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Art Moves Us

The Giant Dipper, 2010, airbrush, ink on paper by Ati Maier

Visual Thinking Strategies II LTC 8900-60 June 11, 2012 Elizabeth Ozbun

Table of Contents

I. Unit Overview Rationale/Purpose Big Idea and Theme Key Concepts Essential Questions Objectives Cross-Curricular Objectives Table of Specifications: ADE Curriculum Framework Sequence of Images Image Rational Artmaking Activities

II. Lesson Plans Lesson 1: Yay! Roller Coasters! Lesson 2: Wow! Color! Lesson 3: In a picture Lesson 4: I feel. Lesson 5: Post-Assessment

III. Assessment Strategies IV. Additional Resources

I. Unit Overview

Rationale/Purpose Art Moves Us is an art unit for kindergarten students. The big idea is influenced by the work of John Dewey in Art as Experience. The purpose of this unit is to help students to verbalize their art experiences, recognize emotion, and express emotion in art. The students will do this my making art and communicating meaning in written and spoken language. The students live in a highly visual culture. They need to know how to understand, produce, and respond to visual images. In this unit, students will be guided to understand that line and color can be used to communicate meaning. The goals of this unit are to increase higher level thinking skills, creativity, and affective development. These goals are met through the use of Visual Thinking Strategies, open-ended art activities, and the scaffolding of assessment tools. The unit construction is based the recommendations for curriculum development defined by Sydney R. Walker in her book, Teaching Meaning in Artmaking.

Big Idea and Theme


The big idea of this unit is: Art is experience. The subject matter is roller coasters.

Key Concepts Art is the experience of making art Art is the experience of encountering art Art can convey a message. Art can convey a mood.

Art can convey symbolism that the viewer interprets.

Essential Questions
How do we experience making art? How do we encounter art? How do artists convey messages? How do artists convey moods? How do artists use symbols?

Objectives

The student will discuss artworks with peers using VTS strategies. The student will use a variety of line to types to communicate a message. The student will identify colors with emotions. The student will use colors as symbols for emotion. The students will create line drawing schemas that communicate emotion The student will identify meaning expressed their artworks. The student will communicate personal experience in an artwork using line and color.

CROSS-CURRICULUAR CONNECTIONS Descriptive Writing (Language Arts) 2-D and 3-D (Math)

Table of Specifications Arkansas Department of Education Student Learning Expectations

Lesson 1

Lesson 3

Lesson 4 X X X X X

ADE Standard VA.5.K.1 Investigate lines


VA.5.K.3 Identify basic colors

X X X

X X X

X X X

VA.6.K.3 Produce an artwork that involves problem solving


VA.6.K.6 Transfer ideas and feelings to others through original works of self expression

VA.6.K.7 Produce artwork inspired by or connected to content from other disciplines (e.g. social studies, literacy, performing arts, science, math) VA.7.K.2 Tell about a personal artwork and works of others (e.g. famous artists, appropriate elements of art, subject matter) X

Lesson 5 X

Lesson2

VTS Images (in sequence)

Title Coney Island, 1945

Artist/Culture

Rationale

1. 2. The Giant Dipper, 2010

Weegee Pre-Assessment of (Arthur Fellig), emotional language 20th Century, American

Ati Maier, 21st Century, German

Motivational eye candy, sensory invitation to discuss color and line in an engaging context

3. Hansel and Gretel, 2009 Corey Godbey, 21st Century, American Compare/Contrast, identifying feeling of being too small or lost

The Lost Child, 1866

Arthur Hughes, Compare/Contrast, 19th Century, identifying feeling of being English found and belonging

4. Coney Island, 1945 5. Weegee Post-Assessment of (Arthur Fellig), emotional language 20th Century, American

VTS IMAGE RATIONALE

Image #1: (Day One) The photograph by Weegee is a pre-assessment image. The image introduces the subject matter, roller coasters, and the viewpoint I expect the students to take, of a young child. The photograph is taken just above the eye level of the young boy, so the students will be entering the image at his level. The image is not overwhelming for the age group. The stop action is in located in the roller coaster cars on the tracks, and in the turning of the boy to look at the roller coaster. There is an intersection of the rollercoaster track, the boys head in the center of the image, and the fence. The students will be driven to form narratives that I will record and later compare with post-assessment dialogue. The information I am looking for is emotional response.

Image #2: (Day Two) The VTS discussion of this painting will follow a video clip and a sculpture activity using line. It contains strong elements of line and color. The image will scaffold the unit to include discussions of color. I think the students will respond emotionally to the artwork because it will be a sensory overload.

Images #3 and #4; (Day Four) Students will have been scaffolded to communicating emotions through line and color through childrens literature in Day Three. The VTSing of these artworks side by side will follow a reading of a book about a little boy who is told he is too small to ride roller coasters, and subsequently gets lost in the park. I am hoping that students bring personal of experiences of feeling big, small, lost, scared, frustrated, loved, and protected to the table in the discussion of the book and these two images. Recognition of various feelings of growing up will be used for a self-portrait activity.

Image #5; (Day Five or Six) The Weegee photograph will be VTSed again for postassessment. I will record this discussion and look for evidence of transference student emotional language to a black and white image,

Artmaking Activities

Artmaking Activity A: Students will construct a three dimensional rollercoaster out of construction paper strips. Students will use paper lines, combine different line types, and produce a continuous rollercoaster. The purpose of the lesson is to enforce that lines can communicate. The emphasis will not be on emotions in the first artmaking activity.

Artmaking Activity B: Color and emotions will be introduced in the second art making activity. The students will work two-dimensionally to make a printmaking plate. The students respond the painting, The Giant Dipper, and make the lines of a roller coaster using glue. After the glue dries, students will choose colors that express their feelings about roller coasters. Paint will be applied with rollers, and prints will be made.

Artmaking Activity C: Students will discuss as a class and develop schemas for portraying emotions. The class schemas will be documented on a chart using crayons.

Armaking Activity D: Students will respond to a writing prompt such as, Tell of a time when you felt too small. Explain why you felt small, and who helped you. Student will use a schema and oil pastels to communicate their feeling in a self-portrait.

II. Lessons Lesson One: YAY! Roller coasters!

Learning Goal: The student will use a variety of line to types to communicate a message. The student will identify meaning expressed their artworks. The student will discuss artworks with peers using VTS strategies.

Instructional Time Necessary: 50 minutes Essential Questions aligned to the lesson:


How do we encounter art? How do artists convey messages? How do we experience making art?

Materials Necessary: VTS Image #1 Thrill Ride: The Science of Fun by Imax, Chapter 2 Video camera for pre-assessment Glue 9x12 cardstock bases pencils Lesson Introduction: The students will VTS Coney Island, 1945 by Weegee, followed by a short clip of a roller coaster ride. Lesson Steps / Student Learning Activities:

1. VTS image #1. 2. Watch video clip of roller coaster ride. 3. Demonstration: How to fold glue tabs 4. Guided Practice: How to create different line types 5. Independent Practice: Making paper roller coasters Wrapping up the lesson: Ask Group A students to share with the class how their roller coaster works.

Lesson Two: WOW! Color!

Learning Goal: The student will discuss artworks with peers using VTS strategies. The student will use a variety of line to types to communicate a message.

Instructional Time Necessary: 50 minutes Essential Questions aligned to the lesson:


How do we encounter art? How do artists use symbols?

Materials Necessary: Roller Coaster by Marla Frazee VTS Image #2 Note book paper and Chart paper to write down expressive language Glue 11x14 cardboard rectangles pencils

Lesson Introduction: The teacher will read Roller Coaster. Lesson Steps / Student Learning Activities: 1. Read Roller Coaster by Marla Frazee. 2. VTS Image #2: teacher will jot personal notes of expressive language used during discussion. 3. Demonstration: How to draw with glue. 4. Independent Practice: Students will reflect on the VTS image, then draw a picture that comes to mind using continuous glue lines. Wrapping up the lesson: Write down the colorful words the students used during VTS on chart paper and review with the class.

Lesson Three: In a Picture

Learning Goal: The student will identify colors with emotions. The student will use colors as symbols for emotion. The students will create line drawing schemas that communicate emotion

Instructional Time Necessary: 50 minutes Essential Questions aligned to the lesson:


How do artists convey moods? How do artists use symbols? How do we experience making art?

Materials Necessary: Cardboard printing plates

Brayers Paper plates of paint 11X14 Drawing paper My Many Colored Days by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher The Way I Feel by Janan Cain pencils Lesson Introduction: The teacher will read My Many Colored Days. Lesson Steps / Student Learning Activities: 1. Read My Many Colored Days by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher 2. Briefly review emotions that could match different colors 3. Demonstration: How to roll on paint. How to pull a print 4. Guided Practice: Students will roll on paint and pull prints with teachers help and/or permission. 5. Read The Way I Feel by Janan Cain. 6. Ask student to come up to the board and share ideas for schema that communicate emotions using line and color. 7. Teacher will record ideas on chart paper. Students can keep charts at their seats. Wrapping up the lesson: Ask Group B students to explain their prints to the class.

Lesson Four: I Feel.

Learning Goal: The student will identify meaning expressed their artworks.

The student will communicate personal experience in an artwork using line and color. The student will discuss artworks with peers using VTS strategies.

Instructional Time Necessary: 50 minutes Essential Questions aligned to the lesson:


How do we encounter art? How do artists convey messages? How do artists convey moods? How do artists use symbols?

Materials Necessary: Little Rabbit Lost by Harry Horse VTS Image #3 VTS Image #4 Schema charts Oil pastels 9x12 drawing paper pencils Lesson Introduction: The teacher will read Little Rabbit Lost. Lesson Steps / Student Learning Activities: 1. Little Rabbit Lost by Harry Horse 2. Ask students to share times when they felt big or small. 3. VTS Images #3 and #4 4. Give writing prompt: Tell of a time when you felt too small. Explain why you felt small, and who helped you. 5. Review colorful words.

6. Demonstration: Student will use a schema and oil pastels to communicate their feeling in a self-portrait. Wrapping up the lesson: Ask Group C students to explain their drawings to the class.

Lesson Five: Post-assessment

Learning Goal: The student will discuss artworks with peers using VTS strategies.

Instructional Time Necessary: 50 minutes Essential Questions aligned to the lesson:


How do we encounter art?

Materials Necessary: VTS Image #1 Video recorder to tape post assessment Any unfinished projects and necessary supplies Lesson Introduction: VTS Image #1 Lesson Steps / Student Learning Activities: 1. Conduct Post-Assessment 2. Finish up any incomplete work Wrapping up the lesson: I felt happy doing this unit with you.

III. FORMATIVE & SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES 1. Pre-assessment/Post-assessment The students VTS Coney Island, 1945 by Weegee. I will be using videos of the sessions to list viewing behaviors, art vocabulary and perception of twodimensional space. I will reflect upon the concept development, if any, between the two videos to rate the efficacy of the lessons and make changes. 2. Checklist: Auditory-Sequential vs. Visual-Spatial Learning Styles I have been researching the differences of two primary modes of thinking this summer. Research is beginning to show that about one-third of students are auditory-sequential, another one-third are visual-spatial, and the last one-third have auditory-sequential skills with a visual-spatial preference. Education places a high value on auditory-sequential skills, and visual-spatial students with high intelligence often fall into a pattern of underachievement. I will be using a checklist and narratives at all stages of the unit to determine the make up of my class so I can differentiate my lessons, and communicate my observations with my colleagues. Sample checklist source: http://www.visualspatial.org/vslasl.php

The Auditory-Sequential Learner


Thinks primarily in words Has auditory strengths Relates well to time Is a step-by-step learner Learns by trial and error Progresses sequentially from easy to difficult material Is an analytical thinker Attends well to details Follows oral directions well Does well at arithmetic Learns phonics easily Can sound out spelling words Can write quickly and neatly Is well organized Can show steps of work easily Excels at rote memorization Has good auditory short-term memory May need some repetition to reinforce learning Learns well from instructions Learns in spite of emotional reactions Is comfortable with one right answer Develops fairly evenly Usually maintains high grades Enjoys algebra and chemistry Masters other languages in classes Is academically talented Is an early bloomer

The Visual-Spatial Learner


Thinks primarily in pictures Has visual strengths Relates well to space Is a whole-part learner Learns concepts all at once Learns complex concepts easily; Struggles with easy skills Is a good synthesizer Sees the big picture; may miss details Reads maps well Is better at math reasoning than computation Learns whole words easily Must visualize words to spell them Much better at keyboarding than handwriting Creates unique methods of organization Arrives at correct solutions intuitively Learns best by seeing relationships Has good long-term visual memory Learns concepts permanently; does not learn by drill and repetition Develops own methods of problem solving Is very sensitive to teachers' attitudes Generates unusual solutions to problems Develops quite asynchronously (unevenly) May have very uneven grades Enjoys geometry and physics Masters other languages through immersion Is creatively, technologically, mechanically, emotionally or spiritually gifted Is a late bloomer

3. Checklist: Fine Motor Skill Assessment I will use a check list with three ratings : Independent, Re-teach, Hand Over Hand.

Independent means they previously had the skill, or figured it out through the demonstration and trial and error. Re-teach means I went over and re-demonstrated a skill to a student as they worked along with me. Hand Over Hand means the student needed manual scaffolding and is in the stage of proximal development (or not). I will use this information to modify my teaching and plan modifications. The technical skills I have identified in this unit are: Folding: paper tabs Folding: accordion style Use a glue bottle Draw glue lines Draw shapes Draw various line types Load a brayer Apply paint with a brayer Pull a print

4. Student Product Self-Assessment I will set up a table with examples of three levels of completion for each product. Students will be guided to match their work to the examples. Work that does not resemble the starred example in terms of craftsmanship will need to be taken back to the students seat and revised.

IV. Additional Resources Roller Coaster by Marla Frazee

My Many Colored Days by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher

The Way I Feel by Janan Cain

Thrill Ride: The Science of Fun by Imax (1997)

Little Rabbit Lost by Harry Horse

Art & Creative Development for Young Children by Jill Eglebright Fox and Robert Schirramacher

Teaching Meaning in Artmaking by Sydney R. Walker

Art as Experience by John Dewey as synthesized by www.rowan.edu