Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 16

www.hopewellsun.

com
JUNE 6-12, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Volunteers needed
Safety Town event coming
to Hopewell. PAGE 4
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Public
safety
staff is
honored
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
At Hopewell Townships
committee meeting on May 29,
the committee members recog-
nized all of Hopewells public
safety employees for their ef-
forts and explained the
progress thats been made
with the Deer Management
Advisory Committee.
Mayor Michael Markulec
presented a proclamation hon-
oring the Pennington First Aid
Squad, Union Fire Company,
the Rescue Squad, Pennington
Fire Company, Hopewell Fire
Department and Emergency
Medical Unit and the Hopewell
Township Police Department.
Access to quality, emer-
gency care dramatically im-
proves the survival and recov-
ery of those who experience
sudden illness or injury, he
read from the proclamation.
And, the Emergency-Medical
Service system consists of
emergency positions, emer-
gency nurses, emergency-med-
ical technicians, paramedics,
firefighters, first responders,
emergency medical dispatch-
ers, educators, administrators
and others. The members of
the Emergency-Medical Serv-
ice team, whether career or
Shows raise epilepsy awareness
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Did you know one in every 26
people will develop epilepsy at
some point in their life? Many
people dont, which is exactly
why Pennington resident Eric
Miller is working to spread the
word and raise awareness about
epilepsy through a series of con-
certs this summer at his home.
The concert series is called
Candlelight Concerts for Epilep-
sy Awareness, which Miller
started in memory of his late
wife, Carolina Barcelos Carneiro
de Oliveira Miller, who died at 25
from Sudden Unexpected Death
in Epilepsy (SUDEP) last August.
SUDEP is a little known and a
less-understood aspect of epilep-
sy, Miller said. Its kind of like
the boogeyman.
Miller said there is a debate
among doctors on whether to in-
form patients about SUDEP
which he says is an even harder
concept to grasp especially for
epileptics and their families.
A 2010 study among Italian
epilepsy specialists showed only 9
percent of doctors inform their
patients about SUDEP. Neurolo-
gists still debate whether to tell
their epileptic patients because of
the risk of instilling too much
fear since its still a relatively rare
occurrence.
The first concert Miller put on
apart from this Candlelight series
was only a month after his wifes
death, which happened to fall on
his wedding anniversary. It was
held at Rho Waterfront formerly
known as KatManDu and was
the start of a series of about 10
concerts.
It was a blessing for me, per-
sonally, to start this, Miller said.
Its good for me to have some-
thing to focus on.
After the concert at Rho Water-
front, he decided to host a big ben-
efit on March 25, since March 26
is Purple Day, the international
day for epilepsy awareness. By
holding it so close to the aware-
ness day, the event was a huge
success, drawing in Carolinas
family from Brazil, Millers fami-
ly and a nice-sized crowd.
All proceeds from the benefit
went to the Epilepsy Foundation
of New Jersey.
Miller had singers perform
whom he had a close personal re-
lationship with, such as Marshall
Crenshaw, Jeffrey Gaines, and
headliner of the event Dan Reed,
who also played at Millers wed-
ding reception.
Miller explained why he asked
Reed to perform, which holds
great significance to his cause
and naming of the event.
Dan has a song named Can-
dlelight, Miller said. I had a
vivid memory of holding Caroli-
nas hand during a performance
of that song at an event we went
to when she was alive, so I didnt
even have to think about it.
After all of his success throw-
ing events at other venues, Miller
decided to take advantage of his
musical contacts many of
whom are close friends and
Special to The Sun
From left, Rob Mitzner plays the cajon, guitarist and headliner Jann Klose plays the guitar and sings, and
Lars Potteiger accompanies the two on piano on May 19 at the first concert of the Candlelight Concert
series to raise epilepsy awareness. A picture of Carolina rests on the mantel between Mitzner and Klose.
please see FIVE, page 9
please see DEER, page 6
JUNE 6-12, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
New Lower-Cost FHA
Saver Reverse Mortgages
Now Available At
We know that seniors are cost conscious and now you can save thousands of
dollars with an FHA Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) Saver
Reverse Mortgage.
Come in or call and get the facts.
The HECM Saver virtually eliminates the initial mortgage insurance
premiumsaving you thousands
We now have a fixed rate HECM Saver that eliminates the origination fee!
Why pay more? Come in and check out the HECM Savers
and save twice with our lowest cost reverse mortgage!
Department of
Education issues
annual report cards
The state Department of Edu-
cation has issued its 2010-11 re-
port cards on every school in New
Jersey. Here, therefore, is a brief
look at the Hopewell School Dis-
trict.
In the 2010-11 school
year, Hopewell employed 25 ad-
ministrators. The state average is
26.
Administrators in the district
were paid better than the state av-
erage, as well. In the district, ad-
ministrators averaged a $128,539
salary, while statewide, adminis-
trators averaged $119,491.
In the district, teachers
salaries averaged $72,819.
Statewide, the teacher-salary av-
erage is $63,851.
Meanwhile, the average cost
per student in the district was
$19,926. Statewide, the average
cost per student is $17,469.
Be sure to check back with The
Sun next week the edition of
June 13 for a full review of the
states findings.
Parents Anonymous/Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 6-12, 2012
20% OFF
Household Specials
Excludes Tablecloths & Sheets
Exp. 6/16/12.
25% OFF
Alterations & Repairs
Not valid with other offers.
Exp. 6/16/12.
24% OFF
Any Dry Cleaning Order
6 pieces or more
Excludes Shirts. Exp. 6/16/12.
Theyre back!
SPRING SPECIALS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
Pennington Market Shopping Center 25 Route 31 South, Pennington
Tailor On Premises Suedes and Leathers Wedding Gown Specialists (Cleaning and Preservations)
Fast and Friendly Service Same-Day Dry Cleaning Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
www.tricountyexteriors.com
10 OFF
Any roof or siding repair
With this coupon. Not valid with
other offers or prior services.
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
$2S0 OFF
Any complete roofing or siding job
With this coupon. Not valid with
other offers or prior services.
FREE
Roof Accessories
with every roof!
Ask for detaiIs!
FREE
Gutter CIeaning
with every roof!
Lic.# 13VH06774500
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'll fix your drip in just one trip!"
Come Dance With Us!

Pennington Shopping Center Route 31 South, Pennington


609-737-7338 www.B4NCLwBRkSHLRCLR.CBH
SLHHLR CL4SSLS
4NB wBRkSBBPS
Starting 1une 11th
Ballet
*
Tap
*
Jazz
Tapping Tots
Lyrical
*
Hip Hop
Pre-School
*
Adult
r
eg
ister
n
o
w
!
Local businesses and individu-
als have sprung into action to sup-
port an effort by the MOMS Club of
Hopewell Valley to bring the na-
tionally recognized Safety Town
educational program to students
in the district. Already established
in nearby communities, Safety
Town provides rising kinder-
garteners with an introduction to
safety awareness in a safe, fun and
constructive play environment.
In addition to overwhelming
community support, a number of
individuals have volunteered
time and effort to make Safety
Town a reality this summer. A
local pre-school teacher will be as-
sisted by two junior instructors
and nearly 24 youth volunteers to
lead the curriculum.
Children who are at least 13
years old are eligible to apply to
work with the children attending
Safety Town as they learn about
and practice their safety skills.
All teens who successfully com-
plete the program will receive a
letter of recommendation and
earn 16 service hours for complet-
ing the session.
Volunteer applications for
teens interested in helping with
the inaugural session of Safety
Town to be held from June 25 to
June 29 at Hopewell Elementary
School are available online at
www.hvymca.org/preschool/safe
ty-town. The deadline for applica-
tions is Friday, June 8.
Emily Frank earns
degree in nursing
Emily Frank, of Hopewell,
earned a bachelor of science de-
gree in nursing from Quinnipiac
University during the 81st under-
graduate commencement exercis-
es on May 20.
Megaffin graduates from
Connecticut College
Hopewell resident Grace
Megaffin earned a bachelor of
arts degree from Connecticut Col-
lege at the 94th commencement
ceremony on May 20. Megaffin
majored in film studies.
on campus
Volunteers sought
for Safety Town event
JUNE 6-12, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
ANNUALS PERENNIALS SHRUBS TREES
ORCHIDS HOUSE PLANTS POTTERY
CONTAINER GARDENING SPECIAL EVENTS DECOR
LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND INSTALLATION
Floral Design
Now Available
Find the perfect floral
arrangement for any
occassion. Send flowers
anywhere in the country
or locally.
(90B) 559-B002
1980 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 www.MontgomeryGardens.com
Join us on Facebook
Cardcn Ccnlcr : lcr|-l
ADVENTURE GIFT FOR GRADS & DADS
Blue Moon Acres will be bring-
ing a real farm experience to the
community with the opening of a
farm market on June 14 at Blue
Moons Pennington farm at 11
Willow Creek Drive.
The certified organic farm,
centered in Buckingham, Pa.,
with the new farm in Pennington,
will be serving the neighborhood
locally produced foods and goods,
as well as the opportunity to en-
gage in the farm experience
themselves.
Owners Jim and Kathy Lyons
have provided organic food to
restaurants for 20 years and wanted
to offer it to their neighbors as well.
The reason for opening the
farm market is to bring the com-
munity to the farm and to give
them a farm experience to see
what plants look like growing in a
field, to cut their own herbs and
flowers, to see the chicks whose
eggs they enjoy roaming the pas-
ture, Kathy said.
The Lyons family wants to pro-
vide a direct relationship be-
tween consumers and the produc-
ers of their food. The Blue Moon
Acres Farm Market will feature a
DIY cut flower and cut herb
garden, where visitors choose
and cut their own greens. There
is a childrens garden in the
works, with plans to include a
vegetable plot, music garden,
fairy garden and craft garden.
Inside the geothermal heated
and cooled building will be a se-
lection of Blue Moon-grown certi-
fied-organic produce, micro-
greens, pasture-raised eggs, as
well as an array of product from
other local vendors.
After its opening on June 14,
the market will be open Thurs-
days and Fridays from 10 a.m.
until 7 p.m., Saturdays from 10
a.m. until 6 p.m., and Sundays
from noon to 5 p.m.
Blue Moon Acres brings farm
experience to Pennington
Brendan A. Maurice, of
Hopewell, graduated with a bach-
elors degree in psychology from
Centenary College in Hack-
ettstown on May 12.
The son of Kathleen Bird, of
Hopewell Borough and Arthur J.
Maurice, of Glassboro, formerly
of Hopewell Borough, will begin
his post-graduate studies in the
fall at Centenary. He will work to-
ward a master's degree with a
focus on elementary schooling
counseling.
Maurice earns psychology degree
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 6-12, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
T
he governor, along with a
bunch of other people, visited
Atlantic City to kick off the
Memorial Day weekend. And, while he
was there, he announced that new reg-
ulations will be proposed to authorize
sports betting in the state.
What about the federal law that says
the state cant have sports betting?
Gov. Christie reportedly said some-
thing to the effect of go ahead and try
to stop us.
The federal government probably
will try to stop it. And, judging from
history, its at least a 21-point favorite
to win.
The governor, though, is right. Com-
mon sense dictates that sports betting
should be legal. Billions of dollars are
wagered on sporting events every
year with a good chunk of that
money going to illegal betting opera-
tions.
Lots of people bet on sports in some
form, or at least want to bet on sports.
New Jersey residents at the polls over-
whelmingly supported sports betting
last year. How many of you have par-
ticipated in a March Madness office
pool, for example?
And whats really the difference be-
tween investing in the stock market
and trying to pick winners on the grid-
iron, diamond or court? In both in-
stances, people conduct research, ana-
lyze the data and try to predict the fu-
ture. Sometimes they win. Sometimes
they lose. But its the same principle.
Yet one is legal and one is not. Want
to bet on the Eagles? Fly to Vegas or
find a bookie. Want to buy some
shares of Apple? Log on to your own
personal investment portal. It doesnt
make sense.
We wish the governor well, as
theres really no doubt that legalizing
sports betting in New Jersey would be
a boon to Atlantic City and racetracks.
But hes in for a real fight. Federal
courts in the past have upheld the ban,
which has been in place for two
decades. Then again, they havent met
Chris Christie.
Sports betting a long shot
But governor believes that, despite law, it can happen in New Jersey
Boot the ban
Were all for Gov. Christies attempt to
bring legalized sports betting to New
Jersey. It makes sense. At the same
time, we recognize that overturning a
federal ban will be an uphill battle.
volunteer, engage in thousands of hours of
specialized training and continue educa-
tion to enhance the right saving skills.
After the members of the Pennington
First Aid Squad and the Hopewell Fire De-
partment Emergency Medical Unit who at-
tended the meeting were formerly recog-
nized, they received a standing ovation
from the residents and committee mem-
bers.
So far, weve done around 440 calls this
year and were heading for our record this
year of 1,200, Pennington First Aid Squad
Capt. Kurt Schmitt said. That couldnt be
done without the support of Hopewell Val-
ley Emergency Services and the financial
support we get from the fire commission-
ers, and not to mention, the generous dona-
tions we receive from the community.
Jon Guerard, a 22-year veteran of the
Pennington Rescue Squad, also comment-
ed on the recognition by detailing how
many new services and procedures the
squad needed to learn over the years.
Weve seen a dramatic turnaround in
patient survivability and outcomes, just
due to the training and the efficiency of
the whole system, he said.
Markulec proceeded to personally
thank each of the members who attended
and noted how they represent the back-
bone of the community.
After the proclamation, senior biologist
and conductor of Hunting and Shooting
Sports Outreach Program Cindy Kisner, of
the New Jersey Division of Fish and
Wildlife, spoke about her collaboration and
progress with the Deer Management Advi-
sory Committee.
The Deer Management Committee was
created in September 2009 to help control
the deer population in Hopewell by educat-
ing residents and conducting studies on
deer vehicle collisions, agricultural losses
and landscape-planting damages.
They meet monthly and provide the
township committee with reports, infor-
mation and advice about steps to take to
better manage the deer population in
Hopewell and to mitigate the adverse ef-
fects of the deer population on the health,
economics and ecology of the township.
In 2010, the township approved the com-
mittees requests to create a task force to
implement the plans to control the deer
population safely and peacefully.
Kisner wanted to personally thank the
members of the committee for approach-
ing her division to work together on these
tasks and goals.
I want to compliment them on their
work, their many months of research,
reaching out to our agency, and giving us
the opportunity to work with the munici-
pality on various aspects in regard to regu-
lations and safety issues, she said.
Co-chairs of the Deer Management Ad-
visory Committee Denise Moser and Bill
Cane explained how theyve worked in col-
laboration with the police, farmers, gar-
deners and other residents to enforce this
plan.
Cane said there are two types of deer
hunting bow and gun. He also noted how
bow-hunting season is quickly approach-
ing starting in September and that
theyve been vigorously working to put
this plan into effect to control hunting.
Weve taken a hard look at all of the
properties to ascertain bow versus shotgun
and the number of people who will allow
it, he said. The homework has been done,
but we still have a couple of things we need
to work out.
DEER
Continued from page 1
Deer Management Committee outlines progress
Please recycle
this newspaper.
JUNE 6-12, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
The Hopewell Township
Health Department invites resi-
dents to participate in a Safe
Home, Safe Family Expo on Sat-
urday, June 9 from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Public Works Building at 203
Washington Crossing Pennington
Road in Titusville.
There will be over 30 municipal
departments, local agencies, serv-
ice providers or public health
partners there to provide useful
information on making your
home environment safer and
keeping you family safe and
healthy.
Come ask all of those ques-
tions you have about septic sys-
tems and learn about some of the
new technologies and what you
need to do to upgrade or replace
your existing septic systems if
and when you sell your home.
Find out about drilling wells,
deepening wells and replacing
pumps, also water testing
and treating water quality prob-
lems.
Local contractors will be on
hand with actual septic tanks,
demo water treatment systems,
and well water equipment.
The New Jersey Department of
Environmental protection
(NJDEP) will be on hand to ex-
plain arsenic in well water, radon
gas in your basement and how to
test for them.
Are you prepared for the next
natural weather event? Did you
lose power in the ice storm last
October? Come and find out how
to properly install a generator to
keep your food cold, run your well
or just for a few lights.
Going green? Then come learn
about composting and pesticide
safety, and learn how to make
your own rainwater barrel with
Rutgers Cooperative and the
township environmental commis-
sion.
Have an elderly member of the
family at home? Get information
on making the home safer to pre-
vent falls and injuries, medica-
tion safety and information on
Project Life Saver.
Other topics include swim-
ming pool safety, car seat
safety inspections and bicycle
safety.
Lastly, the NJ Blood Service, (a
division of www.nyblood
center. org) will be there for any-
one able to donate life saving
blood.
Appointments can be made on
line. Everyone who donates will
receive two tickets for a New York
Mets game.
For more information, contact
the health department at (609)
737-0120, ext. 636 or 638. Also, visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Safety expo on June 9
WEDNESDAY JUNE 6
Farm Share 101: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Train Station. Part of
Hopewell Public Librarys
Wednesday Night Out series. Res-
ident Sharon Vecchiarelli, board-
certified health counselor and
nutrition educator, will speak. For
more information visit
tonourish.info.
The Truth About Extreme Coupon-
ing: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Robin Gilbert will
discuss the reality of aggressive
use of coupons to purchase con-
sumer goods.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Hopewell Township Zoning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the first
Wednesday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewelltwp.
org.
THURSDAY JUNE 7
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
SATURDAY JUNE 9
Build-A-Rain-Barrel Workshop:
Noon to 2 p.m. at Hopewell Town-
ship Public Works
building/garage, 203 Washington
Crossing-Pennington Road,
Titusville. Participants will be
shown step-by-step how to build
a rain barrel and learn how to
install it at home. Helpers will be
available. Fee is $45 per barrel
and includes a short presenta-
tion, instructions, tools, parts and
materials. For registration and
order form, visit www.hopewell
twp.org. For further questions,
call Jim Gambino at (609) 818-
1708.
Hopewell Public Library Book Sale:
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mystery, books
on tape, health and fitness, teen
reads, picture books and plenty
more reads will be available for
purchase. Please do not bring
book donations.
SUNDAY JUNE 10
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY JUNE 11
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
Hopewell Township Committee
regular meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Municipal Building, 201
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road. Open to the public. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time, for agenda or for more
information.
TUESDAY JUNE 12
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Hopewell Township Affordable
Housing Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Township Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time or for more information.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JUNE 6-12, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
MIchac! Cnrtcsc, DMD
311 Wilhersoon Slreel, Irincelon, N} O8542
6O9-683-8282 vvv.drcorlese.com
Dn Ynur Dcnturcs Hurt?
MIssIng Tccth?
Unhappy WIth Ynur 5mI!c?
Crovns
DenlaI ImIanls
SmiIe Makeover
Snoring & SIee Disorders
SeciaI Needs of Gerialric Ialienls
Snoring and SIee Disorders
When nothlng eIse uorks, ue can heI!
ur exerls offer soIulions lo lhe mosl comIex
denlaI issues everyday using slale-of-lhe-arl
rocedures and lechnoIogy.
EXPERT 5ECOND OPINION
CIefl IaIale & Li
TM} & TMD
IaciaI Reconslruclion
(In|ury, Cancer)
ridges
Denlures
Consultant for the New Jersey State Board of Dentistry NJ State Specialty License #3272
PrIncctnn PrnsthndnntIcs
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
Alcoholics Anonymous
of South Jersey
(856) 486-4444
PSA
Narcotics Anonymous
of New Jersey
(800) 992-0401
PSA
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
start a series of home charity
concerts. He works in collabora-
tion with the Epilepsy Founda-
tion of New Jersey and the
Epilepsy Project.
Theres a big network of
house concerts in the world, (and)
most people dont know that, he
said.
Miller held the first concert at
his home on May 5, which fea-
tured his friend and singer Jef-
frey Gaines. He attracted 25 peo-
ple in person and 15 people who
were streaming online through a
website called Stageit.com.
Stageit.com is a free website
for performers to broadcast their
performances live via laptop. The
website allows performers to
make money, interact with view-
ers and reach a large fan base all
from the privacy of their own
homes.
Performers on Stageit.com are
able to choose their own price for
what they want to charge view-
ers, with a minimum of 10 cents.
Miller charges a pay what you
can basis.
For me, its more about the
broadcast and getting the mes-
sage out to people everywhere,
he said. Getting the message out
about SUDEP is more important
than raising money.
Also helpful for Millers bene-
fits is that Stageit.com only takes
a negotiable percentage of the
proceeds. Viewers are also able to
tip the performers, which Miller
uses to donate to his select chari-
ties.
Miller learned about
Stageit.com from another per-
former that he knows. By using
this website, Miller is able to
reach a larger fan base and raise
international awareness about
epilepsy since people can tune
into his concert from anywhere
in the world.
To learn more about these con-
certs, visit www.stageit.com/Can-
dlelightConcert.
For his home concerts which
can accommodate up to 40 people
Miller charges $15 to $30 per per-
son. All door admission goes to
the performers he invites. The
Epilepsy Foundation of New Jer-
sey is also in attendance at the
concerts to accept donations di-
rectly and offer additional epilep-
sy information and resources.
The next concert Miller will be
holding is on Saturday, June 9,
and will feature John Wesley
Harding, a folk/pop singer and
songwriter that has performed
alongside Bruce Springsteen, Lou
Reed, and REM.
Tickets are $25 per person.
Miller will be hosting four
more concerts as of now after
Hardings event Francis Dun-
nery on June 23; Dan Reed on
July 15; Ari Hest on July 22; and
Sharon Little on Aug. 11. Tickets
for these concerts range from $15
to $30 per person.
Since Miller began hosting
these concerts, he has managed to
raise nearly $5,000.
Since her passing, I've been
working tirelessly to raise aware-
ness about epilepsy, he said.
The personal side of it is so no
one has to go through what I went
through. I have an urgency about
it because my wife died, but there
are people that die everyday from
it and its not really known that
people even have it.
For more information about
the Candlelight Concert series or
to purchase tickets, visit
www.candlelightconcert.org. For
more information about epilepsy
and the Epilepsy Foundation of
New Jersey, visit www.epilepsy-
foundaton.org.
JUNE 6-12, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi rob - reiiiicroi, iJ
rioie coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
800 B. Denow Road Penn|ngton, NJ 08654
609-737-6900
www.m|zuk|b|stro.com
FREE KANI SALAD
or SEAWEED SALAD
W|th any purchase
of $30.00 of more
Dine in only. Must present coupon at
time of purchase. Expires 6/15/12.
Great Cars
From Good People
SERVICE SPECIALS
DETAILING SPECIAL
$
19
9
Hand Wash & Wax
Vacuum & Shampoo Carpets
Clean Windows, Door Jambs, etc.
Complete Vehicle Detail - Inside & Out
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 6/30/12.
Reg $179.95
LUBE OIL & FILTER CHANGE
$

00
0ff
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 6/30/12.
TIRE SPECIAL
$
400ff
Set of 4 Tires
$10 Per Tire/Minimum of 2
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 6/30/12.
PRE-OWNED SPECIALS
WE BUY CARS
2004 Toyota Avalon XLS
V6, Automatic Transmission, Airbags, ABS, Air Condition-
ing, AM/FM/CD/Radio, All Power Options, Leather Seating,
Power Sunroof, Alloy Rims, Keyless Entry, Rear Defroster
and More. VIN#4U384228, 114,149 miles. Grey. $10,995
2006 Ford F350 4x4 Supercab
V8, Automatic Transmission, 4WD, ABS, Airbags, Cloth
Seats, 8 Bed, Tow Group, AM/FM/CD/Radio, All Power Op-
tions, Cast Wheels, Keyless Entry Tilt Wheel and More. Clean
Car Fax. VIN#6EB28585, 105,735 miles. Black. $15,900
SEE ALL 70+ VEHICLES IN OUR CURRENT
INVENTORY AT: WWW.BELLEMEADGARAGE.COM
2454 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 908-359-0017
www.bellemeadgarage.com
609-466-8886 www.vallerieeuropeanspa.com
FIVE
Continued from page 1
Five more concerts planned
Pet Friends Grief
support for pet owners
(800) 404-7387
PSA
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 6-12, 2012
DENTAL LA8ER 8 HEREl
NO SHOT. NO DRILL. NO PAIN!
Call our office for a consultation on Waterlase

Dentistry.
EMERGENCY CARE
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
Waterlase

Dental Laser
Decay Removal Cavity Preparation
General Soft Tissue Procedure Avoid Being Numbed
Avoid the Shot and Pain Laser Cavity Detection
Simon Milman, DMD
2288 Brunswick Pike (Business Rt. 1 & Lake Drive)
Lawrenceville, NJ
695-6773 www.tdcmilman.com
Minutes from Pennington, Hopewell and Princeton
Programs for Infants - 6 years
Coupon expires
June 20
Established 1998
Member, American Montessori
Society
MONTGOMERY
609-252-9696 www.NHMontessori.org
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
6/30/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
6/30/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Expires 6/30/12.
oooa/s Vaoyoy as/c/s
-o/ca/s v/ao/c-s
vc-cooa/s -ccs
J/-o/s
lANDSCAPf lNSTAllATlON & RfNOVATlON:
PATlOS - WAlkWAYS - RfTAlNlNG WAllS - ClfAN-UPS - MUlCHlNG
Bring in your
pots and pIantcrs
for pIanting!

All NURSfRY STOCk


Mix & Match - 3 GaIIon

PfRfNNlAlS
Mix & Match
(reg. $22.95-26.95)
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On May 15 at 8 p.m., Officer
Joseph McNeil responded to
Hamilton Avenue for the report of
possible underage drinkers in a
wooded area. During an investi-
gation, a 29-year-old man was
found to have an outstanding
warrant for his arrest out of
Hopewell Township. He was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for
processing. He was later released
and his matter will be heard in
municipal court. The report of
underage drinking was unfound-
ed.
On May 14 at 9:30 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino responded to
the Mercer County Vocational
School on Bull Run Road for the
report of criminal mischief.
Sometime between May 11 and
May 14, someone shot projectiles
at the building causing damage to
two windows. The damage was es-
timated at $1,200.
On May 9 at 4:36 p.m., Officer
Louis Vastola stopped a car for
traveling at 53 mph in a 25 mph
zone along Denow Road. While
speaking with the driver, an 18-
year-old man, Vastola says he
smelled the odor of marijuana
coming from the car. A further in-
vestigation found the driver to be
in possession of three plastic
bags containing marijuana. Po-
lice say the man was also found to
be in possession of a digital scale
and a metal grinder, commonly
used to grind marijuana. He was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for
processing, where he was
charged with the possession of
marijuana (under 50 grams), pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
speeding, failure to wear a seat-
belt and possession of CDS in a
motor vehicle.
He was later released and his
case will be heard in municipal
court.
On May 11 at 8:25 p.m., Sgt.
Christopher Kascik responded to
the ShopRite parking lot for the
report of a woman passed out in a
car. Kascik arrived and says he
found a 34-year-old woman asleep
in a parked car, which had its en-
gine running. A further investiga-
tion found revealed the woman to
be in possession of a hypodermic
needle containing heroin, police
said. After performing field-sobri-
ety tests, the woman was placed
under arrest and transported to a
local hospital where she was
treated and later released. She
was charged with drunken-driv-
ing, reckless driving, possession
of heroin and the possession of a
hypodermic needle.
This case will be forwarded to
the Mercer County Prosecutors
Office for review.
On May 12 at 1:20 p.m., Officer
Vincent Amabile responded to an
East Broad Street business for the
report of an intoxicated man
causing a disturbance at a store.
Amabile arrived and said he
found a 58-year-old man who ap-
peared to be intoxicated and in
possession of a bottle of rum. He
was issued a summons for an or-
dinance violation for the con-
sumption of alcohol in public.
This case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
On May 16 at 9:11 p.m., Sgt.
Michael Cseremsak was on a foot
patrol when he says he saw a 24-
year-old man walking along East
Broad Street. Knowing that the
man had an outstanding warrant
for his arrest out of Hopewell
Township, Cseremsak ordered
him to stop. The man didnt stop
and crossed Broad Street in an at-
tempt to flee from him. The man
was eventually stopped and taken
into custody by Cseremsak. He
was transported to police head-
quarters for processing, where he
was charged with resisting arrest
and failure to use a crosswalk,
which will be heard in Hopewell
Borough Municipal Court.
After failing to post bail, the
man was remanded to the Mercer
County Correction Center. The
original outstanding warrant will
be heard in Hopewell Township
Municipal Court.
On May 17 at 8 p.m., Officer
Vincent Amabile says he ob-
served a car cross over a center-
line while traveling along Route
546. Amabile says he stopped the
car and spoke with the driver, a
54-year-old man, whom he says
had the odor of alcohol on his
breath. After performing field-so-
briety tests, the man was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with drunk-
en driving, reckless driving and
driving while suspended, which
will be heard in municipal court.
He was later released to an ac-
quaintance.
On May 15 at 2:33 p.m., Officer
Brian Dendis responded to a
Hopewell Amwell Road address
on a report of a burglary. Some-
time between 9:30 a.m. and 2:15
police report
Passenger Tires
Performance Tires
Truck & SUV Tires
Always the BEST PRICE!
No coupons needed!
Commercial
Lawn & Garden
Heavy Equipment
Tractor Tires
Bob-Cats
Vogue Tires & More!
1735 North Olden Extension

Ewing, NJ
609-895-8811 HOURS: Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm Sat 8am-Noon
With us your price doesnt change! Price includes tire balance, valves, etc
Wholesale Tires Open to The Public
WHERE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY COMES FIRST!
Tire mounting on premises.
All major and minor brands.
please see POLICE, page 11
p.m., someone forced opened a
first-floor window and removed a
flat screen television, jewelry and
a video game system from the
home. The loss was estimated at
$560. Detective Michael Sherman
is assisting with this investiga-
tion.
On May 19 at 8:44 p.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino responded to a
River Road address on a report of
illegal dumping. Sometime be-
tween 8:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.,
someone dumped a large quantity
of construction debris in a home-
owners driveway. The debris con-
sisted of broken tile and wooden
molding.
On May 20 at 9:45 p.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino stopped a car
along Bear Tavern Road for a non-
functioning headlight and non-
functioning brake lights. Infanti-
no says he spoke with the driver, a
42-year-old man, who had an ac-
tive arrest warrant out of Mays
Landing.
The man was placed under ar-
rest and transported to police
headquarters for processing,
where he was charged with a
maintenance-of-lamps violation,
which will be heard in municipal
court.
He was later released on his
own recognizance on the out-
standing warrant.
On May 18 at 12:04 a.m., Officer
Joseph McNeil charged a 49-year-
old woman with drunken driving,
reckless driving and failure to
maintain lane. According to wit-
nesses, the woman had traveled
along Route 29 through Hopewell
Township and crossed over the
centerline several times before
being stopped in Ewing Town-
ship. Police say she had the odor
of alcohol on her breath and was
placed under arrest after per-
forming field-sobriety tests. She
was processed at police headquar-
ters and was later released to a
relative, police said. This case
will be heard in municipal court.
On May 15 at 5:30 p.m., Sgt.
William Springer responded to
Chicory Lane on a report of solic-
iting. Springer says he spoke with
two 24-year-old men, were solicit-
ing business for Vivint, Inc., a se-
curity company based out of
Orem, Utah. Both men were is-
sued summonses for soliciting
without a permit, police said.
Their cases will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
JUNE 6-12, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
G R A N D O P E N I N G !
www.whenigrowupconsignment.com
609-750-8880
4110 Quakerbridge Road #2 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
Mon-Sat 10am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm CONSIGNMENT NEEDED!
.---' -,-----
-
.
-
-
1 ,-
-
,
10% OFFStrollers, Bedding, Play Pens, Toys and more! Exp. 6/30/12
609-924-9700
www.fearawaydrivingschooI.com
Same rates as Lawrence HS for HS students!
FEAR AWAY
Driving SchooI
Route Test Special $70.00
$110 with 1 Hour Practice
Teen Special $280.00
+$10 Permit Purchase
ller relii erl e|
!etterti:e |i|re:: Cer|er |errirj|er * Z17J |errirj|er Keei
J7JZJS er J7SS&SJ1
jerrirj|erjettjmeil.tem
Cheryl Burke
Two-time Champion
Dancing with the Stars
MULCH LAWN SERVICE TOPSOIL PRUNING
SPRING CLEAN UP EDGE TRIMMING NEW GARDEN BEDS
Located in Ewing N.J. 609-516-0259
www.bluegardenlandscape.webs.com
Blue Garden Landscaping
15% OFF ANY SERVICE
With a year contract. Exp. 6/30/12.
20% OFF ANY SERVICE
Exp. 6/30/12.
police report
POLICE
Continued from page 10
Statewide Domestic
Violence Hotline
(800) 572-7233
PSA
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 6-12, 2012
Fate can be an unexplainable
fortune/another chance de-
served, writes Hopewell Valley
Central High School (CHS) sopho-
more Taylor Guttesman in her
poem published in Aspirations,
the Mercer County College liter-
ary magazine that showcases
high school literary and artistic
talent.
Fate smiled on Taylor and 30
other writers and artists from
CHS whose talent and creative
work was published in the maga-
zine this spring.
That was a record number for
CHS students, who submit work
every year to the magazine, and
more than any other school in
Mercer County.
In a ceremony last month cele-
brating the group at the Kelsey
Theater on MCCCs campus,
Dean of Liberal Arts Robin
Schore noted in an age of digital
books, where print is becoming
a dinosaur, the printed literary
magazine is a thing of substance
that student writers and artists
will be able to share with their
grandchildren.
Many of the works published
were done in class.
Kate Fletcher, a sophomore,
wrote her poems because they
were school assignments,
but found that she loves Eng-
lish.
Thomas Lehman-Borer, who
also wrote his poem as part of a
sophomore poetry lesson, said he
appreciated this project
because it showed him how
enjoyable poetry writing can
be.
English teacher Tery Solomon
thinks this years record number
of published writers is a direct re-
flection of some special pro-
grams, in addition to a strong
English curriculum at the high
school.
We have a group of students
who meet weekly at lunch to
write and share their works in
progress, she said. It grew out
of the JoAnn Meyer Writing ini-
tiative, fostered by the Hopewell
Valley Education Foundation
(HVEF), referring to former dis-
trict communications director
JoAnn Meyer, who died in
2010.
Solomon also credits visiting
poet and teacher Luray Gross,
who has led workshops at the
school, and who will return to
work with selected classes at CHS
this spring, again under the spon-
sorship of the HVEF.
Some students have personal
motivations for writing.
The paper and pen cant judge
you, so you might as well pour
your heart out, junior
Maddie Neider said, who
published two essays in Aspira-
tions.
Special to The Sun
Hopewell Valley Central High School students are: back row from left,
Thomas Lehman-Borer, Russell Nicholson, Kara Hageman, Charlotte
PrudHomme, Hannah Solomon, Julia Rentsch, Kristen Hegedus, Ben
Ngu, Sean Gunther, and Sophie Davis; and front row, from left, Chiara
Nodari, teacher Tery Solomon, Sophia Rosenthal, Justine Thompson,
Erin Amantia, Madison Nicolao, Taylor Guttesman, Mandy Lee, Maddie
Neider, Scott Brown, and Rohan Galgali. The other students that pub-
lished that arent pictured include Shelby Butler, Katie Cirriani-Jones,
Danielle Deering, Kate Fletcher, Ellie Goldgar, Lane Meyer, Haley Morin,
Casey Parrett, Hank Piper, and William Rich.
Mercer County College publishes student literary magazine
Special to The Sun
An Honor Guard from the United States Marine Corps fires a rifle
salute near the Veterans Memorial at Alliger Park in Hopewell
during The Hopewell Valley Veterans Associations annual Memo-
rial Day Ceremony on Saturday, May 26.
Celebrating Memorial Day
Special to The Sun
Three Pennington Boy Scouts, Kennan Meyer, Conor Hassett and
Jeremy Thong, were recently recognized for obtaining the rank of
Eagle Scout. Kennan built two footbridges along the Curlis Lake
Woods trail in Pennington, while Jeremy constructed a footbridge
and a sign for the Oak Street entrance to the trail. Conor built
footbridges around the pond in the Stony Brook Millstone Water-
shed. The boys, from Troop No. 44, thanked the Pennington Day
Grant Committee and the community for their support.
Trio achieves Eagle Scout ranking
The Pennington farmers mar-
ket is every Saturday from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at Rosedale Mills located
at 101 Route 31 North in Penning-
ton.
This years market includes or-
ganic vegetables and wildflowers
from Penningtons Chickadee
Creek Farm, sweet corn and
honey from Kerrs Korn and Farm
Stand, pasture-fed beef, lamb and
free range chicken from Beechtree
Farm, award-winning wine from
Hopewell Valley Vineyards, sun-
flowers from Nine Acres Farm,
hand-knit alpaca good from Woods
Edge Farm, artisan breads from
Village Bakery, and organic meals
from Comfort Foods.
New at the 2012 Pennington
farmers market will be Treeli-
cious Orchards, the highly-re-
garded, low-impact farm run by
seventh generation growers in
western New Jersey, and Penning-
tons celebrated Deli on a Bagel.
Treelicious produces both her-
itage varieties and new hybrids of
apples, peaches, plums, pears,
apricots, and cherries, as well as
fresh-baked, fruit-filled, baked
treats, while Deli on a Bagel will
sell hot coffee, fresh sandwiches
and brunch creations.
In addition, Mr. Pickle, Sweet
Belgians, waffles and a new
mushroom vendor will partici-
pate occasionally.
Music in June will feature
Mark Bodino, Tom Adelman, Jeff
Greisemer, Across the Street and
Billy.
Farmers market
every Saturday
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
See our video demonstration on www.coit.com
Professional Air Duct Cleaning
or Dryer Vent Cleaning
Carpet, Tile & Grout,
Hardwood Floor Cleaning
Drapery & Area Rug Cleaning
Reduce air contaminants and make
your home smell fresh while reducing
allergy aggravation pollutants such as
mold, mildew, fungi, dust, pet hair and
the particulate pollutants left by dust
mites. NADCA certified. Minimum
charge & fuel charge may apply.
Expires 6/23/12.
33% OFF 33% OFF
COITS powerful carpet cleaning equip-
ment removes ground in dirt to help
extend life. We are certified to comply with
all major carpet manufacturers cleaning
specifications, including stain resistant
carpets. Minimum charge & fuel
charge may apply. Expires 6/23/12.
35% OFF
This exclusive treatment will remove
dust, smoke, pollen, odors and soil, yet
guarantees that your draperies will
return with parallel pleats,
even hems and no shrink-
age! Minimum charge &
fuel charge may apply.
Expires 6/23/12.
40% OFF
Your Home Cleaning Experts.
COIT provides full-service cleaning for your
home - all backed by our unique, industry-leading
guarantees. We strive to make things hassle-free by
providing convenient, on-time appointments. And we
guard against surprises by providing a free written
estimate prior to any service.
7
8
2
3
1
E
T
Follow Us On Face Book Coit Cleaners South Jersey and Philadelphia

People you trust trust Coit.


Order Online 24/7 Same Day Service Available
www.coit.com
Find us on facebook and
twitter for more coupons!
(856)-566-0700
CLEANING
Carpet & UphoIstery CIeaning
Drapery & BIind CIeaning
TiIe & Grout CIeaning
Area Rug CIeaning
Air Duct & Dryer Vent CIeaning
Hardwood FIoor CIeaning
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JUNE 6-12, 2012 PAGE 15
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
EIectricaI Services
Moving-Estate SaIe
Editing & Writing
Roofing
Home Improvement
CIeaning
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
HIGHEST PRICES PAID for GOLD DIAMONDS SILVER
can be damaged in any condition
With precious metal prices at all time highs now is the
time to turn broken or unwanted
Jewelry Sterling Silver Silver Coins Flatware
Gold Coins Diamonds High End Watches into Cash
Make us your last Stop
.-eot eme/e-s
5 Po|ots ham||too Twp at the coroer oI 00akerbr|dge & d|ob0rg 8d. 609-584-8800
OVER 32 YEARS
A FAMILY BUSINESS
CASH
EXPERT JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIR
POOLS
New Rebuild Service
Open Close Liners
Paint Removals
Patios Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
Concrete Masonry
Wanted To Buy
UP TO $1100 CASH
For Cars or Trucks w|th bad
Eng|nes or Transm|ss|ons
$500 CASH For
Any Comp|ete Junk Car or Truck
W|th or W|thout T|t|e

1oo pooped 1o scoop?


We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
II/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
Warring the Written Word?
Professional Proofreading,
Editing and Writing
Quality Service at Affordable Rates
www.editwriteonline.com
609-654-8702
Huge Moving-Estate Sale
in Belle Mead - 237
Monroe Ave. ONE DAY
ONLY! Sat. June 9th, 8am
- 3pm. Early birds wel-
come. Furniture, col-
lectibles, linens, clothes,
new Mary Kay cosmetics,
toys, games, electronics,
kitchenware, Gorham,
Lenox, Reed & Barton,
international items, many
new & never used items.
RAN OR SHNE.
FREE ESTIMATES 856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty. Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete New Concrete Seal Coating
Power Washing Mudjacking Stain Removal
Concrete Leveling
Concrete Repair
m&m mOVINO
AND HA0LINO
CleanOutsHouses
GaragesYards
Local& LongDistance

Services
609-481-8030
Home Clean Outs
Basements
Estate Buy Outs
Attics
Pre-Settlement Real Estate
Clean Outs
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'llfixyourdripinjustonetrip!"
Lic.#13VH06774500
WE OFFER:
NewShingleRoofsSeamlessGutters Skylights
SidingSlateRoofRepairsRubberRoofs
Windows&DoorsCappingSoffits
Licensed Insured ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
TBI-CO0NTY BNTBBIOBS
Roofing
Are you stuggling to
understand Islam?
Read this new book by
an American Muslim
www.Islamforamericans.com
Why choose P. Cooper Roofing and Siding?
30 Years Experience Family Owned and Operated High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics Professional Installation
www.cooperroofing.com
Virtual Home
Remodeler
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job

Похожие интересы