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RAFFLES MILLENNIUM INTERNATIONL

NEW DELHI

THESIS ON

MARKETING MANAGEMENT OF RAFFLES MILLENNIUM INTERNATIONL SCHOOL

SUBMITTED TO: PROF. ______________ PROF. _______________

ABSTRACT
Today's business environment is characterized by change and complexity. Product life cycles are shrinking while consumer preferences are changing frequently and dramatically. Technology is no longer a trump card for gaining competitive advantage, but more a wild card, with an unknown value and an uncertain impact on performance. A number of technologies are available to achieve a particular end in any given industry, and in most cases, it is almost impossible to foretell which will fail and which will succeed. In such an environment, innovation is critical to an organization's survival and growth. This is particularly true in activities related to marketing such as new product development or product modifications and process and communication changes - perhaps more so than in any other function. As with business, so with business education. While the demand for management education is growing in the country, business schools are also facing the fallout of the turmoil in the business environment, having to cope with profound changes in their markets. This article discusses why business schools in India should become more businesslike, and begin to practice some of the theories they have been teaching for so long.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

It is well-established fact that behind every achievement lays an unfathomable sea of gratitude to those who have extended their support and without whom the project would never have come into existence. I express my gratitude to Raffles Millennium International, New Delhi for providing me an opportunity to work on this thesis as a part of the curriculum. Also, I express my gratitude to Prof. __________and Prof. ______________for their kind cooperation.

CONTENT

INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................1 PROFILE...............................................................................................25 LITERATURE REVIEW.........................................................................41 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY.............................................................57 FINDING AND ANALYSIS....................................................................59 CONCLUSION......................................................................................71 RECOMMENDATION...........................................................................73 BIBLIOGRAPHY...................................................................................75 ANNEXURE QUESTIONNAIRE........................................................76

INTRODUCTION
For quite sometimes Indian B schools have branded to explain the value of the business degree to the public. Now that the MBA and other business degrees are better understood, the drive to differentiate has come once again to the forefront. There is already brand differentiation like: IIM and non IIM brands. Its time to go further deeper. The branding strategy and programme of a B-school need to go far beyond the product portfolio and embrace the whole offering from the business school including products, price, place and more importantly people. A brand should be based on the reality of a school's present situation and culture. And above all, it must have credibility. B-school branding is based on not only who you are, but what you do as well. Branding is both an art and science, once successful it provides the B-school the necessary enigmatic aura. But it isn't rocket science either. Rather, it's a culmination of discussions and process that starts with business school faculties, staff and Students asking and answering questions:" Who are we, how should we add value to stake holders?" To develop a distinct brand, business schools must look at their histories, their legacies, and their ambitions to uncover. it is always better to consider the seven good friends of Rudyard Kipling in brand building process: who , what , when , where , how , why and how much .the crux of brand building entails answering those seven questions to your stakeholders --MBA aspirants , current students , alumni , corporate ,other organizations and your social contour .this discussion will be focused towards how to build your brand through your stake holders --the tools and techniques. The Business of Business Education

Traditionally in India, education, even business education, has not been viewed in terms of products or markets. Instead, education has been viewed as the responsibility of the government. Consequently, educational institutions have for long operated in an environment quite different from the one businesses operate in, following practices and approaches far removed from the rough and tumble of corporate life.

However, this situation is now changing dramatically, in much the same way the rules of doing business in India have changed in the past decade or so. The financial crunch facing both the central and state governments has resulted in a reduction in the government's role in providing education, particularly higher education. Now, due to reduced funding from the government, most government funded educational institutions are not in a position to expand or change to meet the demands of the marketplace. In this changed environment, business schools are realizing that they operate in a marketplace, and that to survive they must begin applying the theories they teach to their own operations.

A business school serves two markets one consisting of prospective students, and the other consisting of prospective employers. There is what is sometimes described as an 'implicit understanding' between the student and the business school (or at least the better schools) that the student will get a job if he completes his course successfully. Hence the critical role of placements in the success or failure of a business school. Both these markets have now become more fragmented, dynamic and demanding. Students today are better informed than ever before, and have a variety of educational options and institutions to choose from. Potential employers, faced with challenges of their own, are looking to recruit people who fulfill increasingly tougher requirements. New areas of study are opening up, and at the same time, new demands are being placed on management graduates.

While the demand for business education is becoming more and more complex and unpredictable, the providers of these services are increasingly hamstrung by inadequate budgets and antiquated work ethics and organization structures. The work culture of these organizations is more attuned to operating in the comparatively placid, government controlled economy of the last century. In the absence of funds from the government and other institutions, business education, to be successful, must be managed like a business. Without subsidies and external funds, neither a business or a business school can survive if the scale of its operations falls below a viable threshold. In much the same way that most of the enterprises in the small

scale sector in India are unviable, business schools below the threshold scale will find it difficult to compete and grow. Scale is important because of the virtuous spiral that signifies success for a business school. For business schools to succeed, they must attract talented students. The best students flock to institutes which draw recruiters. Recruiters go only to those institutes where they can find talented employees. To break into this virtuous cycle, business schools must be able to make large investments in research, in salaries to star faculty, and in top of the line infrastructure. With the government no longer willing to play the role of a benevolent sponsor, and in the absence of private charitable endowments to educational institutions, business schools must look to other ways to succeed. To achieve the required scale of operations , business schools must learn to market themselves. Since all business schools know and understand or are at least expected to know and understand - the principles of marketing, to succeed, a school must market itself innovatively.

Innovation: The Heart of Marketing

According to Peter Drucker, "Innovation is an economic or social rather than a technical term. It can be defined in demand terms rather than in supply terms, that is, as changing the value and satisfaction obtained from resources by the consumer. to create new and different values and new and different satisfactions, to convert a 'material' into a 'resource,' or to combine existing resources in a new and more productive configuration." Here, innovation has been defined in terms that would be familiar to any marketeer. Marketing successes that drive top line growth in organizations and expand their markets are not the result of accidents rather, they are the result of successful innovation in products and/or processes. Such innovation is becoming increasingly necessary for any organization's survival. TInnovation is often described as being of two types. Innovation with a capital 'I,' involving high risk, high investment initiatives that significantly impact the

organization as a whole; and that with a small 'i,' denoting incremental changes and improvements to products and processes. Both kinds of innovation have a role to play in marketing success. Innovation is not just about creative ideas. Although creativity is essential, in a business context, good ideas by themselves mean little. They must be translated into value adding activities for the business through successful implementation. This makes innovation essentially a collaborative process. In today's organizations, teams are necessary to implement an individual's creative ideas. Hence, when writing about innovation, most authors stress the importance of organization structure, systems and culture in making an organization a successful innovator. Clearly, there are many facets to fostering innovation in an organization.

How can a business school design and market its products innovatively? While any number of choices are available , a few of the more important ones are discussed below. Look for New Business Models: Understand the Core, Expand the Boundaries Business schools need not restrict themselves to teaching management concepts. They can and should be involved in content development, content dissemination, and research. The same factors that contribute to the strength of India in the areas of IT and IT enabled services low wages, an educated, English speaking workforce, and so on can also contribute to the growth of Indian business schools as centers of academic content development and dissemination. How many institutions in India have explored this as an alternate revenue stream?

In the field of research or content development, how many institutions have explored the vast content - much of it free - available on the Internet, including large electronic databases of journals and publications? Are there ways to utilize this content for the benefit of the business school and the academic community as a whole?

Innovate

on

Products

Experiment,

Experiment,

Experiment

To an organization willing to take risks, today's business and business education environment present as many opportunities as threats. Niche segments are constantly appearing in the market, and designing and delivering programs catering to these segments will help expand the scope of a business school's operations. In addition to identifying and catering to niches, business schools need to be flexible in designing the curricula for their mainstream programs. Gone are the days when curricula were like five year plans. Now, schools must be flexible, constantly tweaking and fine-tuning the course content and structure to make them attractive both to students and recruiters. They must interact constantly with the industry (not just at the time of placement, as is the case with most schools today) to identify leading indicators of changes in employment demand, and design their programs according to demand.

However, all innovation involves numerous risks. All experiments in course and curriculum design will not be successful in fact, most are likely to fail. But without constant experimentation, innovation cannot take place. Innovate on Processes: Minimize the Time Lag between Idea and Action The same sense of urgency with which well run businesses execute their plans must be repeated in business schools. Ideas must be implemented quickly. Of course, proposals must be evaluated but delaying implementation for too long risks the possibility that by the time a program or course reaches the market, it is out-of-date. And if this sense of urgency leads to occasional failures, these should be regarded a fair price to pay for moving quickly.

Create an Innovative Organization: Throw Out the Old, Bring in the New Business schools need to re-examine their organization structure and the kind of people they recruit. Is the traditional, hierarchical structure that we find in most educational institutions flexible and responsive enough to meet the needs of today's students and employers? Are the faculty members capable of inspiring and

energizing tomorrow's managers? It is an unfortunate truth that in India, a Ph.D. in management is often though not always - the last refuge of the unemployed, or even the unemployable, MBA. To what extent should business schools be slaves to ranking systems that provide arbitrary, and often unjustified, weightage to the number of such doctorates among the faculty? Business schools, to be prepared to meet the challenges of the present and the future, require merit-based (rather than senioritybased) organization structures and systems that value and reward research and publication as much as degrees. To build credibility in the market, the faculty members themselves must demonstrate some of the characteristics of successful managers foresight, flexibility, and innovativeness.

B-SCHOOL AS IN INDIA AND ITS BRANDING THROUGH RANKING SYSTEM It is the marketing advertising & promotion season for b-schools in India. The MBA aspirants have started gathering information on known ,little known or (even) unknown b-schools , depending on their academic performance . They must decide soon as to which b-schools they should apply to if they have to be in the reckoning for MBA admissions in the 2008 academic session . It is also the special issue season for the business publications of different hues. These special issues are thicker and heavier as more than half of the pages are advertisements from b-schools ,not to mention equal number of pages as advertorials ( camouflaged advertisements in the garb of write-ups about the advertiser). In the midst of this commercial activity an average graduate ,who is seeking a business /management career path, has to differentiate strong brands from the poor ones. The business publications ( with or without a research agency collaboration) are ready to offer all he help in the form of b-schools ratings /rankings or grading, based on as diverse set of methodology as the number of b-schools in India.

There are about 1400 b-schools in India, most of which are private entrepreneurial ventures. It includes university departments, government funded ( like the IIMs) or

heavily supported by business houses. About 80 to 100 b-schools are added to this pool every year .With that the competition also heats up gradually and so does the importance of branding. No wonder the ( private) education industry has emerged as one of the biggest ad-spender .The campaigns between June and October every year turnout to be the biggest attractions for media ,and hence the special issues. In this brand-building exercise all sorts of exaggerated claims are advanced ,naturally to attract as many applicants as possible. The media-supported b-school ratings serve as an important platform for branding exercise. For many poorly rated b-schools, the ads work as a neutralizing agents.

As the number of b-schools goes up ,so does the confusion for the average MBA aspirant .The students, therefore, are becoming more discerning as the time passes by. They seek more and better information on b-schools in order to short-list their choice of destination. Almost all b-schools have information on their websites but it is ,at times, not considered reliable. Thus the rating/ranking of b-schools has gained importance over time. For media this increases the circulation of the special issues containing ratings but also fetches them huge ad revenues.

Official Accreditation After AICTE was set up, approvals were granted to a variety of institutions to run post graduate programmes. Due to AICTE the time pressure the process adopted by was not fool proof . As a result some of the approved institutions did not

even have bare minimum facilities such as faculty ,library ,building ,computers etc. The need to have a proper accreditation process was badly felt at that time . AIMAs attempt to implement an objective accreditation mechanism did not bear fruit . Many b-Schools with little or no capability had received accreditation from AICTEs National Board of Accreditation. Although AICTE had a well defined accreditation process on paper. But when it came to implementation ,questions were raised. As a result AICTE drew flak from experts in management education all over the country. The need to have some objective and impartial B-School rating was felt at this stage. This opportunity was seized by Prof Dharani Sinha ,whose consulting firm

COSMODE was pioneer in launching the b-school ratings in 1998 ,with Business Today as the media partner. After COSMODE did the first ranking with Business Today magazine, other ranking agencies/ and publications also jumped the bandwagon in course of time. Global b-school ratings Cosmode-BT1998 rating may be the pioneering effort in India to grade/rank b-

schools, but globally such exercises have been undertaken for decades. The first ever b-school ranking was done by Columbia University in the US in 1972.This was more of an academic standard evaluation. This pioneering effort used two different types of data. Factual information on research /publications by the faculty members of the b-school under scanner and Perception-based evaluation by the Deans about b-Schools. Columbias ratings were followed next year by yet another university -Georgia State University ,albeit with a modified criteria. GSU added two new factors -the curriculum of the b-school and more importantly the employability of its graduates. We have not seen so far any academic institution taking up the cudgels to undertake a rating exercise as happened in US. Media dominance of evaluation /ranking in India is also based on international pattern. Even in the US the b-school ratings was taken over by the media. Prominent among them are : Business Week (BW),Financial Times, U.S. News & World Report, the Wall Street Journal Since 1986, BW had conducted surveys, every two years, of graduating MBA students and recruiters to create a customer satisfaction scorecard. US News and World Report launched its B-school ranking exercise in 1990, Asia Inc in 1995, Financial Times in 1999, Forbes in 2000, and Wall Street Journal in 2001. The methodology used, parameters and the weights allocated in these surveys are different. The ratings therefore are drastically different from each other.

Table : 1 International B School Surveys by Media

Media

Started

Frequenc y

Weightage & Ranking Criteria

Business Week

1986

Every years

2 45% students survey, with different parameters 45% recruiters survey with different parameters

10% faculty publications U.S. News & 1990 World Report Annual 40% DeansSurvey 35% Graduates Employability / starting salaries, . 25%Studentsacademic quality ( GMAT Scores included) Asia Inc 1995 Annual 20% Peer-Reputation Ranking (by Deans) 45% School & Faculty Quality 35% Students academic quality Financial Times 1999 Annual 20% Graduating Students starting salary 20% 3-year growth in salary post MBA 10% faculty research/ publications 10% international faculty & students 5% Ph.D. students placement 5% faculty with doctorate 5% women faculty and students 25% other criteria related to admission, curriculum

etc Forbes 2001 Every years 2 Surveys alumni; Measures return on investment in dollars and cents by focusing on salary and gains in comparison to tuition costs Wall Harris Interactive Street 2001 Annual Corporate recruiter perceptions towards bschool talent, and the characteristics they consider most important when hiring graduates.86 b- schools are rated on 21 key attributes. (perceived strengths and weakness among recruiters potential skills, in ).Parameters ,Strategic Value for include: thinking, money Students Leadership invested

Journal-

Entrepreneurial

recruiting,

communications skills

The Approach & Methodology The approach & methodology used by various rating agencies has been different .Each rating agency has also been modifying the methodology, by making suitable amends , in every subsequent rounds. Broadly speaking there have been three distinct approaches in b-school ratings. These are( a) Ratings based on hard facts/objective data obtained from b-schools,(b) Perception survey among different groups of stakeholders, and (c) a combination of the two . It is natural that the ultimate output i.e. the ratings will be different if the methodology adopted is not the same. As a result of the vast difference in rating by various agencies, every different approach has been under question. Not only in India ,but even in Europe and US, where different approaches have been used by agencies ,he outcome has been drastically different . disagree. But no one is complaining. And they have all agreed to Table --- describes the approaches used by various agencies over a

period of time . Cosmode-BT ratings in 1998 used a combination of objective data and a perception based survey with a relative ratio of 4:6. However in next round of ratings in 2000, the ratio was reversed in favour of hard facts/data ,which was 7:3.

Out of 1000 points , a total of 700 points were allocated to the factual information, which included new parameters like governance, evaluation system and placements. The perception survey was conducted among corporate recruiters, students, teachers and alumni. These perceptions were supplemented by hard information on facilities, course content, and placement ratios to arrive at the final rankings. Learning from the experience that the perception survey did not present unbiased information, Cosmode dropped this component in the next round (2002) and entire rating was now based on hard facts only. In this round new information such as industry interface and networking were added and relatively higher weight was assigned to placement and pedagogy. This departure in methodology led to differences between Cosmode and BT. Subsequently with Business World- a rival business magazine. Business today hired AC Cosmode was first Nielsen ORG for b-school ratings in 2003, while Cosmode decided to join hands Although agency to launch its b-school ratings, not every one was happy ,and for obvious reasons. B-Schools which received high ranks went tom-tom about their achievements while those which were left behind had reasons to question the methodology. Even after two rounds of improvement in methodology adopted by BT-Cosmode, questions remained. That gave rise to opportunity for other agencies/ publications to come with a different and more logical approach for ratings. The major debate which still lives by the day in 2009 is whether ratings should be based on hard facts or perception of the stakeholders ( or a combination of the two ). And if it is the combo, the right ratio between the two ? B-school ratings ,based on hard facts attract criticism as the facts submitted by b-schools are not always verifiable or verified . Wherever such verification is done ( to whatever extent ) fudging has been unearthed in many cases ( see table 5) raising doubts about the veracity of the data. Then comes the question of parameters used and the weights allotted to these parameters. As has been said earlier not only the parameters used by different rating agencies differ from one another but even the items which define the parameter. Placement, for example, gets 10% weight in BI( 2008) which increases to 15% in 2009, placement performance is given 21% weightage by Outlook ( and uses information such as percentage of students placed -50 marks, ratio of average salary to the fees -70 marks, median saklary -70 marks, maximum and minimum salary -70 marks each and faculty perception-70 marks). AIMA also uses placement

parameter ,without disclosing its components or the relative weightage. BT in its brand-equity model includes placements( multiple placement offers/ 100% placement as benchmark ) but with same limitations as AIMA, leaving it beyond comparison. Cosmode-BW used a 30% combined weight for placement & industry interface . It leaves ample scope for guessing as to what are the components and again the net weight used for placement as an activity of measuring success. Similarly industry-interface , as a parameter is given weights ranging from 4.5%( BI) to 19% (Outlook-C fore), while it finds no mention in BT-AC Nielsen. For Outlook rating this parameter includes seminars ,revenue from consultancy & MDPs, incubation cell ,joint research with industry etc., these important items are missing in many other ratings. Intellectual Capital is another parameter with varied definition and components, while BW covers it under the title faculty research etc, Outlook calls it intellectual capital & faculty and includes under this parameter published books, cases, research papers by the faculty, participation in seminars etc faculty profile etc a very comprehensive definition. BT-AC Nielsen includes research output, trained faculty and extent of industry people as visiting faculty. It is quite apparent that one practice at a b-school may fetch high reward points in one rating, while for other it may actually pull the score down .BI ,in this category, has several related items such as Academics, intellectual interface and MDP. separately Then there are basic questions regarding the parameters used and their relevance in a b-school evaluation. How important is physical infrastructure ? Certainly there should be sufficient number of well equipped classrooms, a good library /computer lab etc, but why should a b-school in the smaller town with 20 acre campus be necessarily better placed than a compact 3 acre b-schools in the heart of the metropolitan city, which is otherwise complete in all other aspects? Similarly one may argue that a faculty member ,with a doctorate degree from an small-little known university ,can not be rated higher than a counterpart with industry experience but no doctorate. A faculty may have a very impressive CV on paper ,but when comes to classroom ,he may not be as successful motivator as a faculty with lesser qualification & experience. Thus variables like intellectual capital are difficult to define and measure. Those who advance arguments such as above , favour a perception-based survey among the stakeholders . Here the question is which stakeholders and how many ?

How to select them? Which cities /towns and why ? BT-AC Nielsen survey has widely received flak from many quarters on its methodology. One simple reason is that few b-schools which have found place in BT top 30 are ranked very low in other rated in top 15 by all surveys. The very methodology used in BT ratings is to be blamed. The flaw is apparent as one finds many b-schools which are consistently other surveys year after year do not find a place in BT top 30.The general feeling among academicians is that a b-school is not a brand. There is something beyond a brand as a b-school does not get repeat-buyers like a brand, a b-school is not used more ,if it is good . two b-schools can not substitute each other as similar brands do. Is a b-school price sensitive ,like a brand ?The argument continues .. Several independent individuals ( not a concerned party !!) have also raised eyebrows at the methodology adopted by BT-AC Nielesen survey. JAM a very popular ( print & net both) magazine among youth says NO to the credibility of the survey as hard facts are completed ignored for one. The survey has evoked shock and disbelief in the b-school community not without reasons. Top 30 in BT 2008 did not include NITIE, IMI,IIT b-schools at IRMA,TAPMI etc. Similarly TOP 30 in Delhi, Mumbai & Kharagpur,MICA, BT 2009 excluded IMT, NITIE,IMI,

VGSoM(IIT Kh)SJM( IIT B),MICA. These b-schools are consistently ranked in top 25 year after year in various b-school surveys. BT survey uses winning brands models developed by AC Nielsen. But the basic question is whether a brand equity of a b-school be measured much the same way as that of FMCG or White goods? Winning- Brands model is based on identification of exclusivity of a brand .It revolves around advertising effectiveness over a period of time. JAM has following comment on BT Survey : Nielsen's own website states that Winning Brands addresses the following 'marketing issues': -Brand-equity - Advertising effectiveness-campaign comparisons if undertaken on a continuous basis -Market-segmentation -Category-health-analytics

JAM believes a b school is a brand, but its equity is NOT built on advertising. The equity of an educational institute rests on a combination of factors. The most important ones being: -Quality of students -Admission procedure -Quality-of-faculty - Achievements of its alumni What's more, Winning Brands uses a 'behavioural observation' of brand equity. Analyst Jonathan Knowles explains in layman terms: Brand equity is measured in terms of a customer's frequency of purchase and the price premium paid. Once favorable behavior is observed, the methodology seeks to analyze the attitudinal characteristics of those customers.

'Frequency of purchase' in case of MBA is essentially once in a lifetime. There is no explanation from either the market research agency or the magazine on how Winning Brands was adapted to fit the b school category These kinds of questions ,which remain unanswered by the agencies raise further doubts about the motive. Coming from a highly respected MR company ,at least the should be clarification on appropriateness of the methodology adopted. The brand equity model ,when applied to B-schools has identified how the brands stack-up. For last three years IIM A has emerged as the only monopoly brand. Overall, there is no winning brand for last three years. While IIM B has been identified as a distinct brand for last three years, there are only two brands( surprisingly) which are graded as undifferentiated in 2009and 2008. These are IIM C and Symbiosis. While there were 12 brands in the last category in 2008, the remaining ten b schools have scored below 1. Does it enable a student to separate grain from the chaff ? Perhaps it leaves the students more confusing. Thats because of faulty methodology. It benefits only one b-school and the aspersions have already been cast on that. Some comments even go to link the background of the CEO of a publication, who graduated from particular b-school ,as that particular b-schools find a surprise a survey mention in the top 5 b-schools for last two years. Some time back

conducted by MBA students of a prestigious (Top 10) b-school among the MBA

students and aspirants revealed that only 18.6 % respondents found the bschool ratings very -genuine .In response to another question-on ranking surveys -46.7% respondents termed them as cursory /poor. The major criticism with BT AC Nielsen survey is the composition of the sample and the methodology of short-listing 30 b-schools. Of the 592 respondents in 2009 survey, 324 ( 54.7%) were non-students. Whether they were management graduates/ b-schools pass-out or not is not known. It is very important because of the methodology adopted for short listing top 30 b-schools. If they are b-school graduates from India ( in the recent past!!)then they will be aware of many(!) good b-schools ,otherwise they may know only about a few b-schools. The background of remaining respondents ( 131 MBA students and 137 MBA aspirants, together about 45%) is known .But nothing much is known about the 55 % non-students, which is key information . It is given that 61 % of the non-students i.e. 198, were only from Delhi & Mumbai. That leaves remaining 126 non-students from Kolkata, Chennai, Pune, Ahmedabad, Bangalore & Hyderabad. MBA students ( who actually should form the major chunk for a survey of this nature ) are represented by only 131 students and that too spread over 12 towns in India. On an average 11 students per town .If it is based on PPS ( Population proportionate to Size ) Method, then it suggests that only 5-6 students may have come from Lucknow,Patna ,Indore ,Coimbatore etc . and about 12-15 each from other major towns. Imagine !! selecting a sample of 15 MBA students from a city like Delhi ? Delhi has about 100 b-schools spread over 10000 sq Kms ( including NCR ). Could it be called a representative sample ? Now the first phase of the survey. In this phase we( BT) short listed the 30 b-schools that were to be ranked by asking MBA students and recruiters to name those they would consider applying to and hiring from .What was the composition of this sample ? Sample size ? Which towns ? How many in which town ? NONE of these questions are answered. How was this information collected? The respondents were asked to name one /two /more /any number of b-schools unaided and aided ? Or was the choice restricted ? Was it unaided question or a list of b-school was provide to choose from ? Or was it a combination of response ? These are the natural questions a researcher would ask because these are likely to throw up different list of top 30 b-schools. In a sensitive issue such as this the agency ( AC Nielsen) or the media( BT) should have provided more explanation. The questions about the methodology are being

raised for last three /four years. But the silence on the agencies part does not appear to be golden . Do students consider the ratings before applying for MBA ? A survey conducted by IMI students in April 2009 attempted to identify the top factors which students consider before they apply for admission to an MBA / equivalent programme ? This survey was repeated among parents of MBA aspirant students . The preferences revealed were as follows: Preferenc e 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Industry interface Faculty Knowledge repository Infrastructure Placements Infrastructure Curiculam Faculty Students Parents

Stakeholders perception Knowledge repository Admission Procedure B-School ratings Stakeholders perception Fee Structure Faculty student ratio B-School ratings

The above suggests that the MBA aspirants as well as their parents do not attach serious attention to the b-school ratings. It is perhaps due to massive difference among the ratings and also due to the controversy generated by some surprising ratings. Accrediation Vs. Ratings Are these ratings just confusing the students who innocently seek information to make up their minds. The answer is some of them do. What then is the remedy? Should there be a single authoritative objective rating of b-schools ? AICTE started National Board of Accreditation about 10 years back. Not many b-schools have come forward to be subjected to this process. Fear of red tapism? Or simply lack of confidence in objective assessment by a government agency? UGCs proposed accreditation scheme ( NAAC) has also met with the same fate . Some b-schools have initiated action on seeking global recognition through international accreditation

agencies. Prominent among them is MDI ,which has received accreditation from AMBA ( Association of MBAs). The Indian b-schools are not showing much craze about the international accreditation as it should only help if they were in a position to attract students from US and Europe. Given the situation in India ,it is a far cry for majority of b-schools in India. Table 2 : Variation in rankings 2008-2009

BW BTAC B School N 8 BTAC N 9 BTAC N 8 BTAC N 4 OULO OK CFOR E 2008 OULO OK CFOR E 2009 AIM A 200 9 AIM A 200 8 CO SM OD E 200 8 BI 2008 BI 200 8 B I 2 0 0 9 IIM A 1 1 1 1 1 1 SL T 10 T 10 T 10 DN P DN P 1 1 1

200 200 200 200

IIM B

SL

SL

IIM C

SL

SL

IIML

SL

A A+ L1 A++ + + A A+ L1 A++ + + 5 4 7

IIM I

17

11

IIM K

12

13

19

15

19

12

DN P SL SL T

MDI

18

18

24

18

10 XLRI 6 8 5 4 6 5 SL SL T 10 T 10 DN P DN P 15 17 SL A+ 14 9 6 7 6

SPJIMR

14

11

11

13

FMS

12

13

1 1 1 5 1 4 1 0 1 7 1 2 8

JBIMS

15

IMI

27

A+ L2

17

IMT

25

15

16

13

11

SL

SL

11 T 10 T 10 12

A+ L1

10

IIFT

10

16

14

13

SL

SL

A+ L1

A++

NITIE ICFAI HYD IIT D

13 -

9 14 14 10

8 10

8 14

SL

SL

A+ L1 10 A+ L1

12 9 A++

A+

13

A SJM IIT B 12 16 A+ L1 A++ + + VGS IIT KH SYMBIOSI S SIMSREE 4 4 27 8 29 5 26 A SIES 28 31 30 33 A+ L3 A++ + + TAPMI 29 20 18 16 A+ L1 A++ A+ L1 A+ L2 A++ A+

NMIMS WELINGKA R KJSOMAIA YA ICFAI MUMBAI ABS NOIDA BIMTECH

17

10

10

17

14

10

SL

A+ L1

11

1 3 1 9 A

15

15

26

29

18

22

A+ L3

18

26

17

22

19

27

25

A+

A+

23

20

+ +

13

19

28

41

25

28 21

20 21

18 12

28 25 21 21 A

A+ L2

A++ A+ A

LIBA

20

22

23

11

29

38

A+ L2

A++

+ +

TISS XIMB CHRIST COLL BIMT CHENN OSMANIA

18 22

23 24

13 20

12 20

30 16 15

A+ SL A+ T 10 A+ L1

A+ 14 1 6 A +

27

25

32

33

A+ L2

29

30 A

ABA

30

21

17

20

A+

A+

28

A+ L2

A++

+ + A

NIRMA

16

21

22

26

20

A+ L1

A++

+ +

IFMR CHENN

23

19

29

A+

A +

+ A IMM PUNE 24 24 45 A+ L1 A++ + + LBS 25 28 A+ A 19 A+ L1 19 2 0 A 26 22 A A 24 A++ + + 28 29 23 27 B+ A B+ A 36 17 T 10 A A+ A +

BHARATID AS IPE HYD GOA I M

FORE

24

A+ L2

A+ A

ITM MU UBS

NAVI

25

31

A+ L3

A+

+ +

CHANDIG ISB HYD IIPM D IIPM B NIM AHMD IIFM Bhopal 11 16 24 26 A+ 30 27 30 23

15

A+ L1 7 A+ L2 6 4

A + A

IILM

A+

+ +

SCMS Cochin

A + +

Table 3 : Parameters used for Objective data based B-school ratings by various agencies/ publications Agency /Publication Fa cul ty Cu rric ula m Lib rar y / oth er fac iliti es Cosmode-BT 1998 18 0 Cosmode-BT 2000 30 150 10 0 Cosmode-BT 2002 10 0 BW-Cosmode 2003 20 0 125 60 40 12 0 10 0 50 50 70 130 30 0 30 0 10 0 45 45 40 40 30 10 0 80 20 10 0 10 0 1000 1000 700 72 148 400 MDP Go / TRG ETC ver na nc e Acad Ph emic Infra str ysi cal Infr ast r Int ell ect ual ca pit al Admi cur ssio ns/ Stud ents ric ula m Ped y/Pr ogra Eval n syst Pla Fin ce nt an l mg mt me cia Ind ust ry Int erf ac e Alu Ne mn i tw ork ing /In no vat ion Ot her s Total

agog uatio

mme em

BW-Cosmode 2008* BT-AC N 2003

25 0 ye s ye s ye s ye s

10 0 ye s ye s ye s 12 16

250

30 0

10 0

1000

yes

yes

ye s

BT-AC N 2008

ye s

yes

yes

ye s

BT-AC N 2009

ye s

yes

yes

ye s 24 14 9 20 100

OutlookC 2003 % OutlookC 2008 % OutlookC 2009%

Fore

Fore

16

25

21

17

12

100

Fore

19

23

21

19

10

100

AIMA-IMRB 2008

ye s

ye s

ye s

ye s

ye s

AIMA-IMRB 2009

ye s

ye s

ye s

ye s

ye s

BI 2008

21 0

50

65

135

70

120

150

10 0

40

45

15

1000

BI 2009

18 0

50

150

10 0

70

130

55

15 0

50

15

50

1000

* 300 points for Placement includes ind interface,100points for infrastr are for physical & academic infrastructure.

Table 4 : Weightages /Respondents covered in various perception- based B-school ratings

Agency / Publicatio n

Stud ents

Prosp ective stude nts

Recr

Alu

Fac Yo un g Ex ec s

Fu ncti on al He ads

Total

uiters mni ulty / De ans

CosmodeBT 1998 s CosmodeBT 2000 BT-AC 2008 BT-AC 2009 OutlookC Fore 2003 OutlookC Fore 2008 60

50 point

300 pts

100 150 pts pts

600 points

300 points

N 108

101

75

88

77

449

N 131

137

109

10 8

10 7

592

200

60

320

points

(20% of total) 200( 685 recru iters) 200 points

OutlookC Fore 2009

200( 713 recru iters)

200 (10% of total)

RAFFLES MILLENNIUM INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL


Educomp's first venture into Professional Education in India through our joint venture with Raffles Education Corporation. As part of this venture, we are bringing world

class professional development programmes which offer a truly international experience right here in India. As you may be aware, Educomp Solutions Limited, founded in 1994 is a globally diversified education solutions provider and the largest education company in India. Educomp addresses the key markets of private schools, government schools, educational content, teacher training, supplemental education services, pre-schools, professional and higher education as well as online learning. Each child has the right to get an education. The current competitive situation in India provides very few seats in the prestigious institutions for students. While the number of educational institutes has been increasing rapidly in our country, the quality gap still needs to be filled. We welcome you to experience world class professional education in New Delhi, Bengaluru as well as Mumbai in our campuses. Students have the opportunity to get exposed to internationally trained practitioners who will be teaching what is relevant in the real world; they will also have the option of transferring to any of the Raffles campuses after two years to continue their higher studies. Most importantly, students will learn "life skills" that will prepare a foundation for building their own businesses in the future. We are starting with Design courses which include Fashion Design, Fashion Marketing, Interior Design, Product Design as well as Interactive Media Design. Over a period of time, we also aim to introduce courses in Business, Management as well as Hospitality. This is a landmark partnership in the Indian education sector. Providing our students with job oriented skills when they leave school has been a cherished aim for us at Educomp. I want to wish each of you a true learning experience at Raffles Millennium International. Advantages International Qualifications and Recognition Raffles Millennium International offers a 3 year internationally accredited Bachelor degree programme for specialised design courses. With articulation agreements between reputed overseas universities in the United Kingdom and Australia, students are conferred with internationally accredited design qualifications at the end of their studies. Industry Projects and Internships

Students at Raffles Millennium International enjoy valuable, hands-on practical experience through internships and various commercial projects. Vocational training provides students with the opportunity to establish personal network with important industry contacts, enhancing their personal portfolios and employability. International Faculty A rich blend of faculty from around the world with industry experience would be guiding the students to the path of success. This acclaimed people will enhance the ability of students with knowledge to make a mark at their work areas, right after graduation. Inter-College Transfer of Credits Raffles Design College Group (RDCG) is the only institution that offers inter-college transfer credits among our colleges in the Asia-Pacific region. Be it in the cosmopolitan cities of Singapore and Sydney, or the financial hubs located in Shanghai or Beijing, our students can gain international exposure by living and studying in any of our campuses located in our network. Jump Start Your Career Our intensive curriculum ensures that students will earn an internationally recognized degree in three years. Proudly taught by our team of talented programme directors and lecturers, students will be equipped with knowledge and ability to interact with people from diverse nationalities and achieve career maturity at a faster rate. Academic Terms Raffles Millennium International intakes annually: every January, April, July and October. Students are given the flexibility to commence their studies at a time convenient to them, while graduates can enter the labour force at 4 separate times through the year, maximising employment prospects for graduates and serving the ongoing human resource needs of respective design industries throughout the year. One academic year consists of 4 terms with 12 study weeks, and a 1 week holiday between terms. Orientation Day happens on the first day of the academic session, with the opportunity to speak to the lecturers and fresh students.

Facilities

Wi-fi Campus Fully air-conditioned classroom Library and resource centre Computer Lab: PC and Macintosh Sewing Room Pattern Drafting Room Interior Drafting Room Student Terrance Lounge

Internship Partners Students at Raffles Millennium International have the opportunity to complete their international internship at the below mentioned Companies: Advertising Agency

J. Walter Thompson/Bridge Advertising Co. Ltd. Leo Burnett Pte. Ltd. M & C Saatchi McCann-Erickson Ogilvy & Mather Advertising Saatchi & Saatchi

Fashion Label

American Cotton Incorporated Co. Ltd. Bata shoes (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Crabtree & Evelyn

ELLE, China Esprit Fila FJ Benjamin L'Oreal Nike, Beijing Playboy Enterprises Inc. Satchi Fashion, Shanghai The Athlete's Foot, China The Swatch Group Vidal Sassoon

Departmental Store

Carrefour, Shanghai CK Tang Limited IKEA Pte. Ltd. Isetan Lane Crawford Robinsons & Co. (Singapore) Pte. Ltd.

Food & Beverage


Coca-Cola Company Haagen Dazs Pepsi-Cola Beverage Co. Ltd. Shanghai Asia Pacific Brewery Co. Ltd.

Hotel

Shanghai Grand Hyatt Hotel Shangri-la Hotel Changchun, China

Publishing House

China National Publications IMP. & EXP. Corp. Magazines Incorporated Pte. Ltd. BluInc Media Pte. Ltd.

Others

CITIBANK, Shanghai GE Lighting Co. Ltd. Haworth Furniture Co. Ltd. Inchcape Branded Lifestyle Jay Gee Enterprises Pte. Ltd. Luxasia Pte. Ltd. Nippon Paint (China) Co. Ltd. Nokia Mobile Telecommunications Ltd. Siemens Automobile Electronics Ltd. Singapore Airlines Swarovski Components Volkswagen Automobile Plant, Guangdong Louis Vuitton Adidas Zara

Sony Ericcson

IIPM COMPERATIVE STRATEGY

Year 1963: A proposal by Dr. M.K.Chaudhuri to set up an institute under the name of "Institute for Planning and Administration of National Economy" was forwarded to Pt. Jawahar Lal Nehru, the then Prime Minister and Chairman, Planning Commission, Government of India. The institute was committed to cutting edge research and education on economics, entrepreneurship and management. A study tour was undertaken by Dr. M.K.Chaudhuri during 1964-65 to acquire first hand knowledge about the working of similar institutions in Europe. A working paper on Regional Planning was circulated to leading academicians under the name of "Indian Institute of Planning" in 1969. Year 1973: The founder Director resigned from professorship of Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore (IIM-B) and established IIPM in New Delhi. The first residential full-time post graduate diploma programme commenced on 12th August, 1974, with students selected through admission tests-cum-inter views held in Delhi, Kolkata, Bombay and Bangalore. Year 2006: IIPM has grown to become the world's largest business school with 5000 postgraduate management students in nine campuses across seven of India's largest cities, with placement offices in San Francisco, New York, London, Dubai and Singapore.

Dr. M. K.Chaudhuri Research Professor & Founder Director BA Honours (Economics), Presidency College, Kolkata Msc, Ph.D, D.Sc, Berlin School of Economics Malay Chaudhuri studied in Presidency College, Kolkata and in The Berlin School of Economics. He did his MSc in National Economic Planning and management. He was awarded 'excellent' and is a co-record holder. His Ph.D thesis was on the 'Role of small-scale, village and cottage industries for solution of the unemployment problem in India'. His D.Sc thesis was on 'reform plans of the international monetary system'. He worked in private sector organizations like Hindustan Lever, Kuljian Corporation and WS Atkins. He also worked in City and Industrial Development Corporation (CIDCO)- a public sector organization. Before founding IIPM, he was Senior Fellow, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla. He was also Professor of Economics at XLRI,Jamshedpur and IIM,Bangalore. His book Theory of Economic Justice - Production of skills by means of skills, deals with the measurement of contribution of each individual to the process

of production and thereby seeks to answer the question of just reward for an individuals' contribution. He believes that integrating the concepts that emerge from IIPM's national economic planning research would create barefoot managers, committed to eradicating poverty. His second book, The Great Indian Dream, outlines a series of steps that the Government of India must undertake to allocate resources towards this end. The Social Vision of IIPM Though Capitalism has contributed to tremendous growth of productivity, has enriched material life of man, has expanded scope of freedom, yet it has not meant abolition of war, poverty and perversion. Unbridled colonial exploitation and internal class conflict has sullied the ideas of equality, liberty and fraternity. Therefore, Capitalism is not made of colours one can dream of. Communism, as practised in so called Communist countries has lead to totalitarianism and loss of democratic rights, though the rate of growth of national economy in these countries have been much higher than Capitalism ever achieved. Rapid rise of Soviet Union in the past and recent unparallel growth rate of GDP in China amply demonstrates the inherent strength of planned national economic growth. Distributive justice in these countries also forced Capitalism to introduce welfare states. Historical experience therefore compels us to think of possibilities of combining higher growth rate with distributive justice while not sacrificing democratic rights of the people. Indeed, sustained high growth rate in GDP is not possible in the long run if distributive justice is not there. IIPMs Social Vision follows from the above mentioned historical evidence. IIPM wants to contribute to the creation of a movement, backed by proper education and research which will create a society where exploitation of man by man does not exist, where each individual has the scope to achieve his / her potential to the fullest extent. Distributive justice in this society will ultimately mean to each according to his need a transition from to each according to his contribution. In other words, universal humanism is the social vision of IIPM.

IIMs and the MBA education scenario in India Unlike other fields of higher education like Economics, Psychology, Physics or Chemistry, Master level program in Business Management is not built on successful completion of Bachelor level program in Business Management. Graduates of all streams can join MBA programs. It was envisaged by the Ministry of Education that for a multidimensional program which includes subjects like Operation Research, Organisational Behaviour, Accounting, Finance, Economics and Marketing, etc. would need 1024 contact hours (16 hours a week, 32 weeks a year) for 2 years MBA Program. In contrast, to achieve master level proficiency in areas like Economics or Physics, one has to have around 3000 contact hours. Obviously, the contact hours available in the MBA programs were not found adequate. IIMs therefore, increased contact hours to around 24 hours a week, enabling them to teach the whole program in about 1500 contact hours. Academically justified MBA programs with students of diverse background should be of three years duration with at least 24 hours a week of contact hours. A recent proposal to introduce 1-year MBA program to people having 5-years work experience (obviously non-managerial supervisory level experience for most of them) is deemed to dilute academic content of the program to cater to emerging markets as demonstrated by Indian School of Business (with 250 acres of campus, which is double the size of an average IIM campus), Hyderabad. Having failed to prove the superiority of their 2-years MBA programs, the IIMs are lured by the high fees that ISB is able to charge and also to secure very high level of entry salary superceding the elitist salary of IIM pass-outs. Lacking confidence in their academic standards and contributions to business success, IIMs are trying to overcome their secondclass citizen status by entering into devalued 1-year MBA programs. The IIMs are thus, victims of their own criteria of judging an institutes academic status by the level of salaries its graduates can command from the market by restricting artificially the supply of such graduates available to the industry.

A few years work experience at supervisory level neither makes it easy to understand complexities of business nor develops faster learning capacities. On the other hand, a break from academic studies, growing age, fast social and personal

life, makes it relatively difficult to concentrate on studies again. In the West, parents rarely finance expenses of University level studies. High fees charged create snobbish value around MBA courses while restricting entry of students (which in turn jacks up the entry level salary), compelling people to work a few years to save for the fees. Investment for studying MBA also includes sacrifice of their salary during the duration of study. Therefore, potential participants of the MBA program are also reluctant to study for a longer period, Market conditions, therefore, are the compelling reasons for shortening the durations of the program. These truths are being covered by all sorts of spurious theories exaggerating the usefulness of work experience. Why IIPM courses are superior to MBA IIPM has so far claimed the superiority of its Entrepreneur-ship program neither by the size of its campus, nor by the entry level salary of its pass-outs, but by its qualitatively superior and intellectually stimulating academic program. The IIPM course is a 22 month, 1944 hour course which includes in depth studies of national economic processes and ways to regulate its parameters to achieve higher growth rate of GDP ensuring higher growth of market segments within the national economy as well as higher growth of income of all sections of the people, including those who are below the poverty line. The importance of including studies in national economic planning processes can be explained with an example of natural science. At one level of knowledge it appeared that the Sun revolves around the Earth. At a higher level of knowledge it was discovered that the Earth rotates around its axis and also revolves around the Sun. Similarly, present MBA course structure concentrating only on market segments by individual profit making units. This fails to explain the potentiality of market expansion through distributive justice. Potentiality of business is always in harmony with growth rate of national economy. That is why business expands much more rapidly in China compared with expansion of business seen in India in the past. Knowledge of national economic planning potentiality will encourage the owners of capital to demand collectively the raising of living standards of the people at the bottom. IIPMs Entrepreneurship program is superior to standard MBA programs as it also develops certain entrepreneurial qualities in program participants. These helps to

remove aversion to calculated risk taking, imbued with ambition beyond normal career growth. Personal ambition in tune with social vision makes an entrepreneur reach out beyond boundaries again and again. Work remains no work, but hobby. Failures are looked upon as inevitable intermediate stages to success.

The IIPM programme further includes a compulsory specialisation in Marketingwherein all the the 20 plus papers of Marketing are compulsory for all students. Adittionally students chose another elective like Finance or H.R. etc. This stems from the firm conviction that IIPM holds that BUSINESS IS MARKETING. This has also resulted in IIPM bringing out the best selling magazine 4Ps Business & Marketingwhich has the same punch line i.e. Business is Marketing. What perhaps is the most difficult part of the IIPM progaramme to be explained in words is the tremendous change in personality and life on the whole the IIPM course brings about thanks to its special focus on Executive Communication which is a 4 credit per trimester course running throughout the course duration.As a part of this course students typically have to participate compulsarily in more than 40 competitive debates and extempores under the eagle eyes of IIPMs world-class communication faculty members. The end result is a supremely confident and exstremely smart personality which can speak from any public platform fearlessly. IIPM also offers a unique Global Opportunity and Threat Analysis (GOTA) program, through which students are taken abroad for a period of 10-20 days, wherein the students get to attend lecture sessions at leading academic institutions and organisations like World Trade Organisation, United Nations, World Bank, Credit Suisse, Nestle, etc. This allows them to widen their horizon in understanding various forces of globalisation through experiential learning. Further, under the Global Outreach Program, IIPM invites distinguished faculties from leading global institutions like Harvard, Wharton, Columbia, Chicago, Yale, London School of Economics, Oxford, Cambridge, IMD Lausanne, INSEAD, etc., to come down to India to interact with IIPM students. All this put together make the IIPM course better than any other course of a similar nature in India. Course Content

The IIPM programme is today regarded as the only course with a wider coverage than MBA courses taught anywhere else in the world because of its integration with National Economic Planning and a compulsory Marketing Specialization making it the most intellectually stimulating course in India. In the light of globalization, IIPM aims to create a new generation of entrepreneurial managers, who can face with confidence emerging challenges of international markets, while remaining committed to remove massive poverty masses within a generation. For this, we must achieve a growth rate of 14% and more of the national economy and engineer market extension and social entitlements favouring the bottom 80% of the population. This is essential for corporate growth rate of the same order & more. Future entrepreneurial managers must be aware of this and not remain intellectually handicapped. IIPM's Course Content in Media:

2-year

full

time

Programme

in

National

Economic

Planning

and

Entrepreneurship (leading to the award of the MBA degree from IMI)

This is the renowned two year full time Master's residential program that leads to the award of the MBA degree from the International Management Institute, Belgium, one of the Europe's leading business schools. Offered currently at the Asian (New Delhi, Mumbai, Pune, Bangalore, Chennai, Ahmedabad & Hyderabad) campuses of IIPM, students have the option of transferring their credits to IMI Belgium and continuing their studies there. Students study core subjects in the first year related to various areas like National Economic Planning, Marketing, Personnel & Industrial Relations, Finance & Accounting, Production, Quantitative Techniques, IT Systems and various other term papers. In the second year, students have to undertake compulsory specializations related to Marketing & IT. Apart from these two compulsory specializations, students have a choice of taking up an additional specialization, namely Finance or Human Resources. Students in the second year also study advanced core papers like Business Policy & Strategic Planning, Mergers & Acquisitions, International

Marketing etc. Students have to submit a thesis dissertation at the end of the program. Interestingly, this IIPM program has been rated as covering at least 33% more credits than any other MBA course in the world. Visit the links on Faculty to view the intellectual strength behind the Full time Programme in National Economic Planning and Entrepreneurship courses and the subjects covered. Students join the best companies in the world after passing out from this course. 3-year full-time Integrated Programme in National Economic Planning and Entrepreneurship (leading to the award of the BBA degree from IMI) The Bachelor's program at IIPM is ranked amongst the best programs for undergraduates in India. This is a three year full time residential program that leads to the award of the BBA degree from the International Management Institute, Belgium, one of the Europe's leading business schools. As mentioned previously, the Bachelor's program is currently offered at IIPM's Asian campuses in New Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai, Pune, Ahmedabad & Hyderabad. In this IIPM program, in the first year, the IIPM students have to study the foundation courses related to areas like Marketing, HR, Finance, Foreign Languages, Culture, Executive Communication, Quantitative Techniques, General Awareness, History & Literature, Introduction to Management, Introduction to IT systems.

In the 2nd year, students have to undertake core subjects related to various areas like National Economic Planning, Marketing, Personnel & Industrial Relations, Finance & Accounting, Production, Quantitative Techniques, IT Systems and various other term papers. In the third year, students have to undertake compulsory specializations related to Marketing & IT. Apart from these two compulsory specializations, students have a choice of taking up an additional specialization, namely Finance or Human Resources. Students in the third year also study advanced core papers like Business Policy & Strategic Planning, Mergers & Acquisitions, International Marketing etc. Students have to submit a thesis dissertation at the end of the program. The IIPM integrated program is unique in the aspect that students in the final two years undergo as rigorous a course schedule as in the Full time program. Most importantly, these IIPM under graduate students, after

working for two years in the industry, are automatically awarded the MBA degree from IMI. This allows the Integrated students to achieve an industry standing that is comparable to MBA graduates, at the same time allowing a time saving of two years. Visit the link on Faculty to appreciate the top notch faculty teaching at the under graduate programme and the subjects being covered. Another important aspect of this program is that students have the option of transferring their credits to IMI Belgium and continuing their studies at IMI. Students join the best companies in the world after passing out from this course. European Exchange Program with IMI t is considered one of the most valuable learning experiences at IIPM. All students of IIPM who successfully complete the first year of their programme at IIPM in India are eligible to go to IMI for the duration of one trimester in the second year. The students would stay & study at the Antwerp Campus of IMI in Belgium. The students would get the opportunity to interact with international faculty as IMI faculty includes various American, European & Asian professors. Students would be in the midst of truly multi-national student groups as IMI students belong to various parts of the world. During the course of this study, the students would be taken on corporate & academic tours to Brussels (Belgium), Paris (France) & Bruges (Belgium). This would provide the most invaluable opportunity of understanding how global organizations work.

ASIA PACIFIC INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

Asia-Pacific Institute of Management is ranked amongst the top Business Schools in the country. Established in 1996, the Institute has achieved a status of distinction by following the path envisioned by its founders. Their passion for supreme quality management education is evident in every endeavor undertaken at the institute. Asia-Pacific is proud of its faculty consisting of dedicated thought leaders, an infrastructure that can compete with the best and a curriculum that is upgraded regularly to keep in tune with industry needs. Concerted effort on the part of the management, the faculty and the staff enables Asia-Pacific to groom business leaders capable of contributing towards a global corporate order. A robust interface with Industry is ensured through guest lectures, industry visits and industry training opportunities. A symbiotic relationship is encouraged between the industry and the academia through a mutual exchange of practical and theoretical aspects of management knowledge.

Post Graduate Diploma in Management: PGDM (Accredited by NBA) Asia-Pacific has designed its PGDM programme with Dual Majors, so that the young managers acquire deep knowledge of their chosen area and also another complementary area. Accredited by NBA, PGDM is Asia-Pacifics flagship programme and is recognized as equivalent to MBA by AICTE. Post Graduate Diploma in Management (Marketing): PGDM (M) Marketing function offers many career choices, be it in planning, communication, selling, customer relationship management, distribution & supply chain management, and marketing research, etc. Asia-Pacifics PGDM (Marketing) programme has been designed to equip young managers with cutting edge marketing skills. Post Graduate Diploma in Management (International Business): PGDM (IB)

Indian economys connect with the global economy is irreversible and is becoming stronger by the day, throwing up demand for global managers. Asia-Pacifics PGDM (IB) programme endeavours to groom the students for taking up challenging and rewarding careers in the field of International Business. Post Graduate Diploma in Management (Banking and Financial Services): PGDM (BFS) Powered by the revolution in communications, information technology and transportation, financial and banking sector has reached dizzying heights and yet continues to grow at a breathless pace. Asia-Pacifics PGDM (BFS) programme helps create complete financial managers, who can balance the needs of various stakeholders.

Executive Post Graduate Diploma in Management: E-PGDM Asia-Pacifics E-PGDM programme is meant for those who want to acquire professional qualifications on a part-time basis, for building a fast track career in management. It is ideally suited for executives, entrepreneurs and self-employed professionals. \ Executive Post Graduate Diploma in Management(Marketing): E-PGDM (M) Marketing is perhaps the core function of business, and demand for marketing experts grows at ever increasing rates. Asia-Pacifics E-PGDM (M) programme is meant for marketing professionals who want to acquire management qualifications on part-time basis.

The learning environment contributes to creating a conducive frame of mind, so that a student can get the maximum benefit out of the rich course content and the stimulating pedagogy of the Institute. The theme governing the Asia-Pacific campus design is built around two key ideas: World Class and State-of-the- Art. The campus is centrally airconditioned. Spacious acoustically designed lecture theaters with LCD projectors and public address systems facilitate course delivery

through use of audiovisual inputs from slide presentations to video clips and video lessons. Smaller groups can meet in equally comfortable but smaller tutorial rooms The campus is Wi-Fi enabled to permit wireless internet access from any point in range.

The Library & Information Centre (TLIC) is the nerve centre of Asia-Pacific. The institute takes pride in its State of the Art library infrastructure and resources. TLIC is one of the best maintained libraries amongst the business schools of DelhiNCR region The highlights of TLIC are:

Reading Rooms : Large ultra-comfortable and well-illuminated Books : Over 30,000 Project Reports : Over 2,300

300 Pentium IV nodes are connected with high-speed servers like HP-ML350, IBM X-3400 in structured as well as wireless LAN environment

24X7 Internet connectivity to each node at the speed of 1Mbps through Leased Line

Latest versions of widely used original software programs, laser printers and scanners integrated in LAN

Up-gradation of software as per curriculum

Diffused lighting Walls and ceilings are designed to achieve the best acoustic balance

Equipped with LCD projection system together with microphone and public address system

Every lecture theatre is fitted with white boards Tutorial/ Discussion rooms for face-to-face interaction between the teacher & learner

Ergonomically designed auditorium with latest audio-visual aids, ideal for lectures by Senior Executives of industry, seminars and academic activities of the students

For overall development of students through extra curricular activities Hi-tech Conference Hall for industry and Management Development programs

An Amphitheater, which can seat up to 500 persons, is a recent addition. Separate common rooms let the boys & girls unwind between classes. The common rooms are outfitted for indoor sports.

An open air cafeteria supplies hot and hygienic snacks and lunch.

AIMs residence halls and hostels offer a supportive environment for living and learning

Separate, A/C and non- A/C hostel accommodation available for boys and girls close to AIM campus

TRATEGY TO PROMOTING RAFFLES MILLENNIUM INTERNATIONAL Magazine Journal: It is one more way to create buzz in otherwise cluttered MBA market .Encourage your intellectual capital to don thinking caps and hone writing skill. To make you visible write consistently in different MBA coaching institutes magz on different MBA related issues .Do some value addition by providing quintessential tips on GD, interview, personality development and on exams like CAT, XAT etc. Make a series of articles on that so that repeated reading by aspirants leave a lasting impact Top of the mind brand awareness .also write advertorials in those magz. Advertorial is more powerful to build the credibility than advertisement. For developing your own brand publishing your own quarterly management journal is of utmost importance. Institute should arrange competition amongst ongoing batches, alumni and faculties for writing in different management categories. Out of that repository, best one will be chosen for the journal .even industry leaders, CEO, MD can contribute their real life management experience in it. There should not be any compromise in quality .Topic should be very relevant one and out of the box thinking should be encouraged .These journals should be distributed to different corporate houses, MBA coaching institutes and other B-schools on regular basis .Faculties should be encouraged to write at least one book a year. For that they should get incentives. Make you visible among your competitors and customers and start building rapport by taking their feedback on your articles .writing by prominent alumni to different biz magz and paper should be encouraged by institutes.

Tie Up:
Existing students are like your current assets. At every stage of two years course they should feel that there is sustainable value addition. Value for money proposition works quite well for them. for both students and faculties , there should be tie up with foreign university .student and faculty exchange programme must be part of two years rigour .exchange of inputs and ideas between institutes should be carried out so symbiotically so that at the end of the day both the parties experience a win-win scenario. There should be tie up with different corporates for upgrading and developing courses to make it relevant and dynamic in every area mark, fin, sys,

HR, Ops at least 2-3 corporates strong in related areas should proactively participate to develop course, MDP and executive programme. Also make sure that different companies CEO, MDs visit your campus and alumni meet very often for sharing their experience. Through interactive session, show them your class, get the desired attention. Tie up with different NGOs like CRY, CARE; to work in tandem for social cause like natural calamity, AIDS, child labour, woman empowerment, rural development etc. it is necessary to do societal marketing to address social causes to get greater acceptability in govt bodies and society by showing that your MBAs are down to earth, dont live in ivory tower .build a holistic brand image. Organizing seminars in various cities for building awareness is important and for that matter tying up with various MBA coaching institutes like IMS, Career Launcher, TIME- - is a very pragmatic idea .Apart from joint seminars, constantly be in touch with these institutes .Show your performance, placement, up gradation of course prove with rock solid information why you are better than so many B-schools .once they are convinced, they will pass them those information to MBA aspirants. So make these coaching institutes your spontaneous mouth piece for MBA aspirants.

Event management:
It is the most in thing and any B-school should exploit its advantage to the hilt. Any event management creates a short term buzz around the brand. Its like promotion of a product. Raffles Millennium International Branding, Saptarishi Sarkar Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Trichy Road show, seminar at different cities with the help of PR firms; co branding at different management, economic and business seminars; participate in Biz quiz, debate, extempore organize by corporate, media house and B-schools all come under purview of event management .not only participation, achieving laurels one after another in these events is essential to augment visibility and brand image amongst corporate and other B-schools. First participate, learn from these events, then arrange your own event where corporate, media and other prominent B-schools should participate. Try to make this event as your USP.

ONLINE:
In todays World Wide Web era, none can afford to miss online interaction with its stake holders. Develop your web site very carefully. Before that go through at least 50 Indian and international B-school sites. Observe how do they put things and communicate. Make then your own one which is presentation wise very attractive, highly informative, dynamic, very much user friendly .There should be different topics related to Indian and world business and economy. Make your website a good repository of business and industry knowledge. Add few good links like present in www.madhukarshukla.com, so that netizens visit your site again and again for valuable inputs. Build awareness of your institute website amongst MBA aspirants and corporate through online ad like banner, flash in different portals (rediff, indiatimes etc.) youth sites, jobsites, business media sites etc. Make it mandatory for existing every students to write at least one web articles in every trimester for different MBA sites like cool avenues, bizkool, indiainfoline etc. To make the issue serious, there should be certain percentage of CGPA in each trimester, earmarked for such writings .By that measure, in every month, be very conspicuous by your students articles in MBA related portals and make noise to all other B-school peers. Like wise put your institutes seminar and other information as well into those websites.

ALUMNI:
They are your biggest assets and your real interface with corporate your flag bearer. Always keep them in good humour .Dont just try to be in touch with them during Raffles Millennium International Branding, Saptarishi Sarkar Bharathidasan Institute of Management, Trichy placement time they will feel exploited. Be in touch round the year by taking inputs for course, faculty and infrastructure. Ensure that they feel, they are very much part of the family. Networking is the order of the day. The older is the B-school, the bigger is the alumni base. Make alumni database batch wise, sector wise-- modify it often. Share that with all alumni. why should an ex student come back to alma mater wasting his valuable professional and personal life unless he/she finds some value addition in it ! MBAs know the value of networking. Let him feel through your action that you still remember him and help him in his progress,

process of networking. Encourage alumni in participating in different corporate quizzes and debate shows provide interested candidates enough guidance and materials for the same. Go for tie ups with good job consultants and job portals so that they provide enough MBA opening information across all levels time to time. Also provide enough professional and personal development materials to alumni. Make separate HR alumni database and committee. Discuss various ways how to influence corporate and develop long lasting relationship. Few are interested in academics provide them valuable inputs to pursue their career in that field. Apply emotional marketing strategy for alumni. Send 1000 sms at 100 rupees only, to 1000 alumni at one shot! Inform them through mail and sms the progress and happening of Alma mater. Through that process if 20% of alumni respond, well enough! After all 20% of your people is responsible for 80% of your success! Through alumni develop overseas contacts, leads to bring 1-2 new overseas companies at your campus every year. The bottom line is simple: think for your alumni, they will think for you. Services marketing is marketing based on relationship and value. It may be used to market a service or a product.

Marketing a service-base business is different from marketing a goods-base business. There are several major differences, including:

1. The buyer purchases are intangible

2. The service may be based on the reputation of a single person\

3. It's more difficult to compare the quality of similar services

4. The buyer cannot return the service

Service Marketing mix adds 3 more p's, i.e. people, physical evidence, process

service and follow-through are keys to a successful venture. The major difference in the education of services marketing versus regular marketing is that instead of the traditional "4 P's," Product, Price, Place, Promotion, there are three additional "P's" consisting of People, Physical evidence, and Process. Service marketing also includes the servicescape referring to but not limited to the aesthetic appearance of the business from the outside, the inside, and the general appearance of the employees themselves. Service Marketing has been relatively gaining ground in the overall spectrum of educational marketing as developed economies move farther away from industrial importance to service oriented economies. What is marketing? Marketing is the flow of goods and services from the producer to consumer. It is based on relationship and value. In common parlance it is the distribution and sale of goods and services. Marketing can be differentiated as: Marketing of products Marketing of services.

Marketing includes the services of all those indulged may it be then the wholesaler retailer, Warehouse keeper, transport etc. In this modern age of competition marketing of a product or service plays a key role. It is estimated that almost 50% of the price paid for a commodity goes to the marketing of the product in US. Marketing is now said to be a term which has no particular definition as the definitions change everyday. "Managing the evidence" refers to the act of informing customers that the service encounter has been performed successfully. It is best done in subtle ways like providing examples or descriptions of good and poor service that can be used as a basis of comparison. The underlying rationale is that a customer might not appreciate the full worth of the service if they do not have a good benchmark for comparisons. However, it is worth remembering that many of the concepts, as well as many of the specific techniques, will work equally well whether they are directed at products or services. In particular, developing a marketing strategy is much the same for products and services, in that it involves selecting target markets and formulating a marketing mix. Thus, Theodore Levitt suggested that "instead of talking of 'goods' and of 'services', it is better to talk of 'tangibles' and 'intangibles'". Levitt also went on

to suggest that marketing a physical product is often more concerned with intangible aspects (frequently the `product service' elements of the total package) than with its physical . sales after service is very imporatant in service sector. properties. Charles Revson made a famous comment regarding the business of Revlon Inc.: `In the factory we make cosmetics. In the store we sell hope.' Arguably, service industry marketing merely approaches the problems from the opposite end of the same spectrum. Marketing a social welfare tool? I can see several raised eyebrows, especially my non-commercial friends and relatives who often look down upon me when I say I want to pursue a career in marketing. So you are going to be one amongst them? Them who coax, cajole and brainwash vulnerable consumers into spending their hard earned money on things that they hardly know whether they need or not. Well what if I say its not all about money honey! Example of Social Marketing Ever heard about social marketing or that rare but growing breed of social marketers? They are the ones who are trying to the change the world, quite literally. A passing glance on the definition of social marketing as given by Philip Kotler will be enough to support my words. He says

Social marketing is the use of marketing principles and techniques to influence a target audience to voluntarily accept, reject, modify or abandon a behavior for the benefit of individuals, groups or society as a whole. (Social marketing Improving the quality of life --- Philip Kotler, Ned Roberto, Nancy Lee) He even goes further to christen the social marketers as change agents. So what do these social marketers sell? They sell a desired behavior. Behavior that is desirable for the good of the individual and the society at large. For instance, asking someone to abandon an old behavior of smoking or accept a new behavior of exercising five times a week.

Social and Commercial Marketing Differences

Okay, you may say, that indeed is work done for the welfare of the society but how is this in anyway related to the marketing principles learnt and spouted by most "B"school graduates? How do the concepts of segmenting, targeting, and positioning, the 4 Ps and the all important customer orientation help social marketing? These concepts are the building blocks for any social marketing plan although it does differ from commercial marketing in some respects. Firstly, social marketing aims for individual or societal gain rather than financial gain. In commercial marketing often the segmentation is done on the basis of the most profitable segment. In social marketing too, the return on investment of sources is important but in terms of the degree of change brought about. Hence, criteria like extent of social problem, readiness to change and approachability become important. In commercial marketing, competition is viewed as firms, which sell similar products or satisfy similar needs. In social marketing, the competition is the benefits obtained from adopting a behavior opposite to that promoted by the social marketer. For instance a social marketer who wants people to abandon the habit of smoking is competing against the pleasure derived from smoking, which makes their task all the more difficult. The Similarities The differences between social and commercial marketing notwithstanding, there are certain aspects that are common to both. Customer orientation is found in both forms of marketing. The social marketers know their customers and they know that their offer should appeal to the target audience. In both cases the customers must perceive benefits that equal or exceed the perceived costs. For instance if the marketer needs to ask people to stop using plastic bags and use paper bags, the perceived cost of using a paper bag should be less than the benefits obtained by using them. This is often done through legislation, imposing fines etc. Market research is fundamental in both commercial as well as social marketing. Market research is undertaken by social marketers to understand the customers present beliefs, attitude and knowledge about a relevant social issue. In a campaign for donating blood, it will be beneficial for the marketers to understand the reasons

why people hesitate to donate blood, what kind of beliefs and attitudes color their decision to either donate or not donate blood. There is a segmentation of audience in both cases. A campaign to adopt stray dogs may be more meaningful for middle and upper middle class localities rather than for lower middle class households. So, relevant social issues must be identified and the marketing strategy must be tailored accordingly. The 4 Ps are as essential in social marketing as in commercial marketing. An interesting example is that of using environmental friendly carry bags, the product, price, place (availability) and the promotion constitute the marketing strategy for inducing the people to use biodegradable carry bags. Social marketing by whom Social marketing is deployed by government departments agencies, non profit organizations and non - governmental organizations. Several NGOS like CRY, WWF have managed to create and sustain heart- wrenching campaigns. Several commercial organizations also apply social marketing for their CSR initiatives. No wonder social marketers seem to be in great demand and their role in the society is receiving a tremendous impetus. Most often NGOs and NPOs recruit marketing professionals or agencies to drive home their point. The Challenges faced Social marketers face almost the same amount of challenges as those faced by commercial marketers if not more. Their task is made difficult by the fact that returns are difficult to measure. Unlike commercial marketers who have their all important quarterly or yearly sales report to measure their success, social marketers may have to wait for years or decades to see some form of social change. Communication about sensitive social issues may be like walking the tightrope. There might be a very thin line between a hard-hitting and a gory campaign against AIDS. At times, the communication may be so poignant that the next time an individual sees it he/she may like to ignore it rather than think about the issue at all.

Regional differences in a country like India pose similar challenges to both commercial and social marketers. A campaign to save the girl child will be more relevant in a state like UP or Bihar than a state like Kerala. The Significance Social marketing is gaining importance worldwide as humans become aware of social and environmental issues both old and new. It becomes all the more important in cases where legal or political solutions have not helped the cause and voluntary change on the part of the individual or society is desired. Social marketing could well be the answer to several pressing issues worldwide and this in itself could be overwhelming for social marketers. Big advertising names like Ogilvy & Mather are often involved in the rigors of social marketing. Commercial marketers can now put their skill and expertise to bring about social change and I can now tell my socially aware friends, that for every cigarette ad there is an anti-smoking campaign! Social Marketing Theory Social marketing theory is a combination of theoretical perspectives and a set of marketing techniques. Social marketing has been defined as: "the design, implementation, and control of programs seeking to increase the acceptability of a social idea or practice in a target group.1 It utilizes concepts of market segmentation, consumer research, idea configuration, communication, facilitation, incentives, and exchange theory to maximize target group response. 1 In social marketing the intervention is developed from a solid base of communication and socialpsychological theories: marketing techniques are used to supplement message development and program implementation.

Social Marketing theory is based on the "marketing philosophy" that people will adopt new behaviors, or ideas if they feel that something of value is exchanged between him/her and the "social marketer". Thus, one of the goals of a social marketer should be to meet consumer needs and wants The "something" can be a tangible product (i.e., oral contraceptive) or an idea (i.e., notion of family planning) or both. Another assumption is that well-honed and demonstrably effective techniques from the commercial business sector can successfully and efficiently be applied to advance social causes.4 These techniques include the five "P's"- product, price, place, promotion and positioning. In brief, the product refers to the behavior (i.e., eating low fat foods) or idea (i.e., eat five fruits and vegetables a day for better health) that the audience needs to accept. A product line refers to the variety in which the product can be promoted (i.e. drink fruit juice instead of eating a banana) to attain the goal of adoption of the product. The price of the product refers to the monetary as well as the non-monetary cost of a product. These non-monetary costs include psychological, social, or convenience costs. For instance, promotion of a low fat diet may not only require buying higher priced low fat products but also increase difficulty in obtaining such products, preparing them and making them part of a new lifestyle. Reducing these costs greatly increase the chances that a new idea/product will be adopted. The place refers to the distribution sites of the product. The greater the number of distribution sites and the more convenient and appropriate the places where the product can be found the better chance that awareness and use of the product is facilitated. Promotion of a product refers to the ways in which the

audience is made aware of the product, such as use of advertisements, direct marketing and other avenues. In the promotion of a product social marketing campaigns rely on the interaction between mass media and interpersonal channels for increasing awareness and facilitating change. Positioning refers to the psychological "image" of the product. For instance, the promotion of a low fat diet can be "positioned" as a healthy way to a "slimmer" body, or, a way to reduce the chances of getting health disease or certain types of cancer.

Social-psychological theories, complemented with empirical evidence, are important in establishing the variables of importance for adoption of the "product". Careful definition of the problem and clear objective setting are important to any campaign. However, the most significant contribution of social marketing has been the strong focus on consumer needs.2 To maximize the five P's in a social marketing campaign, identification of needs and wants of "consumer" is key to successful marketing of ideas and behaviors. To find out more about the needs and wants of the audience is to conduct intensive audience analysis, including preproduction and production research5, and to design campaign elements for different subgroups (audience segmentation). Audience segmentation refers to the process of breaking down the mass audience into smaller subgroups that are internally as homogeneous as possible while being as different as possible from other groups. However, the "audience" in a social marketing campaign consists of many different stakeholders.

The success of social marketing campaigns is largely dependent on the "buy-in" of all the stakeholders (i.e., the community at large).3 Most social marketing campaigns rely to some extent on the use of existing agencies in the communities for distribution and promotion of the product. In the past four decades, Social marketing theory has become one of the most popular frameworks for the design, implementation and evaluation of health behavior interventions, both in the United States and abroad. The early campaigns, in the 1950's, were conducted in developing countries and focused on family planning, oral rehydration and immunization campaigns. In the past two decades social marketing campaigns have been conducted in developed countries as well , to bring about other kinds of behavior change: smoking cessation, diet, condom use, helmet use and other preventive health behaviors. There is a great deal of literature on some very successful programs in developing countries.
6-10

In the United States,

successful social marketing campaigns include campaigns on: cardiovascular health,11-12 , increasing fruits and vegetables (5-A-Day campaign)13,increasing low-fat eating for Americans,14 decreasing drug use15 increasing condom use16-18 and HIV counseling.19 Evaluation of Social Marketing campaigns include many different formative, process and outcome measures from audience analysis (i.e. focus group research) to assessment of community involvement, tracking of promotional activities; counting of actual sales of Social Marketing products, as well as evaluation of changes in awareness, attitudes and behaviors. The measures for these evaluations are generally based on program goals and other theoretical frameworks. Critique Because social marketing theory is more like a "set of principles" rather than a formal theory, there are few campaigns that include all Social Marketing constructs simultaneously. Most interventions are "losely" based on social marketing principles, most often including only one or two aspects of this comprehensive theoretical and technical framework,20-24 most notably audience analysis (most often through focus group or survey research), audience segmentation and involvement of community agencies. In general the empirical evidence seems to support the importance of thorough audience analysis and involvement of community agencies for successful design and implementation of health behavior campaigns. This suggests that

knowledge of the audience's beliefs, attitudes and behaviors is critical in the design of an effective intervention. Indeed, one of the criticisms of Social Marketing has been that the main emphasis is on the individual rather than the individuals' larger environment.2 It appears that the endorsement, support and resources of individuals' social and physical environment facilitates or hampers campaign activities. It is not clear how the individuals' beliefs/attitudes/behaviors is affected directly by the person's environment. Emerging and related concepts in Social Marketing Meeting individuals needs and desires is a corner stone of Social Marketing. Newer, interactive technologies are able to tailor messages to meet those needs in a quick and efficient manner. Use of computers in generating such messages and use of the World Wide Web/Internet to facilitate the dissemination of this process will greatly enhance health care professionals' ability to target subgroups with relevant information.

Related to Social Marketing is the notion of "edu-entertainment". Edu-entertainment refers to the use of traditional entertainment media (i.e. soap operas, rock songs, theater) for educational purposes. There are many examples of use of entertainment programming for the adopting of social ideas and health habits. In some programs,

health issues are portrayed within the entertainment programming. In other programs, 90-second health segments follow popular shows such as ER or Chicago Hope with the intention to instruct viewers on how to prevent the type of injury or disease portrayed in the weekly television drama. Although it's difficult to implement and evaluate such program, they hold great promise for reaching audiences with important life-style information at a time when they are likely not resisting the message. Another approach to behavior change which has gained visibility in the past decades is Media Advocacy. Media advocacy is the "strategic use of mass media for advancing a social or public policy initiative"".2 Media advocacy promotes a range of strategies to stimulate broad-based media coverage in order to reframe public debate to increase public support for more effective policy level approaches to public health problems.28 Strategies used to accomplish these goals include: "creative epidemiology", "issue framing: and "gaining access to media outlets". Market Selection Approaches B-SCHOOL have developed various types of marketing plans to attract prospective students. Identifying a target market is a key step in this process (Miller et al. 1990; Pappas and Shaink 1994). A university can choose to either ignore the differences among potential students or confront them. If a university chooses the former option, it is practicing mass marketing, or perhaps even non-marketing. Recognizing the differences among potential students enables the development of a target marketing approach.

Mass Marketing

A mass marketing strategy seeks to attract anyone and everyone with a single broadbased marketing appeal. Years ago, people working in B-SCHOOL admission and others in leadership positions within the central administrations either did not think about the different segments of students or believed that not enough consumer

differences existed to justify different programs for various market segments. Instead, they interacted only with those who applied and were admitted.

Rather than identify relatively homogenous subsets of the entire market, mass marketing treats the entire market as a target by focusing on how consumer needs are similar. This marketing effort is characterized by mass production and distribution. Mass communication is used, but only when necessary to provide information. The offering developed represents a compromise, even though only a few are ideally served by this "one-size-hopefully-kind-of-fits-all" strategy.

Undifferentiated marketing and product differentiation are two variations of the mass marketing approach. The first completely ignores market differences and involves developing a single offering for the entire market. B-SCHOOL following this approach would develop degree programs-with a generalized emphasis, much like the classic liberal arts B-SCHOOL-intended to serve any student within the mass market. In the second approach, a university would seek to distinguish its market offering from competitors on the basis of different product characteristics (real or imaginary) and would then use unique promotional appeals. This strategy offers artificial variety and promotes superficial benefits, rather than making real need-based appeals to different market segments. An example of the product differentiation strategy would be a university that promotes usage of a tri-semester plus summer system rather than a quarter system in a market dominated by the latter. In reality, the differences between the two options are not significant to high school students yet to enter BSCHOOL.

Target Marketing

A target marketing approach requires a focus on one or more selected market segments, and the development of separate marketing programs for each segment. Research shows (e.g., Cavanagh 2002; Rindfeish 2003; Selingo 1999; Thomas

2004) that various segments of the market vary in their response tendencies for educational services. Depending on the type and number of market segments to be targeted, the university could pursue one or more target marketing alternatives: 1) differentiated marketing, 2) concentrated marketing or 3) orchestrated marketing. Differentiated marketing involves the decision to operate in two or more segments of the market. A university might decide to select a limited number of clustered or scattered target markets. For example, four chosen segments are shown on the left side of Figure Ha]. When this is done, the university has decided to pursue a "selected differentiated marketing approach." On the other hand and as shown on the right side of, strategists at a university may elect to target each market segment, thereby following a "complete differentiated marketing approach." In either case, a distinct marketing program will be required for each individual market segment.

A high degree of focused effort characterizes concentrated marketing. This strategy takes one of two forms: "exclusive concentrated marketing" (see left side of Figure 1[b]) or "integrative concentrated marketing" (see right side of Figure 1 [b]). In exclusive concentrated marketing, a university focuses all attention on a single segment of the educational consumer market in hopes of dominating that market through total market penetration, Integrative concentrated marketing is simply an extension of the exclusive strategy. This approach involves expanding a single market segment to encompass other similar segments. Employment of integrative concentrated marketing entails using a developed exclusive market segment as a staging area for expansion into contiguous segments. Market knowledge and marketing experiences gained in serving the original market segment enhance the chances for successful expansion.

The strategy of orchestrated marketing consists of developing a selective marketing program designed to meet the common needs of a range ("horizontal" or "vertical") of market segments. While the individual needs of each segment within a market segment range may vary somewhat, the orchestrated marketer finds a key commonality, basic characteristic or persuasive need that several otherwise different

groups share. It is this commonality, characteristic or need that serves as the foundation for the development of a distinctive yet collective marketing program suitable for a set of dimensional market segments. Market orchestration is a midrange choice between the extreme strategies of differentiated versus concentrated marketing.

Selecting a Strategy

Like all other organizations, B-SCHOOL face a classic dilemma when developing marketing strategy. On the one hand, operational cost efficiencies arise from providing a single, undifferentiated offering to all served. With the other, when the market served is heterogeneous (and it usually is) and higher costs accrue from a variety of offerings targeted to the unique needs of the various targeted segments, comes greater student satisfaction and enhanced market success. Consequently, a university must select a marketing strategy that maintains an appropriate balance between its ability to effectively meet the needs of specifically targeted students and its ability to operate efficiently.

Mass Marketing and the Educational Consumer Market

Mass marketing offers a university significant cost advantages in the production, distribution and promotion of an educational services mix. However, this shotgun strategy is highly vulnerable to the competitive actions of other educational institutions that employ a target market approach. It is also likely to result in a somewhat lower average level of satisfaction among service recipients. Given the multiplicity and complexity of educational market segments served by most BSCHOOL-together with the increasing sophistication of students, the maturity of the educational services product life cycle, increased demands for accountability from stakeholders, and the proximity of competitive educational institutions-an undifferentiated mass marketing strategy generally has very limited application.

Product differentiation is a mass marketing strategy that offers some potential. If a unique selling proposition could be developed that clearly distinguished a university's entire educational services mix, then considerable operating advantages could be realized. Certainly, a university might be able to identify some general themes that could be used to identify comparative advantages, but even these general themes may really represent a partial approach toward a target marketing effort.

Target Marketing and the Educational Consumer Market

In recent years, as competition among B-SCHOOL has increased and as resources constraints have become more intense, addressing specific student needs has become even more important (Coccari and Javalgi 1995). The target marketing approach involves the market segmentation process and offers considerable opportunity for success within the higher education market (Klein, Scott and Clark 2001). Consequently, most B-SCHOOL favor a target marketing strategy. A number of different dimensions can be used to divide the aggregate market for educational services into relatively homogeneous subsets. Demographics have traditionally been popular segmentation bases, especially the geographic dimension, and psychographic variables and other approaches for identifying groups with variant needs also aid the targeting mission. As B-SCHOOL explore these options, they should keep in mind that all market segments should be judged on accessibility, substantiality and actionability (Kotler 1982).

A behavioral segmentation scheme, emphasizing consumer motivation, (Haley 1968; Miller and Rose 1994) can be accomplished by using dual dimensions: benefits sought by the consumer and the underlying motivations of that consumption. The benefit/motivation market matrix for educational consumers shown in Figure 2 can often be an accurate representation of the student market for many B-SCHOOL. The

vertical axis in this conceptual model identifies three types of educational buyers based on the principle benefit sought. They are:

1. Quality buyer: A student who demands high-quality services and is not overly concerned with costs. He or she wants the best and is willing and able to pay. 2. Value buyer: A student who demands good value as defined by a fair quality-toprice ratio. He or she looks for high quality for the money spent and expects service levels to match price levels.

3. Economy buyer: A student primarily interested m minimizing financial, as well as acquisition costs and tends to favor the least expensive and most easily purchased service offering. He or she is a consumer willing to accept marginal quality if the price is right and the acquisition is convenient.

The horizontal axis m Figure 2 represents the motivational forces that influence the behavior of educational consumers. The four motivational types of learners are: 1. Career learner: A student whose primary motivation for seeking educational services is career-oriented. This individual seeks specific skills and preparation that will enhance chances for successful job entry, advancement, mobility, and security, as well as improve chances for increased compensation, career satisfaction and social class advancement.

2. Socio-improvement learner: A student whose primary motive for seeking educational services is to improve the mind, broaden horizons, expand general knowledge, realize potential, do his or her own thing, and achieve other personal goals. Self-actualization is the major need that motivates this educational consumer.

3. Leisure-learner: A student whose primary motive for seeking educational services is the entertainment and/or recreational value provided by those services. This individual desires educational services that provide enjoyable learning experiences, allow escapism, permit socialization, enhance quality of life, broaden knowledge of subjects of personal interest and promote general mental welfare.

4. Ambivalent learner: A student learner whose primary motive for seeking educational services is other-directed, unknown or unclear. This individual seeks educational services in order to satisfy someone else (perhaps parents), to identify possible interests, to gam direction, or to avoid other life experiences.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research Objective: Due to recession there has been a decline in the demand for MBA as a career option. Hence, it is time to rethink the strategies available to the BSchools for attracting students. Thus, it is an attempt to study the existing strategies of the B-Schools and the new strategies that must be developed. Research Methodology: 1. Secondary Data regarding the present marketing strategies of the B-Schools will be collected from the internet, newspapers, magazines etc 2. Primary - It would include interviews with the various management of BSchools. It would also include surveys of potential students and existing students. Scope: The thesis would be an attempt to gauge the effects of the 2008 recession in India. It would also study the reactions of the students to it and the changing trend in the demand for MBA as a discipline. The problem at hand is the decreasing admissions into B-Schools and also in campus placements. The thesis, besides these, would highlight the existing strategies adopted by the institutions and the need for a change in them, if at all. Then again, it would try to find out the strategies and plans that can be adopted to bring a positive change in the scenario. Justification: MBA as a career option had been much in demand for the last years. But with the recession setting in around the end of year 2008, all the hype surrounding MBA has vanished. Students are apprehensive about the prospects about this career with companies engaging in lay-offs and avoiding fresh recruitments. Thus, for the B-Schools to still remain in operation and maintain/increase their profits and revenues, an immediate and drastic change is needed. Thus, a study of the above mentioned scope seems most relevant at this moment in the education industry.

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPREATION


Q1. Gender PROFILES OF RESPONDENT

CONCLUSION Female 50% Male 50%


Male Female

As per our data suggested that out of 100 respondent 50% are male and 50% female who is contributed in our survey. It is important to have a balance both of them because some time changing the behavior would miss leads the survey result. So I would care fully taken this ration so the expected result would get more suitable.

2. Age profiles of Respondent

Above 60 5%

20 - 30 34%

20 - 30 30 - 40 40 60

40 60 45% 30 - 40 16%

Above 60

As per our data suggested that out of 100 people there is 4 type of age demography that I captured one is 20-30 age group this age goup is primarly the student of the Raffles Millennium International etiher who using library or English classes. 34% contributed while age group of 30 to 40 contibuted by the 16%, apart from this 45% of the people out of 100 people are basically manager or above level so there age group would be 40 to 60.

3. Functional exposure of the Respondent

10% 38% 40%

Marketing/Communicati on Manager

12%

Head of the Department Employee (General) Students

As per our graph and table 3 suggested that the out of 100 respondent 10% of them are marketing communication manager who involve in our survey which is very important to ask several question about the marketing strategy for the Raffles Millennium International. While 40% who contributed in our survey are from the General employees of the Raffles Millennium International who know better than any body how well Raffles Millennium International is doing in terms of branding and marketing exercise. Also 12% of the respondent are working as a head of department cadre with the Raffles Millennium International because the decision of the marketing strategy also coming from them.

4. Brand preference by the Respondent

Brand Preference

2, 2%

98, 98%

As per our data suggested that the 98% of the respondent suggested Raffles Millennium International is dominating in there market segment this is also true because it is one of the renowned house who not only providing commercial education but also have a strong deliverable quality to the student. 2% of the people suggested that they do not think that Raffles Millennium International is the market leader in terms of the preference wise of the student because it is known for the higher education only.

5. Brand promotional channel for the Raffles Millennium International

Media preference for Advertising

Television 31%

Print 69%

It is very important to judge whether organization following which media to advertise as per our study reflects that in the case of Raffles Millennium International they prefer Print Media because 69% of the respondent suggested the same thing there is various constraint to not opt very frequently Television for the advertisement or internet per say because of the budge constraint etc. but 31% people suggested that now Raffles Millennium International also moving towards the Television Media to advertise there selves.

6. Promotional Activity with different media

B randVisibility P rocess
Direct Calling 8%

Sem inar 11%

Educational Events 39%

Advertisement 42%

It is evident that educational institute promote there selves though educational seminar and the educational events always but in the current scenario or Marketisation of the educational Institute they prefer to go beyond that and advertise there brand in the various channel. As per this project I concerned with the Raffles Millennium International and then I got to know that 39% of the people saying educational events would be better for the Raffles Millennium International to advertise with. While 42% of the respondent saying Raffles Millennium International need to promote there brand through various channel like Internet, TV etc. 11% of the respondent believe that seminar would be the biggest events for the Raffles Millennium International to promote there product in the market.

7. Satisfaction survey result for the Brand Promotion

Raffel MillenuemS chool usingevent as a brand prom otion


Doesnt know 11% Disagree 4%

Appropriate 36%

Veryappropriate 49%

For choosing the right marketing strategy you have to choose the right brand promotional mix and if the percentage of people satisfied with that you should change the strategy as soon as possible. As per our data suggested that 49% of the respondent said current brand promotional matrix using by the Raffles Millennium International is the very appropriate and should continue with that only. Adding to this 36% of the respondent said it is just appropriate because they may suggested some changes like more advertisement etc. while only 4% of the respondent out of 100 said not it does not suitable for the current market scenario for Raffles Millennium International.

8. New was for marketing strategy

RafflesMillenniumInternational always seekingnew waysto advertisem ent


Doesnt know 9% Disagree 6%

Appropriate 28%

Veryappropriate 57%

This question gives suggestion whether Raffles Millennium International Marketing team is using innovative technique for Marketing strategy or not as per our graph and table no 8 suggested that almost 70% of the people agree that Raffles Millennium International always trying some unique concept of the marketing strategy to sustaining the growth like events or some new part time course , different new course launched keeping these things in mind.

9. Need to strategies more in the branding part of the Marketing strategies

Raffles Millennium International to Focus need more in Branding


Doesnt know 4% Disagre e 8%

Appropriate 26%

Very appropriate 62%

As per our graph suggested that the almost 80% of the people said Raffles Millennium International did even better if they will more focus on the branding part because of the various reason some of them are not much brand visibility around the several new students, should tie up with the call center to promote there training division much better than the current one.

10. Funding issue with the Raffles Millennium International

RafflesMillenniumInternational currentlyhave lessfundfor advertisem ent


Doesnt know 6% Disagree 8% Veryappropriate 54%

Appropriate 32%

It is very important that the firm how much spend on the marketing activity because if the fund is not sufficient with the marketing team unless to say the can hit the more targets. As per our study suggested that the more than 70% of the people Believe yes Raffles Millennium International has very less fund for the marketing and the branding which need to increase as per the recommendation for the Raffles Millennium International

RECOMMENDATION

In the final analysis, one might ask. "What's the point of having an accurate marketing segmentation structure?" The future of marketing for educational institutions lies in the more analytical and creative realms of direct interactive multichannel marketing. Well-defined markets and carefully profiled customers encourage the use of database marketing strategies and tactics that speak directly to and interact with individual students. Highly customized and personalized marketing offers can best be tailored to the particular needs and preferences of selected student prospects by using multiple marketing channels of distribution that support direct contact with students. The new era of direct multi-channel marketing requires creating multipletouch points with each student prospect. Gaming access to and securing response from existing and prospective students via electronic (Internet and email), print (direct mail, magazines, newspapers), broadcast (television and radio), teleservices (inbound and outbound telemarketing), and personal (direct sales and retail outlets) channels are rapidly becoming the norm for successful student marketing within the market context of higher education. Attracting and retaining students requires developing and offering a unique value proposition: the only way one can know what constitutes a different value equation is to know and understand the market as individuals and meaningful groups of individuals. Well-defined marketing segmentation structures are a precursor to well-executed direct marketing programs.

The diversity of undergraduate and graduate student markets has increased significantly over the last decade. This variation in student demographics, psychographics and behavioral characteristics has contributed to the "age of individualism" in which the "customers as individuals" theme has become a dominant force in defining the higher education marketplace. Supported by new technologies, extensive globahzation. more socialization, and a keen sense of entitlement, the notion of students as individuals has become a market trend that can only be harvested by carefully crafted marketing strategies and activities based on clearly delineated and profiled segments of the market.The evolution of market segmentation structures is clearly shown by the growth of the idea that consumers

need to be viewed as separate, discrete and distinct entities, evidenced by the sequential segmentation of mass markets into market segments, market niches, micro markets, and individual markets. Clarity of market definition and strategy is becoming more and more important in the emerging knowledge-based economy that defines the higher education industry. The intangible and perishable nature of the typical university offering adds to the need to have an identifiable target market and an actionable strategy to reach it. The suggested strategy-making processes incorporate many well-tested concepts and practices. These procedures allow institutional marketers within the higher education setting to consider alternative ways of identifying target markets and selecting market coverage strategies. With clear understanding of their market structures, academic institutions can develop compelling themes that knit together otherwise independent activities, and focus the energies of their marketers on the university's desired position in the marketplace. Careful market delineation allows universities to excel in definite areas that set them apart from other institutions of higher learning, and therefore provide selected student populations a unique learning value.
As per our study suggested that the more than 70% of the people Believe yes

Raffles Millennium International has very less fund for the marketing and the branding which need to increase as per the recommendation for the Raffles Millennium International

As per our survey suggested that the almost 80% of the people said Raffles

Millennium International did even better if they will more focus on the branding part because of the various reason some of them are not much brand visibility around the several new students, should tie up with the call center to promote there training division much better than the current one.
This question gives suggestion whether Raffles Millennium International

Marketing team is using innovative technique for Marketing strategy or not as per our graph and table no 8 suggested that almost 70% of the people agree that Raffles Millennium International always trying some unique concept of the marketing strategy to sustaining the growth like events or some new part time course , different new course launched keeping these things in mind.

. For choosing the right marketing strategy you have to choose the right brand

promotional mix and if the percentage of people satisfied with that you should change the strategy as soon as possible. As per our data suggested that 49% of the respondent said current brand promotional matrix using by the Raffles Millennium International is the very appropriate and should continue with that only. Adding to this 36% of the respondent said it is just appropriate because they may suggested some changes like more advertisement etc. while only 4% of the respondent out of 100 said not it does not suitable for the current market scenario for Raffles Millennium International. Always make the process objective rather than subjective .show must run seamlessly even if person is not there. Give actionable, measurable target to different student committees of current batch with deadlines. Allocate some percentage of students CGPA in that responsibility. Be clear of your Return on investment (ROI). There should a brand manager for institute brand building with a team they should visit different B-schools...adopt their best practices and more importantly implement in their own house within a time frame. Every student during summer training should collect 3 HR contacts; every respective student should build good relationship over the time with them so that they become convinced to visit your campus. Make your brand colour, logo and language consistent in all your communication. Take entrance through only CAT or XAT never through both. It causes brand confusion in target segments mind. In placement time, have a heterogeneous basket of companies from diverse field and operation. That shows your brands acceptance cutting across diverse sectors in industries.

CONCLUSION
Analyzing the marketing strategy of the Raffles Millennium International would give new insight towards the branding and promotion of the educational institution. With

changing times, the higher education system needs to relook at the role it sees itself in. Several institutions still look at their role as imparting, giving superior knowledge. With the advent of the internet a lot has changed. Its not only information thats easily available, but the discussion forums, the exchange that have made it a learners delight. Modern day educational institutes have no choice but to redefine their character. Hence, educational institutions will have to share and engage people in this transformation process. Education will need to transform from being known as destination by itself to becoming a platform. Education will need to create practical platforms for people to do more, do different, do better. Education will need to be more open and find purpose in inspiring people to design varied approaches and futures in ways they have not done before, using resources they may not have considered before, tending towards a tomorrow we have not imagined before. To convey this to the environment it is a part of, branding will certainly play an important role. The Raffles Millennium International communicates across boundaries and borders, providing a platform for cultural exchange and growth. Towards this aim, the eleven libraries of the Raffles Millennium International regularly host events that foster a greater understanding and appreciation of the arts, commerce, education and technology of and between India and the UK. Measure of the effectiveness of these events would done trough the various marketing strategy. For example social marketing, campaign marketing. Etc.How Raffles Millennium International effectively doing event management and branding for there different services like library, English course etc. Branding Education is more than creating a brand name or a logo or indulging in large media exercises. I would see it as an exercise that helps develop an identity that inspires people. Probably its well put by Kanchana Thamodaran, IIT-ian & Tamil writer when she said, If a brand name serves to expand opportunities, then the question is to optimise the brand's size so as to maximise opportunities without reducing brand equity. Branding in education is not a new phenomenon. We still resonate with impressions when the names of Nalanda and Takshila- ancient Indian Universities. These institutions we evolutionary and served as bridges to realize what several people

wanted to do. Hence without being able to establish a link with people an external branding exercise will be futile. In addition, the above market delineation process support two key marketing abilities: market sensing and customer linking. Market sensing capabilities help institutions to detect change amongst various student populations and provide better opportunities to anticipate possible changes. Customer linking is enhanced by careful market structure delineation, in that it enhances the ability of the university to establish close and collaborative relationships with both current students (higher retention), as well as prospective students (better recruitment). Strong student linkages allow the university to recognize and respond to changes in student needs and preferences.

The market segmentation process is a highly adaptable framework. In addition to student recruitment, it can be used to segment and classify: donors relative to fund raising; employers relative to student placement; participants relative to trainings; and alumni relative to involvement. Building and maintaining relationships is greatly enhanced if the university has a strong program of market delineation, assessment and selection. The widely-regarded practice of relationship marketing has its roots in the customer sensing and linking activities of the market segmentation process of identifying target markets and selecting market strategies.

REFERENCES

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QUESTIONARRIE 1. Gender:

Male Female

Male Female

178 122

2. . Age (in years) 40 60 Above 60

20 - 30 30 - 40

20 - 30 30 - 40 40 60 Above 60

78 56 32 34

3. What is your functional exposure? Marketing/Communication Manager Head of the Department Employee (General) Students 4. Do you think B-SCHOOL is the leader in SCHOOL education etc. Brand Preference Yes 98 10 12 40 38

NO 5. What are the possible media that B-SCHOOL advertise most Media preference for Advertising Print Television

69 31

6. What are the various way of communication that B-SCHOOL using for Brand Visibility? Brand Visibility Process Educational Events Advertisement Seminar Direct Calling 39 42 11 8

. Kindly Rate among these options with these scales

1. Very appropriate 3. Doesnt know

2. Appropriate 4. Disagree

Very Question B-SCHOOL using event as 7 a brand promotion B-SCHOOL always seeking 8 new ways to advertisement B-SCHOOL need to Focus 9 more in Branding B-SCHOOL currently have 10 less fund for advertisement 54 62 57 49 appropriate

Appropriat e

Doesnt know Disagree

36

11

28

26

32