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ordering adjectives 1. opinion 2. size 3. age 4. shape 5. color/colour 6. material 7. origin 8.

Purpose
When we use several adjectives together, we must decide the order to put them in. Sometimes we use more than one adjective in front of a noun: He was a nice intelligent young man. She had a small round black wooden box.

It is very unusual to have more than three adjectives. Adjectives usually come in this order:

3 4

5 6

Gene Speci ral fic Siz Sha Ag Colo Nation Mater opini opini e pe e ur ality ial on on
We use some adjectives only after a link verb:

Opinion adjectives
Some adjectives give a general opinion. We can use these adjectives to describe almost any noun:

afraid content sorry

alive alone glad ill

asleep ready well

good

bad

lovely brilliant

strange excellent

beautiful nice awful

sure unable

important wonderful nasty

Some of the commonest -ed adjectives are normally used only after a link verb: annoyed; finished; bored; pleased; thrilled We say: Our teacher was ill. My uncle was very glad when he heard the news. The policeman seemed to be very annoyed but we do not say: We had an ill teacher. When he heard the news he was a very glad uncle He seemed to be a very annoyed policeman A few adjectives are used only in front of a noun:

Some adjectives give a specific opinion. We only use these adjectives to describe particular kinds of noun: Food: tasty; delicious Furniture, buildings: comfortable; uncomfortable People, animals: clever; intelligent; friendly We usually put a general opinion in front of a specific opinion: Nice tasty soup. A nasty uncomfortable armchair A lovely intelligent animal Usually we put an adjective that gives an opinion in front of an adjective that is descriptive: a nice red dress; a silly old man; those horrible yellow curtains We often have two adjectives in front of a noun: a handsome young man; a big black car; that horrible big dog Sometimes we have three adjectives, but this is unusual: a nice handsome young man; a big black American car; that horrible big fierce dog

north northern countless eventful south southern occasional indoor east eastern lone outdoor west western
We say: He lives in the eastern district. There were countless problems with the new machinery. but we do not say: The district he lives in is eastern The problems with the new machinery were countless.

3. Adjectives that end -ed (e.g. bored, interested) and adjectives that end -ing (e.g. boring, interesting) are often confused. -ed adjectives Adjectives that end -ed describe emotions they tell us how people feel about something. 4. 5.

He got annoyed/annoying habit of always interrupting people Sit down I have got exciting/ excited news for you You look really tired/tiring, why dont you go to bed.

Adverbs of frequency tell how often something happens. The commonest adverbials of frequency are:

I was very bored in the maths lesson. I almost fell asleep. He was surprised to see Helen. Shed told him she was going to Australia. Feeling tired and depressed, he went to bed. -ing adjectives Adjectives that end -ing describe the thing that causes the emotion a boring lesson makes you feel bored.

alway occasionall ofte never normally s y n rarely seldo sometime usually m s

We usually put adverbials of frequency in front of the main verb: We often spend Christmas with friends. I have never enjoyed myself so much. but they usually come after the verb be: He was always tired in the evening. We are never late for work. We use the adverbial a lot to mean often or frequently. It comes at the end of the clause: We go to the cinema a lot. but before another time adverbial: We go to the cinema a lot at the weekend. We use much with a negative to mean not often: We dont go out much. (= We dont go out often) We use how often or ever to ask questions about frequency. How often comes at the beginning of the clause: How often do you go to the cinema? How often have you been here? ever comes before the main verb:

Have you seen that film? Its absolutely terrifying. I could listen to him for hours. Hes one of the most interesting people Ive ever met. I cant eat this! Its disgusting! What is it? Remember that people can be boring but only if they make other people feel bored. He talks about the weather for hours. Hes so boring. NOT I was very boring at the party so I went home. Here are some more adjectives that can have both an -ed and an -ing form amused amusing annoyed annoying confused confusing disappointed disappointing excited exciting exhausted exhausting frightened frightening satisfied satisfying shocked shocking QUIZ 1 1. kids you were disgusting/disgusted, dont talk wher your mouth is full I am very disappointed/disappointing by your behavior

Do you ever go to the cinema at the weekend? Have you ever been there? Longer frequency phrases, like every year or three times a day usually come at the end of the clause:

2.

I have an English lesson twice a week. She goes to see her mother every day.

Im enjoying the party. 3. see, hear, taste, smell, feel are verbs that describe senses. These verbs arent usually used in continuous forms. They are often used with can.

QUIZ 2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. I USE MY MOBILE PHONE A LOT HE IS USUALLY VERY PUNCTUAL HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A SHOOTING STAR? THEY GO TO THEATER EVERY WEEK HOW OFTEN DO YOU CLEAN YOUR CAR? WE SEEM TO EAT OUT A LOT THESE DAYS. I VISIT MY GRANDMOTHER ONCE A FORTHNIGHT IT RARELY RAIN IN AUGUST SHE DOESNT DRINK MUCH.

It smells of smoke in here. NOT Its smelling of smoke in here I cant see anything. Its too dark. 4. Stative verbs describe things that are not actions. Look carefully at these 2 sentences.

He smells of fish. Hes smelling the fish. The second sentence is an action not a state. The man wants to know if the fish is OK to eat. I think we should go to Croatia for our holiday this year. Sorry, what did you say? I was thinking about my holiday. The first sentence is an opinion but the second sentence is an action. DONT BELIEVE / ENJOYING /DO YOU THINK /TASTES/ MEANS 1. LIZ INST ENJOYING HER NEW JOB VERY MUCH

http://esol.britishcouncil.org/buildyour-grammar/adverbs-frequency http://esol.britishcouncil.org/buildyourgrammar?utm_source=facebook&utm_ medium=wallpost&utm_campaign=fbTeachingEnglish

Some verbs are not usually used in the continuous form, even when we are talking about temporary situations or states. These are called stative verbs.

So, we say Im sorry, I dont understand rather than Im not understanding. 1. Stative verbs are often verbs connected with thinking and opinions. She doesnt know what to do NOT She isnt knowing what to do Do you agree with me? I dont recognize it, do you? Other verbs in this group include: believe, doubt, guess, imagine, mean, rem ember, think 2. Other stative verbs are connected with feelings and emotions

I like this song. Who sings it? NOT Im liking this song What do you want to do now? I hate my new boss! Other stative verbs in this group include: dislike, love, prefer. want, wish NB although enjoy is a verb of emotion, it is used in the continuous tense

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