displays


In a similar manner to the macro mode, groups and memories can be displayed on the touchscreen. The relevant manager can be entered directly, and a selected group or memory can be loaded in the current working field. A selected memory number can be recorded directly using the REC function. 1 5 9 13 17 21 2 6 10 14 18 22 3 7 11 15 19 23 Home Group display mode 4 8 12 16 20 24 End ESC Load Grp Mgr All Condens 1. 5. 9. 13. 17. 21. 2. 6. 10. 14. 18. 22. 3. 7. 11. 15. 19. 23. Home Memory display mode 4. 8. 12. 16. 20. 24. End ESC Load Rec Mem Mgr All Condens

16.4.3 Chaser & effect displays


Selecting a chaser or effect display mode provides a similar format on the touchscreen. All functions displayed are as described in the chapter *Chasers & Effects*. 1 4 7 10 13 16 2 5 8 11 14 17 3 6 9 12 15 18 Home Chaser display mode End ESC Effect display mode Config. Step + Add Step Rec All Condens Step Del Step Load Speed 1 4 7 10 13 16 2 5 8 11 14 17 3 6 9 12 15 18 Home End Rec Load Speed Type ESC Config. Step + All Condens Step

A loaded chaser or effect can be configured using the CONFIG touch-key, and presents the touchscreen display indicated below. The effect type can also be selected directly from the touchscreen when the TYPE function is pressed. Mode + Audio + Audio Midi + Midi Chaser & effect configuration Dir Right Left Pendulum Fade Square Triangle Saw Inv Saw Cross Back Cycle Infinite Input 1 2 3 4 5 6 Basic Effect Basic Effect with Audio Speed Symmetric Effect Symmetric Effect with Audio Speed Build Effect Build Effect with Audio Speed Home End Back

Effect type selection (Basic Effect selected)

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Touchscreen Control 16.4.4 Effect generator display


When an effect is created using the effect generator, the touchscreen can be used to make selections and assign functions to the wheel. All functions are explained in the chapter *Effect Generator* in the ISIS Operators Manual.

16.5 Dynamic mode (LCD0)


In Dynamic mode, the touchscreen changes to the most relevant display. For example, if a moving light or colour changer channel is selected, the touchscreen will display the instrument parameters and other motion control functions. Dynamic mode will automatically change the touchscreen contents between the display modes listed below, as applicable. If none of these options is relevant, the Static display mode is shown.

Instrument parameters & motion control functions; Chaser settings; Effect settings; Effect Generator settings.

The touchscreen displays for chasers, effects and the effect generator are described above. Displays for a selected instrument are explained hieronder.

16.5.1 Instrument mode


When an instrument is selected in Dynamic mode, the touchscreen is updated to show specific information for the selected instrument, together with motion control functions. The example below illustrates the display for a Martin Professional Roboscan Pro 918 in mode 4.

A 1 PAN 2 TLT

B 3 GW1 4 IDX GW2 FOC

C CW1 CW2

D ASP ESP STB

9184 MCMgr MCLib

Unsel

Off

Grab Home

Fill End

Steps

Instrument mode for a selected instrument (Martin 918 mode 4)

The touchscreen indicates which parameters are connected to the encoder wheels, where these are available, and allows parameter groups to be selected directly. Pressing the touch-key of an individual parameter will select or unselect that parameter. Other common motion control functions are available at the bottom of the touchscreen.

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Touchscreen Control
If the selected instrument definition contains stepped parameters, these can be displayed and selected from the LCD touchscreen by pressing the STEPS function. One parameter is displayed at a time, together with the steps and any labels that have been assigned. Pressing a step touch-key sends this value directly to the current working field. OPEN 27 GOB4 125 GOB3 205 GOB1 65 GOB5 145 GOB2 225 GOB2 85 GOB5 165 GOB1 245 GOB3 105 GOB4 185 9184 GW1 0002 A . 0003 A . ESC Home 00/00 0004 A . 0005 A . MC Home 0002 B . 0003 B . 0004 B . 0005 B . Open 0001 A . 0001 B . 0001 C . 0002 C . 0003 C . 0004 C . 0005 C . Ignit Home Steps function selected from Instrument mode 0001 D . 0002 D . 0003 D . 0004 D . 0005 D . Reset End

Lib Mgr

Record

Zoom

Load

Steps ESC

MCLib function selected from Instrument mode

From the Instrument mode touchscreen, it is possible to display the contents of Motion Control Libraries (MCLibs). By default, the content of five libraries is shown, allowing the operator to select from the MCLib groups and either record the libraries directly using REC, or to apply a library selection to the selected instrument by using LOAD. Zoom can be used to display MCLib groups individually, one screen at a time. Other motion control functions are available from the bottom of the touchscreen display, and the operator can return to the Instrument mode by pressing ESC.

16.6 Xfade mode (LCD2)


If the Xfade mode is selected, the touchscreen is used to display the sequence of playback 1. The information displayed is identical to a monitor footer configured to show the playback. The Xfade display mode is purely informational, and allows the operator to visualise the playback sequence. No selections can be made from the touchscreen in this configuration. MAN SEQ Event Sp 100% Mem 0.5 1. 2. 3. 4. FF 1..0 2..0 7..0 5..0 4..0 5..0 5..0 2..0 7..0 5..0 6..0 5..0 1..0 5..0 Preset Blackout Cue 1 Cue 2 Cue 3 6..0

Touchscreen display in Xfade mode

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Touchscreen Control

16.7 Output mode (LCD3)


The Output mode is another information display, and provides the operator with a display of channel intensities at the desk Output. No channel selections can be made from the touchscreen in this configuration. The operator can select whether to display all channels or only channels that have an intensity (condensed display). In both cases, the display page can be changed by using the and touch-keys and the first page can be selected by pressing HOME. 1 5 0 1 1 2 1 2 50 12 3 5 0 1 3 2 3 F F 3 3 4 3 5 3 2 5 4 5 0 1 4 2 4 5 5 0 1 5 2 5 3 5 1 5 4 5 5 5 6 50 16 7 8 9 10 1 5 0 3 5 1 5 3 5 0 4 7 F F 5 5 0 5 1 2 5 2 2 F F 2 8 F F 2 9 1 0

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OUTPU Conden T s Touchscreen display in Output mode, showing channel intensities. Home

The same Output display in condensed format.

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Touchscreen Control

16.8 Field mode (LCD4)


The Field mode displays the contents of the selected working field, showing channel intensities. It is similar to the Output mode, in that channels can be shown in condensed mode if required. Navigation is identical to the Output mode. 1 F F 1 1 2 1 3 1 4 1 5 1 2 F F 12 3 F F 1 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 5 3 4 F F 14 5 1 5 2 5 5 0 3 5 4 5 5 5 6 7 1 7 2 7 3 7 4 7 5 7 8 9 10 1 F F 1 1 2 1 3 1 4 1 5 1 2 F F 12 3 F F 1 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 5 3 4 F F 14 5 1 5 2 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 6 7 1 7 2 7 3 7 4 7 5 7 8 9 10

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Channels selected directly from the touchscreen

The extra feature of the Field mode is in allowing the operator to select channels directly from the touchscreen. This can be much faster than typing in a selection of channels on the keypad. Selected channels can be modified immediately by using the wheel or keypad to assign an intensity, or they can be recorded as a group.

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17

HELP

17.1 Introduction
ISIS is equipped with extensive on-line help files. The Help function aims to give an overview of the functions on the desk, and can be used in two ways:

Help can be found on a specific subject, either by jumping directly to its hypertext link on the first page, or by finding the required subject via the alphabetical links; The hypertext links make it possible to browse through the files, finding relevant or similar subjects.

The Help function is easily activated by pressing <help>, or from the Info options of the menu.

17.2 Help on a specific subject


Many subjects have direct hypertext links on the first page of the Help file. Entering the number of the desired option displays the subject.

If the required subject is not in the main help menu, one of the alphabetical searches can be used to search sub-menus of subjects. examples of keystrokes <HELP> Displays a list of available help subjects. Many of these will have sub-topics within them.

The Help function main index <1><1> <ENTER> Makes a subject selection, this example is memories.

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Help
The help file on memories is displayed. It can be scrolled through using the arrow keys or the mouse on the scroll bar. Whenever a word is preceded with a number in pale green, this is a hypertext link to a sub-topic. examples of keystrokes <0> <5> <ENTER> Selects the sub-topic, this example is fade times. <HELP> Pressing Help a second time exits the help files. Escape on the alphanumeric keyboard also exits the help file.

17.3 Browsing the help files


The very nature of the hypertext links makes the help files easy to browse: every time there is a link or subject heading of interest, enter its number on the keypad. Follow the on-screen instructions for help on navigating through the help files. examples of keystrokes <HELP> Displays a list of available help subjects, many of these will have sub-topics within them. <4><0> <ENTER> Makes a subject selection, this example is back up. Continue to use the hypertext links to browse the files at leisure. <CLEAR> Returns to the previous page. <HELP> Press Help a second time to exit the help files. Escape on the alphanumeric keyboard also exits the help file.

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Additional Sources of Information

18

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION

The User Manual for ISIS 2.10. The comprehensive User Manual for ISIS 2.10 can be downloaded from the ADB website. http://www.adblighting.com > ADB Products > Control Desks > ISIS Software > ISIS 2.10 User Manual. The ADB Ethernet Network Guide The "ADB Ethernet Network Guide" can be downloaded from the ADB website. http://www.adblighting.com > ADB Products > Interfaces > Ethernet > select the User Manual. The Wi-Fi User Manual The "ADB Ethernet Network Guide" can be downloaded from the ADB website. http://www.adblighting.com > ADB Products > Interfaces > Wi-Fi Remote Control > select the User Manual. ESTA and its Technical Standards Programme Learn more about - or participate in - the ongoing standards development efforts: http://www.esta.org/tsp/ Example: the ESTA Control Protocols Working Group covers subjects such as DMX512-A the future successor to DMX512/1990 RDM Remote Device Management (EIA-485 serial transmission) ACN Advanced Control Network (over Ethernet). The process of creating a new standard includes one or several Public Reviews. Participate!

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Chapter Overview

19

CHAPTER OVERVIEW
2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 10 11 12 12 12 13 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 17 Page: 173 Issue 1.01

1.INTRODUCTION 1.1 Welcome 1.1.1 About this short-form manual 1.2 Introduction to the ISIS system 1.2.1 Access to functions 1.2.3 User Profiles 1.2.4 Messages 1.3 Summary 2.QUICK START GUIDE 2.1 Turning on 2.2 Working field selection 2.3 Channel selection 2.4 Creating groups 2.5 Intensity assignment 2.6 Memory number selection 2.7 Recording memories 2.8 Loading memories 2.9 Sequential memory playback 2.10 Erasing working field contents 2.11 Deleting 2.12 Creating chasers 2.13 Creating effects 2.14 Output patch 2.15 Saving a show 2.16 Shut Down 3.TURNING ON & OFF 3.1 Turning on the system: Startup 3.2 Show Initialisation (clearing the desk) 3.3 Turning off the system: Shutdown 4.AREAS OF THE DESK: WORKING FIELDS 4.1 Introduction 4.2 The working fields 4.3 Selecting a working field 4.4 Clearing a working field 5.CHANNEL CONTROL 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Selecting channels 5.2.1 Special channel selection tools 5.3 Allocating intensities 5.3.1 Additional intensity functions 5.4 Advanced intensity modifications 5.5 Copying channels and their intensities between the fields 5.6 Testing channels 5.7 Channel tracking 6.GROUPS 6.1 Introduction www.adblighting.com

Chapter Overview 6.2 Creating a group 6.3 Editing a group 6.4 Displaying the group list 6.5 Selecting groups and allocating intensities 6.6 Direct Load of groups 6.7 Group Manager 6.7.1 Naming a group in the Group Manager (Title) 6.7.2 Copying groups in the Group Manager 6.7.3 Deleting groups from the Group Manager 6.7.4 Renumbering groups in the Group Manager 6.8 Recovering deleted groups 7.SUBMASTERS 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Submaster pages 7.3 Selecting submasters 7.3.1 Selecting one submaster 7.3.2 Selecting a list of submasters 7.3.3 Selecting a list of submasters across two pages 7.4 Control in submasters 7.4.2 Adding and subtracting groups 7.4.4 Combining channels, groups and memories in a submaster 7.5 Erasing the submasters 7.6 Submaster modes 7.7 The different submaster modes are summarised below. 7.7.1 Configuring the submasters 7.7.2 Normal 7.7.3 Auto 7.7.4 Bypass 7.7.5 Inhibit (sum correction) 7.7.6 Audio 7.7.7 Configuring a submasters response to the audio input 7.8 Flashkeys 7.8.1 Configuring the flashkeys 7.8.2 Normal 7.8.3 Solo 7.8.4 On / off 7.8.5 Off 7.8.6 Preset 8.RECORDING AND LOADING MEMORIES 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Memory protection 8.3 Recording memories 8.3.1 Recording the contents of a single working field: REC 8.3.2 Recording the total output of the desk: SUM 8.4 Memory times 8.4.1 U p time 8.4.2 Down time 8.4.3 Wait time 8.4.4 Entering times in seconds 8.4.5 Times in minutes Page: 174 Issue: 1.01 www.adblighting.com 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 22 23 23 23 24 24 25 25 25 26 26 27 28 28 29 30 30 31 32 33 34 36 36 37 37 38 38 38 39 39 39 40 41 41 41 42 42 43 43 43

Chapter Overview 8.4.6 Times in 10th second 8.4.7 Same up and down times 8.4.8 Same up and down wait times 8.4.9 Separate up and down times 8.4.10 Separate up and down wait times 8.4.11 All four times different 8.5 Special times 8.5.1 Special times for channels 8.5.2 Special times for instrument parameters 8.5.3 Removing special times 8.6 Loading memories 8.6.1 Loading a memory into one working field 8.6.2 Loading a list of memories into a list of submasters 8.6.3 Direct Load of memories 8.6.4 Combining a memory with other working field contents 8.7 Modifying memories 8.7.1 Re-recording an existing memory 8.7.2 Recording a modified memory as a new memory 8.7.3 Re-loading a modified memory 8.8 Copying memories using the keypad 8.9 Memory Manager 8.9.1 Assigning Autogo to a memory 8.9.2 Naming a memory in the Memory Manager (Title) 8.9.3 Editing memory times and Autogo status 8.9.4 Copying memories in the Memory Manager 8.9.5 Deleting memories from the Memory Manager 8.9.6 Renumbering memories in the Memory Manager 8.10 Recovering deleted memories 8.11 Using Edit Memory 8.11.1 Creating a new memory Blind in Edit Memory 8.11.2 Editing a list of memories 8.12 Memory tracking (conditional editing) 9.PLAYING BACK MEMORIES & OTHER EVENTS 9.1 Introduction 9.2 The playback: Stage and Preset working fields 9.3 Memory links 9.3.1 Creating a link using the Link function 9.3.2 Creating a link in the Sequence Manager 9.4 Intelligent Link 9.4.1 Creating an event using the Intelligent Link function 9.4.2 Editing an event created by the Intelligent Link function 9.5 Events 9.5.1 Alias 9.5.2 Macro 9.5.3 Loop 9.5.4 Wait 9.5.5 Enable/Disable Move In Black 9.5.6 Load submaster 9.5.7 Control submaster fader & flash 9.6 Sequence Manager www.adblighting.com 44 44 45 45 45 46 46 47 48 49 49 49 50 50 50 52 52 52 52 53 53 54 54 55 56 56 57 57 58 59 59 60 63 63 63 63 63 64 65 65 67 67 68 68 68 70 70 70 70 71 Page: 175 Issue 1.01

Chapter Overview 9.6.1 Creating an event 9.6.2 Creating a multi-part event 9.6.3 Naming an event (Title) 9.6.4 Editing or deleting part of an event 9.6.5 Deleting an entire event 9.7 Playback modes 9.7.1 Non-sequential 9.7.2 Sequential 9.7.3 Autogo-Sequential 9.8 Using the playback with manual fades 9.8.1 Continuing a manual fade automatically 9.9 Using the playback with timed fades 9.9.1 Pausing a running fade 9.9.2 Continuing an automatic fade manually 9.9.3 Cut 9.9.4 Pile 9.9.6 Jump 9.9.7 Back Jump 9.9.8 Modifying the speed of an automatic fade 9.9.9 Exiting a running loop 9.10 Autogo 9.10.1 Autogo playback 9.10.2 Autogo memory or event 9.11 Displaying the playback status 10.CHASERS & EFFECTS 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Creating a chaser 10.2.1 A simple 1 channel per step chaser 10.2.2 A chaser using combinations of channel intensities in each step 10.2.3 Using existing memories in chaser steps 10.3 Creating an effect 10.3.1 Effect types 10.4 Recording chasers & effects 10.5 Loading chasers & effects 10.5.1 Direct load of chasers & effects 10.6 Chaser & effect settings 10.6.1 Speed 10.6.2 Direction 10.6.4 Mode 10.6.5 Cycles 10.6.6 Viewing channel intensities as bargraphs 10.7 Chasers with moving lights 10.7.1 Viewing the One Step screen 10.7.2 Viewing instrument parameters in a monitor footer 10.8 Pausing a special effect & manual control 10.9 Autofade: times for chasers & effects 10.9.1 Up and down times 10.9.2 Wait time 10.9.3 Sustain time 10.9.4 Setting chaser and effect times Page: 176 Issue: 1.01 www.adblighting.com 71 72 72 73 74 74 74 75 75 76 76 76 77 78 78 78 78 79 79 80 80 80 81 81 83 83 83 84 85 86 86 87 89 89 90 90 91 91 92 93 93 93 94 95 95 96 96 96 96 97

Chapter Overview 10.9.5 Parameter times in chasers 10.10 Changing the flashkey mode 10.11 Chaser with individual step times Cue Stacks 10.11.1 Setting individual step times 10.11.2 Using a chaser with individual steps 10.12 Responding to an audio input 10.12.1 Enabling the audio input 10.13 Modifying chasers & effects 10.13.1 Changing speed, direction, fade type and mode 10.13.2 Adding or deleting channels from chaser steps 10.13.3 Adding or deleting chaser steps 10.13.4 Adding or deleting channels from an effect 10.13.5 Changing the effect type 10.13.6 Re-recording an existing chaser or effect 10.14 Chaser & Effect Managers 10.14.1 Viewing the chasers or effects list 10.14.2 Editing chasers & effects (title and times) 10.14.3 Renumbering chasers & effects 10.14.4 Copying chasers & effects 10.14.5 Deleting chasers & effects 10.15 Intelligent Link for chasers & effects 10.15.1 Creating an event using the Intelligent Link function 10.15.2 Editing an event created by Intelligent Link 11.THE LIVE WORKING FIELD 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Capturing channels and parameters 11.2.1 Intensities 11.2.2 Parameters 11.3 Releasing captured channels and parameters 11.3.1 Free Instantly (Free Free) 11.3.2 Free to the wheel 11.3.3 Free to the playback 11.4 Loading memories in Live 11.5 Recording memories in Live 11.6 Erasing Live 12.USING COLOUR CHANGERS & MOVING LIGHTS 12.1 Introduction 12.2 Instrument parameter groups 12.18 Controlling colour changers 12.18.1 Intensities 12.18.2 Continuous colour selection (Free mode) 12.18.3 Colour selection by frame number 12.18.4 Colour selection by name 12.19.1 Adjusting additional parameters 12.19.2 Adjusting colour frame alignment and adding frame names 12.20 Initialising moving light instruments ready for use 12.20.1 Opening the instrument using Open 12.20.2 Resetting the instrument using Reset 12.20.3 Ignition of the instrument lamp using Ignit 12.21 Controlling moving light instruments www.adblighting.com 98 98 99 100 100 101 102 102 102 103 103 104 104 104 105 105 105 106 107 107 108 108 109 110 110 110 110 111 111 112 112 113 114 114 115 116 116 116 117 117 117 118 118 119 120 121 122 122 123 123 Page: 177 Issue 1.01

Chapter Overview 12.21.1 Intensities 12.21.2 Azimuth - making the instruments move 12.21.3 Adjusting other parameters Specific parameter configuration and selection 12.21.4 Encoder wheel resolution 12.21.5 Selecting groups or individual parameters 12.22 Viewing parameters 12.22.1 Viewing the parameters display 12.22.2 Viewing the parameter source 12.23 The Home position 12.23.1 Recording the Home position 12.23.2 Loading the Home position 12.24 Controlling parameters on the faders using Unfold 12.24.1 Activating Unfold and selection of parameters 12.24.2 Visualisation of parameters on the faders 12.33.1 Using Unfold with multiple instruments 12.34 Additional motion control functions 12.34.1 Grab 12.34.2 Sending working field content directly to the Output 12.35 Recording memories containing instruments 12.35.1 Behaviour of parameters with respect to memory times 12.35.2 Special Times for motion control parameters 12.35.3 Removing special times 12.36 Move in Black (automatic parameter preset) 12.36.1 Intensity off (MIB AO) mode 12.37 Instruments in Chasers and Effects 12.38 Overview of Motion Control Libraries 12.40 Summary 13.OUTPUT PATCH 13.1 Introduction 13.2 Patch operations 13.2.1 Viewing the output patch screen 13.2.2 Displaying channels to dimmers & dimmers to channels 13.2.3 Deleting the output patch 13.2.4 Patching a single channel to a single dimmer 13.2.5 Patching one channel to several dimmers 13.3 The Dot Patch syntax for multiple DMX universes 13.4 Proportional output factor 13.5 Dimmer laws 13.5.1 Allocating a dimmer law 13.6 Returning to the one-to-one patch 14.SHOW MANAGEMENT 14.1 Introduction 14.2 Saving to disk 14.2.1 Saving a new show 14.3 Loading a show 14.3.1 Selectively loading information from a show 14.4 The Show Manager 14.4.1 Renaming a show in the Show Manager 14.4.2 Deleting a show in the Show Manager Page: 178 Issue: 1.01 www.adblighting.com 123 124 124 126 126 126 127 127 127 128 128 128 129 129 129 130 130 130 131 131 132 132 133 133 134 135 135 136 138 138 138 139 139 139 140 140 141 142 142 144 144 145 145 145 145 146 147 148 148 149

Chapter Overview 14.4.3 Copying a show in the Show Manager 14.5 Creating a backup on floppy disk 14.6 Restoring a backup from floppy disk 14.7 Printing 15.SYSTEM SETUP 15.1 Introduction 15.2 Screen configurations 15.2.1 Display contents 15.2.2 Display footers 15.2.3 Display modes 15.2.4 Paging monitor displays 15.2.5 Display formats 15.2.6 Single screen operation 15.3 Show Initialisation 15.4 Fader configuration and the Manual Table function 15.4.1 Direct channel control 15.4.2 Moving light parameter control 15.4.3 Extra fader control 15.5 Profiles 15.5.1 Selecting a profile 15.5.2 Creating and editing profiles 15.5.3 Locking and unlocking a profile 16.TOUCHSCREEN CONTROL 16.1 Introduction 16.2 Touchscreen setup and operation 16.2.1 Configuring the touchscreen 16.2.2 Selecting touchscreen modes 16.2.3 Selecting functions and other items. 16.3 First touch 16.4 Static mode (LCD1) 16.4.1 Macro display 16.4.2 Group & memory displays 16.4.3 Chaser & effect displays 16.4.4 Effect generator display 16.5 Dynamic mode (LCD0) 16.5.1 Instrument mode 16.6 Xfade mode (LCD2) 16.7 Output mode (LCD3) 16.8 Field mode (LCD4) 17.HELP 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Help on a specific subject 17.3 Browsing the help files 18.ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION 19.CHAPTER OVERVIEW 149 150 151 151 153 153 153 153 153 154 155 155 156 156 158 158 159 159 160 160 161 161 162 162 162 162 162 163 163 164 164 165 165 166 166 166 167 168 169 170 170 170 171 172 173

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ADB Your Partner for Light


Belgium N.V. ADB-TTV Technologies S.A. (Group Headquarters) Leuvensesteenweg 585, B-1930 Zaventem Tel : 32.2.709.32.11, Fax : 32.2.709.32.80, E-Mail : adb@adblighting.com ADB GmbH ADB S.A.S. Boschstrasse 3, D-61239 Ober-Mrlen Tel : 49.6002.93.933.0, Fax : 49.6002.93.933.33, E-Mail : info@adblighting.de Sales office: 168/170, boulevard Camlinat F-92240 Malakoff Tel : 33.1.41.17.48.50, Fax : 33.1.42.53.54.76, E-Mail : adb.fr@adblighting.com Factory & group logistics centre: Zone industrielle Rouvroy F-02100 Saint-Quentin Tel : 33.3.23.06.35.70, Fax : 33.3.23.67.66.56, E-Mail : adb.fr@adblighting.com

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M-1203-E-07j

Subject to modifications