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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 1 of 60

Page ID #:4

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7

André E. Jardini (State Bar No. 71335)

aej~kpclegai.com

K.L. Myles (State Bar No. 243272)

klm~kpclegal.com

KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARK

550 North Brand Boulevard, Suite 1500

Glendale, California 91203-1922

Telephone: (818) 547-5000

Facsimile: (818) 547-5329

Joseph S. Farzam (State Bar No. 210817)

farzam~lawyer.com

JOSEPH F ARZAM LAW FIRM

1875 Century Park East, Suite 1345

8

Los Angeles, CA 90067

Telephone: (310) 226-6890

9 Facsimile: (310) 226-6891

10 Attorneys for Plaintiff

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

11

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UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT

CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA

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15 PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.,

16

Plaintiff,

17

v.

18 U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC.,

19

Defendant.

CiVJ.2- 0430 1 ~wl (~R I

) COMPLAINT FOR PATENT

20

21

INTRODUCTION

22

23 'nfringement and

24 efendant"), and alleges as follows:

25

26

1.

Plaintiff

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC., fies this complaint for

patent

jury demand against defendant U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC. ("the

PARTIES

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC. ("PI-NET") is a California

2.

Plaintiff

business in Menlo Park, California. PI-NET has been

KNAPP, 27 orporation with its principal place of

PETERSEN 28

& CLARKE provider of innovative software products, services and solutions that enable distributed

ILl7';'lLl I OQOOOlOOQ,1

-1-

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 2 of 60

Page ID #:5

1 ransaction processing and control over public and private networks, including, without

2 imitation, the Internet and the World Wide Web.

3 3.

The patents asserted here were issued to Dr. Lakshmi Arunachalam, PI-NET'S

4 ounder. The patents disclose the fundamental technology underlying Web commerce by

5 se of

Web applications. The patents describe a method and apparatus for providing real-

6 ime, two-way transactional capabilities on the Web. The examples of

the pioneering

7 echnology in the patents encompass the transactions commonly entered into by defendant

8 ith their vehicle rental customers.

9 4.

Defendant U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC. ("U-HAUL" and/or

10 'defendant") is a Nevada corporation headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona. U-HAUL

11 perates as a truck rental company in the United States.

12 mRISDICTION AND VENUE

13 5.

This action arises under the patent laws of

the United States, Title 35, United

14 States Code, including 35 U.S.C. sections 271 and 281-285. This Court has jurisdiction

15 ver the action pursuant to 28 U.S.c. sections 1331 and 1338(a).

16 6.

Upon information and belief, defendant is subject to this Court's specific and

17 eneral personal jurisdiction due at least to their substantial business within the State of

18 alifornia and this judicial distrct, including:

KNAPP,

PETERSEN

& CLARKE

19

(a)

Operating a vehicle rental business by use of Internet transaction

20 capabilities which infrnge the patents herein alleged in California and in this judicial

21 distrct; and

22

(b)

Regularly doing or soliciting business, engaging in other persistent

23 courses of conduct; and/or

24

25 individuals in California and in this judicial district.

(c)

Deriving substantial revenue from products and/or services provided to

26

7.

Venue is proper in this

judicial district under 28 U.S.c. sections 1391(b) (c)

27 nd (d) and 28 U.S.c. section 1400(b).

28 III

-2-

1475044.1 08000/00951

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 3 of 60

Page ID #:6

1

GENERAL ALLEGATIONS

2

8.

On November 16. 1999, the United States Patent and Trademark Office duly

3

nd legally issued United States Patent Number 5,987,500 (the '''500 patent") entitled

4

'Value-Added Network System For Enabling Real-Time, By-Directional Transactions On A

5 etwork" to Dr. Lakshmi Arnachalam. PI-NET is the assignee of all rights, title and

6 'nterest in the '500 patent including the right to recover damages for past infringement. A

7 opy of

the '500 patent is attached to the complaint as exhibit A.

8 9.

On January 31,2012, the United States Patent and Trademark Office duly and

9 egally issued United States Patent Number 8,108,492 (the '''492 patent") entitled "Web

10 pplication Network Portal" to Dr. Lakshmi Arunachalam. PI-NET is the assignee of all

11 ights, title and interest in the '492 patent, including the right to recover damages for past

12 'nfringement. A copy of

the '492 patent is attached to the complaint as exhibit B.

13 10. The '500 patent is valid and enforceable.

14 11. The '492 patent is valid and enforceable.

15 12. Defendant infringes the '500 patent directly, contrbutorily and/or by active

16 'nducement by conducting real-time two-way transactions from Web applications across the

17 eb concerning rental transactions for automobiles and/or trcks. Such capabilities include

18 reservations system, payment information, pickup and drop-off times and locations,

KNAPP,

PETERSEN

& CLARKE

19 election of a class of

vehicle, and other detailed information. This real-time two-way

20 ansactional capability on the Web is described in the '500 patent and infringed by

21 efendant.

22 13. Defendant infringes the '492 patent directly, contributorily and/or by active

23 'nducement by conducting real-time two-way transactions from Web applications across the

24 eb concerning rental transactions for automobiles and/or trcks. Such capabilities include

25 reservations system, payment information, pickup and drop-off times and locations,

26 election of a class of vehicle, and other detailed information. This real-time two-way

27

28

ransactional capability on the Web is described in the '492 patent and infringed by

-3-

1475044.1 08000/0095 i

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 4 of 60

Page ID #:7

1

14.

The online capabilities of defendant U- HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC.

2

'nfringes the '500 and '492 patents, exemplified, in part, by the following screen shot of

its

3 pening screen which displays the reservation, location and vehicle selection applications of

4 he inventions of

the patents-in-suit:

5

6

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'Trlreks Trailers Storae Boxes 8. packing supplies lO9tióHs ~,_

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20

15. Defendant's infringing acts have been without express or implied license by

21 I-NET, and/or in violation of

PI-

NET'S rights or claims for relief.

22 FIRST CLAIM, FOR RELIEF

23 INFRIGEMENT OF THE '500 PATENT

KNAPP,

24 16.

PI-NET incorporates by reference each and every allegation in paragraphs 1

25 hrough 15, as though fully set forth herein.

26 17.

Defendant has been and now is infringing, inducing the infringement of,

27 nd/or contributing to the infringement of

the '500 patent, literally and/or under the doctrine

PETERSEN 28

& CLARKE f equivalence, by conducting real-time two-way transactions on the Web in connection

1475044.1 08000/00951

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 5 of 60

Page ID #:8

1 ith the rental of vehicles to their customers.

2

18. PI-NET has not authorized the defendant to use its technology for transactions

3 ver the Web with its customers as covered by the '500 patent.

4

5 ontinue to suffer, substantial and irreparable damage. Upon information and belief,

6 efendant's infringement, induced infringement and/or its contributory infringement of

19.

As a result of defendant's infringing conduct, PI -NET has suffered and will

the

7 500 patent wil continue unless enjoined by this Court.

8

20. Defendant's infringement is and has been wilfuL.

9

21. Upon information and belief, to the extent defendant lacked actual knowledge

10 fthe '500 patent prior to this lawsuit, at a minimum they had constructive notice of

11 atent by operation of at least 35 U.S.c. section 287.

12 22.

PI-NET has no adequate remedy at law for defendant's infringement,

the '500

13 ontributory infringement, and/or induced infringement of

the '500 patent. Unless the

14 efendant's infringing activities are enjoined by this Court, PI-NET wil continue to suffer

15 onetary damages in an amount not yet determined.

16 SECOND CLAIM FOR RELIEF

17 INFRIGEMENT OF THE '492 PATENT

18 23.

19 hrough 22, as though fully set forth herein.

PI-NET incorporates by reference each and every allegation in paragraphs 1

20 24.

Defendant has been and now is infringing, inducing the infringement of,

21 nd/or contributing to the infringement of

the '492 patent, literally and/or under the doctrine

22 f equivalents, by conducting real-time two-way transactions on the Web in connection with

23 he rental of vehicles to their customers.

24 25. PI-NET has not authorized the defendant to use its technology for transactions

25 ver the Web with its customers as covered by the '492 patent.

KNAPP,

PETERSEN

& CLARKE

26

As a result of defendant's infringing conduct, PI-NET has suffered and will

27

ontinue to suffer, substantial and irreparable damage. Upon information and belief,

28

efendant's infringement, induced infringement and/or its contributory infringement of

1475044 1 0800010095 i

-5-

the

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page ID #:9

1 492 patent wil continue unless enjoined by this Court.

2 27. Defendant had knowledge of the '492 patent prior to filing of this complaint

3 ut has continued to engage in their infringing conduct nonetheless. Defendant's

4 . nfringement is and has been willfuL.

5 28. Upon information and belief, to the extent any defendant lacked actual

6 owledge of

the '492 patent prior to this lawsuit, at a minimum they had constructive

7 otice of

the '500 patent by operation of

at least 35 U.S.c. section 287.

8 29. PI-NET has no adequate remedy at law for defendant's infringement,

9 ontrbutory infringement, and/or induced infringement of the '492 patent. Unless the

10 efendant's infrnging activities are enjoined by this Court, PI-NET wil continue to suffer

11 onetary damages in an amount not yet determined.

12 PRAYER FOR RELIEF

KNAPP,

PETERSEN

& CLARKE

13 WHEREFORE, PI-NET prays for judgment:

14 1.

That defendant has infrnged, contributorily infringed and/or actively induced

15 infringement of the '500 patent.

16 2.

That defendant has infringed, contributorily infringed and/or actively induced

17 infringement of the '492 patent.

18

19

3. That defendant's infringement was willfuL.

4. That defendant be preliminarily and permanently enjoined from further acts

20 of

infringement of

the '500 patent.

21 5.

That defendant be preliminarily and permanently enjoined from further acts

22 of infringement of the '492 patent.

23 6.

That PI-NET be awarded damages adequate to compensate for defendant's

24 infringement of the '500 patent.

25 7.

That PI-NET be awarded damages adequate to compensate for defendant's

26 infringement of the '492 patent.

27 8.

28 the maximum rate allowed by law.

That PI-NET be awarded prejudgment interest and post-judgment interest at

-6-

i 475044 i 08000/0095 i

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

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Page ID #:10

1 9.

That the Court declare this to be an exceptional case pursuant to 35 U.S.c.

2 section 285, and award PI-NET its attorneys' fees.

3 10. That the Court award PI-NET enhanced damages pursuant to 35 U.S.c.

4 section 284.

5 11. That the Court award a compulsory future royalty.

6 12. That PI-NET be awarded costs of

Court; and

7 13. That PI-NET be awarded such other and further relief as the Court deems just

8

and proper.

9

10

Dated: May 17,2012

11

12

13

14

KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARK

By:

- ("

André E.

K.L. Myles

Attorneys for Plam iff

rdini

15

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

16

KNAPP,

PETERSEN

& CLARKE

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

1475044.1 08000/00951

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 8 of 60

Page ID #:11

1 DEMAND FOR mRY TRIAL

KNAPP,

PETERSEN

& CLARKE

2 Plaintiff

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC. hereby demands a tral by jury in this

3 matter.

,4

5

Dated: May 17,2012

6

7

8

9

10

11

KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

~~

By:

~

André E. J ard i

K.L. Myles

Attorneys for Plaintiff

==

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

12

13

14

15

16

17

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21

22

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-8-

1475044.1 08000100951

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page ID #:12

EXHIBIT A

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 10 of 60

Page ID #:13

United States Patent (19)

Arnachalam

1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111~I11111111111111111111111111111

(11)

(45)

USOO5987500A

Patent Number:

Date of Patent:

5,987,500

*Nov. 16, 1999

(54) VALUE-ADDED NETWORK SYSTEM FOR

ENABLING RETIME, BY-DIRCTIONAL

TRSACTIONS ON A NEfWORK

(751 Inventor: Lakshmi Arunachalam, Menlo Park,

Calif

(73) Asignee: Pi-Net (nternational, (nc., Menlo Park,

Calif.

( *) Notice:

This patent issue.d on a continued pros-

ecution application filed under 37 CFR

L.53(d), and is subject to the twenty year

patent term provisions of 35 U.S.c.

154(a)(2).

(21) Appl. No.: 08/879,958

(22) Filed: Jun. 20, 1997

Related U.S. Application Data

(62)

(60)

(51)

(52)

(58)

Divisioo of application No. 08(700,726, Aug. 5, 1996, Pat. No. 5,778,178

Provisional application No. 60/00,634, Nov. 13, 1995.

Int. CI.6

U.s.

Field of Search

G06F 13/00

709/203

364!DlG. 1, DIG. 2;

395/762,200.3,200.31, 200.32, 200.43,

681,682,683, 684,685, 689; 7091200,

201, 202, 203, 213, 301, 302, 303, 304,

305; 710/200

References Cited

PUBLICATONS

"Coding witb HTML forms: HTML goes interactive",

Aidrew Davidson, Dr. Dobb's Journal, V20, Nó, Jun. 1995,

p.16.

Primary Exaiiirier-Robert B. Harrell

(56)

AtTorney, Agent, or Firm-Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor &

Zafman LLP

(57)

ABSTRACT

The presnt invention provides a method and apparatus for

providing real-time, two-way transactional capabilities on

the Web. Specifically, one embodiment of the present inven-

tion dislose a confguable value-added network switch for

enablig real-time transactions on the World Wide Web. The

configurable value added network switch compries a sys-

tem for switching to a transactional application in response

to a user specification from a World Wide Web application,

a system means for transmitting a transaction request from

the transactional application, and a system for processing the

transaction request. Additionally, a method for enabling

object routing is disclosed, comprising the steps of creating

a virtual information store containing inormation entries

and attributes associating eacli of the information entries and

the attributes with an object identity, and asigning a unique

network address to each of the object identities. Finally, a

method is diclosed for enabling service management of the

value-added network service, to perform OAM&P functions

on the services network.

35 Claims, 13 Drawing Sheets

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

U.S. Patent

Document 1

Nov. 16, 1999

Filed 05/17/12

Page 11 of 60

Page ID #:14

Sheet 1 of 13

5,987,500

BROWSE

LINK

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Document 1

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Page ID #:16

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Filed 05/17/12

Page 14 of 60

Page ID #:17

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

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Page ID #:19

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 6 of 13

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 18 of 60

Page ID #:21

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Filed 05/17/12

Page 20 of 60

Page ID #:23

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Filed 05/17/12

Page 21 of 60

Page ID #:24

Sheet 11 of 13

5,987,500

OBJECT

1

123.123.123.123.1

WEB

SERVER

(NODE)

.

123.123.123.123

OBJECT

~

2

123.123.123.123.2

~ OTHER

OBJECTS

OBJECT

3

123.123.123.123.3

FIG. 68

n/'o

(7\.

/f ¡

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Filed 05/17/12

Page 22 of 60

Page ID #:25

Sheet 12 of 13

5,987,500

r VAN SWITCH 520

SWITCHING BOUNDARY

SERVICE SERVICE

702 701

ZQ 704

MANAGEMENT APPLICATION

SERVICE SERVICE

FIG. 7

J/

~i

l/

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 23 of 60

Page ID #:26

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 13 of 13

~

USER CONNECTS TO WEB SERVER

RUNNING AN EXCHANGE

,.

S-802

~804

USER ISSUES REQUEST FOR

TRANSACTIONAL APPLICATION

l

WEB SERVER HANDS OFF ~806

REQUEST TO EXCHANGE

t

EXCHANGE ACTIVATES GRAPHICAL USER

INTERFACE TO PRESENT USER WITH LAST

OF POSVC APPLICATION OPTIONS

Ls

+

USER MAKES REQUEST FROM

POSVC APPLICATION LIST

L5810

t

SWITCHING COMPONENT IN EXCHANGE

SWITCHES USER TO

~8

808

12

SELECTED POSVC APPLICATION

t

OBJECT ROUTING COMPONENT

EXECUTES USER'S REQUEST

l-814

l

l-816

~81

DATA RETRIEVED FROM DATA

REPOSITORY VIA TMP

l

USER CONTINUES TRANSACTION

(OPTIONAL) OR ENDS TRANSACTION

l

FIG.

8

8

5,987,500

1 ~

(7-~r

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 24 of 60

Page ID #:27

5,987,500

1

VALUE-ADDED NETWORK SYSTEM FOR

ENABliNG RE-TIME, BY-DIRCTIONAL

TRNSACTlONS ON A NETWORK

RELATD APPLICATONS

This is a divisional of application Ser. No. 08nOO,726,

filed Aug. 5, 1996, now US. Pat. No. 5,778,178,

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates 10 the area of Internet

communications. Specifcally, Ihe present invention relates

to a method and apparatus for configurable value-added

network switching and object routing.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVNTION

With the Internet and the World Wide Web ("the Web")

evolving rapidly as a viable consumer medium for electronic

commerce, new on-line services are emerging to fill the

needs of on-line users. An Internet user today can browse on

the Web via the use of a Web browser. Web browsers are

software interfaces that run on Web clients to allow access

to Web servers via a simple user interface. A Web user's

capabilities today from a Web browser are, however,

extremely limited. The user can perform one-way, browse-

only interactions. Additionally, the user has limited

"deferred" transactional capabilities, namely electroDÌc mail

2

application scripts must be created for each account, as

illustrated in FIG. lB. The ban thus has to create individual

scripts for each of its services to offer usrs access to these

servces. User 100 can then interact in a liited fashion with

these individual applications. Creatig and managing indi-

vidual CGI scripts for each service is not a viable solution

for merchants with a large number of services.

As the Web expands and electronic commerce becomes

more desirable, the need increases for robust, real-time,

10 bi-directional transactional capabilities on the Web. A true

real-time, bi-directional transaction would allow a user to

connect to a variety of services on the Web, and perform

real-time transactions on those services. For example,

although user 100 can browse car dealer Web page 105

15 today, the user cannot purchase the car, negotiate a car loan

or perform other types of real-time, two-way transactions

that he can perform with a live salesperson at the car

dealership. Ideally, user 100 in FIG. 1A would be able to

access car dealer Web page ios, select specifc transactions

20 that he desires to perform, such as purchase a car, and

perform the purchase in real-time, with two-way interaction

capabilities. CGI applications provide user 100 with a lim-

ited ability for two-way interaction with car dealer Web page

105, but due to the lack of interaction and management

25 between the car dealer and the bank, he wil not be able to

obtain a loan and complete the purchase of the car via a CGI

application. The ability to complete robust real-time, two-

way transactions is thus not truly available on the Web today.

SUMMARY OF 1HE INVNTON

It is iherefore an object of the present invention to provide

a method and apparatu for providing real-time, two-way

transactional capabilities on the Web. Specifically, one

embodiment of the present invention discloses a con

fig-

urable value-added network switch for enabling real-time

transactions on the World Wide Web. The configurable value

added network switch compries means for switching to a

transactional application in response to a user specifcation

from a World Wide Web application, means for transmitting

a transaction request from the tranctional application, and

means for procesing the transaction request.

According to another aspect of the present invention, a

method and apparatus for enablig objec routing on the

World Wide Web is dislosed. The method for enabling

object routing comprises the steps of creatig a virtal

information store containing information entries and

attributes, associating each of the information entres and the

aitributes with an objeci identity, and assigning a unique

network address to each of the object identities.

Other objects, feanires and advantages of the present

invention wil be apparent from the accmpanying drawings

and from the detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features and advantages of the presnt invention will

be apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the

detailed description or the present invention as set forth

below,

FIG. lA is an illustration of a current user's browse

capabilities on the Web via a Web browser.

(e-mail) capabilities. E-mail capabilities are referred to as

"deferred transactions" because the consumer's request is 30

not proces.'õed until the e-mail is received, read, and the

person or system reading the e-mail executes the transaction.

This lraiisaction is thus not performed in real-time.

HG. lA ilustrates typical user interactions on the Web

today. User 100 sends out a request from Web browser 102 35

in the form of a universal resource locator (URL) 101 in the

following manner: http://ww.car.com. URL 101 is pro-

cesd by Web browser 102 that determines the URL cor-

responds to car dealer Web page ios, on car dealer Web

server 104. Web browser 102 then establihes browse link 40

103 to car dealer Web page ios. User 100 can browse Web

page LOS and select "hot li" to jump to other locations in

Web page lOS, or to move to other Web pages on the Web.

This interaction is typically a browse-only interaction.

Under limited circumstances, the user may be able to fill out 45

a form on car dealer Web page ios, and e-mail the form to

car dealer Web server 104. This interaction is stil strictly a

one-way browse mode communications link, with the e-mail

providing limited, deferred transactional capabilities.

Under liited circumstances, a user may have access to 50

two-way servces on the Web via Common Gateway Inter-

face (CGI) applications. CGI is a standard interface for

running external programs on a Web server. It alows Web

servers to .create documents dynamically when the server

receives a request from the Web browser. When the Web 55

server receives a request for a document, the Web server

dynamically executes the appropriate CGI script and trans-

mits the output of the execution back to the requesting Web

browser. This interaction can ihus be termed a "two-way"

transaction. It is a severely limited transaction, however, 60

because each CGi application is customized for a particular

type of application or service.

For example, as illustrated in FIG. IB, user 100 may

access bank ISO's Web server and altempt to perform

transactions on checking account 152 and to make a pay- 65

ment on loan account 154. In order for user 100 to access

,.hDr-i~;nn

r.,

n!

ii;"" .,

,.

1,

,.,.,

~i Ii;A ,-

,t~

\1.1

1

rrT

FIG. IB is an illustration of a current user's capabilities

to perform limited transactions on the Web via eGI appli.

cations.

FIG.

~_~

~I

2 illustrates a iypical computer sysiem on which the

;r,."

~':""""

1

"'

:i:.~

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.y ,~/

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 25 of 60

Page ID #:28

5,987,500

3

AG.3 ilustrates the Open Systems Interconnection (OS!)

ModeL.

AG. 4A ilustrates conceptually the user value chain as it

exists today.

4

and instructions. A data storage medium 208 contaimng

digital information is configured to operate with mas stor-

age device 207 (0 allow processr 202 access LO the digital

information on data storage medium 208 via bus 201.

Processr 202 may be any of a wide variety of general

FIG. 4B illustrates one embodiment of the present inven- 5

tion.

purose processors or microprocessors such as the Pen-

tium™ microprocessor manufactured by InteFM Corpora-

tion or the Motorola ™ 68040 or Power PCTM brand micro-

processr manufactured by manufactured by Motorola™

Corporation. It wil be apparent to those of ordinary skill in

the art, however, that other varieties of processors may also

be used in a particular computer system. Display device 205

may be a liquid crystal device, cathode ray tube (CR1), or

otber suitable display device. Mass storage device 207 may

FIG. SA ilustrates a user accessing a Web server includ-

ing one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5B illustrates the exchange component according to 10

one embodiment of the present ínvention.

FIG. 5C illustrates an example of a point-of-service

(POSvc) application lit.

AG. 5D ilustrates a user selecting a bank POSvc appli-

cation from the POSvc application list.

FIG. 5E illustrates a three-way transaction accordig to

one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6A ilustrates a value-added network (VAN switch.

FIG. 6B illustrates the hierarchical addressing tree strc- 20

ture of the networked objects in DOLSIBs.

FIG. 7 ilustrates conceptually the layered architecture of

a VAN switch.

IS be a conventional hard disk drive, floppy disk drive,

CD-ROM drive, or other magnetic or optical data storage

device for reading and writing information stored on a hard

disk, a floppy disk, a CD-ROM a magnetic tape, or other

magnetic or optical data storage medium. Data storage

medium 208 may be a hard disk, a floppy disk, a CD-ROM,

a magnetic tape, or other magnetic or optical data storage

medium.

!n general, processor 202 retrieves processing instructions

FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of

the present invention.

and data from a data storage medium 208 using mass storage

25 device 207 and downloads this information into random

access memory

203 for execution. Processor 202, then

DETAlLED DESCRIPTION OF THE

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus

for configurable value-added network switching and object

routing and management. "Web browset' as usd in the

context of the present specifcation includes conventional

Web browsers such as NCSA Mosaic™ from NCSA and

executes an instruction stream from random access memory

203 or read-only memory 204. Command selections and

information input at input device 206 are used to direct the

30 flow of instructions executed by procesr 202. Equivalent

input device 206 may also be a pointing device such as a

conventional mouse or trackball device. The results of ths

processing execution are then displayed o.n display device

205.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention is

implemented as a software module, which may be executed

on a computer system such as computer system 200 in a

conventional manner. Using well known techniques, the

application software of the preferred embodiment is stored

on data storage medium 208 and subsequently loaded into

and executed within computer system 200. Once initiated,

the softare of the preferred embodiment operates in the

manner desribed below.

45 FlG.3 ilustrates the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI)

reference modeL. OS! Model 300 is an international standard

that provides a common basis for the coordination of stan-

dards development, for the purpos of systems interconnec-

tion. The present invention is implemented to function as a

routing switch within the "application layet' of the OSI

modeL. The model defines seven layers, with each layer

communicating with its peer layer in another node through

the use of a protocol. Physical

layer 301 is the lowest layer,

with responsibility to transmit unstructured bits across a

link. Data li layer 302 is the next layer above physical

layer 301. Data link layer 302 transmits chunk across the

link 2.d deals with problems lie checksumming to detect

d:ita corrùptioD, orderly coordination of the use of shared

media and addressing when multiple systems are reachable,

Network bridges operate within data link layer 302.

Network layer 303 enables any pair of systems in the

network 10 communicate wiih each other. Nerwork layer 303

coniains hardware units such as routers, that handle routing,

packet fragmenraiion and reassembly of packets, Transport

layer 304 establishes a reliable communicaiion stre:im

," .

between a pair of systems, dealing wiili errors such as lost

.

Netscape Mosaic™ from Netscape™. The present invention 35

is independent of the Web browser being utilized and the

user can use any Web browser, without modifcations to the

Web browser. In the following detailed description, numer-

ous specific details are set fortli in order to provide a

thorough understanding of the present invention. It wil be 40

apparent to one of ordinar skil in the art, however, that

these specifc details need not be used to practice the present

invention. In other instances, well-known strctures, inter-

faces and proceses have not been shown in detail in order

not to unnecessàriy obsure the present invention.

FIG. 2 ilustrates a typical computer system 200 in which

the present invention operates. The preferred embodiment of

the present invention is implemented on an mMTM Personal

Computer manufactured by IBM Corporation of Armonk,

N.Y. Alternate embodiments may be implemented on a 50

Macintosh ™ computer manufactured by Apple™

Computer, Incorprated of Cupertino, Calif. It wil be appar-

ent to those of ordinary skill in the art that other alternative

computer system architecnires may also be employed.

In general, such computer systems as ilustrated by FlG. 55

2 comprise a bus 201 for communicating information, a

procesr 202 coupled with the bus 201 for processing

information, main memory 203 coupled with the bus 201 for

storing information and instructions for the processor 202, a

read-only memory 204 coupled with the bus 201 for storing 60

static information and instructions for the processor 202, a

display device 205 coupled with ihe bus 201 for displaying

information for a computer user, an input device 206

coupled with the bus 201 for communicating information

aod command selections to the processr 202, and a mass 65

storagc device 207, such as a magnetic disk and associated

24

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 26 of 60

Page ID #:29

5,987,500

5

tation. Session layer 305 offers services above the simple

communication stream provided by transport Layer 304.

These services include dialog control and chaining. Presen-

tation layer 306 provides a means by whicb OSI compliant

applications can agree on representations for data. Finally,

application layer 307 includes services such as fie transfer,

6

example, user 100 can select button 500, entitled "Transc-

tions" and Web server 104 hands user 100's request over to

the exchange component. The button and the title can be

replaced by any mechanism that can instruct a Web server to

hand over the consumer's request to the exchange compo-

nent.

FIG. 5B illustrates exchange 501. Exchange 501 com-

prises Web page 505 and point-of-service (POSvc) applica-

tions 510. Exchange SOl als conceptually incluGes a

switching component and an object routing component

(descnbed in more detail below). POSvc applications 510

are transactional applications, namely applications that are

designed to incorporate and take advantage of the capabili-

ties provided by the present invention. Although exchange

access and mal!agement services (FTAM)

, c1ectrocic mail

and virtual terminal (VI services, Application layer 307

provides a means for appLication programs to access tbe OSI

environment. As described above, tbe present invention is 10

implemented to function as a routing switch in application

layer 307. Application layer routing creates an open channel

for the management, and the selective flow of data from

remote databases on a network.

A Overview

501 is depicted as residing on Web server 104, the exchange

15 can also reside on a separate computer system that resides on

FIO. 4A ilustrates conceptually the user value chain as it

existS today. The user value chain in FIG. 4A depicts the

types of transactions that are performed today, and the

channels through which the transactions are performed. A

"transaction" fòr the purposes of the present invention 20

includes any type of commercial or other type of interaction

that a usr may want to perform. Examples of transactions

include a deposit into a bank account, a request for a loan

from a bank, a purchase of a car from a car dealership or a

purchase of a car with fiancing from a bank. A

of other transactions are also possible.

A typical usr transaction today may involve user 100

walkg into a bank or driving up to a teller machine, and

interacting with a live bank teller, or automated teller

large variety 25

machine (ATM) software applications. Alternatively, user 30

100 can perform the same transaction by using a personal

computer (PC), activating application software on his PC to

accss his bank account, and dialing into the bank via a

modem line. If user 100 is a Web user, however, there is no

current mechanism for performing a robust, real-time trans- 35

action with the bank as illustrated in FIG. 4A. COL scripts

provide only limited two-way capabilties, as desribed

above. Thus, due to this lack of a robust mechanism by

which real-time Web transactions can be performed, the

bank is unable to be a true "Web merchant," namely a 40

merchant capable of providing complete transactional ser-

vices on the Web.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, as

ilustrated in FIG. 4B, each merchant that desires to be a

Web merchant can provide real-time transactional capabil- 45

ties to usrs who desire to access the merchants' services via

the Web. This embodiment includes a service network

runing on top of a facilities network, namely the Internet,

the Web or e-mail networks. For the purposes of this

application. users are described as utilzing PC's to access 50

the Web via Web server "switching" sites. (Switching is

described in more detail below). Users may also utilize other

personal devices such as network computers or cellular

devices to access the merchants' services via appropriate

switching sites. These switching sites include non-Weh 55

network computer sites and cellular provider sites, Five

components interact to provide this service network

functionality, namely

an exchange, an operator agent, a

management agent, a management manager and a graphical

user interface. Al five components are described in more 60

detail below.

As ilustrated in FlG. 5A, user 100 accesses Web server

104. Having accessed Web server 104, user 100 can decide

that he desires to perform real-time transactions. When Web

server 104 receives user 100's indication that he desires to 65

perform real-iimc transactions, the request is handed over 10

1

~ri

~

s:_~_~ '11~1~ _~~"

iflt; t.-,

the Internet and has an Internet address. Exchange 501 may

also include operator agent 503 that interacts with a man-

agement manager (described in more detail below).

Exchange 501 creates and allows for the management (or

distributed control) of a service network, operating within

the boundaries of an IP-based facilties network. Thus,

exchange 501 and a management agent component,

described in more detail below, under the headings "VAN

Switch and Object Routing," together perform the

switching, object routing, application and service manage-

ment functions according to one embodiment of the present

invention.

Exchange 501 processes the consumer's request and

displays an exchange Web page 505 that includes a list of

POSvc applications 510 accessible by exchange 501. A

POSvc application is an application that can execute the type

of transaction that the user may be interested in performing.

The POSvc list is displayed via the graphical usr interface

component. One embodiment of the present invention sup-

ports HyperText Markup Laguage as the graphical user

interface component. Virtual Reality Markup Language and

Java™ are also supported by thi embodiment. A varety of

other graphical user interface standards can also be utiized

to implement the graphical user interface.

An example of a POSvc application list is ilustrated in

FIG. 5C. User 100 can thus select from POSvc applications

Bank 510(1), Car Dealer 510(2) or Pizeria 510(3). Numer-

ous other POSvc applications can als be included in this

selection. If user 100 desires to pedorm a number of bankng

transactions, and selects the Bank application, a Ban

POSvc application wil be activated and presented to usr

100, as ilustrated in FIG. 5D. For the purposes of

shown as runnin on

ilustration,

exchange 501 in FIG. SD is

a different computer system (Web server 104) frm the

computer systems of the Web merchants running POSvc

applications (computer system 200). Exchange 501 may,

however, also be on the same computer system as one or

more of the computer systems of the Web merchants.

Once Bank POSvc application 510 has been activated,

user 100 will be able to connect to Bank services and utilize

the application to perform banking transactions, thus access-

ing data from a bast or dala repository 575 in the Bank

"Back Offce." The Bank Back Offce comprises legacy

databases and other data repositories that are utilized by the

Bank to store ilS data. Ths connection between user 100 and

Bank services is managed by exchange 501. As illustrated in

FIG. 5D, ODce the connection is made between Bank POSvc

application 510(1), for example, and Bank services, an

operator agcnt 00 Web server 104 may be activated to ensure

the availability of distribuied functions and capabilities.

Each Wcb merchant may choose the iypes of services ihai

;, ""

ilrl

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/S

.:~-

/

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

Filed 05/17/12

Page 27 of 60

Page ID #:30

5,987,500

7

decided to include in their POSvc application acce to

checking and savings accounts, user 100 will be able to

perform real-time transactions against his checkig and

savings accounts. Thus, if user 100 moves $500 from his

checking account into his savings account, the transction 5

will be performed in real-time, in the same manner the

transaction would have been performed by a live teller at the

bank or an Ar machine. Therefore, unlike his prior access

to bis account, user 100 now bas the capability to do more

than browse his bank account. The ability to perform these 10

types of robust, real-time transactions from a Web client is

a signifcant aspect of the present invention.

8

identity. The networked object identity identifies the infor-

mation entries and attributes in the DOLSIB as individual

networked objects, andeacb networked object is assigned an

(nternet address. The Internet address is asigned based on

the (P address of the node at which !he networked object

resides.

r;or example, in FIG. SA, Web server 104 is a node on the

Internet, with an IP address. All networked object assciated

with Web server 104 will therefore be assigned aii Internet

address based on tbe Web server 104's IP address. These

networked objects thus "brancb" from the node, creating a

hierarchical tree structure. The Internet addres for each

networked object in the tree essentially establihes the

individual object as an "IP-reachable" or accesible node on

the Internet. "IP utilizes this Internet address to uniquely

identify and access the object from the DOLSIB. FIG. 6B

ilustrates an example of this hierarchical addressing tree

strctue.

Eacb object in tbe DOLSIB bas a name, a syntax and an

encoding. The name is an administratively assigned object

ID specifying aD object type. The object type together with

Bank can also decide to provide other types of services in

POSvc application 510(1). For example, Bank may agree

with Car dealership to allow Bank cutomers to purchase a 15

car from that dealer, request a car loan from Dank and have

the entire transaction performed on the Web, as ilustrated in

FIG. SE. In this instance, the transactions are not merely

two-way, between the Wier and Bank, biit three-way,

amongst the consumer, Bank and Car dealership. According 20

to one aspect of the present invention, this three-way trans-

action can be expanded to noway transactions, where n

represents a predetermined number of merchants or other

service providers who have agreed to cooperate to provide

services to users. The present invention therefore allows for 25

"any-to-any" communication and transactions on the Web,

the object instance serves to

uniquely identify a specific

instantiation of the object. For example, if object 610 is

information about models of cars, tben one instance of !hat

object would provide user 100 with information about a

specific model of tbe car while anotber instance would

provide information about a diferent model of the car. The

syntax of an object type defines the abstract data structure

corresponding to that object type. Encoding of objects

defines how the object is represented by the object type

syntax while being transmitted over the network.

C. Management and Administration

As described above, exchange 501 and management agent

601 together constitute a VAN switch. FIG. 7 illustrates

conceptually the layered architecture of VAN switch 520.

Specifcally, boundary service 701 provides the interfaces

between VAN switch 520, the Internet and the Web, and

multi-media end user devices such as PCS, televisions or

telephones. Boundary service 701 also provides the interface

40 to the on-line service provider. A user can connect to a local

thus facilitating a large, flexible variety of robust, real-time

transactions on the Web.

Finally, Bank may also decide to provide intra-merchant

or intra-bank services, together with the inter-merchant 30

services described above. For example, if Bank creates a

POSvc application for use by the Bank Payroll department,

Bank may provide its own employees with a means for

submitting timecards for payroll processing by the Bank's

Human Resources (HR) Department. An employee selects 3S

the Bank HR POSvc application, and submits his timecard.

The employee's timecard is procesd by accessing the

employee's payroll information, stored in the Bank's Back

Offce. The trausaclIon is thus proced in real-time, and the

employee receives his paycheck immediately.

B: Van Switching and Object Routing

application, namely one accessible via a local VAN switch,

or be routed or "switched" to an application accessible via

a remote VAN switch.

Switching servce 702 is an OSI application layer switch.

SWitching service 702 thus represents the core of the VAN

switch. It performs a number of tasks including the routing

of user connections' to remote VAN switches, described in

the paragraph above, multiplexing and prioritization of

requests, and flow control. Switching servce 702 also

faciltates open systems' connectivity with both the Internet

(a public swtched network) and private networks including

back ,offce networks, such as bang networks. IDtercon-

As descibe above, exchange SOl and management agent

601, ilustrated in FIG. 6A, together constitute a value-added

network (VAN switch. These two elements may take on

diferent roles as necessary, including peer-to-peer, client- 45

server or master-slave roles. Management manager 603 is

ilustrated as residing on a separate computer system on the

Internet. Management manager 603 can, however, also

reside on the same machine as exchange 501. Management

manager 603 interacts with the operator agent 503 reiding 50

on exchange 501.

VAN swtch 520 provides multi-protocol object routing,

depending upon the specifc VAN services chosen. Ths

multi-protocol object routing is provided via a proprietary

protocol, TransWeb™ Management Protocol (IP). TMP 5S

incoIporates the same security featues as the traditional

Simple Network Management ProtoLì)l, SNMP. It also

allows for tbe integration of other traditional security

mechanims, including RSA security mechanisms.

One embodiment of tbe present invention utilizes TMP 60

and distributed on-line service information bases

(DOLSlBs) £0 perform object routing. Alternatively, TMP

can incorporate s-HTf, Javan" the WinSock API or ORB

witb DOLSfBs to perform object routing. DOLSIBs are

virtual information stores optimized for networkig. All 65

information cntries and attributes in a DOLSIB virtual

nected application layer switches form the applicatioD Det-

work backbone. These switches are one significant aspect of

the presnt invention.

Management service 703 contains tools such as Informa-

tion Management Services (lMS) and application Network

ManagemeGt Services (NMS). These iocls are used by the

end users to manage network resources, including VAN

switches. Management service 703 also provides applica-

tions tbat perform Operations, Administration, Maintenance

& Provisioning (OAM&P) funciions. Tbese OAM&P func-

tions include security management, fault management, con,

figuration management, performance management and bil-

ing management. Providing OAM&P functions for

applications in ihis manner is anotber significant aspect or

,/ì ¡

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OZ(t

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5,987,500

9

Finally, application service 704 contains application pro-

grams that deliver customer services. Application service

704 includes POSvc applications such as Bank POSvc

descnbed above, and illustrated in FIG. 6A. Other examples

of VAN services include multi-media messaging, archivaV 5

retrieval management, directory services, data staging,

conferencing, fiancial services, home bankg, nsk man-

agement and a vanety of otber vertical services. Each VAN service is designed to meet a particular set of requirements

related to perfonnance, reliability, maintenance and ability 10

to handle expected traffc volume. Depcnding on tbc type of

service, the characteritics of the network elements will

difer. VAN service 704 provides a number of functions

including communications services for both management

and end usrs of the network and control for the usr over 15

the user's environment.

FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating One embodiment of

the present invention. A user connects to a Web server

runing an exchange component in step 802. In step 804, the

usr isues a request for a transactional application, and the 20

web server bands off the request

to an exchange in step 806.

The exchange activates a graphical user interface to present

user with a list of POSvc application options in step 808. In

step 810, the user makes a selection from the POSvc

application list. In step 812, the switching component in the 25

exchange switches the user to the seLected POSvc

application, and in step 814, the object routing component

executes the user's request. Data is retrieved from the

appropnate data repository via TMP in step 816, and fially,

the user may optionally continue tbe transaction in step 818 30

or end the transaction.

Thus, a configurable value-added network switching and

object routing method and apparatu is disclosed. These

specifc arrangements and methods described herein are

merely ilustrative of the principles of the present invention. 35

Numerous modications in form and detail may be made by

those of ordinary skl in the art without departing from the

scope of the present invention. Although this invention has

been shown in relation to a particular preferred embodiment,

it should not be considered so limited. Rather, the present 40

invention is limited only by the scope of the appended

claims.

We claim:

1. A confgurable value-added network switch for

enabling real-time transactions on a network, said config- 45

urable value-added network switch compromising:

mt:ans for switching to a transactional application in

response to a user specification from a network'

application, said transactional application providing a

usr with a plurality of transactional services managed 50

by at least one value-added network service provider,

said value-added network service provider keeping a

transaction flow captive, said plurality of transactional

servces being performed interactively and in real time;

means for transmilling a trdnsactim) request from said 55

transactional application; and

means for processing said transaction request.

2. The configurable valuc-added nctwork switch as

claimed in claim 1 wherein said means for switching to a 60

transactional application further compris:

means for receiving said user specification;

means for enabling a switch to said transactional appli-

cation; and

means for activating said transactional application, 65

3. The configurable value-added oetwork switch as

r-l-:;tTP.1 in ('¡":im? \l/h

,

;n C",,:rl

r

l~

r

:

:

,.

:

1

10

transaciional application further includes means for creating

a transaction link betweeo said network application and said

tranactional application.

4. The configurable value-added network switch as

claimed in claim 2 wherein said means for receiving said

usr specification further comprises:

means for presnting said user with a lit of transactional

applications, each of said transactional application

being asciated with a particular value-added network

service provider; and

means for submitting said user specification according to

a user's selection of said transactional application from

said list of transaciional applications.

S. The configurable value-added network switch as

claimed in claim 1 wherein said means for processing said

transaction request further compriss means for coupling

said means for tranmitting to a host means.

6. The configurable value-added network switch as

claimed in claim 5 wherein said host means contains data

corresponding to said transaction request.

7. The configurable value-added network switch as

claimed in claim 1 wherein said value-added network ser-

vice prav'idees cooperating to provide said plurality of

transactional services to users.

8. The configurable value-added network switch as

claimed in claim I' further

comprising means for controlling

and priontiZing multiple transaction requests initiated by

various users.

9. The configurable value-added network switch as

claimed in claim 1 further compnsing means for providing

security management, fault management, configuration

management, performance management and biling man-

agement.

10. A method for confguring a value-added network

switch for enabling real-time transactions on a network, said

method for configunng said value-added network switch

compromising the steps of:

switching to a transactional application in response to a

usr specification from a network application, said

transactional application providing a user with a plu-

rality of transactional servces managed by at least one

value-added network service provider, said value-

added network service provider keeping a transction

flow captive, said plurality of transactional seivices

being performed interactively and in .real time;

transmitting a transaction request from said transactional

application; and procesing said transaction request.

11. The method for configuring said value-added network

switch as claime(j in claim 10 wherein said step of switching

to a transactional application further comprises the steps of:

recciving said user specifcation;

enabling a switch to said transactional application; and

activating said transactional application.

12. The method for configuring said value-added network

switch as claimed in claim 11 wherein said step of activating

said transaciional application futher includes a step of

creating a transaction link between said network application

and said transactional application.

13. The method for configuring said value-added netwnrk

switch as claimed in claim 11 further comprising the steps

of:

coiitrolling security;

performing fault maoagement;

providing configuration management;

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CJ

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

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Page ID #:32

5,987,500

11

enabling biling management.

14. The method for configuring said value-added network

switch as claimed in claim 11 wherein said step of receiving

said user speòfication further compries steps of:

12

to perform Operations, Administration, Maintenance & Pro-

visioning (OAM&P) functions.

27. An object router on a network, said object router

comprising:

presenting said user with a list of transactional

applications, ach cf said transactional application

being asociated with a particular Internet service pro-

vider; and

submitting said user specification according to a usr's

selection of said transactional application from said list 10

of transactional applications.

means for assoiating an object identity with information

entries and attributes, wherein the object identity rep-

resents a networked object;

means for storing said information entries and said

attributes in a virtual information store; and

means for assigning a unique network address to said

15. The method for configuring said value-added network

switch as claimed in claim 10 wherein said step of process-

ing said transaction request further comprises the step of

transmitting said transaction request to a host means.

16. The method for configuring said value-added network

switch as claimed in claim 15 wherein said host means

contains data corresponding to said transaction request.

object identity.

28. The object router in claim 27 wherein said means for

associating said object identity with said information entries

15 and said attributes in said virtual information store further

includes means for associating a name, a syntax and an

encoding for said object identity.

29. The object router in claim 28 wherein said name of

17. The method for

configurig said value-added network

said object identity specifes an object type.

switch as claimed in claim 10 wherein said value-added 20

network service providers cooperate to provide said plurality

of transactional seivices to said user.

18. The method for confguring said value-added network

switch as claimed in claim 10 further compriing the step of

controlling and prioritizing multiple transaction requests 25

initiated by various users.

30. The object router in claim 29 wherein said object type

and an object instance uniquely identify an instantiation of

said object type.

31. The object router in claim 30 wherein said syntax

defines a data structure for said object type.

32. The object router in claim 27 further comprising

means for utiliing said unique network address to identify

and route said object identity on ihe network.

33. The object router in claim 27 further comprising

meansfor utilizing ~aid unique network address 10 idenlify

19. A method for enabling object routing on a network,

said method for enabling object routing comprising the steps

of:

associating an object identity with information entries and

attributes, wherein the object identity represents a net-

worked object;

storig said information entries and said attributes in a

virtual information store; and

asigning a unique network addre to said obje-et identity.

30 and route said object identity on the Internet.

34. The object router in claim 27 further comprising the

step of utilizing said unique network address of said object

identity to perform Operations, Administration, Mainte-

nance & Provisioning (OAM&P) functions.

35 35. A configurable value-added network system for

enablig real-time transactions on a network, said config-

urable value-added network system comprising:

means for switclung to a transaciional application in

response to a user specification from a network

application, said transactional application providing a

usr with a plurality of transactional services managed

by at least one value-added neiwork seivice provider,

said value-added network seivice provider keeping a

transaction flow captive, said plu~ality of transactional

seivices being performed interactively and in real time;

mean for activating an agent to create a transaction link

between said user application and said transactional

application;

mean for transmitting a transaction request from said

transactional application; and

20. The method in claim 19 wherein said step of associ-

ating said object identity with said information entries and

said attributes in said virtual information store further

includes the step of.asciating a name, a syntax and an 40

encoding for said object identity.

21. The method in claim 20 wherein said name associated

with said object identity specifies an object type.

22. The method in claim 21 wherein said object type and

an object instance uniquely identify an instantiation of said 45

object type.

23. The method in claim 22 wherein said syntax defies

a data structure for said object type.

24. The method in claim 19 further comprising the step of

utiliing said unique network address to identify and route 50

said object identity on the network.

25. The method in claim 19 further comprising the step of

utiliing said unique network address to identify and route

said object identity on the Internet.

26.l1e method in claim 19 further comprising the step of 55

a host means for processing said transaction request and

retrieving daia corresponding to said transaction

request.

utiliing said unique network address of said object identity

*

*

*

*

*

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

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Page 30 of 60

Page ID #:33

EXHIBIT B

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

Document 1

(12) United States Patent

Arunachalam

(54) WEB APPLlCATlON NETWORK PORTAL

(76) Inventor: Lakshmi Arunachalam, Menlo Park,

( *) 1'otice:

CA (US)

Subject to any disclaimer, the terru of tlis

patent is extended or adjusted under 35

U.s.c 154(b)

by

o days.

(21) App!. No.: i 2/628,060

(22) Filed:

(65)

Nii\'. 30, 2009

Prior Publication Data

US 201 0/0306 102 A 1

Dec. 2, 2010

(60)

(60)

Related U.S. Application Data

Division of application No, 11/980,185, filed on Oct.

30, 2007, now Pat. No. 8,037,158, which is a

coiitinuation-in-par of application No. 09/792,323,

filed on Feb. 23, 2001, iiow Pat. No. 7,340,506, which

is a division of application No. 09/296,207, lìed on

Apr. 21,1999. now Pat. No. 6,212,556, which is a

coiitinuation-in-par of application No. 08/879,958,

filed on lun. 20, 1997, now Pat. No. 5,987,500, which

is a division of application No. 081700,726, filed on

Aug. 5,1996, now Pat. No, 5,778,178.

Provisional applicatioJl No. 60/006,634, filed on Nov.

13,1995.

(51)

(52)

(58)

Int.CI.

G06F 13/00 (2006.01)

U.S.

Fidd of

709/219; 709/225; 709/228

Classification Search ,

709/217,

709/219,223,224,225,227,229

See application file for complete search history.

(56)

References Cited

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Filed 05/17/12

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11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111I111111111

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(10) Patent No.:

(45) Date of Patent:

US 8,108,492 B2

Jan. 31, 2012

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(Continued)

FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS

WO W097/18515 AI 5fl997

WO WOOOi637S1 Al 1012000

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

U.S. AppL No. 121268,060, filed Nov. 30, 2009, Arnachalam.

c.s, Appl No. i 2/628,066, filed Nov. 30, 2009, Aninachal:un,

Li.S. Appl No. 121628,068, filed Nov. 30, 2009, Arnachalam.

Li ,S. Appl No. i 21628,069, fied Nov. 30. 2009. Arnachalam.

(Continutx)

Primary Examiner - "íet Vu

ABSTRACT

The present inveiiion provides a method and apparaiis for

(57)

providing real-time, two-way transactional capabilities on the

Web. Specifically, one embodiment of

the present invention

discloses a method for enabling object routing, the method

comprising the steps of creating a virtal information store

containing information entries and attributes associating each

of the information entres and the attributes with an object

identity, and assigiùng a unique network address to each of

the object identities. A method is also disclosed for enabling

service management of

the value-added network service, to

perfonn OAM&P functions on the services network.

13 Claims, 13 Drawing Sheets

WE

SERVER

1C

OPERTOR

AGEtr

fj

EXCHGE ~

WE

PAGE

:i il

PONT-o-

SERVCE

APUCATlONS

VAN

swrra- S.

OBECT

ROR

il

~1

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW

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