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Microsoft ® Office O O u u t t l l o o o o
Microsoft ® Office O O u u t t l l o o o o

Microsoft ® Office

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Microsoft ® Office O O u u t t l l o o o o k

Table of Contents

The Fundamentals

5

Starting Outlook 2007

6

Understanding the Outlook 2007 Program Screen

7

Understanding

Items

9

Understanding the Message Window

10

Understanding the Ribbon

11

Using the Office Button and Quick Access Toolbar

12

Using the Navigation Pane

13

Using

the

To -Do Bar

15

Using

Menus and Toolbars

16

Using

Keyboard Commands

18

Using

Help

19

Exiting Outlook 2007

 

21

Composing and

Sending E-mail

22

Composing an E-mail Message

23

Changing Message Format

24

Formatting Text

25

Inserting a Signature

27

Attaching a File to a Message

29

Working with Hyperlinks

30

Specifying Message Options

32

Checking your Spelling

34

Sending

Working

E-mail

35

with Distribution Lists

37

Saving Unfinished Messages (Drafts)

39

Using the Out of Office Assistant

40

Receiving and Sorting E-mail

41

Receiving and Reading E-mail

42

Replying to and Forwarding a Message

44

Opening

an Attachment

46

Flagging a Message for Follow-up

48

Using Color Categories

 

50

Sorting Messages

52

Changing

Views

 

53

Printing a

Message

54

Organizing and Finding Information

55

Exploring

the

Folder List

56

Creating and Using Folders

57

Managing Folders

59

Creating and Using Search Folders

60

Modifying and Deleting Search Folders

62

Working with Contacts

63

Adding a Contact

64

Adding an E-mail Sender to the Contacts List

65

Editing and Deleting Contacts

66

Changing Contact Views

67

Working in a Contact Window

68

Finding and Organizing Contacts

70

Printing the Contacts List

72

Using the Calendar

74

Viewing

the Calendar

75

Scheduling Appointments

and Events

77

Editing and Rescheduling Appointments and events

79

Working with

Color-coding

Recurring Appointments

80

Calendar Items

82

Viewing Calendar Items

 

84

Arranging Calendar Items

85

Working with Meeting Requests

86

Setting Reminders

88

Configuring

Calendar Options

90

Printing the Calendar

91

Working with Tasks

92

Adding a Task

93

Changing Task Views

95

Updating a Task

97

Creating a Recurring Task

98

Attaching an Item to a Task

99

Assigning a Task

101

Printing a Task

103

Completing a Task

104

Collaborating with Other Users

106

Working with Group Schedules

107

Setting and Publishing Free/Busy Appointment time

109

Opening Shared Calendars

110

Sharing Your Calendar

111

Sharing Outlook Folders

113

Advanced Topic

115

Using Outlook Web Access

116

1

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Starting Outlook 2007

6

Windows XP

6

Understanding the Outlook 2007 Program Screen

7

Understanding Items

9

Understanding the Message Window

10

Understanding the Ribbon

11

Tabs

11

Groups

11

Buttons

11

Using the Office Button and Quick Access Toolbar

12

Using the Navigation Pane

13

Switch between panes

13

Using the To-Do Bar

15

Using Menus and Toolbars

16

Menu bar

16

Toolbars

16

Using Keyboard Commands

18

Keystroke shortcuts

18

Key Tips

18

Using Help

19

Search for help

19

Browse for help

19

Choose the Help source

20

Exiting Outlook 2007

21

Welcome to Microsoft Outlook 2007! Microsoft Outlook lets you send and receive e-mail messages, schedule
Welcome to Microsoft Outlook 2007!
Microsoft Outlook lets you send and
receive e-mail messages, schedule
appointments, and organize your contacts
and addresses. It also reminds you of
tasks you need to complete.
This chapter introduces the Outlook
fundamentals. Besides learning how to
start and exit the Outlook program, you
will learn how to find your way around
the Outlook screen and item windows.
You will also learn how to use keyboard
commands and access Outlook’s help
features. Let’s get started!

The Fundamentals

Starting Outlook 2007

In order to use a program, you must start—or launch—it first.

Windows XP

1. Click the Windows Start button.

The Start menu appears.

2. Select All Programs.

The programs and menus listed here will depend on the programs installed on your computer.

3. Select Microsoft Office.

4. Select Microsoft Office Outlook 2007.

The Outlook program screen appears.

Note: A desktop icon will be available.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Start the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 program.

• Exercise: Start the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 program. Figure 1-1: The Start menu in Windows

Figure 1-1: The Start menu in Windows XP.

The Fundamentals

Understanding the Outlook 2007 Program Screen

The Outlook 2007 program screen may seem confusing and overwhelming at first. This lesson will help you become familiar with it.

Exercise Notes

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Understand and experiment with the different parts of the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 program screen.

parts of the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 program screen. Title bar: Displays the name of the
Title bar: Displays the name of the program you are currently using (Outlook) and the

Title bar: Displays the name of the program you are currently using (Outlook) and the item you are currently working with (Inbox).

and the item you are currently working with (Inbox). Instant Search: Enter key words to perform

Instant Search: Enter key words to perform a search of message content and folders.

Menu bar: Displays a list of menus that you use to give commands to Outlook.

Menu bar: Displays a list of menus that you use to give commands to Outlook. Clicking a menu name displays a list of commands—for example, clicking the Edit menu name displays different editing commands like Cut and Paste.

the Edit menu name displays different editing commands like Cut and Paste. Reading Pane: Displays the

Reading Pane: Displays the selected message.

Standard toolbar: Contains buttons for common commands such as creating new items, printing items, and

Standard toolbar: Contains buttons for common commands such as creating new items, printing items, and getting help. The buttons on the Standard toolbar change depending on what you’re working on.

toolbar change depending on what you’re working on. Help text box: Type a question about Outlook

Help text box: Type a question about Outlook here and press the <Enter> key to search Outlook Help for answers. The Outlook Help window displays the results.

Inbox: Folder that displays your incoming e-mail messages. Close button: Click the close button in

Inbox: Folder that displays your incoming e-mail messages.

Inbox: Folder that displays your incoming e-mail messages. Close button: Click the close button in the

Close button: Click the close button in the Title bar to exit the Outlook program.

To-Do Bar: Keep tabs on your cale ndar, appointments, and tasks all in one place.

To-Do Bar: Keep tabs on your calendar, appointments, and tasks all in one place. The To-Do Bar can also be displayed in a minimized format.

The To-Do Bar can also be displayed in a minimized format. Navigation Pane: Contains buttons and

Navigation Pane: Contains buttons and icons you can click to move among Outlook’s folders and tools. The pane’s contents change when you click a different Navigation Pane button—i.e. Mail, Calendar, or Contacts.

Status bar: Displays messages and feedback. Mail folders: Displays all your mail folders, including the

Status bar: Displays messages and feedback.

Status bar: Displays messages and feedback. Mail folders: Displays all your mail folders, including the Inbox,

Mail folders: Displays all your mail folders, including the Inbox, Outbox, Junk E-mail, Drafts, and Sent Items folders.

Navigation Pane Buttons: Click a button to see the folders and tools for a certain

Navigation Pane Buttons: Click a button to see the folders and tools for a certain category—i.e. Mail, Calendar, or Contacts.

for a certain category—i.e. Mail, Calendar, or Contacts. Scroll bars: Use the vertical scroll bars to

Scroll bars: Use the vertical scroll bars to view different parts of the panes.

The Fundamentals

Understanding Items

In Outlook, an item is the basic element that holds information. Items are used to send and view e-mails, and also to organize information like tasks and contacts.

Since they present different types of information, different types of items differ in their appearance.

Table 1-1: Outlook Items provides an overview of items available in Outlook.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Explore and understand the various types of items available in Outlook 2007.

Table 1-1: Outlook Items

M a i l M e s s a g e Compose a message to

Mail Message

Compose a message to be sent by e-mail.

A p p o i n t m e n t Add an appointment to

Appointment

Add an appointment to your calendar.

M e e t i n g R e q u e s t Set

Meeting Request

Set up an appointment to which you invite other people or reserve resources such as a conference room.

C o n t a c t Enter information about a person including their name,

Contact

Enter information about a person including their name, company, job title, and e-mail address.

D i s t r i b u t i o n L i s

Distribution List

Crate a collection of contacts that allows you to quickly send mass e-mails.

T a s k Enter to-do items that can be tracked until completion.

Task

Enter to-do items that can be tracked until completion.

T a s k R e q u e s t Inform someone else of

Task Request

Inform someone else of a task you would like them to perform.

The Fundamentals

Understanding the Message Window

The mail message window, like other item windows in Outlook 2007, features the new Ribbon in place of menus and toolbars. This lesson will help you become familiar with the basic features of the message window.

Exercise Notes

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Understand and experiment with the different parts of the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 screen.

Office Button and Quick Access Toolbar: The Office Button allows you to see everything you
Office Button and Quick Access Toolbar: The Office Button
allows you to see everything you can do to your document. The
Quick Access Toolbar contains common commands such as
Save and Undo. You can add more commands as well.
Send button: Click here to send the message once you’ve
finished composing it.
Ribbon: The tabs and groups of commands on the Ribbon
replace the menus and toolbars found in the message window in
previous versions of Outlook.
Message Area: Type your e-mail message here as you
would using a word processor. The ribbon will open when
you start your message.
Tips: Double-clicking on the Message tab on the
Ribbon opens and closes it. A mini-toolbar is
available when you click in front of the typed
message.
Recipients: Enter the e-mail addresses of the recipients in the
To field. Use the CC field to send a copy of the message to any
recipients who are not directly involved, but who might be
interested in the message. (Blind Copy, Bcc, is also available
when you click on the CC field)
Signature: You can create a customized signature that
appears on your messages. You can include contact
information and even a logo.
Subject line: Enter a title here so that recipients quickly know
the reason for your e-mail.
Scroll bar: Use the scroll bar to view different parts of a
long message.

The Fundamentals

Understanding the Ribbon

In most of the Office 2007 programs, menus and toolbars have been completely replaced by the Ribbon. Outlook 2007 is different. Menus and toolbars remain on the Outlook 2007 program screen, while the new Ribbon appears only in item windows such as message windows. The Ribbon keeps commands visible while you work instead of hiding them under menus or toolbars.

The Ribbon is made up of three basic components:

Tabs

Commands are organized into tabs on the Ribbon. Each tab contains a different set of commands. In Outlook, there are two different types of tabs:

Command tabs: These tabs appear by default whenever you open an item window. For example, in a new message window, the Message, Insert, Options and Format Text tabs appear by default.

Contextual tabs: Contextual tabs appear whenever you perform a specific task and offer commands relative to only that task. For example, if you insert a table in a message, the Design and Layout tabs appear on the Ribbon.

Groups

The commands found on each tab are organized into

groups of related commands. For example, the Basic Text group contains commands for formatting message text.

Click the Dialog Box Launcher (

corner of a group to display even more commands. Some groups also contain galleries that display several formatting options.

contain galleries that display several formatting options. ) in the bottom-right Buttons One way to issue

) in the bottom-right

Buttons

One way to issue a command is by clicking its button on the Ribbon. Buttons are the smallest element of the Ribbon.

the Ribbon. Buttons are the smallest element of the Ribbon. Tips You can minimize the Ribbon

Tips

You can minimize the Ribbon so that only tab names appear, giving you more room in the item window. To do this, double-click the currently displayed command tab. To display the Ribbon again, click any tab.

Based on the size of the item window, Outlook changes the appearance and layout of the commands within the groups.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Click the New button on the Standard toolbar to create a new e-mail message. Then click each tab on the Ribbon to view its commands.

Command tab

Contextual tab

Button Group Dialog Box
Button
Group
Dialog Box

Launcher

Figure 1-2: Ribbon elements.

Group Dialog Box Launcher Figure 1-2: Ribbon elements. Figure 1-3: Minimizing the Ribbon gives you more

Figure 1-3: Minimizing the Ribbon gives you more room in the Message window.

The Fundamentals

Using the Office Button and Quick Access Toolbar

Near the Ribbon at the top of an item window are two other tools you can use to give commands in Outlook 2007: The Office Button and the Quick Access Toolbar.

Office Button

The Office Button appears in the upper-left corner of an item window and contains basic file management commands including New, which creates a new item; Save, which saves the current item; and Close, which closes the currently opened item.

Tipsitem; and Close, which closes the currently opened item. The Office Button replaces the File menu

The Office Button replaces the File menu found in item windows in previous versions of Outlook.

Quick Access Toolbar

The Quick Access Toolbar appears to the right of the Office Button and provides easy access to the commands you use most frequently. By default, the Save, Undo, Redo, Previous Item and Next Item buttons appear on the toolbar; however, you can customize this toolbar to meet your needs by adding or removing buttons. To customize it:

Click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button at the end of the Quick Access Toolbar and select the commands you want to add or remove.

TipsToolbar and select the commands you want to add or remove. You can change where the

You can change where the Quick Access Toolbar appears in the program window. To do this, click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button at the end of the Quick Access Toolbar. Select Show Below the Ribbon or Show Above the Ribbon, depending on the toolbar’s current location.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Click the New button on the Standard toolbar to create a new e-mail message, if necessary. Click the Office Button to open it. Move the Quick Access Toolbar below the Ribbon, then move it back above the Ribbon. Click the message window’s close button (the X button in the upper- right corner of the message).

(the X button in the upper- right corner of the message). Figure 1-4: The Office Button

Figure 1-4: The Office Button menu.

Undo

Previous

Item Save Redo Next Item
Item
Save
Redo
Next
Item

Customize

Figure 1-5: The Quick Access Toolbar.

The Fundamentals

Using the Navigation Pane

The Outlook program is made up of several sets of tools and folders, each with their own separate and unique screens. You can switch between these sets of tools by using the Navigation Pane.

The Mail pane appears by default when you start Outlook, but you can display other panes by clicking different Navigation Pane buttons such as Calendar, Contacts, or Tasks.

Switch between panes

Click a navigation pane button (for example, Mail, Calendar, Contacts, or Tasks) in the Navigation Pane.

The selected pane appears.

or Tasks) in the Navigation Pane. The selected pane appears. Other Ways to Switch Panes: Click

Other Ways to Switch Panes:

Click Go on the menu bar and select the pane you want to view.

Table 1-2: The Navigation Pane provides an overview of the contents of the Navigation Pane.

an overview of the contents of the Navigation Pane. Tips To minimize or expand the Navigation

Tips

To minimize or expand the Navigation Pane in the window, click the Minimize the Navigation Pane or Expand the Navigation Pane button at the top of the Navigation Pane.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Display and explore the Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks panes, one at a time. Then return to the Mail pane.

Tasks panes, one at a time. Then return to the Mail pane. Figure 1-6: The Navigation

Figure 1-6: The Navigation Pane with Mail displayed.

Table 1-2: The Navigation Pane

Compose, manage, organize, send, and receive messages.

Compose, manage, organize, send, and receive messages.

Pane Compose, manage, organize, send, and receive messages. I n b o x Contains all your
I n b o x Contains all your recent incoming e-mail messages.

Inbox

Contains all your recent incoming e-mail messages.

U n r e a d M a i l Contains all your unread messages.

Unread Mail

Contains all your unread messages.

S e n t I t e m s Stores copies of messages you have

Sent Items

Stores copies of messages you have sent.

I t e m s Stores copies of messages you have sent. M a i l
M a i l b o x Provides a preview of your day; summarizes appointments,

Mailbox

Provides a preview of your day; summarizes appointments, tasks, and new e-mail messages.

D e l e t e d I t e m s Works like the

Deleted Items

Works like the Windows Recycle Bin; where you can find deleted Outlook items.

D r a f t s Stores draft messages that you haven’t yet completed.

Drafts

Stores draft messages that you haven’t yet completed.

O u t b o x Temporarily stores any messages that you’ ve composed that

Outbox

Temporarily stores any messages that you’ve composed that have not been sent.

The Fundamentals

Table 1-2: The Navigation Pane

S e a r c h F o l d e r s Provides quick

Search Folders

Provides quick access to color categorized messages, messages flagged for follow-up, messages with large attachments, and unread messages.

messages with large attachments, and unread messages. Enables you to view and schedule appointments, events, and

Enables you to view and schedule appointments, events, and meetings.

Stores addresses, numbers, e-ma il addresses, and other inform ation about people you contact.

Stores addresses, numbers, e-mail addresses, and other information about people you contact.

addresses, and other inform ation about people you contact. Allows you to organize and manage to-do

Allows you to organize and manage to-do items.

N o t e s Works like electronic sticky notes; allows you to jot down

Notes

Works like electronic sticky notes; allows you to jot down quick bits of information.

F o l d e r L i s t Displays all the folders in

Folder List

Displays all the folders in Microsoft Outlook.

S h o r t c u t s Contains shortcuts (that you add yourself)

Shortcuts

Contains shortcuts (that you add yourself) to other folders, such as the My Documents folder.

C o n f i g u r e b u t t o n

Configure buttons

Allows you to add or remove buttons from the Navigation Pane.

C o n f i g u r e b u t t o n s

The Fundamentals

Using the To-Do Bar

The To-Do Bar is new for Outlook 2007 and combines a basic calendar, the day’s appointments, and current tasks into one pane. It allows you to keep tabs on multiple sources of information in Outlook all at once.

Display the To-Do Bar

Select View To-Do Bar Normal from the menu.

The To-Do Bar appears on the right-hand side of the screen.

The To-Do Bar appears on the right-hand side of the screen. Tips To minimize the To-Do

Tips

To minimize the To-Do Bar, click the Minimize the To-Do Bar button, which is located at the top of the To-Do Bar.

If you click a date on the calendar in the To-Do Bar, the Calendar module is displayed on the screen.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Display the To-Do Bar, minimize it, and then maximize it again.

the To-Do Bar, minimize it, and then maximize it again. Minimize the To-Do Bar Date Navigator

Minimize the

To-Do Bar

Date

Navigator

Appointments

Tasks and

To-Do items

Figure 1-7: The To-Do Bar.

The Fundamentals

Using Menus and Toolbars

Using menus and toolbars are two good ways to give commands in Outlook. While they have been replaced by the Ribbon in item windows, they still remain on the Outlook 2007 program screen.

There are also two more tools that you can use in Outlook 2007 that make relevant commands even more readily available: contextual menus and the Mini Toolbar.

Menu bar

The menu bar is located just beneath Outlook’s title bar. The menus on the menu bar include: File, Edit, View, Go, Tools, Actions, and Help. Within each menu is a list of related commands. To issue a command using a menu:

1. Click the menu name with the mouse.

The menu appears.

Other Ways to Open a Menu:1. Click the menu name with the mouse. The menu appears. Press <Alt> and then the

Press <Alt> and then the underlined letter in menu.

2. Select a command from the menu.

Tip: Additional submenus will appear under certain menu items. Additional submenus will appear under certain menu items.

Toolbars

Outlook’s toolbars provide an even faster way to give commands. By default, the Standard toolbar appears on the program screen, displaying buttons for issuing the most commonly used commands. To give a command using a toolbar:

Click the button on the toolbar for the command you want to issue.

button on the toolbar for the command you want to issue. Tips To display the Advanced

Tips

To display the Advanced and Web toolbars, right- click anywhere in the menu or toolbar area of the Outlook program screen and select the toolbar you want to display from the menu.

Toolbar buttons change depending on which folder is open. For example, when the Inbox is displayed, Outlook displays message-related buttons. When Calendar is displayed, appointment-related buttons appear.

To display a toolbar button’s description, point to the button and wait a second. A ScreenTip appears, telling you what the button does.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Explore the commands available under each of the menus on the menu bar, then explore the commands available on the Standard toolbar. Right-click a message in the Inbox pane to display a contextual menu.

a message in the Inbox pane to display a contextual menu. Figure 1-8: The Menu bar.

Figure 1-8: The Menu bar.

to display a contextual menu. Figure 1-8: The Menu bar. Figure 1-9: The Standard toolbar. Figure

Figure 1-9: The Standard toolbar.

1-8: The Menu bar. Figure 1-9: The Standard toolbar. Figure 1-10: The Advanced toolbar. Figure 1-11:

Figure 1-10: The Advanced toolbar.

The Menu bar. Figure 1-9: The Standard toolbar. Figure 1-10: The Advanced toolbar. Figure 1-11: The

Figure 1-11: The Web toolbar.

The Fundamentals

Contextual menus

Another type of Outlook menu, a contextual menu, displays a list of commands related to a specific object or area. To open a contextual menu:

1. Right-click an object or area in the item window or program screen.

A contextual menu appears, displaying commands that are relevant to the object or area you clicked.

2. Select an option from the contextual menu, or click anywhere outside the contextual menu to close it without selecting anything.

Mini Toolbar

New in Outlook 2007 is the Mini Toolbar, which appears when you select text in a new item window, and contains common text formatting commands. To view the Mini Toolbar:

1. Select text in an item window.

The Mini Toolbar appears above the text you selected.

Trap: Sometimes the Mini Toolbar can be hard to see due to its transparency. To make Sometimes the Mini Toolbar can be hard to see due to its transparency. To make the Mini Toolbar more visible, point to it.

Tip: A larger version of the Mini Toolbar also appears along with the contextual menu whenever A larger version of the Mini Toolbar also appears along with the contextual menu whenever you right-click in an item window.

2. Click the desired command on the Mini Toolbar or click anywhere outside the Mini Toolbar to close it.

or click anywhere outside the Mini Toolbar to close it. Figure 1-12: A contextual menu. Figure

Figure 1-12: A contextual menu.

Mini Toolbar to close it. Figure 1-12: A contextual menu. Figure 1-13: The Mini Toolbar. Sarasota

Figure 1-13: The Mini Toolbar.

The Fundamentals

Using Keyboard Commands

Another way to give commands in Outlook 2007 is using the keyboard. There are two different types of keyboard commands in Outlook 2007: keystroke shortcuts and Key Tips.

Keystroke shortcuts

Keystroke shortcuts can save time when issuing common commands, such as creating a new mail message.

In order to issue a command using a keystroke shortcut, you simply press a combination of keys on your keyboard. For example, rather than clicking the New button on the Standard toolbar to create a new mail message, you could press and hold the keystroke shortcut, <Ctrl> + <N>.

Table 1-3: Common Keystroke Shortcuts provides an overview of commonly used keystroke shortcuts.

Key Tips

New in Outlook 2007, Key Tips appear whenever you press the <Alt> key in an item window.

To issue a command using a Key Tip:

1. Press the <Alt> key.

Tiny letters and numbers, called badges, appear on the Office Button, the Quick Access Toolbar, and all of the tabs on the Ribbon.

2. Depending on the tab or command you want to select, press the letter or number key indicated on the badge.

3. Repeat this step as necessary until the desired command has been issued.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Memorize some common keystroke shortcuts.

Table 1-3: Common Keystroke Shortcuts

<Ctrl> + <O>

Opens the selected item.

<Ctrl> + <N>

Creates a new item.

<Ctrl> + <S>

Saves the currently opened item.

<Ctrl> + <P>

Prints the selected item.

<Ctrl> + <B>

Toggles bold font formatting.

<Ctrl> + <I>

Toggles italic font formatting.

<Ctrl> + <C>

Copies the selected text or object.

<Ctrl> + <X>

Cuts the selected text or object.

<Ctrl> + <V>

Pastes the selected text or object.

Key Tip badge

> Pastes the selected text or object. Key Tip badge Figure 1-14: Press the <Alt> key

Figure 1-14: Press the <Alt> key to display Key Tips.

The Fundamentals

Using Help

When you don’t know how to do something in Outlook 2007, look up your question in the Outlook Help files. The help files can answer your questions and offer tips about Outlook’s features.

Search for help

1. Click the Microsoft Office Outlook Help button

) on the Standard toolbar.help 1. Click the Microsoft Office Outlook Help button The Outlook Help window appears. Other Ways

The Outlook Help window appears.

) on the Standard toolbar. The Outlook Help window appears. Other Ways to Open the Help

Other Ways to Open the Help window:

Press <F1> or type a question in the “Type a question for help” box on the menu bar.

2. Type what you want to search for in the “Type words

to search for” box and press <Enter>.

A list of help topics appears.

3. Click the topic that best matches what you’re looking for.

Outlook displays information regarding the selected topic.

Browse for help

1. Click the Microsoft Office Outlook Help button

) on the Standard toolbar.help 1. Click the Microsoft Office Outlook Help button The Outlook Help window appears. 2. Click

The Outlook Help window appears.

2. Click the category that you want to browse.

The topics within the selected category appear.

3. Click the topic that best matches what you’re looking for.

Outlook displays information regarding the selected topic.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Browse topics in the “What’s new” category of Help. Then search the phrase “create a new message”. Change the help source to the “Outlook Help” section under “Content from this computer” and search the term again.

Enter search keywords here. Browse help topic categories. Choose a help source.
Enter search
keywords here.
Browse help topic
categories.
Choose a
help source.

Figure 1-15: The Outlook Help window.

The Fundamentals

Choose the Help source

If you are connected to the Internet, Outlook 2007 retrieves help from the Office Online database by default. You can easily change this to meet your needs.

1. Click the Search button list arrow in the Outlook Help window.

A list of help sources appears.

2. Select an option from the list.

Now you can search that source.

Table 1-4: Help buttons provides an overview of the buttons available in the Help window.

an overview of the buttons available in the Help window. Tips When a standard search returns

Tips

When a standard search returns too many results, try searching offline to narrow things down a bit.

Office 2007 offers enhanced ScreenTips for many buttons on the Ribbon. You can use these ScreenTips

to

learn more about what a button does and, where

available, view a keystroke shortcut for the command. If you see the message “Press F1 for more help”, press <F1> to get more information relative to that command.

When you are working in a dialog box, click the

Help button (

help regarding the commands in the dialog box.

button ( help regarding the commands in the dialog box. ) in the upper right-hand corner

) in the upper right-hand corner to get

Table 1-4: Help buttons

Back Click here to move back to the previous help topic.

Back

Click here to move back to the previous help topic.

Forward Click here to move forward to the next help topic.

Forward

Click here to move forward to the next help topic.

Home Click here to return to the Help home page.

Home

Click here to return to the Help home page.

Print Click here to print the current help topic.

Print

Click here to print the current help topic.

Change Font Size Click here to change the size of the text in the Help

Change Font Size

Click here to change the size of the text in the Help window.

Show Table of Contents Click here to browse for help using the Table of Contents.

Show Table of Contents

Click here to browse for help using the Table of Contents.

Keep On Top/Not on Top Click here to layer the Help window so that it

Keep On Top/Not on Top

Click here to layer the Help window so that it appears behind or in front of all other Microsoft Office programs.

The Fundamentals

Exiting Outlook 2007

When you’re finished using Outlook 2007, you can exit it.

Select File Exit from the menu.

can exit it. • Select File → Exit from the menu. The Outlook program closes. Tips

The Outlook program closes.

File → Exit from the menu. The Outlook program closes. Tips Other Ways to Exit Outlook:

Tips

Other Ways to Exit Outlook:

Click the Close button on the title bar.

Having too many programs open at a time can slow down your computer, so it’s a good idea to exit programs that aren’t being used.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Exit the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 program.

Exercise: Exit the Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 program. Click here… …or here to exit Outlook Figure

Click here…

…or here to exit Outlook

2007 program. Click here… …or here to exit Outlook Figure 1-16: Exiting Outlook. Sarasota County Government

Figure 1-16: Exiting Outlook.

2

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Composing an E-mail Message

23

Changing Message Format

24

Change the format of all messages

24

Change the format of a single message

24

Formatting Text

25

Change Font Type

25

Change Font Size

25

Change Font Color

25

Change Font Style

26

Inserting a Signature

27

Create a signature

27

Adjust signature defaults

28

Manually insert a signature

28

Attaching a File to a Message

29

Working with Hyperlinks

30

Insert a Hyperlink

30

Change the text of a hyperlink

30

Open a hyperlink

31

Specifying Message Options

32

Set message priority

32

Request a read or delivery receipt

32

Other Options

33

Checking your Spelling

34

Spell check a single word

34

Sending E-mail

35

Send a message

35

Recall a message

35

Working with Distribution Lists

37

Create a distribution list

37

Send an e-mail using a distribution list

38

Saving Unfinished Messages (Drafts)

39

Save an unfinished message

39

Open a saved message

39

Using the Out of Office Assistant

40

Microsoft Exchange Server 2007

40

This chapter covers two of the most-used functions in Microsoft Outlook: How to compose and
This chapter covers two of the most-used
functions in Microsoft Outlook: How to
compose and send an e-mail message.
The steps involved in composing and
sending a message are pretty basic, but
there’s quite a bit you can do in between
these processes to maximize the effect
that your messages have. This chapter will
show you how to insert a signature, attach
a file to a message, and more.
Using Exercise Files
This chapter suggests exercises to practice
the topic of each lesson. There are two
ways you may follow along with the
exercise files:
• Open the exercise file for a lesson,
perform the lesson exercise, and close
the exercise file.
• Open the exercise file for a lesson,
perform the lesson exercise, and keep
the file open to perform the remaining
lesson exercises for the chapter.
The exercises are written so that you may
“build upon them”, meaning the exercises
in a chapter can be performed in
succession from the first lesson to the last.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Composing an E-mail Message

This lesson explains how to perform the most basic e-mail task of all: how to compose an e-mail message.

1. Click the Inbox folder in the Navigation Pane.

The contents of your Inbox appear.

2. Click the New Mail Message button on the Standard toolbar.

An Untitled – Message window appears.

Other Ways to Create a New Message:Standard toolbar. An Untitled – Message window appears. Select File → New from the menu and

Select File New from the menu and select Mail Message from the submenu. Or, press <Ctrl> + <N>.

3. Type the recipient’s e-mail address in the To , Cc and/or Bcc field(s). (See Table 2-1: Ways to Address an E-mail Message for a description of each field.)

If you want to send the message to more than one person, simply place a semicolon ( ; ) between each recipients’ e-mail address—for example, JohnH@acme.com; BettyT@yahoo.com.

Tip: If you don’t know the recipient’s e-mail address, but he or she is in your If you don’t know the recipient’s e-mail address, but he or she is in your Address Book, click the To button to select the address from your Address Book.

4. Type the subject of the e-mail in the Subject field.

The Subject field of a message lets your recipients know what the message is about. It also

5. Click inside the body area of the message window and type your message.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Compose a new e-mail message, entering your own e-mail address in the To field and “FYI” in the Subject field. Type “Today I learned how to compose and send an e- mail message.” in the message body area.

and send an e- mail message.” in the message body area. Figure 2-1: The Untitled –

Figure 2-1: The Untitled – Message window.

Table 2-1: Ways to Address an E-mail Message

To

Sends the message to the recipient you specify.

Carbon Copy (Cc)

Sends a copy of the message to a recipient who is not directly involved, but who might be interested in the message.

Blind Carbon

Sends a copy of the message to a recipient without any other recipients knowing. To display the Bcc field, click the Options tab on the Ribbon and click the Show Bcc button in the Fields group.

Copy (Bcc)

Composing and Sending E-mail

Changing Message Format

Microsoft Outlook can read and create messages in three different formats: HTML, Rich Text, and Plain Text. This lesson will explain each of these three formats and show you how to change formats.

Change the format of all messages

If you want to change the format of all future messages, change the default message format.

1.

In

the main Outlook window, select Tools

Options from the menu.

The Options dialog box appears.

2.

Click the Mail Format tab and click the Message format list arrow.

A

list of message formats appears. See Table 2-2:

Message Formats for a description of each format.

3.

Select a message format from the list and click OK.

Now every new message will be created in the selected format.

Change the format of a single message

If you want to change the format of an individual message, change the message format manually.

1.

In

the main Outlook window, select Actions New

Mail Message Using from the menu.

A

list of message formats appears.

2.

Select the message format you want to use.

A new message, with the selected format applied,

appears.

A new message, with the selected format applied, appears. Other Ways to Change Message Format: Open

Other Ways to Change Message Format:

Open the message whose format you wish to change, click the Options tab on the Ribbon, and select a message format from the Format group.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Open the Options dialog box and display the Mail Format tab. Make sure HTML is selected in the Message format section, and click OK.

Table 2-2: Message Formats

HTML

HTML messages can contain formatting and are compatible with most e-mail programs.

Pros: Compatible with most e-mail programs.

Cons: Some recipients may not be able to handle HTML formatting. For example, the formatted text you see in your message window will appear as plain text or unrecognizable characters to your recipients.

Rich Text

Rich Text messages can contain formatting but are only compatible with Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Exchange.

Pros: Allows for some formatting.

Cons: Rich-formatted messages are only compatible with Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Exchange.

Plain Text

Plain Text messages can be read by everyone but can’t contain formatting.

Pros: Understood by all e-mail programs.

Cons: No formatting options.

Click here to change the default message format.

formatting options. Click here to change the default message format. Figure 2-2: Changing the default message

Figure 2-2: Changing the default message format.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Formatting Text

In this lesson you will learn how to change the font type, size, style and color of the text in your e-mail messages.

Trap: You cannot format message text if your message format is set to Plain Text. To You cannot format message text if your message format is set to Plain Text. To see which message format you are using, visit the Format group on the Options tab.

Change Font Type

One way to emphasize text in a message is by changing its font type.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the Format Text tab on the Ribbon and click the Font list arrow in the Font group.

A list of available fonts appears.

3. Select a font type from the list.

Change Font Size

Making text larger is another way to emphasize text.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the Format Text tab on the Ribbon and click the Font Size list arrow in the Font group.

A list of font sizes appears.

3. Select a font size from the list.

Change Font Color

Changing font color is another way to emphasize text in an e-mail message.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the Format Text tab on the Ribbon and click the Font Color list arrow in the Font group.

A list of font colors appears.

3. Select the color you want to use.

Other Ways to Change Font Type, Size and Color: Color:

Use the commands located in the Basic Text group on the Message tab, or use the commands found on the Mini Toolbar.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: If necessary, create a new e-mail message with your e-mail address in the To field, “FYI” in the Subject field, and the text “Today I learned how to create and send an e-mail message” in the message body area. Select the text in the message body area and change the font type to Arial Black. Select the word “compose” and change the font color to red, and do the same for the word “send.”

Font

Font Size Italics Underline Font Color
Font Size
Italics
Underline
Font Color

Bold

Figure 2-3: The Font group on the Format Text tab.

Basic Text group

Mini Toolbar

group on the Format Text tab. Basic Text group Mini Toolbar Figure 2-4: You can also

Figure 2-4: You can also format text using the Mini Toolbar or the Basic Text group on the Message tab.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Change Font Style

In addition to changing font type, size, and color, you can also emphasize the text in an e-mail message by changing its font style. The most common font styles are bold, italic and underline.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the Format Text tab on the Ribbon and click the appropriate button in the Font group.

The formatting is applied to the selected text.

Font group. The formatting is applie d to the selected text. Other Ways to Change Font

Other Ways to Change Font Style:

Use the commands located in the Basic Text group on the Message tab, or use the commands found on the Mini Toolbar, or use the keystroke shortcuts shown in Table 2-3: Font Style Keystroke Shortcuts.

Table 2-3: Font Style Keystroke Shortcuts

Bold

<Ctrl> + <B>

Italic

<Ctrl> + <I>

Underline

<Ctrl> + <U>

Composing and Sending E-mail

Inserting a Signature

A

signature is boilerplate text or a file that can be attached

to

an e-mail message. Your signature appears at the

bottom of any new messages you compose and can

include such things as:

Your name, title, and organization

Your phone and fax number

Your address

A link to your Web page

Create a signature

1. In the main Outlook window, select Tools Options from the menu.

The Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the Mail Format tab and click Signatures.

The Signatures and Stationery dialog box appears. Here you can create new signatures and manage existing ones.

3. Click New, enter a name for the signature, and click OK.

4. In the Edit signature field, type the text that you want to appear in the signature. Then, format the signature as desired.

5. Insert pictures or hyperlinks, if desired.

6. Click OK, and then click OK again to save the signature.

The next time you create a new message, your signature will appear.

time you create a new message, your signature will appear. Tip: You can create more than

Tip: You can create more than one signature in Microsoft Outlook. For example, you might want to use one signature for professional correspondence and another for personal.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Open the Options dialog box, display the Mail Format tab, and click Signatures. Create a new signature named “Practice” and, in the Edit signature field, type “Jeanne Trudeau.” Press <Enter> and type “Director of Business Development.” Apply boldface formatting to “Jeanne Trudeau,” and italicize “Director of Business Development.” Click OK, OK when you’re finished.

Click here to insert a picture

Click here to insert a hyperlink
Click here to
insert a hyperlink

Figure 2-5: The Signatures and Stationery dialog box.

Signature
Signature

Figure 2-6: An example of what a professional signature might look like.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Adjust signature defaults

By default, your signature will appear at the bottom of every new message you compose. However, you can change this and other options to meet your needs.

1. In the main Outlook window, select Tools Options from the menu.

2. Click the Mail Format tab and click Signatures.

The Signatures and Stationery dialog box appears.

. The Signatures and Statione ry dialog box appears. Other Ways to Open the Signatures and

Other Ways to Open the Signatures and Stationery Dialog Box:

In the message window, click the Insert tab on the Ribbon and click the Signature button in the Include group. Select Signatures from the menu.

3. Under Choose default signature, click the appropriate list arrow and specify the appropriate options.

Take a look at Table 2-4: Signature Options for a description of each option.

4. Click OK, then click OK again to save your changes.

Manually insert a signature

By default, your signature will appear at the bottom of every new message you compose. If you have specified otherwise, however, follow these steps to insert a signature manually.

1. In the Message window, click the Insert tab on the Ribbon.

2. Click the Signature button in the Include group and select the signature you want to insert from the list.

The signature is inserted into the message.

Table 2-4: Signature Options

E-mail account

Select the account for which you want to assign the signature.

New messages

If you have created multiple signatures, click this list arrow to select the signature you want to use. Or, select (none) if you don’t want to use a signature.

Replies/forwards

By default, your signature does not appear at the bottom of any forwarded messages or replies. If you would like your signature to appear at the bottom of forwarded messages and replies, click the list arrow and select the signature you want to use.

Signature button

and select the signature you want to use. Signature button Figure 2-7: To manually insert a

Figure 2-7: To manually insert a signature, click the Signature button in the Include group and select a signature from the list.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Attaching a File to a Message

One of the most useful features of e-mail is the ability to attach one or more files to a message. You can attach pictures, documents, PDFs and more in Outlook.

1. In the Message window, click the Insert tab on the Ribbon.

2. Click the Attach File button in the Include group.

The Insert File dialog box appears.

3. Navigate to and select the file you want to insert, then click Insert.

The selected file is attached to the message.

Insert . The selected file is attached to the message. Other Ways to Attach a File:

Other Ways to Attach a File:

In the Message window, click the Message tab on the Ribbon and click the Attach File button in the Include group.

Attachment

Exercise

Exercise File: Certificate.docx

Exercise: If necessary, create a new e-mail message with your e-mail address in the To field, “FYI” in the Subject field, and the text “Today I learned how to create and send an e-mail message” in the message body area. Click the Attach File button in the Include group on the Ribbon. Navigate to your practice folder and attach the Certificate.docx file to the message.

Attach File button
Attach File button

Figure 2-8: When a message contains an attachment, the name of the attached file appears in the Attached field.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Working with Hyperlinks

A hyperlink is a dynamic word or icon that, when clicked,

opens to a specific file or location. You can create a

hyperlink to a Web page, picture, document, and more.

Insert a Hyperlink

Inserting a hyperlink is extremely easy—all you have to do is type!

1. In the body area of the message, position the insertion point where you want to insert the hyperlink.

2. Type the Web address of the page you want to link to; for example, www.scgov.net; and press <Enter>.

Outlook formats the Web address as a hyperlink.

Other Ways to Insert a Hyperlink:. Outlook formats the Web address as a hyperlink. Copy the Web address and paste it

Copy the Web address and paste it into the message body.

Change the text of a hyperlink

If the Web address you want to link to is rather lengthy,

you probably don't want the entire address to appear in the

message window. When this happens, change the hyperlink's text.

1. In the Message window, click the Insert tab on the Ribbon.

2. Click the Hyperlink button in the Links group.

The Insert Hyperlink dialog box appears.

3. Type the hyperlink text in the Text to display field.

The hyperlink text is the text in the message that will be clicked. For example, “Click here!”

4. Type the address that you want to link to in the Address field and click OK.

The hyperlink is inserted into the message.

Other Ways to Change Hyperlink Text:and click OK . The hyperlink is inserted into the message. Right-click the hyperlink, select Edit

Right-click the hyperlink, select Edit Hyperlink from the contextual menu, and follow the steps described above.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: If necessary, create a new e-mail message with your e-mail address in the To field, “FYI” in the Subject field, and the text “Today I learned how to create and send an e-mail message” in the message body area. Select the text “to create and send an e-mail message” and type “to insert a hyperlink.” Select the word “hyperlink,” click the Insert tab on the Ribbon, and click the Hyperlink button in the Links group. In the Address field, type “www.scgov.net”. Click OK. If you are connected to the Internet, click the hyperlink to open it.

Hyperlink button

Internet, click the hyperlink to open it. Hyperlink button Click a hyperlink to open it. Figure

Click a hyperlink to open it.

Figure 2-9: In order to distinguish hyperlinks from normal text, Outlook underlines them and displays them in a different color.

text, Outlook underlines them and displays them in a different color. Figure 2-10: The Insert Hyperlink

Figure 2-10: The Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Open a hyperlink

Opening a hyperlink is extremely easy…

Click the hyperlink.

a hyperlink is extremely easy… • Click the hyperlink. Other Ways to Open a Hyperlink: Right-click

Other Ways to Open a Hyperlink:

Right-click the hyperlink and select Open Hyperlink from the contextual menu.

and select Open Hyperlink from the contextual menu. Tips If the address you want to link

Tips

If the address you want to link to contains spaces or characters, you must enclose the entire address in chevrons. For example, <file://C:\My

Documents\Sales Results.doc>.

If the URL begins with www, you do not need to type http://. Outlook will automatically format the URL as a link to the Web.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Specifying Message Options

Just like you can assign parcel insurance or specify overnight delivery for letters and packages, Outlook lets you specify options for your e-mail messages. You can mark messages as urgent, specify a read receipt for all messages, or request that your messages be encoded so that they can only be read by the intended recipient(s).

Set message priority

If the intended recipient of a message receives a lot of e- mail throughout the day, specify your message as important so that it will stand out in his or her Inbox.

1. In the Message window, click the Message tab on the Ribbon.

2. In the Options group, click the High Importance or Low Importance button.

High Importance: Inserts a red exclamation point next to the message subject.

Low Importance: Inserts a blue, downward- pointing arrow next to the message subject.

The specified priority has been assigned to the message.

Other Ways to Set Message Priority:The specified priority has been assigned to the message. Click the Message tab on the Ribbon

Click the Message tab on the Ribbon and click the Dialog Box Launcher in the Options group. Under Message settings, click the Importance list arrow and select an option from the list. Click Close.

Request a read or delivery receipt

If you feel like your messages are being ignored, try requesting a read receipt. That way, you can track when a recipient receives and reads the message.

Trap: Read receipts only work if your recipient’s e-mail program supports them. Read receipts only work if your recipient’s e-mail program supports them.

1. In the Message window, click the Options tab on the Ribbon.

2. In the Tracking group, select Request a Delivery Receipt and/or Request a Read Receipt.

Request a Delivery Receipt: Sends you a notification when the message has been successfully delivered.

Request a Read Receipt: Sends you a notification when the recipient has opened the message.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: If necessary, create a new e-mail message with your e-mail address in the To field and “FYI” in the Subject field. Assign high priority to this message.

High Importance
High Importance

Figure 2-11: A message that has been assigned high priority has a red exclamation point next to it.

has been assigned high priority has a red exclamation point next to it. Figure 2-12: What

Figure 2-12: What a read receipt looks like.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Tip: Don’t rely too heavily on read receipts; your recipients have the option to deny them. Don’t rely too heavily on read receipts; your recipients have the option to deny them.

Other Ways to Request Receipts:receipts; your recipients have the option to deny them. Click the Options tab on the Ribbon

Click the Options tab on the Ribbon and click the Dialog Box Launcher in the Tracking group. Under Voting and Tracking options, select Request a delivery receipt for this message, Select a read receipt for this message, or both. Click Close.

Other Options

You might have noticed a variety of other message options on the Ribbon or in the Message Options dialog box. See Table 2-5: Other Options for a description of each.

Table 2-5: Other Options

Sensitivity

Displays a tag indicating how the recipient should treat the message.

Security Settings

Encodes the message so it is not readable by anyone except the intended recipient(s).

Have replies sent to

Sends all replies to the message to someone else, such as an assistant.

Do not deliver before

Waits to send the message until the date and time you specify.

Expires after

Makes the message unavailable after a specified date and time.

the message unavailable after a specified date and time. Figure 2-13: The Message Options dialog box.

Figure 2-13: The Message Options dialog box.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Checking your Spelling

It’s usually a good idea to spell-check your messages before you send them. Not only do spelling errors make you look unprofessional, they also reflect poorly on your product or organization.

Spell check a single word

By default, Outlook checks for spelling errors as you type, underlining misspelled words in red. This makes it easy to correct spelling errors individually.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: If necessary, create a new e-mail message with your e-mail address in the To field, “FYI” in the Subject field, and the text “Today I learned how to insert a hyperlink” in the message body area. Select the text “insert a hyperlink” and type “check my spelalling.” Right-click the misspelled word, “spelalling,” and select “spelling” from the contextual menu.

1. Right-click the misspelled word.

A contextual menu appears, offering suggestions for the correct spelling of the word.

2. Select the correct spelling of the word from the contextual menu.

Outlook corrects the spelling of the word and the red underline disappears.

Tip: If a word is underlined in red but you know it is correctly spelled, you If a word is underlined in red but you know it is correctly spelled, you can get rid of the red underline by selecting Ignore, Ignore All, or Add to Dictionary.

Other Ways to Check Spelling:selecting Ignore , Ignore All , or Add to Dictionary . Table 2-6: Spelling Options I

Table 2-6: Spelling Options

Ignore Once

Accepts the spelling as is and moves on to the next spelling error.

Ignore All

Accepts the spelling as is and ignores all future occurrences of the word in the message.

Add to Dictionary

If a word cannot be found in the Microsoft Office Dictionary, it is marked as misspelled. This option adds the word to the dictionary so that it is recognized during future spell checks.

In the Message window, click the Message tab on the Ribbon and click the Spelling & Grammar button in the Proofing group.

the Spelling & Grammar button in the Proofing group. Outlook checks for spelling errors as you
the Spelling & Grammar button in the Proofing group. Outlook checks for spelling errors as you

Outlook checks for spelling errors as you type, underlining questionable words in red.

errors as you type, underlining questionable words in red. Click here to display the Spelling dialog

Click here to display the Spelling dialog box.

Figure 2-14: To correct a spelling error, right-click it and select a correction from the contextual menu.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Sending E-mail

Sending an e-mail message is perhaps the easiest command you can perform in Outlook.

Send a message

1. Make sure that your message is complete.

Below are a few questions to ask yourself before sending:

Have you entered the correct e-mail address (es) in the To field?

Have you entered an appropriate subject in the Subject field?

Did you spell check the message?

If you answered “Yes” to all of the above questions…

2. Click the Send button.

Your message is released into cyberspace, on its way to the specified recipient(s).

into cyberspace, on its way to the specified recipient(s). Other Ways to Send a Message: Press

Other Ways to Send a Message:

Press <Alt> + <S>.

Recall a message

Sometimes you might forget to attach a file to a message, or accidentally send a message to the wrong person(s). When this happens, you can recall the message – provided the following conditions are met:

The recipient has not opened the message

You and the recipient use Microsoft Exchange

1. In the main Outlook window, click the Mail button in the Navigation pane.

The Mail pane appears.

2. Click the Sent Items folder in the Mail pane and double-click the message that you want to recall.

The message opens in its own window.

3. On the Ribbon, click the Other Actions button in the Actions group and select Recall This Message.

The Recall This Message dialog box appears.

4. Specify your options and click OK.

The message is recalled.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: If necessary, create a new e-mail message with your e-mail address in the To field and “FYI” in the Subject field. Send this message.

Send button

in the Subject field. Send this message. Send button Figure 2-15: When you’re ready to send

Figure 2-15: When you’re ready to send a message, click the Send button.

you’re ready to send a message, click the Send button. Figure 2-16: The Recall This Message

Figure 2-16: The Recall This Message dialog box.

Composing and Sending E-mail

5. If you chose to replace the recalled message with a new message, make your edits as necessary and click Send.

The recalled message appears.

6. Click the Close button to close the recalled message.

To see if your recall was successful, check your Inbox for a notification.

Recall notification

check your Inbox for a notification. Recall notification Figure 2-17: After you recall a message, a

Figure 2-17: After you recall a message, a notification appears in your Inbox telling you whether or not the recall was successful.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Working with Distribution Lists

A distribution list, sometimes called a group, is an Address Book entry comprised of several names from the Address Book. You use distribution lists to send an e-mail message to every member of the group in a single mailing. You can use distribution lists to quickly send e- mails to:

All employees in the same department or organization

Members on the same project or committee

A group of friends

Distribution lists show up as items in your Address Book and Contacts list the same way that a person’s name does. To address an e-mail message using a distribution list, follow the same procedures that you would with any other message.

In this lesson, you will learn how to create a distribution list that you can use to send e-mails to multiple recipients.

Create a distribution list

Before you can send e-mails to recipients in a distribution list, you need to create the list.

1. Click the New button list arrow on the Standard toolbar (a drop down menu will appear) and select Distribution List.

The Untitled – Distribution List window appears.

2. Enter a name for the distribution list in the Name field.

For example, you could call the distribution list “Family” or “Management Team”.

Now you’re ready to choose which recipients you want to include in the distribution list.

3. Click the Select Members button in the Members group on the Ribbon.

The Select Members dialog box appears, giving you access to all of the contacts in your address book.

4. Find and double-click the names of recipients you want to add to the distribution list.

As you add recipients, their names appear in the Members field at the bottom of the dialog box.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Create a distribution list named “Friends” and add several of your friends to the list. Send them an e-mail using the new distribution list.

Select the address book that contains the recipients you want to add to the distribution list.

Select recipients to add to the distribution list
Select recipients
to add to the
distribution list

Recipients that have been added to the distribution list.

Figure 2-18: The Select Members dialog box.

Recipients that have been added to the distribution list.

Recipients that have been added to the distribution list. Figure 2-19: The Distribution List window. Sarasota

Figure 2-19: The Distribution List window.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Tip: To search for recipients in different address books—for example, the Contacts folder—click the Address Book To search for recipients in different address books—for example, the Contacts folder—click the Address Book list arrow at the top of the Select Members dialog box and select the desired address book.

Other Ways to Add Recipients:Members dialog box and select the desired address book. Select the name of the recipient, then

Select the name of the recipient, then click the Members button at the bottom of the Select Members dialog box.

5. Click OK when you’re finished.

You return to the Distribution List window. The name you entered for the distribution list now appears in

the title bar and the names of the recipients are listed

in the window.

6. Click the Save & Close button in the Actions group on the Ribbon.

The window closes and the new distribution list is saved.

Send an e-mail using a distribution list

Once you have created a distribution list, it’s easy to send a mass e-mail to the group’s recipients. The process for sending an e-mail to a distribution list is the same as it is for a single recipient.

1. Click the New button on the Standard toolbar.

A new message window appears.

2. Click the To button.

The Select Names dialog box appears.

3. Select the name of the distribution list you want to use, click the To button and click OK.

You return to the message window.

Tip: If your distribution list is rather large, or if you’d like to keep everyone’s name If your distribution list is rather large, or if you’d like to keep everyone’s name and e-mail address private, enter the distribution list into the Bcc field instead of the To field.

Trap: If you can’t find the distribution list you want to use in the Select Names If you can’t find the distribution list you want to use in the Select Names dialog box, you may need to click the Address Book list arrow at the top of the Select Names dialog box and select a different Address Book.

4. Type your message text and click the Send button once you’re ready to send it.

All the recipients on the distribution list will receive the same e-mail from you.

Select the distribution list you want to send the e-mail to.

Select the distribution list you want to send the e-mail to. Figure 2-20: Sending an e-mail

Figure 2-20: Sending an e-mail to a distribution list.

Composing and Sending E-mail

Saving Unfinished Messages (Drafts)

If you get interrupted while composing an e-mail message, all is not lost; you can save the unfinished message and return to it later.

Save an unfinished message

Click the Office Button and select Save from the menu.

Outlook saves the unfinished message to the Drafts folder.

Outlook saves the unfinished message to the Drafts folder. Other Ways to Save a Message: Click

Other Ways to Save a Message:

Click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar.

Open a saved message

It’s easy to return to an unfinished message.

1. In the main Outlook window, click the Mail button in the Navigation Pane.

2. Click the Drafts folder.

A list of unfinished messages appears.

3. Double-click the message you want to finish.

The message opens in its own window, exactly how you left it.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Create a new message to yourself with “Practice” in the Subject field and the text “I’ll finish this message later” in the message body area. Save a draft of this message. Open the Drafts folder and double-click the “Practice” message. Close this message.

Drafts folder
Drafts folder

Double-click the message you want to finish.

Figure 2-22: Opening an unfinished message that has been saved to the Drafts folder.

unfinished message that has been saved to the Drafts folder. Figure 2-21: Anytime a message is

Figure 2-21: Anytime a message is closed unexpectedly, Outlook asks if you would like to save it.

ComposingComposing andand SendingSending E-mailE-mail

Using the Out of Office Assistant

If you know that you’re going to be out of the office for a few days, it’s a good idea to set up the Out of Office Assistant. The Out of Office Assistant sends an automatic response to any messages you receive while you’re away.

response to any messages you receive while you’re away. Trap: The Out of Office Assistant only

Trap: The Out of Office Assistant only works if you are using Microsoft Exchange.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2007

If you are using Microsoft Exchange Server 2007, you have access to several new Out of Office features:

Rich text formatting: now you can apply fonts, colors and formatting to your replies,

Customization: Now your replies can be customized based for recipients both inside and outside your organization. For example, you could specify that your co-workers receive a different message than your clients.

Start and stop time: Tired of forgetting to turn off the Out of Office Assistant? Now you can apply a start and stop time in advance.

1. In the main Outlook window, select Tools Out of Office Assistant from the menu.

The Out of Office Assistant dialog box appears.

2. Click the Send Out of Office auto-replies option and specify a start and stop time, if desired.

Now you need to enter the text that will appear in your auto-reply.

3. On the Inside My Organization and/or Outside My Organization tab(s), type your auto-reply.

4. Click OK.

Exercise

Exercise File: None required.

Exercise: Open the Out of Office Assistant dialog box. Take a look at the options available in this dialog box, and then close it.

options available in this dialog box, and then close it. Figure 2-23: The Out of Office

Figure 2-23: The Out of Office Assistant dialog box, if you are using Exchange Server 2007.

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Receiving and Reading E-mail

42

Retrieve e-mail manually

42

Retrieve e-mail automatically

42

Read e-mail

42

Replying to and Forwarding a Message

44

Reply to a message

44

Forward a message

44

Delete a message

45

Opening an Attachment

46

Preview an attachment

46

Open an attachment

46

Save an attachment

47

Flagging a Message for Follow-up

48

Flag a message

48

Change flags

48

Set a reminder date

48

Remove a flag

49

Using Color Categories

50

Assign a color category

50

Clear a category

50

Rename a category

50

Create a new category

51

Change the Quick Click category

51

Sorting Messages

52

Changing Views

53

Printing a Message