Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 74

Downing, Karley - GOV

From: Evenson, Tom - GOV


Sent:
To:
Tuesday, June 07, 2011 8:31AM
Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Morning News Update 06.07.11
WEEKLY HEADLINE GOAL: IT'S WORKING
Daily Headline Goal: It's Working
Office of Governor Scott Walker- Morning News Update for June 7, 2011
News Summary:
Wis. Supreme Court hears nearly 6 hours oftestimony yesterday re: the budget repair bill.
Barack Obama administration rejects Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's request for high-speed rail
Amtrak funding
Weiner Now Says He Sent Photos.
Wisconsin's Front Pages:
Appleton Post-Crescent
Eau Claire Leader-Telegram
Green Bay Press Gazette
La Crosse Tribune
Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Oshkosh Northwestern
Racine Journal Times
Sheboygan Press
Stevens Point Journal
Wisconsin State Journal
Watch: Television Clips for June 6
Social Media Update:
Twitter Followers 1 Week Ago: 20,461
Twitter Followers Today: 20,651
Facebook Likes 1 week ago: 63,287
Facebook Likes Today: 63,364
Nation/World
U.S. funding for future promises lags by trillions
USA Today
27
The federal government's financial condition deteriorated rapidly last year, far beyond the $1.5 trillion in new
debt taken on to finance the budget deficit, a USA TODAY analysis shows.
Weiner Now Says He Sent Photos
Wa/1 Street Journal
Rep. Anthony Weiner on Monday admitted sending sexually suggestive photographs or messages to six
women online over three years, but said he wouldn't resign over his behavior or the lies he told to cover it up.
Anthony Weiner's Judgment
Editorial- Wa/1 Street Journal
last November, 67,000 citizens of the 9th U.S. District in Queens, New York, voted to return Anthony Weiner
to the House of Representatives. Agree or disagree with his politics and style, Mr. Weiner became a principal
player at the highest level of our public life. That's over, blown up by Mr. Weiner's singular lack of judgment.
ObamaCare's Next Constitutional Challenge
Op-Ed- Wa/1 Street Journal
The constitutional battle over ObamaCare has largely focused on the constitutionality of the individual
mandate. Namely, does forcing individuals to buy health insurance violate the commerce clause?
Milwaukee
Feingold leads Capitol protest; tent city erected
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Madison- Former U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold led a crowd of hundreds of marchers, taxicabs and an antique fire
engine around the Capitol Square in a demonstration Monday against Gov. Scott Walker's budget bill, and at
least eight people were arrested.
Wisconsin Supreme Court weighs its role in collective bargaining case
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Madison- State Supreme Court justices expressed skepticism Monday about a Dane County judge's ability to
halt a law limiting collective bargaining by public workers, giving Republicans who control the legislature hope
the court may act quickly in their favor.
Find the right balance
Editorial- Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
legislators need to ensure that a measure that would provide discounts for manufacturers on their energy
bills doesn't become a burden for homeowners and small businesses.
Wisconsin budget includes big policy issues
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Madison- As the budget committee wrapped up work last week, Republicans largely avoided putting
earmarks in the state budget bill but injected new and far-reaching policies into it.
Business production tax break added to state budget
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Aiming to make Wisconsin more attractive to business, Republican lawmakers have proposed reducing the
state tax on the production earnings of manufacturers and agricultural businesses to almost nothing by 2016.
28
State school official blasts voucher program expansion to Green Bay
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
State Superintendent Tony Evers on Monday blasted the Legislature's budget committee for its late-night vote
Friday to expand to Green Bay a program that allows students to attend private and religious schools at
taxpayer expense.
Preventing fraud
Editorial- Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
The latest revelations alleging fraud in the FoodShare program should prompt state officials to tighten
supervision. Requiring photos on recipients' Quest cards could help.
Localities still shedding jobs
Daily Reporter
States such as Wisconsin, New Jersey and Ohio have first-term governors who "are trying to make their names
by cutting spending," Naroff said. "It wasn't the 'in thing' before to become a governor and immediately slash
and burn. Now, you've got economic and political realities that are different from any time before."
Choose your own fake outrage: Scott Walker's art collection, or Face book food stamps?
A. V. Club Milwaukee
While the rest 9f Milwaukee was enjoying a weekend full of sun, drink, and thrillingly skimpy outfits, the more
politically minded among us were enjoying what they enjoy best: fake outrage. In one corner, members of the
Anti-Scott Walker Fun Club cried foul after learning the boy governor recently removed a painting from his
Executive Residence.
Helping criminals hurts justice
Editorial- Racine Journal Times
Crime shouldn't be a family affair. The state has a peculiar exemption for family members who aid or assist
relatives to escape police or hide evidence- they can't be prosecuted.
Madison
Justices split politically as court takes up collective bargaining law
Wisconsin State Journal
As the state Supreme Court heard arguments Monday on a Dane County judge's order blocking a law that
curtails collective bargaining by public employee unions, questions from the justices appeared to fall mostly
along the court's political divide.
State Supreme Court justice: 'Where does it stop?'
Wisconsin Reporter
"If the court prohibits the enhancement of an act ... what about enjoining a senator from introducing
legislation?" Gableman asked.
UW System broadband expansion plan in danger
Wisconsin State Journal
The University of Wisconsin System would be forced to return about $37 million in federal funds intended to
extend broadband Internet across Wisconsin, under a provision passed by the Legislature's budget committee
Friday.
29
EDITORIAL: Madison does not know best
Beloit Daily News
IT ISN'T OFTEN we have an opportunity to say this: Three cheers for a politician with the guts to tell the truth.
Green Bay/Appleton
Barack Obama administration rejects Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's request for high-speed rail Amtrak
funding
Appleton Post-Crescent
Democratic President Barack Obama's administration has rejected Wisconsin's applications for $232 million in .
high-speed rail funding to improve Amtrak service on the Hiawatha line. Ridership on that line grew to a
record 800,000 passengers last year, according to the governor's office.
Republicans ask Wisconsin Supreme Court justices to act in union case
Associated Press- Appleton Post-Crescent
MADISON -Attorneys for Republican lawmakers asked the Wisconsin Supreme Court on Monday to overturn
a judge's order blocking the state's polarizing union powers law. Democrats urged the justices to uphold the
ruling or make the GOP go through the usual - and slow- appeals process.
State, local superintendents condemn voucher program
Associated Press - Green Bay Press-Gazette
MADISON- Wisconsin state Superintendent Tony Evers says expansion of school vouchers for Green Bay
should be removed from the state budget.
Editorial: Open records take hit in budget bill
Appleton Post-Crescent
Every year, elected officials and candidates are required to fill out what are called "statements of economic
interest." They're records of officials' finances that are part of the state's open government principles.
Editorial: Don't erode local control
Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter
But Gov. Scott Walker and the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee want to chip away further at the
standard of local control. A provision in Walker's budget plan, which the committee approved with some
changes, puts limits on local governments' property tax authority.
Fond du Lac arts groups respond to state budget cuts
Fond duLac Reporter
Local arts groups say they understand that cuts are necessary but they are afraid of what so deep cuts will
bring.
La Crosse/Eau Claire
Date set for recall vote on Kapanke seat
La Crosse Tribune
The Government Account-ability Board on Friday set a July 12 date for recall elections of six Republican
senators. If more than one Democratic challenger emerges, July 12 will be a primary and Aug. 9 the general
election.
30
Mohr, Mark - GOV
From:
Sent:
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Friday, May 20, 2011 2:44 PM
To:
Cc:
Schmitt, Peg - DOT; Gottlieb, Mark- DOT; Berg, Michael - DOT; Newson, Reggie- DOT
Himsel, Linda - DOT; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: TV 3 interview request
I like the idea of having the Secretary do it, sorry was just out when you called.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608) 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
http:Uwww.facebook.com/pages/Governor-Scott-Walker/175220979161820http://twitter.com/govwalker
www. walker. wi.gov
From: Schmitt, Peg - DOT
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2011 2:08 PM
To: Gottlieb, Mark- DOT; Berg, Michael - DOT; Newson, Reggie- DOT
Cc: Himsel, Linda - DOT; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: TV 3 interview request
Jessica Arp, TV 3 Madison, is working on a story about state engineers. Her interest is because the State Engineers
Association put out a release (http://wisea.org/) last month about the large number of retirements. She has also talked
with SEA about cost-benefit analysis and state reliance on consultants. She is requesting an interview on Monday, May
23, and has the following questions:
How does the large number of engineer retirements impact our ability to handle projects?
Why do we rely so heavily on consultants?
Why do we outsource work even when cost-benefit analyses indicate work would cost less using state
workers?
I told her I wasn't sure we'd be able to do this on Monday. Rory Rhinesmith has testified to the Legislature on this issue
and has basic talking points down so that's a possibility to consider. Let's discuss.
Peg Schmitt
Office of Public Affairs
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Phone: 608-266-7744
FAX: 608-266-7186
E-mail: peg.schmitt@dot.state.wi.us
1
Mohr, Mark - GOV
From: Schmitt, Peg - DOT
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2011 2:08 PM
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Gottlieb, Mark- DOT; Berg, Michael - DOT; Newson, Reggie - DOT
Himsel, Linda - DOT; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
TV 3 interview request
Jessica Arp, TV 3 Madison, is working on a story about state engineers. Her interest is because the State Engineers Association put out a release
(http://wisea.org/) last month about the large number of retirements. She has also talked with SEA about cost-benefit analysis and state reliance on
consultants. She is requesting an interview on Monday, May 23, and has the following questions:
How does the large number of engineer retirements impact our ability to handle projects?
Why do we rely so heavily on consultants?
Why do we outsource work even when cost-benefit analyses indicate work would cost less using state workers?
I told her I wasn't sure we'd be able to do this on Monday. Rory Rhinesmith has testified to the Legislature on this issue and has basic talking points down so
that's a possibility to consider. Let's discuss.
Peg Schmitt
Office of Public Affairs
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Phone: 608-266-77 44
FAX: 608-266-7186
E-mail: peq.schmitt@dot.state.wi.us
1
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Index:
Quotes of the Week
Message
Week in Review
Jobs Focus
Budget Focus
What the Dems are Saying
Around the Country
In Case You Missed It
From Washington
Great Read of the Week
Sen.Fitzgerald <Sen.Fitzgerald@legis.wisconsin.gov>
Friday, May 20, 2011 5:48 PM
*Legislative Senate Republicans
GOP Senate Weekly Update: May 20, 2011
Week of Mav 20, 2011
***Members and staff are strongly encouraged to contribute to the Update with press releases, talking points,
news items, suggestions, best practices, contributions or ideas for improvement. Please send these items
throughout the week by email to Andrew We/house or Hannah Huffman, or by calling 266-5660.
Quotes of the Week
"Ensuring integrity of elections is of utmost importance in our
democracy. [Photo ID] strengthens Wisconsin voters' confidence in the
electoral process and guarantees everyone the right to vote.
-Sen. Mary Lazich on final passage of Photo I D. Read more ...
30
"Currently there are approximately 3.5 million registered voters while at
the same time, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT)
reports that there are 4.4 million drivers' licenses and state
identification cards issued."
-Sen. Joe leibham on Photo I D. Read more ...
"With each month, Wisconsin's economy is growing stronger under
Governor Walker's leadership and jobseekers are taking notice,"
-Acting DWD Sec. Scott Baumbach. Read more ...
Message
GOP Keeping Promises, Still Focused on Jobs
After years of fighting and three vetoes, Republicans finally passed long-overdue election reform with a
commonsense requirement to show a Photo I D. Republicans have been keeping their promises to the
people of Wisconsin with similar reform and a consistent focus on job creation and balancing the state
budget.
The Democrats used every delay tactic they could, including shouting, interruption and protesting on
the floor of the Senate. But the rules were clearly defined before session started and adhered to on
the floor, even through shouts of "shame" and unwieldy protests in the Senate Chambers.
The focus once again shifts to balancing the budget and the state's job climate. Wisconsin has seen
some positive steps in the ongoing struggle to recover from the poor economy:
The first three months of the year Wisconsin has seen the private sector create 24,000 jobs,
including more than 11,000 manufacturing jobs. Manufacturing jobs are back above
government jobs, after government jobs eclipsed manufacturing for the first time in our state's
history last year.
This month, CEO magazine ranked Wisconsin 24
1
h for jobs ran kings ... leapfrogging 17 other
states for the best improvement in the whole country.
Wisconsin has maintained our bond rating without tax increases, and our budget is on track to
send an even better message about the long-term health of our state. Moody's credit reporting
agency called it a "credit-positive budget"
Senate Republicans have contributed significantly to the effort to improve our state's economy and
business climate, with accomplishments that include:
Creating the WEDC to replace Commerce
long overdue Tort Reform
Tax Credits for new jobs and businesses that relocate to Wisconsin
31
Dairy and livestock investment credits, etc.
Republicans are keeping the promise we made to Wisconsin in the last election to reform the way
Wisconsin does business.
Week in Review
***Wisconsin Adds Jobs,. Unemployment Rate Drops Again
Wisconsin added 9,700 jobs in the month of April, for a year-to-date total of 36,700. The state's
unemployment rate dropped from 7.4 percent to 7.3 percent.
Details: DWD Release
Federal BLS data for April
Reuters: Jobless claims fall, 4-week average hits 6-month high
Senate Passes Photo ID
After more than 10 hours of debate, 27 amendments proposed and loud protests surrounding the
vote, Republicans passed a long-overdue electoral reform with the requirement that voters prove their
identity with a photo I D. The measure is an important assurance that voters in one part ofthe state
won't get their vote cancelled out by someone voting illegally somewhere else.
For additional information and talking points, please contact the Leibham and Lazich offices.
***Must read: Media Trackers: The lies of the left concerning Voter ID
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Senate passes photo ID; some Democrats refuse to vote
GOP Senators Protect Senior Care
A popular prescription drug program for seniors in Wisconsin will be preserved, thanks to Republican
Senators.
On March 30, Senators Alberta Darling and Randy Hopper maintained their commitment to protect
SeniorCare by announcing that they would be removing the changes from the Governors' budget.
On April 26, the Associated Press confirmed the announcement reporting that GOP Senators would be
removing the change to the prescription drug program.
This week, Sen. Fitzgerald, Speaker Fitzgerald, and JFC Co-Chairs Vos and Darling confirmed again that
the committee is working on a change that will be voted on in the coming weeks, keeping the program
as-is.
32
Sen.Fitzgerald: Republicans Saving SeniorCare
Sens. Darling. Hopper Release {3-30-11}
Associated Press: Republicans signal breaks with Walker over budget
Wisconsin State Journal: Assembly speaker says SeniorCare won't be cut.
Senate Protecting Transportation Fund from Raids
A constitutional amendment to protect the state's transportation fund from raids received preliminary
approval in the Legislature this week. The Senate passed the measure 26-6 and the Assembly passed it
82-11. Under the proposal, money could not be diverted from the transportation fund, as has
happened in the past.
Governor Doyle and legislative Democrats raided $1.3 billion from the transportation fund during his
eight years in office.
Senate Joint Resolution 23 was introduced by Senator Randy Hopper, who said that the change is
needed because, "Raids on the transportation fund have been all too easy to fall back on by past
ad ministrations."
While the measure did pass on a bi-partisan vote, Senator Fred Risser opposed the change, calling it "a
good deal for the highway lobby" during Tuesday's debate on the Senate floor. "I don't think highways
are more important than education."
The amendment will need to be approved by lawmakers again the next legislative session and receive
approval by voters in a statewide referendum. Voters in 54 counties supported the plan in advisory
referendums last November.
Sen. Randy Hopper Statement
Wisconsin State Journal: Legislature passes constitutional amendment
Finding Forward Coalition: Bipartisan vote a first step to protect transportation fund
State Paid $67.3 Million in Overtime Costs in 2010
The state saw an increase of 2.5 percent over the past year in overtime costs for state employee and
UW System employees, according to the nonpartisan Legislative Audit Bureau. The bureau released a
report on Thursday showing that $67.3 million had been spent on overtime costs.
The departments of Corrections and Health Services accounted for the largest share of overtime, and
the report identified nine state workers who made more than $65,000 in overtime last year alone. An
additional concern was noted that an agencies have been using surplus positions to address staffing-
and overtime- needs.
Co-chair ofthe Joint Audit Committee, Sen. Rob Cowles expressed his concern saying that, "Adequately
staffing 24-hour facilities can be a challenge, but we are going to have to have to come up with a more
cost-effective way to do this."
33
This is the third report that the Audit Bureau has conducted on overtime costs, and the first year that
UW System employees were included. Governor Walker's newly formed Waste, Fraud and Abuse
Commission is expected to identify ways to trim the state's payment costs this summer.
Read the full Audit Bureau report here.
Governor Walker
Joint Audit Committee Release
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Nine state workers earned more than $65,000 each in overtime.
Other news from the Audit Bureau this week- Director Jan Mueller is resigning after 13 years as the
head of the state's auditing agency. Her resignation comes with praise from both Republican and
Democrat legislators.
Sen. Cowles Release: Joint Audit Committee Co-Chairs
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Nine state workers earned more than $65,000 each in overtime
More School Reform Changes on the Way
School districts will have more flexibility under a bill introduced this week by Senator Luther Olsen.
Senate Bill 95 was initiated at the request of administrators and school board members and modifies
10 state mandates. The purpose of the changes is to allow individual school districts the ability to
decide what is best for their schools and to provide support to districts that will be under pressure in
the face of proposed budget cuts.
The most controversial provision of the bill is a change that would allow school districts to use
standardized tests results to discipline or fire teachers. Plans are in motion to clarify this language to
ensure that it gives administrators the power they need without being unfair to teachers. Other
changes in the bill include:
Allowing school boards the power to create policies that would allow extracurricular sports to
be counted as physical education credits.
Allowing a police report to be used as the sole basis for enforcing athletics suspensions.
Removal of the 25 percent limit on funding for school library computers.
Critics ofthe bill include Mary Bell, head of the WEAC, who opposed nearly all of the changes
during a public hearing on Monday saying that it would erode the quality of public schools.
Contact Senator Luther Olsen's office at 608-266-0751 with any questions.
Watch Joint Public Hearing
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Wisconsin legislators focus on teacher discipline.
Maciver Institute: Joint Education Committee Discusses a Range of School Reforms from Physical
Education to Teacher Evaluations
WEAC: Educators, parents say new bill would decimate public education.
34
fobs Focus
~
***Pierce County Herald Editorial: Is Walker's message what CEOs want to hear? [yes]
Wisconsin Radio Network: Commerce Board holds inaugural meeting
Appleton Post Crescent:Gov. Walker introduces members of WEDC
Sauk Prairie Eagle: Cedar Grove Cheese Expanding to Milwaukee
Reuters: Home sales, factory data show recovery weak
*** USA Today: Job creation limps along after recession
USA Today: Claims for unemployment benefits fall: future looks bumpy
***Milwaukee Business Journal: Manpower Group: Employers struggling to find qualified workers
Budget Focus
Partisan Sniping, GOP Reform
This week, Democrats continued their pattern of rhetoric and motions to try to paint the Republican
reform budget as "extreme."
In reality, Republicans made a series oftargeted cuts to state government and continued the dedicated
approach to fund essential services and hold the line on taxes and spending.
The co-chairs also outlined an aggressive schedule for wrapping up JFC action: the committee will be in
exec session Tuesday and Thursday of next week, and the week after memorial day.
Maintaining Stewardship at an Affordable Rate
The committee approved $60 million annually in bonding in the state's Knowles-Nelson
Stewardship Program. Under the program, the DNR acquires land and provides grants to local
governments and non-profit conservation organizations. Under Democrat control, bonding for
stewardship was increased to $86 million. Republicans are ensuring that we can properly
protect Wisconsin's natural resources without breaking the bank. The committee's proposal
also requires legislative oversight for any individual stewardship purchase greater than
$250,000 and requires the DNR to report its land acquisition goals to the Legislature.
Secretary of State
The committee approved the Governor's recommendation to transfer administrative duties
from the Secretary of State's Office to the Department of Administration and the Department
of Financial Institutions.
35
Maintaining Funding for Women's Health Services, While Protecting Life
The committee voted to partially restore state funding to family planning clinics for pregnancy
testing, prenatal care, cervical cancer screening, STD prevention, testing and treatment, and
general health screenings that were eliminated in the Governor's budget. The committee
further specified that tax dollars cannot be appropriated to organizations that perform
abortions or provide referrals for abortion services.
Improving Access to Dental Services
The committee voted to increase funding for the Seal-a-Smile program which provides dental
sealants for school children. The committee also created an appropriation to help fund non-
profit dental clinics throughout the state that provide assistance for children, seniors and low-
income individuals.
Restore Funding to the Medical College of Wisconsin
The committee voted to restore funding to the Medical College of Wisconsin that was cut in
the Governor's budget.
PACE Program
The Governor's budget eliminated the Purchase of Agricultural Conservation Easements (PACE)
Program. PACE purchases conservation easements from farmers, paid for by conversion fees
on property owners who develop their land. Sixteen projects had already received preliminary
approval from DATCP. The committee voted to retain the statutory authority for PACE and
appropriated sufficient funds to pay for the sixteen outstanding projects. The committee also
repealed the conversion fees, repealed PACE's bonding authority and required DATCP to submit
a proposal to the legislature on a more cost effective way to preserve agricultural lands.
Buy Local, Buy Wisconsin
The committee approved the continuation of the Buy local, Buy Wisconsin Program which
helps Wisconsin farmers sell their products to local consumers.
Green Bay Press-Gazette: Panel stops money for abortion clinics
Appleton Post Crescent: SeniorCare survives budget cuts; GOP leaders work on deal to spare schools
Around the Country
Reuters: Tennessee House passes bill to curb teachers' unions
Detroit Free Press: lawmakers seek tenure reforms, say firing too costly
Miami Herald: Florida Gov. Scott signs controversial election bill
Detroit Free Press: State senate Ol<s bill forcing teachers, public employees to pay at least 20 percent
of health care premium
36
Around the State
DNR: Walleye bag limits to increase on 384 northern lakes
Janesville Gazette: Janesville manufacturer thriving despite decline in housing market
Sheboygan Press: Prepare for liftoff: Rockets for Schools returns to Sheboygan shoreline
In Case You Missed It
Washington Post: Senate Democrats won't release their spending plan
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Mortgage delinquency rate falls statewide, nationally
Great Read of the Week
Chicago Tribune: Rep. Paul Ryan op-ed: The budget debate we all deserve
For more information on anything contained in the GOP Senate Update and to contribute ideas and topics
for future weeks, please contact Sen. Fitzgerald's office at 608-266-S660 or email Andrew Wei house or
Hannah Huffman.
37
Mohr, Mark - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Monday, May 23, 2011 5:51 PM
Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
********Today's update also includes last Friday's update that was not sent out********
Legislative Affairs Team
Legislative Contacts
Representative Knudson called regarding the Governor possibly going up to the Hudson area
Representative Petersen's Office called asking for the details for an event the Governor will be at in Waupaca on Thursday.
Senator Jauch's Office called regarding tuition reciprocity in the budget.
Tomorrow's Committee Calendar
JFC will be holding an executive session tomorrow. Several items are on the calendar including DOA-procurement, DNR- water quality and DHS- medical
assistance.
Tuesday's Committees Date Time Room Bill Author
Waste Fraud Abuse
JCRARExec
A. Transportation Hearing
5/24/2011
5/24/2011
DOA-St.
Croix
9:00 Room
9:30 300 SE
5/24/2011 10:30 GAR
Local Government Consolidation and CESAs
Rules relating to the development of best
management practices to control emissions of
hazardous air contaminants from agricultural
waste. (the committee will be voting to suspend
parts of DNR rules and will be introducing LRB
drafts)
Emergency Rule 1050- The Wisconsin
Department of Children and Families order
relating to DCF 56, foster care
SB 41/ AB 50- motor carrier liability
AB 64- single trip permits for oversized mobile
1
xxxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx
Lazich,
Nygren
Petrowski
A. Jobs, Economy and Small
Business Hearing
S. Judiciary, Utilities,
Commerce, and Government
Operations
A. Consumer Protection and
Personal Privacy Info Hearing
Commerce
Venture Capital
5/24/2011 11:00 328 NW
5/24/2011 11 :00 201 SE
5/24/2011 1:00 300 NE
homes
AB 80- operating motor vehicle after the
suspension of license
AB 81- disabled identification cards
AB 132- motor vehicle dealers
(Hearing) SB 47/AB 70- changes to the
membership of the Small Business Regulatory
Review Board
SB 80- changing the boundaries of Marquette
County and Green Lake County
SB 85- theft of certain services and providing a
penalty
SJR 16- veto power of county executive over
appropriations (second consideration)
S R 18- state sovereignty
Sandy Chalmers- Administrator- Department of
Krusick
Krusick
Ballweg
Tauchen
Olsen
Zipperer
Harsdorf
Leibham
Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection XXXXXXX
Michelle Reinen- Director- Bureau of Consumer
Protection XXXXXXX
Cheryl! Olson-Collins- Administrator- Bureau of
Consumer Affairs Department of Financial
Institutions XXXXXXX
Paul Egide- Director- Bureau of Consumer Affairs
Department of Financial Institutions XXXXXXX
Economic Development and Regulatorv Reform Team
o Jason is working on drafting a document countering editorial piece written in the Journal Sentinel on the negatives of the current venture capital
proposal
2
DNR
Biomass Study
o The DNR would like to be represented in any biomass study committee that is brought together.
Venture Capital
Committee Votes
o Both the Assembly Job Creation Committee and the Senate Economic Development Committee have delayed voting the bill out of committee from
next week until after Memorial Day
DATCP
Consumer/Privacy Protection
o DATCP has four positions they have held vacant that they can use for general consumer protection activities, or
They can provide legislation to expand the privacy protection office at DATCP to allow the four positions to investigate identity theft.
o DATCP will make a decision on which option is best.
o Next Tuesday DATCP has been asked to testify in the Assembly Consumer Protection and Personal Privacy Committee, if a hearing is scheduled.
They will have an opportunity to provide a recommendation to the committee if they think legislation should be passed to expand their
investigative abilities in regards to identity theft.
DOT
Contact with Congresswoman Bachmann regarding the Stillwater Bridge.
PSC
911 Service Fee
o Received a letter from Bayfield County Administrator urging either administrative or legislative reform on '911 Service Fee'
o Asked PSC to respond with prior approval of response letter
WHEDA
DFI
Modernization Bills
o Met with Mike Semmann of WBA to discuss the two bill drafts
o WBA supports substance of both bills
Agency Update
o Exec. Director Winston met with Sec. Huebsch and policy team to update the governor's office on WHEDA, discuss agency strategic goals, and
potential issues
o Discussed status of modernization bill package and WHEDA lending
Credit Union Conversion
o Nate met with the Cooperative Network to discuss the JFC's approval of the motion that allows credit union conversion into mutual savings banks
or savings institutions
o Group is against motion, and lobbying legislators to overturn the action taken by the JFC
Anchor Bank
o Executives met with Keith and Jason on status of regulatory and financial position, status of recapitalization plans, and future plans for Wisconsin
Tourism
Agency Update
3
o Sec. Klett, Dep. Sec. Fantle met with Sec. Huebsch and policy team to update the governor's office on Tourism, discuss agency strategic goals,
and potential issues
o Discussed using the governor in television/billboard/print ads to promote Wisconsin Tourism
o Also discussed: Indigenous Games, EAA, time-share legislation, room-tax legislation, Arts Board, and Film Program
Arts Board
o Tourism to respond to a letter received from Schauer Arts and Activities Center (Washington and Dodge Co.'s) with concerns on the Arts Board
and arts funding in the proposed budget
JOBS Hotline
1 call received
Human Services and Education Team
DHS:
DVR from DWD could be moved to DHS via budget motion in JFC. DHS is advocating for this addition.
Vacancies at DHS with retirements are on the increase (Feb. 2011: 12.49%, May 2011: 15.0%)
DHS News:
Study touts FamilyCare (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
The study was done for the Wisconsin Family Care Association, made up of public and private firms that arrange for services for frail elderly and adults with
disabilities served through the program. The review says the state is saving nearly $90 million a year by serving clients in FamilyCare when compared with a
separate services program. Both programs rely on Medicaid funding, which is a blend of federal and state money. The comparison data had not been available
previously.
Editorial: Don't let Medicare go bankrupt (Wisconsin State Journal)
A lot of older folks in Wisconsin and the nation seem to have missed this important point in the ongoing debate over how to shore up the government's popular
health care program for retirees.
Republicans suggest deal possible on healthcare (Reuters)
Top Congressional Republicans said on Sunday they would be open to a comprise on healthcare costs, one of the biggest stumbling blocks in a deal to get the
United States' debt under control. Republican Paul Ryan, the chairman of the House of Republicans Budget Committee, said he would "absolutely" by willing to
negotiate with Democrats, who have hammered his plan to scale back government-run health plans for the poor and the elderly. With Ryan's plan headed for likely
defeat in the Democratic-controlled Senate, that chamber's top Republican said it was time for "an adult conversation" on ways to keep healthcare costs under
control.
Education:
Met with facilitator for Read to Lead to go over procedures and agenda items.
Education News:
UPDATE: School board member withdraws controversial gift card proposal
A Madison School Board member who proposed using $1.3 million in docked teacher pay to give workers $200 year-end bonuses has withdrawn the idea.
Board member Ed Hughes said his proposal stirred up a "hornet's nest of resentment" in the community. He said he received lots of emails as news outlets around
the country picked up the story, first reported by the State Journal on Thursday.
DPI chief, Racine superintendent decry voucher plan (Milwaukee Jouma/Sentinefl
4
In a pre-emptive attack on the possible expansion of private school vouchers into Racine, the local and state schools superintendents warned Thursday that such
a move would hurt Racine Unified School District, increase local taxes and not raise student achievement.
'Vouchers are a double whammy," Racine Unified Superintendent Jim Shaw said at a new conference held at Walden Ill Middle and High School, a magnet school
within the district. "They decrease resources for public education and raise taxes for the local taxpayer."
Education:
Attended DPI Educator Effectiveness meeting and made some significant progress
o Student achievement data for tested subjects and grades will be based on WKCE value-added growth
o other assessments can be used for non-tested subjects and grades
o We are continuing to push for measures to be as uniform as possible throughout the state with a strong focus on student outcomes
Marquette University expressed concerns about allowing Herzing University and other for-profit colleges to be eligible for financial aid from HEAB. JFC
will take up the issue tomorrow.
Education News:
All UW schools push for flexibility as Madison-only plan looks unlikely (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/
A three-month debate over the way the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the rest of the UW System are run has shown that all state universities are going to
need more freedom from state rules to remain competitive and to offset deep proposed budget cuts, state lawmakers say.
Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt undecided on school vouchers (Green Bav Press-Gazette/
Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt says he has not decided whether to support a private-school voucher program in Green Bay.
Education needs creative ideas and variety, Schmitt said, but he also wants to discuss the issue with other mayors whose communities have used vouchers.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Cost of Collective Bargaining:
Wisconsin State Journal. School district racks up $300,000 legal bill fighting teacher's porn-related firing
The Middleton-Cross Plains School Board has spent about $300,000 in the last year fighting a grievance filed on behalf of a teacher fired after an investigation
found he viewed pornography at school.
Andrew Harris, a former seventh-grade science teacher at Glacier Creek Middle School, along with seven high school staff members and one administrator, were
investigated and disciplined after the district discovered porn and other inappropriate adult content, including nudity and sexual jokes, in their email system during
the fall of 2009.
"In these days in a shortage of cash we're loath to spend money on lawyers," said Ellen Lindgren, president of the Middleton-Cross Plains School Board. "On the
other hand, we believe the community supports the termination of a teacher who intentionally accesses pornography."
Union leaders say the case isn't about teachers viewing porn on a school computer- an action they agree. is wrong. Rather, they argue the discipline for Harris
and the others was unjust and not based on clear standards or objective criteria.
A union lawyer, Willie Haus, a/so alleges the district went after Harris because he was a union leader who had criticized the School Board.
5
Local Governments and Property Taxes:
Wisconsin Rapids Tribune. Analysis: Schools with be forced to lower taxes
The analysis by University of Madison-Wisconsin economic Andrew Reschovsky released today says 329 districts would be prevented from raising property taxes
under Walker's budget plan and would actually be required to reduce property taxes to meet new revenue limits.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Milwaukee County's largest union still pushing for new contract
The county and AFSCME are currently in arbitration over an impasse on a contract for 2009 and 2010, said the letter by AFSCME public policy director Patricia
Yunk.
The 2011 county budget already counts on health and pension contributions that hadn't been won from most union workers. The state law would require
employees to contribute about 6% of their pay toward their pensions - up from the county's budget plan of a phased-in 4% pension contribution.
The county budget also called for unpaid furlough days to workers whose unions had not agreed to the concessions. Those furloughs would be rescinded if a new
labor deal were reached or when the state law takes effect.
The county concessions on pension, health care, overtime restrictions and a wage freeze have already been imposed on the 15% of county workers who don't
belong to a union. Three smaller unions also have agreed to the concessions.
County Controller Scott Manske said the county would not shortchange its budget if it didn't immediately activate the higher pension contributions because
furloughs would continue to be used as a savings alternative.
Matt Gerhke of Lisbon called about an issue. His call was returned but he is yet to get back to us.
Mayor Bauer of Durand called to invite us to a League event. I declined because it is during a Soglin meeting.
Veterans:
Randy Hopper's Senate subcommittee had a public hearing on the Petersen bill to reorganize the Veteran's Board. There were no surprises and even
Senator Cullen seemed supportive. Whether he votes for the bill is unclear.
Veterans Board Chair Naylor called for an update on the new nominees to the Board. I told him soon. He was preparing for June's Board Meeting.
Concealed Carrv:
Janesville Gazette. Editorial: Taking aim at concealed carry
With Republicans controlling our Legislature and trigger-happy Jim Doyle no longer wielding his veto pen, Wisconsin appears poised to enact concealed carry
legislation.
It's about time.
Forty-eight states allow concealed carry. To those who fear Wisconsin will turn into the Wild West, we ask: Has this occurred in other states? Has any state
repealed its legislation?
6
Opponents and supporters of concealed carry can point to studies that back their claims. The criminals already have guns. Concealed carry can serve as a
deterrent. Criminals are more reluctant to attack if they fear you might be carrying a gun.
Emergency Management
Janesville Gazette. La Crosse mayor declares state of emergency
Mayor Matt Harter declared a state of emergency. Rescue workers went door to door to check on people, sometimes forcing their way through debris to get inside,
the mayor said. Areas were evacuated after the storm left homes uninhabitabla and downed power lines made areas unsafe, but no one was seriously hurt or
killed, the mayor said.
"That's nothing short of a miracle, "Harter said.
The storm roared across the city of 51,000 about two hours southeast of Minneapolis late in the afternoon. It was unclear Sunday evening whether it spawned a
tornado, but it struck with enough force to topple massive trees and send debris sailing through the air.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Milwaukee area to lose $4.2 million in annual homeland security funds. Wall Street Journal.
The five-county Milwaukee area is losing all of its annual $4.2 million in federal aid to prepare for natural disasters and acts of terrorism, federal and city officials
said Thursday.
That won't shut down all emergency readiness programs immediately, said Steve Fronk, Milwaukee director of homeland security and emergency management.
Previous grants will help fund current programs for about two more years, and some federal funds still will be available through the state, he said.
Corrections:
Green Bay Press Gazette. Corrections strain state's finances
The problem was exacerbated in 1997 when Wisconsin, like many states before it, passed truth-in-sentencing legislation. The law was meant to fix a penal system
that allowed offenders to serve a portion of their sentence before they were released.
"Just about everybody in the courtroom knew that if you get a 20-year sentence you'll probably get out in five," Hamblin said. "The only person that doesn't
understand that is the victim and the general public."
Waste, Fraud. and Abuse:
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Nine state workers earned more than $65,000 each in overtime
Madison - Nine state workers made more than $65,000 in overtime last year, including one who took in about $105,000 in overtime to more than double her
salary.
For the second vear in a row, the state worker making the most in overtime was Sheryl Lee Fors, a 53-year-old nurse clinician at Southern Wisconsin Center who
made a base salary of $91,077 and $104,930 in overtime. Total earnings for the year. $196,007.
7
In 2009, Fors made $188, 070, including almost $97,000 in overtime.
Gov. Scott Walker will "ensure taxpayer resources are being efficiently and effectively used in relation to necessary overtime pay," said a statement from Walker
spokesman Cullen Werwie.
Walker's Waste, Fraud and Abuse Commission will make recommendations on reducing overtime in a report being released this summer, Werwie said.
Werwie touted Walker's move to limit collective bargaining for state employees .as a means of reducing overtime costs. The Legislature approved Walker's bill on
collective bargaining in March, but it has not taken effect because of a legal challenge.
Wisconsin Reporter. Audit bureau: State must contain overtime costs
The DOC and DHS have long been responsible for the bulk of the state's overtime pay. In 2010, the two agencies accounted for 66 percent of Wisconsin's
premium overtime cost, paid at 1.5 times an employee's normal hourly rate. Both departments cite their 24-hour facilities as the major reason for using overtime,
some of which is mandatory.
Legislators acknowledged the need for around-the-clock staffing at such facilities, but said there must be a less expensive way to provide it.
"We just have to do a better job of managing our people and working together to find a solution for these overtime problems," said state Rep. Samantha Kerkman,
R-Powers Lake, co-chairwoman of the Joint Audit Committee. "For example, why was it better (in 2009) and now it's back to this?"
Intergovernmental News:
Reuters. Tennessee House passes bill to curb teachers' unions
The vote of 59-39 in the House restricts the unions to collective bargaining only on pay and benefits. The bill does not allow collective bargaining on working
conditions and matters dealing with performance, such as classroom assignments and bonus pay.
The Senate voted 18-14 on May 1 to repeal a 1978/aw that required school boards to engage in collective bargaining with teachers' unions. Instead, all bargaining
would be handled by local teachers and their school boards, according to the bill.
8
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Fantle, David -TOURISM
Tuesday, May 24, 20111:50 PM
'Don Walker'
RE: Tourism
Don, please call Cullen and he can be the point person on this as our agency is about promoting the state and growing
the tourism economy.
Our "scope" is tourism and we prefer to stay in our area of expertise.
Thanks,
DF
Dave Fantle I Deputy Secretary I Wisconsin Department of Tourism 1-
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, WI 53708-8690 TraveJWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
From: Don Walker [mailto:DWALKER@journalsentinel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:37 PM
To: Fantle, David - TOURISM
Subject: RE: Tourism
Dave: I want to speak to the Tourism Secretary ABOUT the budget-repair bill. I want to discuss with her the dinner cabinet
secretaries had with the governor afte the super bowl, what was said, and when she first was told about the collective
bargaining provision of the bill. That's why I called you guys.
Don Walker, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
From: Fantle, David -TOURISM [mailto:DFantle@travelwisconsin.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:28 PM
To: Don Walker
Subject: Tourism
Hi Don,
I understand that you left Lisa Marshall a voice mail something to do with the budget repair bill.
If that's what it's regarding, please call Cullen Werwie
If it has something to do with our mission of marketing the state for tourism, please let me know.
Best,
DF
Dave Fantle I Deputy Secretary 1 Wisconsin Department of Tourism 1-
21
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, WI TraveiWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
22
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Fantle, David -TOURISM
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:56 PM
'Don Walker'
Subject: RE: Tourism
Don, it's important for our agency to be the part of government that doesn't wade in on politics. So I guess, that means
no as it pertains to this topic.
Thanks,
DF
Dave Fantle I Deputy Secretary I Wisconsin Department of Tourism [-
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, WI 53708-8690 TraveiWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
From: Don Walker [mailto:DWALKER@journalsentinel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 20111:52 PM
To: Fantle, David -TOURISM
Subject: RE: Tourism
I'll take that as a no. I really don't need Cullen. l;ve called the secretaries of each agency. Workforce Development doesn't
have anything to do with the budget, either, but I wanted his take. That's what I called you.
From: Fantle, David -TOURISM [mailto:DFantle@travelwisconsin.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:50 PM
To: Don Walker
Subject: RE: Tourism
Don, please call Cullen and he can be the point person on this as our agency is about promoting the state and growing
the tourism economy.
Our "scope" is tourism and we prefer to stay in our area of expertise.
Thanks,
DF
Dave Fantle I Deputy Secretary I Wisconsin Department of Tourism 1-
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, WI 53708-8690 TraveiWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
From: Don Walker [mailto:DWALKER@journalsentinel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:37 PM
To: Fantle, David - TOURISM
Subject: RE: Tourism
19
Dave: I want to speak to the Tourism Secretary ABOUT the budget-repair bill. I want to discuss with her the dinner cabinet
secretaries had with the governor afte the super bowl, what was said, and when she first was told about the collective
bargaining provision of the bill. That's why I called you guys.
Don Walker, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
From: Fantle, David -TOURISM [mailto:DFantle@travelwisconsin.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:28 PM
To: Don Walker
Subject: Tourism
Hi Don,
I understand that you left Lisa Marshall a voice mail something to do with the budget repair bill.
If that's what it's regarding, please call Cullen Werwie at
If it has something to do with our mission of marketing the state for tourism, please let me know.
Best,
DF
Dave Fantle 1 Deputy Secretary [Wisconsin Department of Tourism -
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, TraveiWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
20
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 2:00 PM
cullen.werwie@wi.gov
FW:Tourism
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Govemor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpf@wisconsin.gov
From: Fantle, David -TOURISM
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:56 PM
To: 'Don Walker'
Subject: RE: Tourism
Don, it's important for our agency to be the part of government that doesn't wade in on politics. So I guess, that means
no as it pertains to this topic.
Thanks,
DF
Dave Fantle [ Deputy Secretary I Wisconsin Department of Tourism -
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, Wl Trave!Wisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
From: Don Walker [mailto:DWALKER@journalsentinel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:52 PM
To: Fantle, David -TOURISM
Subject: RE: Tourism
I'll take that as a no. I really don't need Cullen. l;ve called the secretaries of each agency. Workforce Development doesn't
have anything to do with the budget, either, but I wanted his take. That's what I called you.
From: Fantle, David- TOURISM [mailto:DFantle@travelwisconsin.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 1:50 PM
To: Don Walker
Subject: RE: Tourism
Don, please call Cullen and he can be the point person on this as our agency is about promoting the state and growing
the tourism economy.
Our "scope" is tourism and we prefer to stay in our area of expertise.
17
Thanks,
DF
Dave Fantle 1 Deputy Secretary I Wisconsin Department of
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, WI TraveiWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
From: Don Walker [mailto:DWALKER@journalsentinel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 20111:37 PM
To: Fantle, David - TOURISM
Subject: RE: Tourism
Dave: I want to speak to the Tourism Secretary ABOUT the budget-repair bill. I want to discuss with her the dinner cabinet
secretaries had with the governor afte the super bowl, what was said, and when she first was told about the collective
bargaining provision of the bill. That's why I called you guys.
Don Walker, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
From: Fantle, David -TOURISM [mailto:DFantle@travelwisconsin.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 20111:28 PM
To: Don Walker
Subject: Tourism
Hi Don,
I understand that you left Lisa Marshall a voice mail something to do with the budget repair bill.
If that's what it's regarding, please call Cullen Werwie
If it has something to do with our mission of marketing the state for tourism, please let me know.
Best,
DF
Dave Fantle I Deputy Secretary I Wisconsin Department of Tourism 1608.266.8773
201 West Washington Avenue PO Box 8690 Madison, WI 53708-8690 TraveiWisconsin.com
Harnessing the power of tourism to build a better Wisconsin
18
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
Heath, Stanley <Stanley.Heath@dhs.gov>
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 2:27 PM
To: Heath, Stanley
Subject:
Attachments:
State Incident Communications Conference Line (SICCL) roster
SICCL- 10 May_2011.xls
State and Local communicators,
Please review the latest version of the SICCL roster for names and contact information. The
SICCL is the primary way the Office of Public Affairs shares incident communication products such as
talking points, public affairs guidance and announcements during incidents requiring a coordinated
response.
The majority of this information is provided by the National Joint Information Center email or
nationaljic@dhs.gov
The list has a State as well as a Local/City tab.
If you have any questions please give me a call.
This list is For Offical Use Only (FOUO).
Stan Heath
Department of Homeland Security
Office of Public Affairs
Chief Planner
16
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Hogan, Pat - DOA
Sent:
To:
Tuesday, May 24, 20114:07 PM
Hurlburt, Waylon - GOV
Cc: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
http://www.isonline.com/news/waukesha/122529354.html
After Hartland teachers agree, union blocks insurance switch
e-mail
print
By Mike Johnson of the Journal Sentinel
May 24, 2011 3:44p.m. 1(29) COMMENTS
Hartland - Teachers in the Hartland-Lakeside School District have agreed to switch
health insurance providers to save the district $690,000, but the executive committee of
a union that represents Arrowhead High feeder schools is blocking the change, officials
say.
Faced with a $1.2 million reduction in state aid for the 2011-12 school year, the School
Board has been looking at ways to reduce costs and avoid program cuts and increases in
class sizes, Superintendent Glenn W. Schilling said Tuesday.
The board determined it could achieve some saving by switching teachers' health
insurance from WEA Trust, the nonprofit company started 40 years ago by the state's
largest teachers union, to another provider when the contract expires on June 30.
In the end, the board and teachers - after a series of joint meetings to study the issue -
agreed to go with United Healthcare.
Teachers overwhelmingly supported the change, said Schilling and Ginny Henningsen,
the former School Board president who has been serving as a liaison in negotiations with
teachers since leaving the board in April.
The Arrowhead United Teachers Organization's executive committee rejected the switch
on Monday.
Samuel Froiland, a director for Cedar Lake United Educators, which represents the
Arrowhead United Teachers Organization, said the committee asked School Board
negotiators to include an agreement to bargain between now and July 1 on wages and
other work rules as part of the insurance change.
The committee wanted a full labor agreement, rather than having a segregated deal on
insurance/ Froiland said.
That was rejected, he said.
14
"There was a willingness to try to work with them on this. It's unfortunate the district
refused that offer .... This was not about the carrier. This was about the district's
unwillingness to negotiate anything but health insurance," Froiland said.
The move in Hartland-Lakeside to save on health insurance comes at a time when Gov.
Scott Walker has proposed slicing $834 million in state K-12 education spending over
the next two years, a decrease of nearly 8% from current funding.
Walker has said, though, that measures included in his budget-repair law will help
districts make up for the cuts. The law, which is being challenged in court, limits
collective bargaining for public workers, including teachers.
The law imposes new health care contributions on workers if they are in the state's
health insurance plan and requires most public employees to pay half the cost of their
pensions- typically 5.8% of pay.
It repeals bargaining by public employee unions over their benefits and work conditions,
leaving only bargaining over wages with a cap based on the rate of inflation, barring a
referendum.
Hartland-Lakeside isn't in the state's insurance plan.
But switching from WEA Trust to United Healthcare will give the district enough saving
coupled with $250,000 in saving from Walker's pension contribution provision the
maintain the district's current level of programs and services, Henningsen said.
Other districts have switched from WEA Trust insurance to achieve savings, the
Menomonee Falls district among the latest.
The Falls School Board on Monday approved a new contract with teachers that achieved
a saving of $2.4 million by switching health insurance from WEA Trust to Humana.
Hartland-Lakeside School Board President Dave Elario said the board will meet Tuesday
night to discuss its options on health insurance.
But Elario said it is likely the board will move forward with making the change, and he
and others believe Walker will prevail on the collective bargaining changes.
"We've come up with what we think is a very fair proposal that the local teachers are
supporting .... We're together on this. And yet we've got the AUTO exec board, they're
not part of our community and they are standing in the way of something in my opinion
that's good for teachers, students and taxpayers," Elario said.
"There's too much at risk to not make the change," he said. "We can.'t afford to have
higher class sizes," he said.
Patrick Hogan
Office of Governor Scott Walker
-
Pat.Hoqan@wisconsin.gov
15
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Eggert, Linda R- DOC
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 4:56 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
DOC DL Executive Planning; Saunders-Buss, Beth A- DOC; Cobb, David F- DOC;
Anacker, Joy L- DOC; Bergeman, Diane - DOC; Waddell, Pamela L- DOC; Le Monds, Tim
J - DOC; Condreay, Lynn M - DOC; Bender, Kailey N - DOC
DOC Media Contacts
MEDIA CONTACTS FORMA Y 24, 2011
Waukesha Freeman, Brian Huber- interviewed Lincoln Hills School Superintendant Paul Westerhaus on the progress of
the consolidation at Lincoln Hills.
Lee Berquist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel- requesting an interview with the Secretary about Governor Walker's speech
to Cabinet outlining budget bill and collective bargaining proposal, etc. Declined interview request.
Hank Snyder, Daily Citizen, Waupun - requesting photos of female inmates planting flowers in city. Approved.
John Diedrich, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel -wanting follow up age by county information for juvenile commitments. No
such document exists.
From the Department of Corrections: Please consider the environment before printing this message.
13
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
Subject:
At least be fair
Hegerfeld, Kathy- DOT
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 7:14AM
Today's Reader Review
http :1/www .json I ine.com/news/opi n ion/122536644. html
The Legislature should retain the state's regional transit authorities. But if it does disband
them, it should at least do so in a fair manner.
May 24, 2011
State Rep. Robin Vas wants to derail the regional transit authorities that were set up or authorized a couple of years back
under a different Legislature. That's a bad idea all by itself. But the way his proposal works is even worse- and another
slap in the face to Milwaukee by the Racine County Republican.
Even if his colleagues agree with Vas on breaking up RTAs, they should at least have the decency to splifthe money
fairly. The money- about $1.27 million -should be split among Kenosha, Racine and Milwaukee in the same proportion it
was raised.
Beyond that, the Legislature should maintain the state transportation fund as the source for transit aid. Moving transit
funding to the general fund, as suggested by Gov. Scott Walker, would consign state transit systems to the scrap heap.
And given new estimates of the balance in the transportation fund, the Legislature also should eliminate or reduce transit
cuts to ensure a more balanced approach to transportation.
Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele and other county officials have pointed out Vos' proposal would take money that
was raised primarily in Milwaukee County to help fund the Southeastern Regional Transit Authority and divide it evenly
among the three counties that make up the authority unless they work out a different arrangement.
That's not what most people would call fair. But Vos also thinks of transit as a social service, so it's obvious his
perceptions are skewed. Vas' proposal would disband the Southeastern RTA, a Dane County RTA and two others that
were authorized but never created. He's wrong to do that, and he's wrong about the split.
Abele wrote a letter to the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee, pointing out the inherent unfairness, and adding, "The
proposal to split this money in thirds between three counties would needlessly divert Milwaukee County tax dollars to
other areas when our transit system faces nearly $7 million in transit cuts in the next state budget" A county official said
last week the Milwaukee portion came to well above 90%.
The RTAs should be retained and fairly and reliably funded. They can help foster economic development and jobs and a
balanced transportation network. They also can help communities deal with a state budget that cuts significant amounts of
aid. They're a tool that Walker and the Legislature should put in the hands of local officials.
But if the Legislature is going to remove that tool, it should at least do so in a way that is fair to those who provided the
lion's share of funding .

Your opinions
4
http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/122536624.html
May 24, 2011
DRUNKEN DRIVING
Legislators should work for citizens
"Toughen OWl bills," was an excellent editorial (May 15). I hope every legislator in Wisconsin has or will read it, and to
make sure mine do, I'm sending them each a copy.
It's time for those who are catering to the beer and alcohol interests to start working for the safety and welfare of the
citizens.
Raising the taxes on beer and wine and other alcoholic beverages is long overdue. Rep. Terese Berceau (D-Madison)
had a good bill last year; it would have provided funds for law enforcement and treatment programs.
The Journal Sentinel Editorial Board said it well in the last paragraph: "Legislators need to dig deep and find the courage
to start with Ott's and Darling's bills and make them even tougher, along the lines of what Krusick and others have
proposed."
Thank you, Journal Sentinel, for your efforts in this battle.
J.M. Prager
Waukesha
VOTERID
Shame on Walker and Republicans
Shame! Shame! Shame on Gov. Scott Walker and his Republican cronies in Madison. Taking the vote away from people
by making it difficult to vote is really an ugly Republican tactic.
According to the new voter identification bill soon to be signed by our upstart governor, I, at age 68 after voting for 45
years in Wisconsin without difficulty, now have to go and get some kind of special state identification to correspond to my
voter registration.
This draconian move to deal with a nonexistent problem of voter fraud is sheer nonsense to any thinking person. The
governor perhaps should rather put some effort or thought into correcting problems in the system of voter tabulation in
Waukesha County, which are surely manifest to all honest citizens of Wisconsin.
I cannot wait till we older folk can correct the myriad Walker-inspired political abominations during the upcoming recall
voting season.
Terrence Lauerman
De Pere
***
How about a poll tax, too?
I'm so glad that we finally have voter photo ID requirements in Wisconsin.
This will help put an end to the thousands of instances of voter fraud that occur during each election, create viable jobs
and, most important, limit the annoyance of having lower-income residents and people of color try to vote.
5
For the next step, since we are apparently in such a monumental fiscal crisis, let's also institute a poll tax to raise some
much-needed revenue to pay for the cost of implementing the voter ID checking process.
Rob Guilbert
Brown Deer

Wis. DOT outsourcing costs taxpayers millions
http://host.mad is on .com/news/state and regional/article 073d4240-1 ecd-5311-8893-4c6ac90d3c4f.html
May 24,2011
The Wisconsin Department of Transportation is paying contractors millions of dollars for work that could be done cheaper
by state employees.
Through the end of last month, taxpayers were shelling out an extra $13.8 million to have private consultants do work that
state workers could do.
DOT officials blame an internal staffing shortage. Department Secretary Mark Gottlieb says that leaves no option but to
hire contractors.
The figures were released Tuesday in a WISC-TV report ( http://bit.ly/koR8ZD). The station reviewed paperwork from
some 300 projects and found that 80 percent made reference to a lack of sufficient DOT staff.
Gottlieb says the DOT is filling 50 engineer positions but still has a vacancy rate of 15 percent. Gov. Scott Walker has
proposed holding transportation funding steady in this coming two-year budget.

Walker to sign photo ID requirement into law
http://www.gazettextra.com/weblogs/latest-news/2011/may/25/walker-sign-photo-id-reguirement-law/
By ASSOCIATED PRESS
May 25,2011
MADISON, Wis. (AP)- Gov. Scott Walker is scheduled to sign into law a bill requiring voters to show photo identification
at the polls.
Walker planned to sign the bill Wednesday in the Capitol.
It marks the end of an eight-year push by Republicans to enact the photo ID requirement. They passed it three times
when Democrat Jim Doyle was governor, but he vetoed it each time.
Republicans say the requirement is needed to combat voter fraud, while Democrats say it's more about disenfranchising
voters.
6
The requirement to show a photo ID when voting would take effect next year, but other changes affecting absentee voting
and the ability to vote take effect immediately and would be in force for recall elections this summer.

Traveling Memorial Day weekend? Fuel up with these tips
http://www. postcrescent.com/article/20 11 0525/ APCO 1 01/1 05250520/T raveling-Memoriai-Day-weekend-Fuel-up-these-
tips?odyssey-tabltopnews[img[FRONTPAGE
Written by
The Post-Crescent
May. 24, 2011
Near-record gasoline prices aren't discouraging travelers this Memorial Day weekend, traditionally viewed as the start of
summer.
AAA projects 34.9 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home this weekend, a 0.2 percent increase from last
year. AAA expects 695,000 Wisconsin
residents to travel this weekend, about the same number as last year.
Peak travel hours are expected to be between noon and 8 p.m. Friday and noon and 8 p.m. Monday.
Motorists traveling in Wisconsin will find regular unleaded gasoline ranging between $3.70 and $3.95 a gallon, which is
about $1 a gallon more than a year ago.
Travelers also will see plenty of roadwork throughout the state. Here's where to check for potential construction delays
.and travel information:
State roadwork
A few work zones may slow travels. The state Department of Transportation says major work zones include:
In Milwaukee, at the 1-94/1-43/l-894 Mitchell Interchange, ramps from northbound 1-94 to westbound I 43/1-894 and
from eastbound 1-43/l-894 to southbound 1-94 are closed. Detours are posted via local streets or via 1-94 through
downtown Milwaukee.
1-94 in Waukesha and Dane counties.
U.S. 41 at Oshkosh and Green Bay.
Check gasoline prices
Gasbuddy.com: www.gasbuddy.com
AAA's Daily Fuel Gauge Report: www.fuelgauge. report.com
Enforcement effort
7
During the Memorial Day weekend, law enforcement agencies will be participating in the Click It or Ticket mobilization,
encouraging motorists to buckle up to
protect themselves in the event of a crash. Unbuckled motorists will get tickets.
During the Memorial Day weekend last year, 11 people were killed in 10 Wisconsin traffic crashes. On average, Memorial
Day weekend crashes claim eight
lives, state officials said.
Up-to-date weather
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov
Road and air travel information
Wisconsin Department of Transportation travel information: www.dot.state.wi.usltravel. The same information also
is available by dialing 511.
Austin Straubellnternational Airport: www.fly grb.com
Outagamie County Regional Airport: www.atw airport.com
Milwaukee County General Mitchell International Airport: www.mitchellairport.com
Reserve a campsite
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources campsite reservations: www.wisconsin stateparks.reserve
america.com
The National Recreation Reservation Service: www.recreation.gov
Things to do around town
If you're planning to stay home, there is plenty going on in the Fox Cities. Check out
these websites:
Fox Cities Convention and Visitors Bureau:
www. foxcities.org
Fox Cities Hub (The Post-Crescent): www.fox citieshub.com. Also check out Thursday's Weekend section in The
Post-Crescent.

S.S. Badger car ferry sets sail Thursday
http://www. htrnews.com/article/2011 0525/MAN01 01/1 05250727/S-S-Badger-car-ferry-sets-saii-
Thursday?odyssey-tab[topnewsltextiFRONTPAGE
8
Written by
Patti Klevorn
May. 25, 2011
Editor's note: The S.S. Badger car ferry's first crossing of the 2011 sailing season is Thursday with arrival in Manitowoc at
about noon, following the 4-hour, 60-mile
crossing from the eastern shore of Lake Michigan.
LUDINGTON, Mich. -As the S.S. Badger crew prepares the car ferry to set sail, they're readying the ship to operate as it
has the more than 50 years it's been
making trips from Ludington across Lake Michigan to Wisconsin.
The last-standing coal-fired passenger vessel in the country will burn coal, take the coal ash that builds up from the coal
fire and mix it with water to make a slurry,
dumping it overboard into the lake at some 100-foot depths six or so miles offshore- not always in the same place.
The ash slurry has been tested and found to be inert, according to results the Ludington (Mich.) Daily News viewed. Still,
it's a substance, and banned, as the Daily
News first wrote about in 2009 when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created vessel general permits in reaction
to a lawsuit it wasn't doing enough to keep ships from contaminating the water.
Dozens of substances are allowed in the lake, with a permit, but coal ash isn't one of them- at least come 2012.
What does all this mean for the Badger?
"We are extremely concerned for the 250 people who work here," said Lake Michigan Carferry President and CEO Bob
Man glitz.
He said he also is concerned for the restaurants, motels and other businesses - in both Ludington and Manitowoc - that
rely on tourist business from the S.S.
Badger for a substantial portion of their business.
Manglitz estimates 750 people's jobs rely on the Badger bringing passengers back and forth across the lake.
LMC is trying to find a way to comply with the regulations, looking at the variety of options it can come up with, but none of
those have yet panned out
The options include:
Ash retention- continuing to use coal, but retaining it and unloading it once docked.
Diesel engines- the company will continue to seek grant opportunities toward this end.
>>Alternative fuel- the company is hoping to partner with other steamships that currently use heavy fuel to use the same
new technology they may come up with for repowering their vessels.
"Ash retention is not our No. 1 choice," Manglitz said. "It would be expensive to do and maintain."
In listening to the engine room crew, he hears, "It would make a hard job harder."
Lake Michigan Carferry has hired an engineering firm out of Ann Arbor, Mich., that specializes in helping coal-fired plants,
but there are no readily available
fixes for the Badger.
"I believe we're going to be running in 2014 and beyond," Manglitz said.
How, he doesn't know. "It will take a lot of support and partnerships," he said.
Some steamships operate using a heavy, less-processed fuel and have the EPA's permission to do so, at least until 2020.
9
The ship's operators are pursuing the possibility of repowering their vessels. Whatever process the companies create also
may work for the S.S. Badger, Manglitz
said.
"It's just very complicated and very expensive," Manglitz said.
"These are big companies," he said. "With their resources, it seems logical to me to pool with them on this."
"These are very serious possible options," Manglitz said. "But we know it won't be easy."
The company has been operating as though it will find a solution, spending large amounts of money to keep the car ferry
operating and investing in finding a solution to the EPA's requirement.
The Badger is in great shape, better than in years, Manglitz said.
'Reservations are up'
"Our reservations are up significantly this year over last year," said Lynda Matson, LMC's vice president of customer
service.
Passenger reservations are up, as are commercial and truck traffic reservations, she said.
With the price of gasoline around $4 a gallon, the company is using a marketing message of encouraging shorter trips to
destinations that are close to home.
"We have a great price-point and we offer a lot to do on board," Matson said.
The company has extended its discount pricing, offering $199 one-way tickets for two adults with a vehicle.
"It's a great value," said Matson.
2010 was up in passengers over 2009, and 2011 looks to be up over 2010, Matson said.
Manglitz said the company values its customers now as much as ever.
"We appreciate each and every passenger," he said.
And truck traffic is a great business for the company.
Truck drivers tell LMC the car ferry is a big time money saver, he said.
Local residents again have the opportunity to buy a discount ticket- $35- to sail the first day of the season.
The Badger offers wireless Internet for a fee (it has to buy use of satellite service since it's moving) and rents out iPads.
The Badger will again offer a Manitowoc shoreline cruise from 2 to 4 p.m. June 4 featuring the Happy Schnapps Combo
and an all-you-can-eat Badger party buffet,
with tickets priced at $39. Call (800) 841-4243 for reservations.
S.O.S. campaign launched
Seven Ludington-area residents formed a group to support the car ferry's continued operation on Lake Michigan past the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2012 deadline for an end to the boat's dumping of coal ash into the lake.
Ludington Mayor John Henderson and other citizens formed the group Save Our Ship! to spread the message that the
Ludington area needs the Badger to continue
operations beyond 2012 in order to remain a competitive player in the region's tourism and manufacturing industries.
10
The group is asking for others to join and support the campaign by purchasing items through an online auction.
''There is a real possibility that the S.S. Badger may have to cease operations in December 2012, but we are hopeful that
the S.O.S. campaign will help demonstrate
that our communities need the S.S. Badger and influence Lake Michigan Carferry and the federal government to come to
an acceptable solution to continue operations," Henderson said.
The S.O.S. Task Force is working with Manitowoc Mayor Justin Nickels and other members of the community to take on
this issue together, as the Badger's operations affect both communities.
"The S.S. Badger is an important asset to both of our communities and surrounding regions," Henderson said. "We look
forward to working together with Manitowoc and bringing light to the issue at hand."
It is asking people to sign up on the website, www.sosbadger.com, and states those joining will be informed when their
action is needed.
The Save Our Ship! campaign also is conducting an online auction of authentic Badger and car ferry artifacts through 6
p.m. Thursday at www.ssbadgerstore.com/auction. Items include a life ring, rare photographs, captains' jackets, a
chadburn and many more historic artifacts .

CS bridge open, but some access ramps will close Tuesday
http://www .wiscnews.com/portagedailyreqister/news/article 835c1 ad0-867 c-11 e0-a0d7 -001 cc4c002e0 .html
By Lyn Jerde
Daily Register
May 24,2011
TOWN OF DEKORRA- The Columbia County Highway CS bridge isn't closing down -yet- but the on-ramps and off-
ramps for southbound travelers on Interstate 39/90/94 won't be available for three weeks, starting Tuesday.
Anyone traveling south (or east) on Interstate 39/90/94 won't be able to leave the road at Exit 115 in the town of Dekorra,
nor will anyone traveling on CS be able to enter the interstate's southbound lanes from there.
Chad Hayes of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation said both the southbound on and off ramps will be closed for
21 days. The closure will allow the contractor to replace the concrete pavement, add curb and gutter and install new storm
sewers.
The bridge will remain open during the project, but only to one-lane traffic, regulated by a temporary stoplight.
However, Hayes said, any southbound traveler needing access to the area near the junction of CS and the interstate- an
area that includes, among other businesses, two restaurants and a convenience store- can get there by continuing south
toward Exit 119 (Highway 60), then immediately re-entering the interstate northbound. The northbound on- and off-ramps
at Exit 115 will be open, though they're due for a weeklong closure sometime in August.
The Highway CS bridge replacement is being done one lane at a time to accommodate businesses in the area, whose
owners told DOT officials that complete lack of access to the bridge, for the four months that the project would have taken,
would have been financially devastating to enterprises that depend primarily on customers traveling on the interstate.
The DOT agreed to replace the bridge one lane at a time, though doing so added about $300,000 to the project's
estimated $2 million cost, and increased the duration of the work from four months to seven months. Completion is
targeted for November.
11
There will be a period of about seven days, probably sometime in October, when the bridge will be closed to allow the
concrete joint between the two halves of the bridge to cure adequately, Hayes said.
For most of the busy summer tourism season, however, the bridge and the exit ramps at Exit 115 will be accessible.
But for people who travel at night, expect lane closures on the interstate near the construction area this we.ek.
Flashing lighted signs will warn both northbound and southbound motorists of the closures of lanes- sometimes two of the
three lanes of traffic- between 9:30 p.m. and 5 a.m. the following day. During that time, there also are likely to be ramp
closings.
Hayes, who said he spends considerable time at the construction site, said no workers have been injured, but sometimes
interstate traffic runs a little fast, and a little close, for the safety of the workers, especially in the overnight hours .

Kathy Hegerfeld
WisDOT
Office of Public Affairs
Rm. 1038 Hill Farms
Madison, WI
(6o8)261-5895
9
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Steffes, Laurel J - DNR
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 4:07 PM Sent:
To: DNR DL AD DLT; DNR DL OC PA ALL; Werwie, Cullen J- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV;
Ross, Laurie J - DNR
Subject: Selected DNR news media contacts
Pat Durkin, outdoor writer. Diane Crawford, Licensing Data Manager, handled. Wanted to know Gov. Walker's and
others' hunting and fishing license recent history. Scott Walker, ALIS record first created 11/16/2007. Purchase
history: 2007 gun deer; 2008 gun deer license; 2009 Gun Deer, Archery deer, pheasant stamp (no small game), $1
to venison donation; 2010 Conservation Patron, $10 contribution to Fish and Wildlife, $20 contribution to Venison
Processing; 2011 Conservation Patron. Tom Barrett, No record. Of note: Mark Neumann has bought deer and fish
license privileges every year dating back to start of ALIS in '99 including patron licenses in '04 and '05.
Susan Bence, environmental news reporter for Milwaukee public radio (WUWM). Drinking and Groundwater
Director Jill Jonas handled. Bence is thinking of completing a more detailed news report on the recently passed
disinfection legislation (no date at this time). Suggested she contact Borchardt and Bradbury regarding their research
and for any community names they might suggest would be willing to discuss disinfection. Confirmed that the
legislation relates to municipally owned public water systems.
Rachel White, The Lakeland Times. Chief Warden Randy Stark handled. Rachael wanted to do a story on our
enforcement of aquatic invasive species Jaws. She hear we were stepping up enforcement efforts. Made the
following points:
Highlighted the importance of preventing the spread of invasive species to protect our Jakes and rivers, native
species and habitat.
Emphasized the importance of lakes, rivers and native species to economy, quality of life, property values, and
recreational opportunity.
Said we strive to achieve voluntary compliance through three tools: enforcement, education, and community
involvement
Outlined how we rolled out the new Jaw last year with high levels of education. Explained that as is the case with
any new Jaw, we begin to enforce it after a period of education.
Explained our polls show high levels of knowledge of the Jaw.
Explained how individual actions matter in preventing the spread of invasive- one persons actions can
undermine the efforts of everyone else
I said those who know the Jaw and choose to not follow it are subject to enforcement action.
Officers exercise discretion in making enforcement decisions, and every case must be evaluated individually.
Said that preventing the spread of invasive is important work, particularly to the next generation of people in
Wisconsin.
Lee Bergquist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Laurel Steffes handled. Check in. On reviewing the Natural
Resources Board agenda, he will yield the paper's coverage to Paul Smith tomorrow and will not attend. He once
again raised the question of whether DNR could provide Internet audio feeds from the Board meeting as the PSC
does.
Vickie Mrotek, news anchor, WSAW TV 7, Wausau. Tom Meronek, DNR fisheries biologist, handled. Station
looking for excuse to get a camera outdoors on a nice day and decided they'd like an update on the big fish kills
experienced three weeks to a month ago on Lake du Bay and the Stevens Point Flowage. Most of those dead fish
were crappies. At first a virus was suspected, and there are still tests pending, but the DNR fish health expert is now
leaning toward no virus. Instead the theory is that poor gill development, caused by unusually hard winter stress,
made it impossible for these fish to take up enough oxygen once the ice melted, temperatures rose and metabolisms
increased. Early ice and consistent snow cover kept the flowages dark and the absence of solar would have
contributed to low oxygen levels in these impoundments, along with nutrient runoff. And winter lasted a month longer
than has been usual. This could have been exacerbated by a large year class of crappies. The bottom line is that the
fish kill is over, there are still crappies in the age range, so a whole year class was not lost and there are a ton of
other fish in these lakes and the fishermen are out there and the fishing is good.
1
Jeff Starck, Wausau Daily Herald. Ed Culhane, regional public affairs manager, handled. Starck was looking for
DNR contact, preferably in central Wisconsin, to talk about road salt and its effect on surface waters. A relatively
aggressive search turned up not much. West Central water leader was unaware of any ongoing DNR studies or
programs or expert contacts. I did provide Jeff with a link to a story about Bob Germer, a DNR waste and materials
management specialist in Spooner who worked with Polk County Highway Dept. to successfully test a mixture of dairy
salt brine with road salt and sand as a way of reducing chloride pollution. Unfortunately, Germer isn't available this
week. Also provided a DOT contact.
Doug Reed, The History Channel, producer "Only in America." Laurel Steffes handled. Chief Warden Stark
forwarded the contact. The program host will be in Wisconsin Dells on June 24 and Eau Claire on the 27th or 29th.
They would like to do a segment on road kills, alia' "Dirty Jobs" on Discovery. He was looking to have DNR take him
out. Both Stark and Steffes explained that road kill pickups are done by contractors. Ed Culhane, public affairs
manager in Eau Claire, will work with LE staff to review contractors in the area and check with them on sharing their
name and number (though the list of contracts would be a public record.) Reed will call Culhane in two days to see if
something can be set up. Steffes explained that the show would have to work directly with the contractor, not DNR.
Chuck Quirmbach, Wisconsin Public Radio. Laurel Steffes handled. Looking for written materials outlining DNR's
assessment of EPA's proposed mercury and air toxics approach. Quirmbach is in Chicago today covering a related
hearing and needs background. Informed him we had no materials available I could email but would refer Air Director
John Melby on his return to the office. Quirmbach said he would record his story late today for tomorrow a.m.
Darcie Beckman, Times Reporter, Adams. Jodi Stormoen, DNR forest ranger, handled. Regarding DNR's
involvement in on-going tornado clean-up efforts in Adams County. Discussed 3 things specifically: 1. Grant funding
being utilized for chipping of debris in the Town of Monroe as a result of their Community Wildfire Protection Plan. I
directed her to Amy Luebke for more specific information. 2. Plan for assessing wildfire hazard for the upcoming
spring fire season and possible burning restrictions in the affected area that may result from that assessment. 3.
Contact information for Austin and Nina for general information regarding timber harvesting and tree planting.
Trent Artus, WQOW TV 18, Eau Claire. Ed Culhane, regional public affairs manager, handled. Artus wanted local
DNR comment on governor's signing of bill negating the requirement for municipal water disinfection. Artus was told
that Jill Jonas was the DNR contact for this issue.
o Danyel Piecek, Reporter, Northlands News Center, Duluth (KBJR and KDLH, NBC and CBS); Jay Kittlestad,
Reporter, KQDS - Fox 21, Duluth; and WDIO newsroom- ABC, Duluth. Joanne Haas, Public Affairs Manager for
Enforcement and Science, called and sent follow-up e-mails to pitch public safety stories regarding commercial trap
nets rule changes and Memorial Day boat traffic on Lake Superior.
o Kathy Hanson, Sawyer County Record. Kenneth Jonas, DNR wildlife supervisor, handled. About the fate of the
bears that were trapped near the intersection of Hwy. 27 and Co. trunk K (Trailways Inn) within the last month. Was
quite frank with her and explained that one sow with her two yearlings were trapped and relocated on two occasions.
After the third time the sow returned and was trapped due to behaviors that were of concern for human health and
safety she was euthanized and that one of the yearlings recently suffered the same fate the third time it was trapped.
She asked about the sow with newborn cubs that was in the same vicinity and I explained that she and her cubs were
also trapped and re-located but to my knowledge have not been seen in this area since that time. Talked extensively
about the human habituation and food conditioned responses that these bears exhibited and that the feeding of these
bears by people is what ultimately has now lead to the demise of two of those bears. Stressed that when a bear starts
approaching people and human dwellings with the expectation of being fed, and no longer can be chased off by
people who become uncomfortable in their presence, the risk of that bear actually causing injury to people becomes
extremely heightened. I also explained that the Dept. took the action to lethally remove these bears from the
population because we were concerned that the risk they posed was too great for the safety of the general public that
we serve.
Frederica Freyberg, "Here and Now," Wisconsin Public Television. Laurel Steffes handled. She would like to do
an interview with Cathy Stepp about the phosphorus rules. This would be a pre-taped segment for the show and,
therefore, would not have to be taped on a Friday. When asked, Fred said she would accept a surrogate. Her angle
is that the rules "are QUITE expensive" for some canners and wastewater systems, and she would like to explore
that. I told here I would get back to her Wednesday when we have had a chance to see who is available.
Lynette Kalsnes ofWBEZ91.5 Chicago Public Media. Eric Ebersberger, Water Use Chief, handled. Regarding the
Great Lakes Compact and the City of Waukesha's diversion application. Lynette had very general questions related
to the significance of the Compact in general, and the process for reviewing and potentially approving a diversion
application such as Waukesha's. Her interview will be part of a larger Great Lakes series, and will air sometime in
late June.
2
Raymond Neupert, WSAU Radio, Wausau. Laurel Steffes handled. Follow-up today's musky news release. Gave
him the contacts in the fish program. http://dnr.wi.gov/news/DNRNews Lookup.asp?id=276#art3
5/23
Dean Bortz, Outdoor News. Jeremy Peery, warden supervisor, Eau Claire, handled. The story is on the federal
conviction of Richard Kochevar and I provided him with the answers to his questions. Additionally, I believe that he
will be contacting Warden Bowe as well. Kochevar, who has an extensive record of game violations, was convicted
of tagging a deer shot in Nebraska with a Wisconsin hunting tag.
Rachel White, The Lakeland Times. Land Administrator Kurt Thiede handled. A reader was concerned about loss
of funding for Wildlife Services [for problem wolf control.] Reported that we are currently proceeding business as
usual. WS has indicated that they would be funded until Sept. 1. In the mean time we are investigating our options for
picking up their workload. Whether it be internally taking on that work or using a contractor to perform our depredation
investigation work. We are committed to managing our wolf population when they are delisted and until that time we
will follow through on our requirement to investigate and reimburse those who suffer losses as a result of wolf
depredations.
Sauk Prairie Star. Dana White Quam, Regional Park Specialist, attended a meeting Monday in which the reporter
was present. Regarding the rail to trail discussion through Sauk Prairie into Devil's Lake. This has been a series of
meetings organized by the Sauk County Economic Development Committee to resolve issues between rail use and
potential trail use. Quam gave a presentation regarding the process we will go through to develop the trail, including
the lengthy timeframe it will take, mostly because of the Army's timeframe for BAAP. Also, Frank Huntington was also
at the meeting and discussed DOT's role.
Director
Office of Communication
Wisconsin Deportment of Natural Resources
(\if) phone: (608) 266-8109
(\if) fax: (608) 266-6983
([;'])e-mail: Laurei.Steffes@Wisconsin.gov
3
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 7:26 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject:
Attachments:
Left him a vm
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Re: Zac Schultz story
mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:55 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Fw: Zac Schultz story
Do you want to give schultz a shout
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent:Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:53PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Zac Schultz story
Now he's moved into the annual certification votes as a defense.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49 PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: nW alker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money"', but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
78
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultzl5
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the vote'"-," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
Waunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save moneye., but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
79
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only if we can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
80
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
Wei house, Andrew <Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov>
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:56 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: Zac Schultz story
Attachments: mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
But he didn't say the whole other 2/3 of the paragraph that it leads into.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:55PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
That was the one that Walker said that particular provision, doesn't have a direct fiscal impact.
Overall collective bargaining changes would save the state 300 million and locals 1.44 billion. That's real money.
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:53PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Zac Schultz story
Now he's moved into the annual certification votes as a defense.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49 PM
To: Wei house, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money0.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
81
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultzl5
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the vote"'," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
W aunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save money"<, but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
82
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only if we can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
83
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 7:21 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject:
Attachments:
Yes
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Re: Zac Schultz story
mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:55 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Fw: Zac Schultz story
Do you want to give schultz a shout
---------------------------
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:53PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Zac Schultz story
Now he's moved into the annual certification votes as a defense.
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49 PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money,..._, but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most oftheir money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
84
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultz15
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the vote0..," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
Waunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save moneya.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
85
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only if we can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
86
Downing. Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent:
To:
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:56 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject:
Attachments:
Fw: Zac Schultz story
mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
Do you want to give schultz a shout
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:53PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Zac Schultz story
Now he's moved into the annual certification votes as a defense.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49 PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money"'-, but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
87
Posted Wednesday, May 25,2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultzl5
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the votect," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
W aunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save moneyc._, but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
88
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only if we can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
B9
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:55 PM
To:
Subject:
Wei house, Andrew - LEGIS; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re: Zac Schultz story
Attachments: mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
That was the one that Walker said that particular provision, doesn't have a direct fiscal impact.
Overall collective bargaining changes would save the state 300 million and locals 1.44 billion. That's real money.
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:53 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: RE: Zac Schultz story
Now he's moved into the annual certification votes as a defense.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money0., but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voteri.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
90
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultz15
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the v o t e ~ , " Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
W aunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to .
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save money<?l., but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
. money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
91
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only ifwe can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
92
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
Welhouse, Andrew <Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov>
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:54 PM
To:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
RE: Zac Schultz story
Attachments: mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
Now he's moved into the annual certification votes as a defense.
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46 PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save m o n e y ~ , but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultzl5
93
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the vote0..," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
Waunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save moneyo.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
94
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only if we can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
95
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Attachments:
Welhouse, Andrew <Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov>
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:47 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Zac Schultz story
mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money,.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultzl5
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the votee...," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
Waunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
102
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save moneyc.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
103
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only if we can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
104
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Attachments:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49 PM
Wei house, Andrew- LEGIS; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re: Zac Schultz story
mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save moneyG.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultzl5
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the vote0..," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
Waunakee) says about voter ID.
99
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many of the
changes don't save money0., but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
ofthe Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
100
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only ifwe can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
101
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
Wei house, Andrew <Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov>
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:51 PM
To:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
RE: Zac Schultz story
Attachments: mag-glass_lOxlO.gif
I've been arguing with him for the last 20 min. He doesn't seem to care, says it's technically accurate the way he wrote it.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV [mailto:Chris.Schrimpf@wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 5:49 PM
To: Welhouse, Andrew; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Zac Schultz story
Thanks. We'll give him a shout. Your response is right
From: Welhouse, Andrew [mailto:Andrew.Welhouse@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 05:46PM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Zac Schultz story
Today, Zac went with a story that the Dems are pushing about how everything we do is aimed at killing the Dems. Here's
the line I bitched to him about today: "Walker has admitted many of the changes don't
save money0.., but they do make it harder for unions to raise money and
stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their money
supporting Democrats."
Unnecessarily loaded and incorrect, no? Zac said that Walker did said flat out that certain provisions have no fiscal
impact on the state. I said no, it all works toward a larger picture and has an impact at the local level. They asked
specific about the state to trap him ... it DOES have an impact.
FYI.
Full story below
Dems Say Voter I.D. Part of GOP Conspiracy
Posted Wednesday, May 25, 2011 --5:18pm
By Zac Schultz
Twitter @zschultz15
96
Madison: Republicans say Voter ID is needed to prevent voter fraud, but
Democrats say it's just one part of a larger plan to keep the GOP in power
for the next decade.
"This is all about suppressing the vote<\," Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-
W aunakee) says about voter ID.
Democrats say the Voter ID bill will make it harder to vote for the elderly,
the poor and students, all groups that traditionally support Democrats.
They say that is the true purpose of the bill, not preventing fraud as the
Republicans claim. "Re-write the rules and you win the game," says Sen.
Kathleen Vinehout (D-Alma). "That's what's been happening since
January. Re-write the rules and you win the game."
Many Democrats say Voter ID is just one way Republicans are trying to
keep themselves in power. "It is part of a larger plan, I think, to make it
much more difficult for Democrats to win," says Rep. Kelda Roys (D-
Madison).
Democrats say the first step was Governor Walker's changes to collective
bargaining for public employees. Walker has admitted many ofthe
changes don't save money<\, but they do make it harder for unions to raise
money and stay in existence. Public employee unions spend most of their
money supporting Democrats.
The final step is redistricting. Republicans have hired private attorneys at
taxpayer expense to re-write the legislative boundaries. Democrats are
convinced Republicans will gerrymander the map to ensure a majority of
districts lean Republican.
Under the normal timeline, local communities would draw their maps first,
but Democrats think Republicans will rush a map in case they lose control
of the Senate during the recalls. "I do anticipate the Republicans will try to
jam a redistricting package through in June," says Rep. Roys.
97
"I must have been left out of the conspiracy, apparently I missed the
conspiracy meeting," says Brian Schimming, who is with the Republican
Party of Wisconsin. Like all Republicans, he dismisses the theories as the
fears of a minority party. "If they want to spend their time spinning
conspiracies, that's fine. They ought to focus on winning elections."
Republicans argue these ideas aren't new. They've been trying to pass
Voter ID for years, and redistricting is required by federal law after the
census. "They're crying wolf on just about any issue we bring up," says
Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).
One thing both sides agree is no matter what happens, Democrats can still
win next year. "People can overcome the Republican's attempt to game the
system in their own favor," says Rep. Roys. "But only ifwe can maintain
this momentum and keep the pressure on them."
98
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
DWD MB Communications Office
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 8:43AM
Barkelar, Craig D - DWD; Barroilhet, Dan - DWD; Bartol, Fred - DWD; Baumbach, Scott C
- DWD; Beckett, Laura L- DWD; Berge, Sharon - DWD; Bernstein, Howard I - DWD;
Black-Radloff, Rita - DWD; Blodgett, Rebecca R - DOC; Blodgett, Steve R- DWD;
Brockmiller, William - DWD; Burgett, Carol - DWD; Charles, Amy D - DWD; Conway, John
P - DWD; Cook, Tristan - DWD; Crary, Cathy- DWD; Denis, Gary J - DWD; Dipko, John A
- DWD; Domenoski, Brian K - DWD; Dwyer, Charlene - DWD; Falk, Elizabeth C - DWD;
File, Nicole L- DWD; Fosdick, Anna - DWD; Gerrits, Karen - DWD; Gottschall, Chuck -
DWD; Grant, Ken G - DWD; Grosso, Eric - DWD; Hodek, Scott A- DWD; Holt, Deb -
DWD; Irwin, Michael A - DWD; Jones, Richard - DWD; Kikkert, Becky- DOA; Liedl,
Kimberly- GOV; Lingard, Sue- DWD; Maxwell, Georgia E - DWD; McDonald, Scott -
DWD; Metcalf, John C - DWD; Michels, Thomas A- DWD; Morgan, Karen P - DWD;
Myska, Amy- DWD; Natera, Ramon V - DWD; OBrien, Christopher D - DWD; O'Brien,
Pamela - DWD; O'Connor, Rene - DWD; Palzkill, .Bruce R- DWD; Pasholk, Mary L- DWD;
Pawasarat, Jane - DWD; Pelon, Brian - DWD; Phillips, Amelia - DWD; Preysz, Linda -
DWD; Reid, Andrea - DWD; Richard, JoAnna - DWD; Roehr, Edwin A Jr- DWD; Rozek,
Allison J - DWD; Ryan, Edward - DWD (DET); Sachse, Jeff A- DWD; Schmalle, Verlynn C -
DWD; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Shutes, David L- DWD; Solomon, Brian - DWD; Spurlin,
Dennis A- DWD; Thole, Kristina E- DWD; Thomas, John - DWD; Thompson, Heather-
DWD; Udalova,Victoria M - DWD; Vue, Mai Zong - DCF; Weber, Sue - DWD; Werwie,
Cullen J - GOV; Westbury, John R - DWD; Westfall, Grant- DWD; Williamson, Linda -
DWD; Winters, Dennis K- DWD; Wisnewski, Jerry- DWD; Wurl, Mark W- DWD;
Younger, Thomas - DWD
DWD CustomScoop 5.25.11
http://host.madison .com/wsj/business/article 62d5831 a-83bf-11 e0-8805-001 cc4c002e0. html
Pressing ahead: Suttle-Straus makes major investment despite recession
KAREN RIVEDAL 1 krivedal@madison.com 1608-252-6106 I Posted: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 7:00 am
Despite continuing qualms about the economy, Waunakee printer Suttle-Straus is choosing a bold path out of the
recession with a $2.6 million equipment upgrade enabling a "bigger, better, faster" approach to doing business. Installed
last month, the three new pieces- one traditional printing press, one digital press and a machine that folds and finishes
printed products - represent a change-out of about 20 percent of the company's equipment.
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2011/05/24/general-wi-xqr-wisconsin-budqet 8483164.html
Walker not counting on union savings this year
By SCOTT BAUER , 05.24.11, 06:19 PM EDT
MADISON, Wis. --Gov. Scott Walker no longer expects to see the savings from forcing state workers to pay more for their
health insurance and pension benefits before the start of the next budget year in July. Walker is supporting a bill circulated
Tuesday in the Legislature by Republican lawmakers that doesn't count on the state seeing $30 million in savings for this
budget year, which ends June 30, through the concessions.
110
http://blogg ingblue. com/20 11/05/24/exactly-why-did-man ny-perez-resig n-as-dwd-secretary
Exactly why did Manny Perez resign as DWD Secretary?
Earlier this month Department of Workforce Development (DWD) Secretary Manny Perez resigned from his position
abruptly. at the time citing his desire to "explor[e] business opportunities." In a followup comment, fellow Slogging Blue
contributor Jeff Simpson noted he was told Perez was escorted from the building by Capitol Police, and now comes a
report from Tony Galli of WKOW's Inside Scoop blog that Perez may have been the subject of a workplace complaint prior
to his resignation:
http ://www.stevenspointj ournal.com/article/20 11 0523/CWS03/3 0 523 00 14/Entrepreneurial-training-
offered?odyssey=mod% 7Cnewswell% 7Ctext% 7CSP J-Business% 7Cp
Entrepreneurial training offered .
The Small Business Development Center at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point will offer an entrepreneurial
training program starting June 7, the university announced Wednesday. A free introductory session is set for 6 p.m. to 7
p.m. June 7 at the Wisconsin Learning Center in the Portage County Business Park in Stevens Point, according to a news
release. The six-week program, which will run from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays from June 21 to July 28, will
focus on assisting entrepreneurs in preparing a solid business plan.
http://www. htrnews. com/article/20 11 0522/MAN 03/1 05220439/ Amerequip-Coro-Kiel-recognized-
safety?odyssey-mod% 7Cnewswell% 7Ctext% 7CFRONTPAGE% 7Cs
Amerequip Corp. of Kiel recognized for safety; Company one of 15 to win Wisconsin
Corporate Safety Award
WISCONSIN DELLS- The Wisconsin Safety Council, the state's leading provider of safety training and programming,
and the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, honored Amerequip Corp. of Kiel as one of 15 companies to
win this year's Wisconsin Corporate Safety Award.
http://www. journaltimes. com/news/local/article e38ac5c4-866c-11 e0-a5f1-00 1 cc4c03286. html
Walker: Wisconsin open for business, Illinois going backward
MICHAEL BURKE mburke@journaltimes.com 1 Posted: Tuesday, May 24,2011 8:15pm
MOUNT PLEASANT- Gov. Scott Walker says Wisconsin and Illinois are headed in opposite directions, and this state
would be a good place for some Land of Lincoln businesses to come to. Walker spoke for about 20 minutes Tuesday at
the Racine Marriott, 7111 Washington Ave., at the annual Racine County Economic Development Corp. celebration. He
said Wisconsin has become much more business-friendly since he took office Jan. 3. Meanwhile, he said, Illinois' budget
problems and tax increases to solve them are making Wisconsin the preferred place to do business.
http://www. journaltimes.com/news/Joca 1/article 2b59dc36-866e-11 e0-86af-001 cc4c03286. htm I? print= 1
Rep. Mason disputes Walker job-growth claims
MICHAEL BURKE mburke@journaltimes.com 1 Posted: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 8:21 pm
RACINE- State Rep. Cory Mason voiced frustration Tuesday with Gov. Scott Walker's claim that he has created 25,000
jobs so far, since taking office Jan. 3. Walker repeated that figure several times at the Racine Marriott Tuesday, at Racine
County Economic Development Corp.'s annual gathering. Mason, 0-Racine, said, "Everyone is glad there are jobs
coming back in the economy. My frustration is: By and large, he is taking credit for things that were put in place during the
(former Gov. Jim) Doyle administration and are now coming to fruition and having some success."
http://www. sheboygan press. com/article/20 11 0525/S H EO 1 01/1 05250421/Lakeland-Automotive-expand-create-30-
jobs?odyssey-tabltopnewslimqiSHE-News
111
Lakeland Automotive to expand, create 30 jobs
9:03 PM, May. 24, 2011 1 3Comments City officials and Lakeland Automotive formally announced Tuesday a $5.6 million
expansion of the Sheboygan auto dealership, which will create 30 new jobs over the next two years. The City of
Sheboygan Redevelopment Authority approved a $300,000 business development loan to assist the company with its
expansion. Groundbreaking will be June 10.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/122522514.html
Budget committee backs benefit cutbacks; Measure among several proposals set for
Legislature
By Patrick Marley of the Journal Sentinel May 24, 2011 11302) Comments
Madison - Many of those who take part-time government jobs in the future would not receive retirement benefits under a
measure adopted Tuesday by the Legislature's budget committee. The provision also would require newly hired full-time
workers for state and local governments and schools to work longer before they could qualify for their full pensions.
112