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MTU Diesel Engines for Stationary Applications Series 2000/4000 Installation Guidelines M060672/00E  2001 MTU Motoren-

MTU Diesel Engines for Stationary Applications Series 2000/4000

Installation Guidelines

M060672/00E

2001

MTU Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Friedrichshafen GmbH 88040 Friedrichshafen / Germany Phone (0 75 41) 90 - 0 Telex 7 34 280 -- 0 mt d Telefax (0 75 41) 90 - 39 28

MTU Diesel Engines for Stationary Applications Series 2000/4000 Installation Guidelines M060672/00E Edition 10/2001

MTU Diesel Engines for Stationary Applications Series 2000/4000

Installation Guidelines

M060672/00E

MTU Diesel Engines for Stationary Applications Series 2000/4000 Installation Guidelines M060672/00E Edition 10/2001

Guide

Guide Page I

Page

I

Table of contents

 

Table of contents

I

Symbols

V

1

General

1

1.1

Foreword

1

1.2

Safety instructions

2

2

Transport and storage

3

2.1

Transport

3

2.2

Storage

3

2.3

Electric welding work on the engine and alternator

4

3

Starter unit and auxiliary power supply

5

3.1

Electric starter

5

3.2

Compressed air starter motor

6

3.3

Redundant starting

7

3.4

Generator

7

4

Fuel system

9

4.1

Fuel system, engine BR 2000

9

4.1.1

Engine fuel schematic diagram BR 2000

9

4.1.2

Description of the engine fuel system BR 2000 (fig. 2)

10

4.2

Fuel system, engine BR 4000

11

4.2.1

Engine fuel schematic diagram BR 4000

11

4.2.2

Description of the engine fuel system BR 4000 (fig. 3)

12

4.3

Fuel supply system BR 2000 and BR 4000

13

4.3.1

Fuel lines

14

4.3.1.1

General

14

4.3.1.2

Recommended material

14

4.3.1.3

Rigid pipe connections

15

4.3.1.4

Infeed line BR 2000 and BR 4000 (from the fuel service tank to the engine)

15

4.3.1.5

Return line (from the engine to the fuel service tank)

16

4.3.2

Fuel pre-filter

17

4.3.3

Fuel service tank

17

4.3.3.1

Configuration and arrangement

17

4.3.3.2

Tank capacity

18

Page

II

Page II Guide

Guide

Table of contents (cont.)

4.3.4

Fuel cooler

18

5

Lube oil system

19

5.1

Filtration

19

5.2

Oil lines

19

5.3

Oil trough/obtaining the required oil quantity

20

5.3.1

Oil level measurement

20

5.3.2

Oil replenishment unit

21

5.3.3

Inclinations

21

5.4

Priming

22

5.5

Crankcase venting

22

6

Combustion air system

23

6.1

Combustion air filter

23

6.1.1

Combustion air filter requirements

23

6.1.2

Filter installation

24

6.2

Maintenance indicator

24

7

Exhaust system

25

7.1

Exhaust line (downstream of the engine)

25

7.2

Seals for the exhaust line

27

7.3

Compensators (downstream of engine discharge)

27

7.4

Exhaust turbochargers

30

8

Engine cooling

31

8.1

General

31

8.2

Cooling system configuration

31

8.3

Engine cooling systems

32

8.3.1

Air/charge air cooling, external -- BR 2000

32

8.3.2

Water/charge air cooling, external -- BR 2000 and BR 4000

34

8.4

Coolant lines

37

8.4.1

General

37

8.4.2

Recommended materials for the coolant pipelines

37

8.4.3

Flexible connections

38

8.4.4

Infeed and return lines between the engine and cooler

39

Guide

Guide Page III

Page

III

Table of contents (cont.)

8.4.5

Venting lines

39

8.4.6

Expansion line

39

8.4.7

Overpressure/underpressure valve with overflow line

40

8.5

Cooling plant

40

8.5.1

Setting up the cooler above the engine

40

8.5.2

Mechanical fan cooler for BR 2000 with air/charge air cooling, external

43

8.6

Expansion tank

43

8.6.1

Quantity

43

8.6.2

Arrangement

43

8.6.3

Size

44

8.6.4

Configuration

44

8.7

Coolant

44

8.7.1

Coolant pre-heating

45

8.7.1.1

Heating power and pre-heating temperature

46

8.7.1.2

Circulation

46

9

Mounts

47

9.1

General

47

9.2

Intrinsic frequency

47

9.3

Isolation efficiency

48

9.4

Engine and alternator mounting assembly in conjunction with flange-mounted alternator (single-mount and dual-mount version)

49

9.5

Selection of resilient mounts for the engine and alternator

50

9.6

Configuration of the resilient mounting elements

51

9.7

Installation instructions for the resilient mounts

51

10

Alternators and couplings

53

10.1

Alternator configurations/designs

53

10.1.1

Single-mount alternator, flanged onto the engine

53

10.1.1.1

Description

53

10.1.1.2

Requirements for the single-mount alternator

53

10.1.1.3

Assembly, engine/single-mount alternator

54

10.1.2

Dual-mount alternator, flanged onto the engine

54

10.1.2.1

Description

54

10.1.2.2

Requirements placed on the dual-mount alternator

54

10.1.2.3

Assembly, engine/dual-mount alternator

54

Page

IV

Page IV Guide

Guide

Table of contents (cont.)

10.2

Force transfer/couplings

55

10.2.1

Torsional oscillation calculation

55

10.2.2

Coupling (between the engine and alternator)

55

10.2.3

Coupling for flange-mounted single-mount alternators

56

10.2.4

Coupling for flange-mounted dual-mount alternators

57

10.2.5

Coupling for free-standing dual-mount alternator

57

10.2.6

Requirements for the axial play of the crankshaft and the alternator shaft

57

11

Engine management

59

11.1

General

59

11.2

ECU (Engine Control Unit)

59

11.3

Engine sensors

60

12

Sound data

61

13

Commissioning/engine operation

63

13.1

Installation inspection

63

13.2

Initial operation

63

13.3

Operation

63

Appendix

A Abbreviations

67

B Designation of the engine sides and cylinders

69

C Formulae

70

Guide

Guide Page V

Page

V

Symbols

The symbols that are used in the safety instructions are explained in the chapter “Safety instructions”.

are explained in the chapter “Safety instructions”. This symbol indicates cross-references to other manuals. MTU

This symbol indicates cross-references to other manuals.

MTU recommendation:

This symbol refers to notes about special MTU recommendations.

Figures and references

Details in figures are provided with reference numbers and reference lines if necessary.

If reference is made in the text to a detail provided with a reference number, the figure number and, separa- ted by an oblique, the reference number of the detail are written in brackets. Example: (5/2) refers to fig. 5, reference number 2.

Page

VI

Page VI Guide

Guide

(This page intentionally blank)

General

General Chapter Page 1 1 1 1.1 General Foreword These guidelines are intended as an aid

Chapter

Page

1

1

1

1.1

General

Foreword

These guidelines are intended as an aid to the project planner, plant and genset constructor and also for assembly companies that plan and carry out installation of MTU diesel engines.

Note:

These guidelines apply to engines in the current MTU BR 2000 range (with the exception of 8V2000) and BR 4000 for stationary applications.

The aim of these installation guidelines is to ensure that the genset is properly assembled.

The installation guidelines do not relieve those in charge of the system from their responsib ility to carry out their own correct work and inspections.

Exclusion of liability

If the information and instructions given in these guidelines are not followed, there shall be no possibility of the manufacturer accepting liability or providing a warranty.

For reasons of space, it is not possible to go into detail about the valid laws, ordinances and regulations. However, they must be observed.

Operational dependability, reliability and a long service life are also influenced by keeping to the stipulated maintenance work. Easy access for operating, maintenance and repair personnel must therefore be guaran- teed when planning and installing the plant.

Chapter

Page

1

2

Chapter Page 1 2 General 1.2 Safety instructions The general safety instructions and accident prevention regulations

General

1.2 Safety instructions

The general safety instructions and accident prevention regulations and those defined by law must be observed.

Where necessary, this documentation contains specially highlighted safety instructions. These safety instruc- tions must always be observed and followed in order to prevent injury and material damage.

DANGER A symbol of this type indicates a danger: ¯ That can lead to personal

DANGER

A symbol of this type indicates a danger:

¯ That can lead to personal injury

¯ That can cause damage to the plant or to parts of it.

In addition to the installation guideline, it is also necessary to observe the respective current technical docu- ments:

¯ Engine installation drawings

¯ Schematic diagrams

¯ Sound spectra

¯ Technical engine data

¯ Accessory drawings etc.

We request that you use the following contact address to request technical documentation:

MTU Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Friedrichshafen GmbH Vertrieb Energietechnik

D--88040 Friedrichshafen

Fax:

E-mail: Beate.Mueller@mtu-online.com

+++497541 908111

Transport and storage

Transport and storage C h a p t e r 2 Page 3 2 Transport and

Chapter

2

Page

3

2 Transport and storage

2.1 Transport

¯ Lift the engine only with suitable suspension equipment.

¯ Lift the engine alone only by the suspension eyes provided (MTU installation documents). The suspension eyes are designed only for the engine weight.

¯ Attach only straight or pay attention to the permissible tilted traction angle.

¯ Pay attention to the engine’s centre of gravity (MTU installation instructions).

¯ In the case of special packing with aluminium film, lift the engine by the suspension eyes of the mounting block or transport it with a forklift truck.

¯ Lift the engine/generator set only using the provided suspension eyes on the genset frame.

¯ Whenever you transport the engine or the genset, always first fit the crankshaft transport safe- guard and the engine mount blocking unit (also see the MTU regulations).

2.2 Storage

¯ Preserve the engine/genset correctly.

¯ Store the engine/genset in a dry room on the original wooden frame or other suitable frame, and cover with a tarpaulin.

¯ When special packing is used, do not cover the aluminium foil and examine the moisture indica- tor regularly (inspection specification for MTU special packaging).

Chapter

2

Page

4

Chapter 2 Page 4 Transport and storage 2.3 Electric welding work on the engine and alternator

Transport and storage

2.3 Electric welding work on the engine and alternator

Important precautionary measures on machine plants with MTU engines:

¯ Welding on the engine or fitted gensets is prohibited.

¯ Never use the engine as a ground connection. (This prevents the ground passing through the engine and causing burn and scorch marks on mounts, which could then lead to pitting of the mounts).

¯ Never lay the welding cable over or in the vicinity of cable ties of the MTU plants (welding cur- rents could be induced in the cable ties, which could possibly cause damage to the electrical plant).

¯ The ground connection of the welding unit may not be connected further than 60 cm from the welding location.

¯ If welding must be carried out on parts adjacent to the engine (e.g. exhaust pipe), these parts must be removed from the engine beforehand.

¯ On the MTU electronics (ECS), it is not necessary to remove the plugs and connectors for carry- ing out welding work if the main power supply switch is set from “On” to “Off” and the cable is disconnected at the negative pole and at the positive pole of the battery.

Engine damage caused due to not observing the above precautionary measures is not covered by the warranty.

Starter unit/auxiliary power supply

Starter unit/auxiliary power supply C h a p t e r 3 Page 5 3 Starter

Chapter

3

Page

5

3 Starter unit and auxiliary power supply

3.1 Electric starter

Electric starters are of the following design as standard:

¯ 24 VDC

¯ Insulated at both poles

¯ Attached to the engine ready for operation

Electrical starter cables must be laid so that they are protected against mechanical damage. When doing this, pay attention to the permissible bending radii.

Note:

this, pay attention to the permissible bending radii. Note: Please contact MTU for information about special

Please contact MTU for information about special configurations.

MTU recommendation:

To keep the cross section of the starter cable to a minimum, always set up the battery near to the starter. Due to the possibility of greater voltage fluctuations during the starting process, it is recom- mended to use a separate starter and control battery, otherwise the electrical engine control can be influenced.

Chapter

3

Page

6

Chapter 3 Page 6 Starter unit/auxiliary power supply 3.2 Compressed air starter motor The principle

Starter unit/auxiliary power supply

3.2 Compressed air starter motor

The principle configuration of the starter system with a compressed air starter motor is shown in fig. 1.

1 7 4 5 6 8 2 3 Fig. 1 : Starter system with compressed
1
7
4
5
6
8
2
3
Fig.
1
:
Starter system with compressed air starter motor
1
Compressed air starter motor
2
Starting valve
3
Compressed air connection, connection point on the motor
4
Hose line
5
Measuring point for pressure
6
Air filter
7
Pressure reduction valve (only required for supply pressure p > 30 bar)
8
Compressed air from the supply system

The data required for the configuration of the air supply system can be found in the technical sales document.

Installation instructions:

¯ The starting valve must be protected against mechanical damage and moisture.

¯ The air line connection is connected on the motor via a flexible connecting hose.

¯ The line route must be kept as short as possible.

¯ The entire system of pipelines must be cleaned on the inside before putting into operation.

MTU recommendation:

A measuring point (M18 x 1.5) must be provided directly upstream of the starting valve (for sys- tem inspections, e.g. when putting into operation).

Starter unit/auxiliary power supply

Starter unit/auxiliary power supply C h a p t e r 3 Page 7 3.3 Redundant

Chapter

3

Page

7

3.3 Redundant starting

Redundant starting systems are used for special requirements regarding the starting safety of the engine.

These consist of two mutually independent starters. If one starter fails, the second starter ensures that the engine starts up safely. Each starter should have its own energy supply.

This starting method is possible with the BR 2000 and BR 4000.

3.4 Generator

The generator and drive are installed on the engine if an order is placed.

The belt drive must have protection against contact.

Electrical cables must be configured and laid so that no mechanical, thermal or chemical damage can occur.

Chapter

3

Page

8

Chapter 3 Page 8 Starter unit/auxiliary power supply (This page intentionally blank) M060672/00E -- 10.2001 --

Starter unit/auxiliary power supply

(This page intentionally blank)

Fuel system

Fuel system C h a p t e r Page 4 9 4 Fuel system 4.1

Chapter

Page

4

9

4

Fuel system

4.1

Fuel system, engine BR 2000

4.1.1

Engine fuel schematic diagram BR 2000

1 T 2 2 4 14 15 13 8 5 12 16 6 17 7
1
T
2
2
4
14
15
13
8
5
12
16
6
17
7
9
11
T
= Temperature sensor
10
3
= Flexible connection
Fig. 2 : Schematic representation of the engine fuel system BR 2000

1 Fuel temperature sensor (MDEC)

10

Venting line

2 Fuel baffle

11

Leak fuel line from injection nozzle

3 Fuel intake from the tank to the engine

12

Individual injection pumps

4 Fuel filter

13

Fuel venting line

5 Non-return valve downstream of fuel hand pump

14

Non-return valve upstream of fuel baffle

6 Fuel hand pump

15

Injection line (high pressure)

7 Non-return valve upstream of fuel hand pump

16

Solenoid valve

8 Non-return valve downstream of fuel delivery pump 17

Camshaft

9 Fuel low-pressure delivery pump

Chapter

4

Page

10

Chapter 4 Page 10 Fuel system 4.1.2 Description of the engine fuel system BR 2000 (fig.

Fuel system

4.1.2 Description of the engine fuel system BR 2000 (fig. 2)

The BR 2000 has electronically controlled high-pressure injection with individual injection pumps, and basically consists of:

¯ Fuel low-pressure delivery pump

¯ Fuel filter

¯ Individual injection pump (each cylinder)

¯ Injectors

The mechanically driven fuel low-pressure delivery pump supplies fuel to the individual injection pumps via the fuel filter and the distributor rails.

The central camshaft generates the pressure in the individual injection pumps. The start and end of delivery are controlled with the electro-magnetically actuated injection valve.

All control and regulation of the injection and the engine’s operating characteristics are performed by the engine’s own electronic engine management. The components described above are all integrated in the engine as standard.

The customer merely has to provide a fuel infeed line and a fuel venting line between the engine and the tank.

A separate leak fuel line for non-pressurized removal is not required with this system.

Chapter 4 Fuel system Page 11 4.2 Fuel system, engine BR 4000 4.2.1 Engine fuel
Chapter
4
Fuel system
Page
11
4.2
Fuel system, engine BR 4000
4.2.1
Engine fuel schematic diagram BR 4000
2 14
16 V
12 V
8 V
12
1
10
1
6
12
P
T
7
P
3
9
2
11
4 18
17
5
8
P
= Pressure sensor
8
= Flexible connection
T
= Temperature sensor

Fig. 3 : Schematic representation of the engine fuel system BR 4000

1

Injection nozzle

12

Quantity restrictor valve

2

High-pressure accumulator

13

Connection, high-pressure pump

3

Fuel filter

fuel lubrication return

4

Fuel infeed connection (from the service tank)

14

Measuring point, fuel pressure

5

Fuel return (to the service tank)

15

Measuring point, fuel temperature

6

Overflow valve

downstream of fuel filter

7

Fuel delivery pump, low pressure

17

Fuel pre-filter

8

Fuel filler neck

18

Fuel hand pump for venting the

9

Fuel high-pressure delivery pump

low-pressure system

10

High-pressure line, single wall (optionally double wall)

11

Overpressure valve

Chapter

4

Page

12

Chapter 4 Page 12 Fuel system 4.2.2 Description of the engine fuel system BR 4000 (fig.

Fuel system

4.2.2 Description of the engine fuel system BR 4000 (fig. 3)

The BR 4000 has a “Common Rail injection system”.

The Common Rail injection system basically consists of:

¯ Fuel delivery pump (low pressure)

¯ Fuel delivery pump (high pressure)

¯ Fuel filter

¯ Pressure accumulator

¯ Injectors

¯ Electronic control unit

The fuel low-pressure delivery pump supplies the fuel high-pressure delivery pump with the necessary amount of fuel and also with sufficient pressure.

The mechanically driven fuel high-pressure delivery pump generates the pressure in the high-pressure accu- mulator, referred to as the “Rail”.

The injectors dose the amount of fuel for the individual cylinders. The injection process is initiated by the flow

to the injector solenoid valve. The injection volume depends on the prevailing pressure and the duration of

the flow to the solenoid.

The electronic control unit (Engine Control System ECS) both regulates the pressure and controls the duration of the flow to the solenoid.

The pressure level is recorded by a sensor fitted in the pressure accumulator. The volumetric flow of the high-pressure pump is adjusted to the respective speed and load point of the engine in accordance with the pressure characteristic stored in the ECS. In addition to these functions, the ECS also controls the correct start of the injection.

All the components described above are integrated as standard into the engine.

The customer merely has to provide a fuel infeed line and a fuel venting line between the engine and the tank.

A separate leak fuel line for non-pressurized removal is not required with this system.

Fuel system

Fuel system C h a p t e r Page 4 13 4.3 Fuel supply system

Chapter

Page

4

13

4.3 Fuel supply system BR 2000 and BR 4000

A perfectly functioning fuel supply system is also important for fault-free engine operation. This means that both the customer’s requirements and the diesel engine requirements must be taken into account in the de- sign of the fuel supply system. The following describes a fuel supply system that is normally used. However, taking into account the diesel engine requirements, different fuel supply systems to this one are also pos- sible.

9 9 10 7 8 Pump on Pump off Min. alarm 11 4 5 6
9
9
10
7 8
Pump on
Pump off
Min. alarm
11
4
5
6
12 13
M
16
1
16
2
14
3
17 max.
18
15
min.

Fig.

4 :

Fuel system BR 2000 and BR 4000

1

Fuel intake

10

Filling connection for the first filling

2

Fuel return on BR 4000

11

Three-way valve

 

Fuel venting on BR 2000

12

Fuel delivery pump

 

3

Fuel pre-filter

13

Fuel hand pump

4

Fuel pump for drainage

14

Filler neck

5

Fuel service tank

15

Supply tank

6

Fuel level monitoring (in the service tank) for pump control and min. signalling

16

Return to the supply tank or the day tank

7

Overflow line

17

Fuel cooler (if required)

8

Filler line

18

Fuel level monitoring

9

Venting line (routed out into the open)

Chapter

4

Page

14

Chapter 4 Page 14 Fuel system 4.3.1 Fuel lines 4.3.1.1 General The corresponding connections on the

Fuel system

4.3.1

Fuel lines

4.3.1.1

General

The corresponding connections on the engine can be found in the engine installation drawing and the fuel schematic diagram.

The connection between these engine connections and the plant’s fuel lines must be made via resilient hoses. These must be fuel-resistant and flame-resistant.

Fuel lines must be laid so that they are free of tension, shears and kinks.

Incorrectly laid fuel lines develop leaks. Risk of fire and danger of groundwater contamination from escaping fuel.

DANGER

The pipe nominal widths given in the fuel schematic diagram are minimum nominal widths that must not be fallen below.

Unless otherwise stated, they apply up to a pipe length of 10 m. Longer pipe routes must be dimensioned on a project-specific basis.

The configuration data required for this can be found in the technical sales document.

4.3.1.2 Recommended material

¯ Seamless steel tubes (in accordance with DIN 2448, DIN 2391, ISO 4200).

¯ Copper pipes are permitted, but are less stable against mechanical influences.

¯ Plastic pipes may only be used in Germany if they have a corresponding inspection certificate.

Fuel system

Fuel system C h a p t e r Page 4 15 4.3.1.3 Rigid pipe connections

Chapter

Page

4

15

4.3.1.3 Rigid pipe connections

The following connection methods are permitted on steel pipes:

¯ Soldered union using sealing cones

¯ Solderless union (cutting ring screw connection)

Exception:

In the case of lines directly attached to the engine (hazard of detachment by engine vibrations)

¯ Flanged joint

¯ Weld joint

The following are not permitted:

¯ Soft-soldered joint

¯ Crimp joint

¯ Glued joint

4.3.1.4 Infeed line BR 2000 and BR 4000 (from the fuel service tank to the engine)

The fuel line must be laid so that the fuel can flow unhindered to the engine.

¯ The maximum permissible fuel temperature before entering the engine is 55 °C.

¯ When ambient temperatures are cold, the possibility of paraffin separation in the fuel must be prevented (by using winter fuel or fuel pre-heating).

Chapter

4

Page

16

Chapter 4 Page 16 Fuel system 4.3.1.5 Return line (from the engine to the fuel service

Fuel system

4.3.1.5

Return line (from the engine to the fuel service tank)

BR 2000

The return line from the engine to the tank is only for venting the engine fuel system. Therefore, only a small amount of fuel is returned in this venting line (max. temperature 85 °C).

This means that the return/or venting line can have a smaller nominal width. A minimum nominal width of 6 mm for max. 10 m of pipe length is sufficient (see fuel schematic diagram).

The return line in the tank should be placed with the outlet opening a sufficient distance from the intake line opening.

Unhindered fuel return to the fuel tank must be guaranteed during starting and operation of the engine (no installation of shut-off valves between the engine connection and service tank).

For further information, see the engine fuel schematic diagram.

BR 4000

The return line must be routed separately into the fuel tank. If possible, the return line should be directed not into the service tank but into the large supply tank (avoiding heating up the fuel in the service tank at the minimum level).

The return line in the tank should be placed with the outlet opening a sufficient distance from the intake line opening.

It is not permissible to directly reintroduce the return line into the fuel intake (upstream of the engine intake).

Unhindered fuel return to the fuel tank must be guaranteed during starting and operation of the engine (no installation of shut-off valves).

It must be noted that the fuel return temperature is approximately 30 – 35 °C higher than the intake tempera- ture.

Therefore, in certain circumstances it may be recommended to provide a fuel cooler. This cooler can be in- stalled in the return line.

Both water/fuel coolers and air/fuel coolers can be used.

For further information, see the engine fuel schematic diagram and chapter 4.3.4.

Fuel system

Fuel system C h a p t e r Page 4 17 4.3.2 Fuel pre-filter In

Chapter

Page

4

17

4.3.2 Fuel pre-filter

In order to protect the fuel low-pressure system (especially the low-pressure pump) against damage caused by coarse impurities in the fuel, a fuel pre-filter must be provided upstream of the engine intake.

Recommended filter fineness:

< 0.1 mm

The filter size depends on the fuel intake quantity and the permissible resistance.

on the fuel intake quantity and the permissible resistance. The configuration data required for this can

The configuration data required for this can be found in the technical sales document.

If there is a higher proportion of water in the fuel, a water separator is required in addition to the pre-filter.

The max. permissible proportion of water in the fuel can be found in the MTU consumables specification.

4.3.3

Fuel service tank

4.3.3.1

Configuration and arrangement

The fuel service tank must be arranged as follows:

The min. fuel level should be above the level of the engine’s own fuel delivery pump (low-pressure pump). This is especially necessary in the case of emergency power systems that place exacting demands on start- ing safety and acceleration time.

This ensures that the intake line is always filled with sufficient fuel and that no air can enter the intake line. Air in the intake line can cause starting difficulties.

If the fuel tanks are arranged below the level of the fuel delivery pump, it is necessary to take account of the intake capacity of the fuel delivery pump. In certain circumstances, special measures are necessary to pre- vent the intake line running empty. This is especially critical in the case of emergency power plants with longer downtimes (standby mode).

The max. fuel level should not be higher than 5 m above the intake inlet on the engine.

DANGER Do not locate the fuel tank in the vicinity of the exhaust lines or

DANGER

Do not locate the fuel tank in the vicinity of the exhaust lines or other heat sources.

The tank must be made of fuel-resistant and corrosion-resistant material.

Chapter

4

Page

18

Chapter 4 Page 18 Fuel system 4.3.3.2 Tank capacity The required tank capacity depends on the

Fuel system

4.3.3.2 Tank capacity

The required tank capacity depends on the engine power, the fuel consumption and the required operating time.

A rough estimation is possible with the following formula:

A rough estimation is possible with the following formula: P x be x t V =
P x be x t V = 830 MTU recommendation:
P x be x t
V =
830
MTU recommendation:

V

=

Tank volume in litres

P

=

Engine power in kW

t

=

Operating time in hours

be

=

Spec. fuel consumption in g/kW h

830

= Density conversion factor

Min. 1000 l tank per engine. In the case of plants with several engines, a separate tank should be provided for each engine.

4.3.4 Fuel cooler

Under certain conditions of use, it may be necessary to use a fuel cooler.

A fuel cooler is recommended in the following cases:

¯ Where there are higher fuel intake temperatures with the risk of an excessive return temperature

¯ If the fuel return line is routed to a tank of < 1000 l

¯ To observe permissible flash point limits (e.g. in Germany, max. permissible: 55 ° C)

Lube oil system

Lube oil system C h a p t e r Page 5 19 5 Lube oil

Chapter

Page

5

19

5 Lube oil system

Operation of diesel engines is only permissible with the lube oil qualities given in the MTU consumables specification.

Only the connections for oil monitoring, drainage, additional filtration and priming that are present on the engine may be used.

Interference with or modifications to the engine’s internal lube oil system are not permissible. If such action is unavoidable, it must not be undertaken until after agreement with MTU.

The diesel engines have autarkic pressurized circulation lubrication via gear-driven oil pumps. The oil trough is normally also the lube oil supply tank.

5.1 Filtration

The standard oil filters fitted are sufficient for standard and emergency power plants, as well as for plants with a normal utilization rate.

In the case of continuous operation plants and plants with a very high utilization rate, as well as when it is necessary to extend the oil change intervals, provision must be made for additional oil care. Multiple filters and, for the BR 4000, lube oil centrifuges are available for this purpose. Selection and use must be agreed with MTU.

5.2 Oil lines

It must be ensured that no contamination enters the oil cycle. Newly laid oil lines must therefore be cleaned before initial operation and must be inspected for leaks.

All oil lines must be resiliently connected to the engine.

Oil-resistant and temperature-resistant hoses are suitable as resilient connections. They must be inserted in the movement direction for bending (do not turn or extend).

All components and lines that are connected on the pressure side of the oil cycle must be designed for the respective operating pressure.

Chapter

5

Page

20

Chapter 5 Page 20 Lube oil system 5.3 Oil trough/obtaining the required oil quantity 5.3.1 Oil

Lube oil system

5.3

Oil trough/obtaining the required oil quantity

5.3.1

Oil level measurement

Normally it is sufficient to check the oil level manually using the standard oil dipstick provided in the engine and to top up as necessary.

However, in the case of automatic operation for longer periods, we recommend electrical oil level monitoring as shown in fig. 5. A still oil level can be measured even when the engine is running, thanks to the separate level tank that serves as a communicating tank.

Note:

When configuring the oil level monitoring, remember that the oil level during engine operation falls compared with when the engine is stationary due to the amount of oil that is circulating. It may be necessary for the system monitoring to make allowance for this.

 
1 2 max. min. 3
1
2
max.
min.
3

max.

min.

5

4

Fig.

5 :

Oil level measurement with separate measuring tank

1

Venting to the crank case

2

Level monitor for remote display

3

Inspection glass with minimum/maximum mark

4

Level tank

5

Communicating connection

Lube oil system

Lube oil system C h a p t e r Page 5 21 5.3.2 Oil replenishment

Chapter

Page

5

21

5.3.2 Oil replenishment unit

The oil supply in the oil trough is normally sufficient to achieve acceptable oil replenishment times.

However, special operating modes require an automatic oil replenishment unit.

operating modes require an automatic oil replenishment unit. MTU recommendation: An automatic oil replenishment unit via

MTU recommendation:

An automatic oil replenishment unit via a level-controlled pump guarantees that the plant is con- stantly ready for use.

The simple and economical oil replenishment units utilizing a float valve are common.

If the oil level in the oil trough is too low, this valve opens and lets oil flow in from an oil supply tank located above the oil trough. Since oil can enter the engine oil trough from the supply tank unnoticed if the float valve is damaged and an oil level that is too high causes engine damage (oil surge), this arrangement is only per- missible with additional monitoring of the maximum oil level.

5.3.3 Inclinations

The standard version MTU engines are approved for the inclinations defined in the technical sales document.

Special engine configurations and lube oil plants are required for steeper inclinations.

Note:

For information on this, please consult MTU.

Chapter

5

Page

22

Chapter 5 Page 22 Lube oil system 5.4 Priming The need for priming depends on the

Lube oil system

5.4 Priming

The need for priming depends on the respective genset applications.

Normally, no priming is necessary.

Priming is only required in the following exceptional cases:

¯ Short-break and no-break plants

¯ Gensets with very frequent starts

¯ Gensets with very short run-up times

¯ Gensets in which the inoperative engine is subjected to vibrations

¯ Extreme engine inclination

The type and duration of the priming must in each case be agreed with MTU on a project-specific basis.

Provision may only be made for interval priming. Continuous priming is not permitted due to the risk of the engine possibly being over-lubricated.

to the risk of the engine possibly being over-lubricated. Also see the information in the technical

Also see the information in the technical sales document.

5.5 Crankcase venting

Our crankcases are equipped as standard with a “closed crankcase venting facility”. This means that separate venting of the crankcase is not necessary.

Combustion air system

Combustion air system C h a p t e r 6 Page 23 6 Combustion air

Chapter

6

Page

23

6 Combustion air system

The performance of an engine mainly depends on the following factors:

¯ The amount of combustion air taken in

¯ Air temperature

¯ Air pressure (installation height)

¯ Intake air barometer reading

When the air is taken in from the engine room, good room ventilation is required in order to keep the tem- perature rise low with respect to the outside air. If this is not possible to a sufficient degree, the combustion air must be taken from outdoors.

6.1

Combustion air filter

6.1.1

Combustion air filter requirements

As a general rule, the MTU diesel engines must be fitted with combustion air filters. Only paper dry air filters with a separation degree of > 99.9 % may be used.

In the case of short operating times (e.g. emergency power operation) combined with normal dust conditions, so-called single filters are normally sufficient. This filter type is included in the basic scope of delivery for the BR 2000 and BR 4000.

The service life of the filters can be increased by using dry air filters with pre-separation (cyclones). In this case, the intake air is rotated by guide blades arranged at an angle, with the coarser dust particles being separated out first. This is necessary when there is more dust together with continuous operational use.

If the customer obtains his own combustion air filters, then the customer is entirely responsible for correct configuration and installation.

The size of the air filter must be agreed in cooperation with its manufacturer so that the following conditions are fulfilled when the expected amount of dust is present:

¯ The filter must be suitable for combustion air throughput and the required degree of separation.

¯ The maximum permissible intake underpressure must be maintained.

maximum permissible intake underpressure must be maintained. ¯ Designed for a sufficient service life. The

¯ Designed for a sufficient service life.

The configuration data required for this can be found in the technical sales document.

Chapter

6

Page

24

Chapter 6 Page 24 Combustion air system Other types of air filter such as oil bath

Combustion air system

Other types of air filter such as oil bath air filters are only permissible in conjunction with dry air filters. MTU must be consulted.

Wet air filters are not permissible due to their low separation degree.

6.1.2 Filter installation

The dry air single filters supplied by MTU are attached directly to the engine by clamps (see the engine installation drawing). Allowance must be made here for the removal height required when changing the filter.

Pay attention to the following if the air filters are fitted separate from the engine:

The intake side for the combustion air should be designed so that

¯ No warm air is taken in

¯ No exhaust gases enter the filter

¯ Problem-free filter changing is possible (provide space for removal)

¯ Protection against the ingress of water is guaranteed

The filter configuration also influences the engine noise level. Our noise spectra are based on measurement with the supplied dry air single filters.

In the case of the intake air line between the filter and engine, it is essential to ensure that there are no leaks. If possible, the line should be kept as short as possible. Longer lines must be supported leak-free in the engine and must be connected to the engine by means of resilient connections.

The resilient connection point (sleeves, hoses) must be resistant to fuel, lube oil and temperatures of up to 120 _ C. Dimensional stability against underpressure is a prerequisite.

On the intake air side, no materials may be used that carry rust, clinker or other deposits and that can cause premature engine wear.

Filters must be arranged so that when a filter is changed, no dust or objects can enter the intake area.

6.2 Maintenance indicator

The maintenance indicators (underpressure indicators) for filter monitoring are included in the basic scope of delivery. Depending on the installation situation, these are already installed on the engine or are supplied loose. The corresponding connection point is shown in the engine installation drawing.

Exhaust system

Exhaust system C h a p t e r Page 7 25 7 Exhaust system DANGER

Chapter

Page

7

25

7 Exhaust system

DANGER Exhaust gases are harmful to health! Condensation from exhaust lines pollutes the groundwater! Exhaust

DANGER

Exhaust gases are harmful to health!

Condensation from exhaust lines pollutes the groundwater!

Exhaust lines can reach temperatures of over 600 _ C!

Appropriate safety measures must be taken with regard to

¯ Protection against contact

¯ Fire protection

7.1 Exhaust line (downstream of the engine)

Use the connection diameters on the engine when configuring the exhaust line. Later reduction is not permis- sible.

In the case of exhaust lines of over 10 m, we recommend a resistance calculation for the exhaust system from the turbocharger to outdoors, taking into account the noise requirements.

The nominal width of the exhaust line is determined by:

¯ The exhaust volume

¯ The maximum permissible exhaust counter-pressure (see technical sales document)

¯ Noise requirements

¯ The type of the following line routing (pipe lengths, bend radii, fittings, silencer)

Additional requirements:

¯ No moisture may enter the engine via the exhaust line. The exhaust discharge must be of a suitable design.

¯ Drainage possibilities must be provided in the exhaust line.

¯ Condensation must be carried to a collecting tank and must be disposed of properly.

¯ Grilles to prevent small animals from entering must be fitted at the outlet.

¯ Ensure that the configuration is favourable for the flow.

The exhaust line is normally laid by joining the exhaust connections on the V engines via a hose to a line of the appropriate diameter.

Chapter

7

Page

26

Chapter 7 Page 26 Exhaust system In certain cases (e.g. if the exhaust line is very

Exhaust system

In certain cases (e.g. if the exhaust line is very short), it may be more economical to lay a separate exhaust line for each turbocharger discharge.

With exhaust joining Separate exhaust routing Fixed point Exhaust joining Compensator Engine Engine
With exhaust joining
Separate exhaust routing
Fixed point
Exhaust joining
Compensator
Engine
Engine

Fig.

6 :

Exhaust routing

Exhaust lines of several engines must not be joined together in a common line.

Exhaust system

Exhaust system C h a p t e r Page 7 27 7.2 Seals for the

Chapter

Page

7

27

7.2 Seals for the exhaust line

The exhaust line must be of a leak-free design.

exhaust line The exhaust line must be of a leak-free design. MTU recommendation: For flange connections

MTU recommendation:

For flange connections (apart from V-belt connections), fit temperature-resistant, asbestos-free seals.

7.3 Compensators (downstream of engine discharge)

The thermal expansion of the exhaust line and the movement during operation of the engine on resilient mounts must be countered by compensators arranged immediately downstream of the engine. Depending on the length of the exhaust line, it may also be necessary to install additional compensators.

The compensators supplied as standard by MTU are multi-walled metal bellows (axial compensators). They are mainly designed for axial expansion absorption (in the longitudinal direction). However, they are also suitable for slight angular (bending) and lateral (thrust) deformation. All torsional stresses (twisting) must be avoided.

axial angular lateral

axial

angular lateral
angular
lateral

Fig. 7 : Possible deformation with compensators

Installation instructions:

The permissible axial expansion absorption range should not be fully used, as the possibility of slight lateral and angular deformations cannot be excluded as a result of installation tolerances and engine operation. These deformations reduce the theoretically permissible axial expansion absorption capacity.

Chapter

7

Page

28

Chapter 7 Page 28 Exhaust system MTU recommendation: So that no impermissible forces arising from thermal

Exhaust system

Chapter 7 Page 28 Exhaust system MTU recommendation: So that no impermissible forces arising from thermal

MTU recommendation:

So that no impermissible forces arising from thermal expansion of the exhaust line act on the engine via the compensator, a (building) fixed point most be provided immediately downstream of the compensator (max. 1 m) (see fig. 6).

If, for building-related reasons, it is not possible to have a fixed point immediately downstream of the com- pensator, a compensator with greater expansion absorption must be installed.

The thermal expansion of exhaust pipes can be seen in the diagram below.

13 12 Austenitic steel (1.4541) 11 10 9 8 Ferritic steel 7 6 5 4
13
12
Austenitic steel
(1.4541)
11
10
9
8
Ferritic
steel
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
Thermal expansion in mm/m

Temperature difference between 20 _ C ambient temperature and max. exhaust pipe temperature

Fig. 8 : Diagram for determining the thermal expansion of exhaust pipes as a function of the temperature

Exhaust system

Exhaust system C h a p t e r Page 7 29 The compensators must be

Chapter

Page

7

29

The compensators must be pre-stressed when installed. The corresponding installation dimensions can be found in the engine installation drawing or the exhaust compensator drawing (also see fig. 9).

Cold state (installation temperature)

Warm operational state

Before installation Engine operation (unstressed state) Installation state (compensator pre-stressed) + --
Before installation
Engine operation
(unstressed state)
Installation state
(compensator pre-stressed)
+
--
Compensator
nominal size/length
Expansion range
Installation size/
installation length

3 clamping pieces distributed on the circumference as an installation aid (e.g. pipe, wooden slat etc.)

Important: Remove the clamping pieces after installing the exhaust line!

Fig. 9 : Compensator installation

Two length measurements are normally given in the engine installation drawings:

Compensator nominal size/length

This measurement refers to the compensator in a neutral, unstressed state and serves only for control purposes.

Compensator installation size/installation length

The compensator must be pre-stressed during installation to the compensator installation size or the installa- tion length. The compensator is then largely stress-free during operation. Check the pre-stress size after installing the exhaust line.

Chapter

7

Page

30

Chapter 7 Page 30 Exhaust system Please observe the following in order to prevent frequently occurring

Exhaust system

Please observe the following in order to prevent frequently occurring installation errors:

¯ Before installation, inspect the compensator for possible damage, e.g. caused during transport.

¯ During operation, compensators must not be impaired with regard to their expansion capacity or their functional capability. Particular attention must be paid to this regarding the insulation of the compensators.

¯ Do not damage the bellows -- do not permit any heavy strikes or impacts, do not throw.

¯ Do not route chains or ropes past the bellows part or attach them to it.

¯ Protect the bellows against welding splashes.

¯ Avoid electrical currents through the bellows (short circuit caused by the welding electrode, ground cable etc.). They can destroy the bellows.

¯ Keep the inside and outside of the bellows shafts free of foreign bodies (dirt, insulation material, cement etc.).

¯ In the case of exhaust compensators with an internal protective tube, during installation ensure that the internal protective tube and the compensator bellows do not touch each other while the engine is in operation.

¯ Inspect the inside before installation and the outside after installation.

¯ After installation, remove clamping pieces, installation aids and transport safeguards (if present).

Ignoring these instructions can result in costly damage to the exhaust turbochargers.

7.4 Exhaust turbochargers

The exhaust turbochargers and the exhaust lines laid on the engine must not be insulated.

Engine cooling

Engine cooling C h a p t e r Page 8 31 8 Engine cooling 8.1

Chapter

Page

8

31

8 Engine cooling

8.1 General

¯ On MTU diesel engines, the heat given off by the engine into the coolant is dissipated by forced circulation cooling in the closed cycle.

¯ Flow cooling or an open cycle is on no account permissible.

¯ Treated water conforming to the MTU consumables specification must be used as the coolant.

¯ Expansion tanks with nitrogen bladders (of the type used in heating systems) are on no account permissible.

¯ At the lowest point of the cooling system, it is recommended to install a f illing point and a drainage point. It must be ensured that no residues remain in the cooling system after the coolant has been drained out.

¯ The cooling system must be configured as a closed overpressure system and fitted with an overpressure valve and an underpressure valve.

¯ Maximum permissible geodetic pressure: 1 bar

Note:

It is not permitted to use zinc in parts that carry water.

8.2 Cooling system configuration

If the cooling system is not supplied by MTU, it must be designed by a specialist company.

The following values are required for the cooler configuration:

¯ The heat given off to the coolant by the engine

¯ Coolant volumetric flow, engine cycle

¯ Engine coolant discharge temperature

¯ Coolant volumetric flow, charge air cycle (in the case of dual-cycle cooling)

¯ Charge air cycle coolant intake temperature (in the case of dual-cycle cooling)

¯ Defroster component in the cooling water in volume percent (vol. %)

¯ Maximum permissible pressure reserve (on the cooling water side)

¯ Operating pressure, test pressure (water side)

Note:

Please consult MTU for more detailed information.

Plant-dependent:

¯ Maximum permissible pressure loss (on the air side)

¯ Noise requirements, if necessary

¯ Contamination reserve

Chapter

8

Page

32

Chapter 8 Page 32 Engine cooling 8.3 Engine cooling systems The BR 2000 and BR 4000

Engine cooling

8.3 Engine cooling systems

The BR 2000 and BR 4000 engines are water-cooled and are also fitted as standard with exhaust turbo- chargers and separate charge air cooling.

This means that dual-cycle cooling systems are required for re-cooling the engine (engine + charge air).

Normally, air is available as the cooling medium. By contrast, water is rarely used as a cooling medium.

The individual engine cooling systems that are possible with the BR 2000 and BR 4000 are described below.

BR 2000

¯ Air/charge air cooling, external

¯ Water/charge air cooling, external

BR 4000

¯ Water/charge air cooling, external

8.3.1 Air/charge air cooling, external -- BR 2000

Here, the charge air is re-cooled via a mechanically driven fan cooler. This fan cooler is designed as a dual- cycle cooler. It is secured to the base skid directly behind the engine (on the aux iliary PTO end side). A fan wheel driven by the engine (via a toothed belt) delivers the required quantity of cooling air through the fan cooler to dissipate the charge air heat and the engine coolant heat.

Main characteristics

¯ Simple charge air routing

¯ The following are not required:

--

Charge air cooler (water-cooled design)

--

Charge air coolant -- circulation pump

--

Temperature controller

--

Coolant lines on the engine

¯ The complete cooler unit, including the fan wheel, fan drive and pipes, is already tailored to the respective application. This simplifies the amount of configuration and installation work required to be undertaken by the customer.

¯ It is not possible to set up the cooler independently of the engine position (e.g. on a roof).

Chapter 8 Engine cooling Page 33 3 4 5 2 1 6 7 13 12
Chapter
8
Engine cooling
Page
33
3
4
5
2
1
6
7
13
12
14
16
10
15
11
9
8
= Flexible connection
Max. 10 m above engine

Fig. 10 :

Coolant diagram, BR 2000 with air/charge air cooling, external (shown with a mechanically driven fan cooler (dual-cycle cooler))

1

Charge air intake, engine

2

Venting line from the engine to the expansion tank (engine coolant cycle)

3

Overpressure/underpressure valve

4

Expansion tank (engine coolant cycle)

5

Overflow line

6

Coolant level sensor (engine shutdown)

7

Panel

8

Cooler (engine coolant cycle)

9

Cooler for charge air

10

Fan wheel (mechanically driven by the engine)

11

Charge air line between engine and cooler

12

Coolant line between engine and cooler (engine coolant cycle)

13

Temperature controller (engine coolant cycle)

14

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the engine (engine coolant cycle)

15

Circulation pump (engine coolant cycle)

16

Exhaust turbocharger

Chapter

8

Page

34

Chapter 8 Page 34 Engine cooling 8.3.2 Water/charge air cooling, external -- BR 2000 and BR

Engine cooling

8.3.2 Water/charge air cooling, external -- BR 2000 and BR 4000

This cooling system consists of two separate coolant cycles:

¯ Engine coolant cycle

¯ Charge air coolant cycle

The main component of the charge air coolant cycle is the charge air cooler located on the engine. The charge air is re-cooled via this water-impinged charge air re-cooler.

Both cycles (engine and charge air coolant cycle) have as standard a circulation pump mechanically driven by the engine, as well as a temperature controller that provides for constant coolant temperatures.

Main characteristics

¯ The coolers can be set up in a position independent of the genset (e.g. on a roof)

¯ More flexible configuration and design of the coolers are possible

¯ Thermostatically controlled charge air coolant cycle

¯ Dissipated heat of the charge air coolant cycle can be ut ilized

¯ More complexity of the charge air coolant cycle

Chapter 8 Engine cooling Page 35 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 1 9
Chapter
8
Engine cooling
Page
35
6
7
8
2
3
4
5
1
9
10
14
19
13
15
18
12
11
17
16
14
= Flexible connection
Max. 10 m above engine

Fig. 11 :

Coolant diagram, BR 2000 with water/charge air cooling, external (shown with an electrically driven fan re-cooler (dual-cycle cooler))

1

Charge air cooler

2

Venting line from the charge air cooler to the expansion tank

3

Venting line from the engine coolant cycle to the expansion tank

4

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the engine (charge air coolant cycle)

5

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the engine (engine coolant cycle)

6

Expansion tank (common for charge air coolant cycle and engine coolant cycle)

7

Overpressure/underpressure valve

8

Overflow line

9

Cooling water level sensor (engine shutdown)

10

Panel

11

Cooler (engine coolant cycle)

12

Cooler (charge air coolant cycle)

13

Fan wheel

14

Coolant line between engine and cooler (engine coolant cycle)

15

Coolant line between engine and cooler (charge air coolant cycle)

16

Temperature controller (charge air coolant cycle)

17

Circulation pump (charge air coolant cycle)

18

Circulation pump (engine coolant cycle)

19

Temperature controller (engine coolant cycle)

Chapter 8 Engine cooling Page 36 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4
Chapter
8
Engine cooling
Page
36
5
6
7
8
9
10
2
3
4
1
11
17
16
18
15
19
14
21
20
13
12
16
15
= Flexible connection
Max. 10 m above engine

Fig. 12 :

Coolant diagram, BR 4000 with water/charge air cooling, external (shown with an electrically driven fan re-cooler (dual-cycle cooler))

1

Charge air cooler

2

Venting line from the charge air cooler to the expansion tank

3

Venting line from the engine to the expansion tank

4

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the engine (charge air coolant cycle)

5

Expansion tank (charge air coolant cycle)

6

Overpressure/underpressure valve

7

Overflow line (charge air coolant cycle)

8

Expansion tank (engine coolant cycle)

9

Overpressure/underpressure valve (engine coolant cycle)

10

Overflow line (engine coolant cycle)

11

Cooling water level sensor

12

Cooler (engine coolant cycle)

13

Cooler (charge air coolant cycle)

14

Fan wheel

15

Coolant line between engine and cooler (charge air coolant cycle)

16

Coolant line between engine and cooler (engine coolant cycle)

17

Temperature controller (charge air coolant cycle)

18

Circulation pump (charge air coolant cycle)

19

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the engine (engine coolant cycle)

20

Temperature controller (engine coolant cycle)

21

Circulation pump (engine coolant cycle)

Engine cooling

Engine cooling C h a p t e r Page 8 37 8.4 Coolant lines 8.4.1

Chapter

Page

8

37

8.4

Coolant lines

8.4.1

General

Before initial operation of the water cycle, all pipelines must be cleaned and free of residues.

The clear widths of the coolant pipes must at least correspond to the cross sections of the engine connec- tions. In the case of longer line lengths, it is necessary to recalculate the necessary cross section.

it is necessary to recalculate the necessary cross section. To do this, refer to the technical

To do this, refer to the technical sales document data for the necessary configuration values.

The lines must be secured at sufficiently close intervals.

When laying the lines, ensure that no air pockets can arise.

8.4.2 Recommended materials for the coolant pipelines

¯ Steel (in accordance with DIN 2448, DIN 2391, ISO 4200)

¯ Galvanized pipes/tanks are not permissible

Chapter

8

Page

38

Chapter 8 Page 38 Engine cooling 8.4.3 Flexible connections On all engines and gensets, it is

Engine cooling

8.4.3 Flexible connections

On all engines and gensets, it is necessary to provide flexible connections with the building directly down- stream of the engine and (in the case of double-resilient mounts) also flexible connections directly down- stream of the base skid.

The following are suitable as flexible connections:

¯ Long rubber unions

¯ Compensators. If the maximum coolant pressure is used, pay attention to the quality of rubber compensators. Too simple designs tend to leak.

¯ Hoses

The flexible connections must be resistant to pressure (overpressure/underpressure), high temperature, oils, fuel and coolant additives.

Flexible connections must be arranged so that visual inspection and problem-free replacement are possible. They must be laid sufficiently far away from moving parts and higher-temperature components.

Long rubber unions supplied by MTU must be fitted as shown in fig. 13.

Total union length C B C Max. perm. offset Max. perm. misalignment Make sure that
Total union length
C
B
C
Max. perm.
offset
Max. perm.
misalignment
Make sure that pipe ends are rounded or
chamfered and deburred.

Fig. 13 : Installation of long rubber unions

Pipe outside diameter

Pipe end spacing B

Push-on length C

Min. bending radius

up to 29

140

30

750

30

up to 59

300

50

1900

60

up to 99

370

65

220

over 100

460

70

2500

Engine cooling

Engine cooling C h a p t e r Page 8 39 8.4.4 Infeed and return

Chapter

Page

8

39

8.4.4 Infeed and return lines between the engine and cooler

The coolant lines must be laid as short as possible and without sharp pipe bends in order to keep the flow resistance as low as possible.

in order to keep the flow resistance as low as possible. The permissible resistances in external

The permissible resistances in external cooling systems can be found in the technical sales document data.

The resilient connections on the engine must be configured so that no impermissible forces caused by vibra- tion and thermal expansion act on the engine.

8.4.5 Venting lines

The venting lines must be routed steadily rising to the expansion tank starting at the connections on the engine.

The venting lines must be routed into the air chamber of the expansion tank.

To completely vent the system, venting lines must be connected at all points provided for that purpose on the engine and charge air cooler.

Important: Ensure sufficient venting of the installed components such as coolers, pre-heating unit etc.

8.4.6 Expansion line

The expansion line must be connected to the expansion tank base. It must be laid as short as possible and routed in directly upstream of the water pump.

The vent and expansion lines must be connected as far away from each other as possible on the expansion tank (avoiding short circuits).

Chapter

8

Page

40

Chapter 8 Page 40 Engine cooling 8.4.7 Overpressure/underpressure valve with overflow line The cooling plant

Engine cooling

8.4.7 Overpressure/underpressure valve with overflow line

The cooling plant must be configured as a closed overpressure system and must be closed with an overpres- sure/underpressure valve that has the following pressure values:

¯ Opening pressure +0.4 bar (overpressure) This increases the boiling point at a higher temperature.

¯ Underpressure --0.1 bar This limits the underpressure in the event of cooling down in the cooling system.

The pressure valve must be installed in the expansion tank (at the highest point).

With the overflow line, surplus coolant arising from thermal expansion in the cooling system is carried off into a separate collecting tank. Unhindered drainage must therefore be guaranteed. Shut-off valves are not per- missible in these lines.

8.5

Cooling plant

8.5.1

Setting up the cooler above the engine

In the event that, for building-related reasons, setting up on the roof is necessary or if the distance between the genset and the cooling system is great, please observe the following:

¯ The engine cooling system and the charge air cooling system only permits a max. static pres- sure of 10 m.

¯ In addition, it is necessary to provide an intermediate heat exchanger. (One possible configuration with an intermediate heat exchanger is shown in fig. 14 and fig. 15)

An intermediate heat exchanger is also appropriate if the distance between the engine and the cooling system is great, since the coolant circulation pumps driven by the engine are not designed for great pipe resistances.

Chapter 8 Engine cooling Page 41 6 11 = Flexible connection 10 9 8 14
Chapter
8
Engine cooling
Page
41
6
11
= Flexible connection
10
9
8
14 13
6
7
12
5
2
3
4
14 13
19 20
1
15
16
17
25
18
22
19
24
23
21

Fig. 14 :

Coolant diagram BR 2000 with water/charge air cooling, external (shown with electrically driven fan re-cooler (dual-cycle cooler), set up over 10 m high with respect to the engine)

1

Charge air cooler

14

Coolant level sensor

2

Venting line from the charge air cooler to the expansion tank

15

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the charge air coolant cycle

3

Venting line from the engine to the expansion tank

16

Coolant line between the engine and the heat exchanger (charge air coolant cycle)

4

Expansion line from the expansion tank

17

Heat exchanger (charge air coolant cycle)

to the engine (engine coolant cycle)

18

Heat exchanger (engine coolant cycle)

5

Expansion tank (engine coolant cycle)

19

Shut-off valve

6

Overpressure/underpressure valve

20

Fan wheel

7

Overflow line (engine coolant cycle)

21

Coolant line between the engine and the

8

Circulation pump, secondary cycle

heat exchanger (engine coolant cycle)

9

Expansion line

22

Temperature controller (charge air coolant

10

Expansion tank, secondary cycle

cycle)

11

Overflow line

23

Circulation pump (charge air coolant cycle)

12

Re-cooler

24

Circulation pump (engine coolant cycle)

13

Collecting tank

25

Temperature controller (engine coolant cycle)

Chapter 8 Engine cooling Page 42 4 5 = Flexible connection 10 9 8 24
Chapter
8
Engine cooling
Page
42
4
5
= Flexible connection
10
9
8
24
6
4
5 7
4
5 6
11
3 6
2
24
12
23
13
1
14
15
16
17
22
18
12
20
21
19

Fig. 15 :

Coolant diagram BR 4000 with separate charge air cooler, water-cooled (shown with electrically driven fan re-cooler (dual-cycle cooler), set up over 10 m high with respect to the engine)

1

Charge air cooler

14

Coolant line between the engine and the

2

Venting line from the charge air cooler to the expansion tank

15

heat exchanger (charge air coolant cycle) Expansion line from the expansion tank

3

Expansion tank (charge air coolant cycle)

16

to the engine (charge air coolant cycle) Heat exchanger (charge air coolant cycle)

4

Overpressure/underpressure valve

17

Temperature controller (charge air coolant

5

Overflow line

cycle)

6

Cooling water level sensor

18

Heat exchanger (engine coolant cycle)

7

Expansion tank (engine coolant cycle)

19

Coolant line between the engine and the heat exchanger (engine coolant cycle)

8

Circulation pump (secondary cycle)

20

Temperature controller (engine coolant cycle)

9

Expansion line

21

Circulation pump (engine coolant cycle)

10

Expansion tank (secondary cycle)

22

Circulation pump (charge air coolant cycle)

11

Re-cooler

23

Fan wheel

12

Shut-off valve (recommended)

24

Collecting tank

13

Expansion line from the expansion tank to the engine (engine coolant cycle)

Engine cooling

Engine cooling C h a p t e r Page 8 43 8.5.2 Mechanical fan cooler

Chapter

Page

8

43

8.5.2 Mechanical fan cooler for BR 2000 with air/charge air cooling, external

With this engine design, the mechanically driven fan cooler is included in the basic scope of delivery and is supplied loose with the engine.

scope of delivery and is supplied loose with the engine. To ensure correct installation of the

To ensure correct installation of the cooler, the special coolant documents together with the installation instructions must be observed.

8.6 Expansion tank

All cooling systems for the MTU engines must be equipped with a separate expansion tank which

¯ Eliminates air bubbles of the cooling system

¯ Absorbs coolant that has expanded as a result of heating

¯ Provides coolant reserves to cover leakage losses

¯ Builds up and maintains the operating pressure of the cooling system

8.6.1 Quantity

The quantity of expansion tanks required depends on the engine cooling system and on the series.

Engine

Water/charge air cooling, external

Air/charge air cooling, external

BR 2000

1

expansion tank

1 expansion tank for the engine coolant cycle

(common for the engine coolant and charge air coolant cycle)

BR 4000

2

expansion tanks

 

(1 each for the engine coolant and charge air coolant cycle)

------

8.6.2 Arrangement

¯ As a separate tank at the highest point of the cooling system, normally arranged on the fan cooler.

¯ Maximum height 10 m above the top edge of the engine.

Chapter

8

Page

44

Chapter 8 Page 44 Engine cooling 8.6.3 Size ¯ The expansion tank should have a liquid

Engine cooling

8.6.3

Size

¯ The expansion tank should have a liquid volume of at least 15 % of the total filling quantity of the cooling system.

¯ Measure the water volume/air volume ratio so that no cooling water escapes via the overpres- sure valve during heating.

8.6.4

Configuration

¯ The expansion tank must be configured as a closed vessel.

¯ With an integrated overpressure/underpressure valve.

¯ Level sensor for monitoring the coolant level (engine stop function), if necessary two-stage level monitor with pre-warning stage.

¯ Expansion tanks with nitrogen bladders are not permissible.

8.7

Coolant

The coolant filling must be a mixture of suitable fresh water and a coolant additive approved by MTU (anti- freeze, corrosion protection). The requirements, mixing ratios and the change intervals can be found in the consumables specification.

Important: Treatment of the coolant must be carried out before the engine is filled.

The coolant with anti-corrosion agent and antifreeze must be collected in a separate tank and, if necessary, disposed of.

CAUTION The valid environmental protection regulations must be observed with respect to ¯ Disposing of

CAUTION

The valid environmental protection regulations must be observed with respect to

¯ Disposing of coolant.

Engine cooling

Engine cooling C h a p t e r Page 8 45 8.7.1 Coolant pre-heating Immediate

Chapter

Page

8

45

8.7.1 Coolant pre-heating

Immediate full load connection following the start-up, e.g. in the case of emergency power use, is only per- missible if the engine coolant has a particular minimum temperature (of 40 _ C).

coolant has a particular minimum temperature (of 40 _ C). Refer to the technical sales document

Refer to the technical sales document data for further information.

If this is not ensured, the engine coolant cycle must be pre-heated. Electrical pre-heating units that are supplied from the existing supply mains while the engine is at a standstill are best suited to this purpose.

Normally, with the dual-cycle cooling system, it is sufficient to only pre-heat the engine cycle. Under extreme conditions of use, it may also be necessary to include the charge air cooling, oil and fuel cycle in the pre- heating.

Note:

Please consult MTU regarding your individual case.

Other pre-heating systems, e.g. diesel/petrol heating appliances and also hot water/steam heat exchangers are also possible. However, separate documentation must be requested for this.

8

1 3 4 5 6 7
1
3
4
5
6
7

2

Fig. 16 :

Diagram of the electrical coolant pre-heating (principle)

1 Discharge from engine

2 Engine

3 Infeed into engine

4 Non-return flap

5 Electric heating rod

6 Filling and drain connection

7 Temperature switch for pre-heating unit On/Off

8 Circulation pump

Chapter

8

Page

46

Chapter 8 Page 46 Engine cooling 8.7.1.1 Heating power and pre-heating temperature The heating power and

Engine cooling

8.7.1.1 Heating power and pre-heating temperature

The heating power and pre-heating temperature depend on several influencing variables:

¯ Engine design

¯ Ambient temperature

¯ Setting up outdoors or indoors