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JULY 11-17, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Kidnapping case
Second relative charged in
kidnapping. PAGE 4
FATE OF THE
FARMSTEAD
JULIE STIPE/The West Windsor Sun
The Grover house awaits its fate as a community committee attempts
to formulate a plan for the historic building.
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
The fate of the historic
Grover farmstead house
and associated buildings,
one of the hottest topics in
West Windsor at the mo-
ment, is presently in limbo,
where it will stay for the
next 90 days.
This is the amount of
time given the newly
formed Grovers Farm
Homestead Restoration
Community Committee to
form a recommendation for
the house which it will pass
on to council and adminis-
tration.
The majority of the
Grover house was built in
the 1860s, and the back por-
tion of the house was built
in the late 1700s, according
to Ted Grover, son of Leroy
Grover, who lived in the
house until his death in
2008.
In 1994, West Windsor
Township purchased the 93-
acre farm, the house and its
other structures from the
Grover family for $3.7 mil-
lion. The purchase was part
of the townships first open
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
West Windsor township
council members Linda
Geevers and Kristina Sa-
monte led the first meeting
of the Grovers Farm Home-
stead Restoration Commu-
nity Committee on June 27,
which was attended by a
number of residents.
The committee was de-
signed, Geevers said, as a
means for community mem-
bers to give their input on
the fate of the historic
Grover house and other
buildings on the property.
The committee will design a
non-binding recommenda-
tion for the house which it
will present to council in
September. Council mem-
bers Geevers and Samonte
will act as liaisons between
the committee and township
council.
The goals of the commit-
tee, Samonte said, will be to
come up with a possible
plan for the house, evaluate
the costs associated with
such a plan, and determine
funding mechanisms for a
plan. The plan should be a
please see GROVER, page 3
Fate of historic
Grover house
still unknown
New committee
meets to discuss
plans for house
please see LAND, page 7
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West Windsor Arts Council
unveils work of teachers, faculty
The West Windsor Arts Coun-
cil unveils the works of its teach-
ing artists and faculty, an eclectic
and sophisticated mix of art ex-
pressed through a variety of
mediums. The exhibit, In the Stu-
dio, runs to Aug. 31; opening re-
ception for the exhibit is on Sun-
day, July 22, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the
West Windsor Arts Center
Gallery, 952 Alexander Road,
Princeton Junction. Gallery
hours are Wednesday to Friday,
noon to 6 p.m.
Women around the world can
sympathize with the frustration
of ripped tights. But imagine if
pantyhose runs could inspire
artistic creations. Sculptor Katie
Truk, a resident of Hamilton, has
been using the delicate legwear as
the muse for her compositions
since 1995.
Pantyhose is much like a per-
son, strong yet unique in color
and composition, says Truk.
Each has its own breaking point
and beauty in complexity of lay-
ered emotion and circum-
stances.
In her collection, pantyhose of
all shapes and sizes are cut,
stretched and twisted across a
string. Although most of her
compositions are encased in a cir-
cular pinwheel, many take the
form of various cylindrical
shapes. The unique design comes
from the juxtaposition between
the rigid wire frame and the fluid-
please see EXHIBIT, page 9
JULY 11-17, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 3
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long-term, sustainable vision, Sa-
monte said.
Present at the meeting was Di-
rector of the Office of Local Gov-
ernment Assistance Cindy Ran-
dazzo, from the NJ Department of
Environmental Protection. Ran-
dazzo said that because of the
propertys farming history, it is
most important that it remains a
farm.
Its in its farming state that
its most significant, Randazzo
said. I think our hope is proba-
bly in Green Acres.
The Grover property was ob-
tained partially through funds
provided by the NJDEP Green
Acres program, which helps gov-
ernments and nonprofits pur-
chase open space with the intent
of preserving it that way. The pro-
gram places certain restrictions
on the use of land and buildings
purchased using its funds, but
will also help fund certain kinds
of projects on Green Acres land.
Residents present at the meet-
ing seemed unanimous in their
desire to restore the house.
Resident John Church said the
project has the potential to be re-
ally exciting.
Church said he has experience
volunteering to work on Habitat
for Humanity houses, and said he
would be willing to put in labor
on the house. Church also pointed
out that many people who work
with Habitat for Humanity are ex-
perienced and talented in con-
struction, yet are willing to volun-
teer their services for a good
cause. He suggested that such
people might be found to work on
the Grover house.
West Windsor resident Jim Sol-
loway also offered his services on
the house as semi-skilled labor.
Resident and contractor Rocky
Procaccini told the committee
that the original estimate of
$500,000 for the restoration of the
house, a number which Geevers
said she received from a local con-
tractor, was way, way, ridiculous-
ly high. Procaccini said the
houses structure is essentially
sound, and that the most impor-
tant move right now is to seal up
the windows and doors, and to
stop any leaks from the roof so
that the structure does not re-
ceive further damage.
It would be an absolute shame
to let that structure go, Procacci-
ni said.
Other attendees at the meeting
included David Harris, curator of
history at the New Jersey State
museum, Dave Goldstein, a li-
censed building inspector, Heidi
Kleinman, a former member of
township council, two students
from High School North, and Ted
Grover of the Grover family, who
said he hoped the house could be
restored.
Id like to see the house pre-
served, Grover said. I think it
really adds to the town.
Grover also said he was both-
ered when he discovered items
were taken from the house and
have disappeared.
We should demand that what
was taken out be put back in,
Grover said.
Dates for future meetings of
the Grovers Farm Homestead
Restoration Community Commit-
tee will be posted on the township
website at http://www.westwind-
sornj.org/.
GROVER
Continued from page 1
Grover property obtained partially through Green Acres funds
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By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
The great aunt of a 5-year-old
boy taken recently from West
Windsor has been charged with
complicity in the alleged kidnap-
ping, according to police.
The boy, David Lundy, allegedly
was abducted by his grandfather
Morris Lundy on June 15, and the
two were found in a Florence,
S.C., MacDonalds restaurant on
June 19.
Morris Lundy has been
charged with kidnapping, inter-
fering with child custody, and en-
dangering the welfare of a child,
police say.
David Lundy was in the cus-
tody of his great aunt Dorothy
Brown when he was taken. Au-
thorities say Browns custody of
the boy had been taken away, and
she was to turn the boy in to the
Division of Child Protection and
Permanency the day he was al-
legedly kidnapped.
Brown has been charged with
kidnapping, endangering the wel-
fare of a child, and hindering
prosecution by telling law en-
forcement officials that she had
no knowledge of the kidnapping,
police said.
In fact, officials say, Brown had
discussed the situation with her
brother Morris Lundy and knew
of his intention to take the boy
out of the state. She had also
packed medications and clothing
for the boy, and made a false call
to 911.
After a bail hearing on Monday,
July 2, Browns bail was lowered
from $1 million to $300,000.
David Lundy is currently in
the custody of child protection
services.
Relative charged
in kidnapping case
Visit us online at www.westwindsorsun.com
Poodle skirts and leather jack-
ets are the height of style as Mer-
cer County Community Colleges
Kelsey Theatre 2012 Summer Fes-
tival presents The Yardley Play-
ers in the rock and roll musical,
Bye Bye Birdie.
Performances are Fridays,
July 13 and 20 at 8 p.m.; Satur-
days, July 14 and 21 at 8 p.m.; and
Sundays, July 15 and 22 at 2 p.m.
Kelsey Theatre is located on the
colleges West Windsor campus at
1200 Old Trenton Road. A recep-
tion with the cast and crew fol-
lows the opening-night perform-
ance on July 13.
Inspired by the media frenzy
that surrounded Elvis Presley
when he was drafted into the
army in 1957, Bye Bye Birdie
tells the story of Conrad Birdie,
the biggest rock and roll star of
the late 50s. Conrads agent, Al-
bert Peterson, is convinced he can
make his fortune and marry the
girl of his dreams if he gets Con-
rad on The Ed Sullivan Show to
make his farewell television per-
formance and kiss his biggest fan
before he goes to war. But Alberts
mother is against his marriage
and Conrads contest winner is in
love with another (or so she says).
Will the show go off without a
hitch?
Dick Van Dyke was the first to
make this Tony Award-winning
musical a success, playing the
role of Albert Peterson both on
the stage and in the 1963 film.
Cast members include Peter
Alexander of Princeton Junction
as Harry MacAffe; Sally Graham
of Yardley, Pa., as Kim MacAfee;
Laurie Hardy of Hamilton as Mae
Peterson; Chris McHugh of Mor-
risville, Pa., as Hugo Peabody;
Chris Neuman of Hamilton as Al-
bert Peterson; Ashley Patrick of
Langhorne, Pa., as Doris
MacAfee; Lorraine Perri of Flo-
rence as Rose Alvarez; Jason
Schwartz of Richboro, Pa., as
Randolph MacAfee; and Brent
Tuccillo of Hamilton Square as
Conrad Birdie.
The show is produced and di-
rected by Marge Swider, with assis-
tant direction by Amy Zalot, musi-
cal direction by David Bohn, chore-
ography by Laura Murey, stage
management by Mike Diiorio, and
set design by Mike Almstedt.
Tickets are $18 for adults, $16
for seniors, and $14 for students
and children. For tickets, call the
Kelsey Theatre box office at (609)
570-3333, or visit www.kelseythe-
atre.net. Kelsey Theatre is wheel-
chair accessible, with free park-
ing available next to the theater.
For more information or to
purchase a discounted series
package, visit www.kelseythe-
atre.net.
JULY 11-17, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 5
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Bye Bye Birdie debuts on July 13
Special to The Sun
Yardley Players presents Bye Bye Birdie at MCCCs Kelsey Theatre
July 13-22. Pictured are cast members. Tickets are available by
calling the Kelsey Theatre Box Office at (609) 570-3333 or online at
www.kelseytheatre.net.
6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN JULY 11-17, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@westwindsorsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call 609-751-0245 or
email advertising@westwindsorsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@westwindsorsun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. You can drop
them off at our office, too. The Sun reserves
the right to reprint your letter in any medi-
um including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Julie Stipe
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
H
e sat there, with a blank face,
as he heard he was guilty on
45 of 48 charges of sexual
abuse of minors. And its likely Jerry
Sandusky, the former Penn State assis-
tant football coach who went so far as
to start a charity for neglected chil-
dren, will never see the light of day
again once hes sentenced in Septem-
ber.
And when that sentence comes
down, is there any doubt it will be just?
Regardless of what the sentence is,
the entire Sandusky ordeal is a re-
minder of just how important it is for
people to speak up on the matter of
sexual abuse.
If youre a witness to such an atroci-
ty, you must speak up and let the au-
thorities know.
If you are a family member of an
abuser or of someone who has been
abused you must let the authorities
know. And if youre a victim, as
painful as it might seem, you must
speak up and you must let the author-
ities know. For if weve learned any-
thing from this case, its just how im-
portant one voice could be if its used
wisely. If someone anyone had spo-
ken up in the 1990s, its possible others
could have been spared from this mon-
ster and his sickening abuse.
And, weve also learned, quite clear-
ly, that as painful as it is for those who
were abused to speak up, doing so
could very well lead to justice being
served and it could lead to sexual
predators being stopped in their
tracks.
All it takes is one conversation: to a
loved one, to a teacher, to a police offi-
cer. And the rest will be taken care of,
with luck, swiftly and justly. Sandusky
is where he belongs behind bars. And
if one just one more predator can be
taken off the streets because someone,
somewhere speaks up after thinking of
this case, then it will be all worth it in
the end.
No one, ever, should have to go
through what those kids went through.
Ever again.
in our opinion
See something? Say something
Conviction of Jerry Sandusky a reminder of importance of speaking up
Sexual abuse hotline
There are numerous sexual-abuse
resources out there, including the
Rape, Abuse & Incest National
Network. RAINN has a hotline for vic-
tims. Call (800) 656-HOPE. All calls
are confidential.
Students from Mercer County Commu-
nity Colleges (MCCC) Nursing program
gathered at the colleges Kelsey Theatre in
late May to celebrate both an ending and a
beginning.
Thirty-eight men and women stood
proudly in front of their friends and
family during a pinning ceremony, mark-
ing the beginning of a new career in nurs-
ing.
We are all about learning and student
success, and what a success we are cele-
brating tonight, MCCC President Patricia
Donohue said.
Dr. Guy Generals, MCCC vice president
for academic affairs, thanked the gradu-
ates on deciding to pursue one of the most
selfless careers.
You should be commended for choosing
this as a profession, he said. Remember
us and continue to strive.
Presiding over the ceremonies was Dr.
Linda Martin, dean of Science and Health
Professions, who gave words of encourage-
ment and praise for the graduating class.
Among the honored guests of the evening
was Jane Foy, a graduate of one of the first
nursing classes at Mercer.
Jane Plunkett, of Lawrenceville, was the
2012 valedictorian.
This has been a challenging and excit-
ing journey for all of us, Plunkett said,
who made a career change after 25 years in
the financial services industry. We have
supported each other through the demands
of our studies and the demands of our
lives, sharing in one anothers joys and sor-
rows.
Plunkett made the decision to go into
nursing after raising her own family. She
said she had always wanted to have a
helping profession, and was glad she fi-
nally made the career change.
Raising three children and caring for
elderly parents made me realize what a dif-
ference caring health-care providers can
make, she said.
In her speech to her classmates, Plun-
kett reminded her fellow students that
while many of them had points during
their studies where they thought they
might not finish, by standing here today
they were proving themselves worthy of
the nursing field.
Each one of us who was called to the
profession must go forward with pride and
enthusiasm, because we DO have what it
takes, she said.
Students and faculty also shared their
gratitude to the families of the nursing
graduates, for their patience and support
during years of rigorous studying and
preparing for their career.
Locals graduate from county nursing program
space acquisition, and the Grover
family continued to live in the
house until 2009, when Leroy
Grovers wife moved out.
Once the house was empty,
there was talk of leasing it, Coun-
cilwoman Linda Geevers said.
However, the property was pur-
chased using funds from the
NJDEP Green Acres program,
which restricts certain uses such
as renting buildings to tenants.
The land has been kept as
farmland and is currently being
leased to Steve Jany, who is grow-
ing alfalfa on the land.
According to Grover, the house
was in livable condition when it
was vacated in 2009. That same
year, the house was evaluated by
the administration, and in 2010,
former West Windsor Business
Administrator Bob Hary said, it
was decided the house should be
demolished.
The decision was made, Hary
said, because the township had
no ideas for the buildings use.
When I became business ad-
ministrator, I went over there
with some of the key managers
with the department, Hary said.
No one could come up with a
focus to repair or renovate it.
Hary said he agrees with
Grover that the house was in de-
cent condition when it was va-
cated but added that he saw no
reason to keep and maintain the
house with no use in mind.
I felt, and I still feel, that the
best option would be to demolish
it, Hary said. I dont see any
other use for it.
In 2010, council voted to appro-
priate $60,000 for demolition of
the farmstead buildings for the
capital budget.
According to both Hary and
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh, the item
did not slip into the budget unno-
ticed, as some residents and coun-
cilmembers have suggested, but
was discussed before the budget
was approved.
The decision to demolish the
buildings was made by council,
Hsueh said.
Geevers, who was on the coun-
cil at the time, said she remem-
bered some discussion.
We did talk about it. It was ap-
proved; the bonds were approved
to have the demolition work done.
At the time, it just didnt get a lot
of publicity in the press, Geev-
ers said. The administration was
recommending demolition so the
council at the time agreed with
it.
Geevers also noted it would
have been difficult to renovate the
house without the approval of the
administration.
I think at the time the admin-
istration did not have an interest
in restoring any of the struc-
tures, she said. You really need
the cooperation of the adminis-
tration.
For two years, Geevers said,
the council heard nothing on the
issue until this spring, when an
item appeared on the May 14
township council agenda request-
ing the council authorize the
demolition of township-owned
structures on the Grover farm-
stead.
Council balked at approving
the demolition and did not taken
action on the item at either the
May 14 meeting or the May 29
council meeting, when the demo-
lition appeared on the agenda for
approval a second time.
Geevers said the item took
council by surprise after the
lengthy period of silence on the
subject, especially since two of
the current council members
Councilman Bryan Maher and
Councilwoman Kristina Samonte
were not members of council
when the demolition was ap-
proved.
Administration officials also
seemed to be taken by surprise.
When they came out so
adamantly I was shocked because
that was a building we had all
agreed was going to be demol-
ished, Hary said.
Anger by councilmembers and
the public over the situation grew
when it was discovered that, in
February, the administration had
allowed the Historical Society of
West Windsor to remove items of
possible value from the house in
anticipation of the demolition.
According to Hary, the proce-
dure is standard for township
buildings due to be demolished.
We were just following rou-
tine procedure, Hary said.
Geevers said the historical so-
ciety apparently trades items
taken out of township buildings
for other items needed for the ren-
ovation of properties such as the
Schenck House.
They have a company that
they barter with, she said.
Geevers said she would have
appreciated if the administration
had told council when it allowed
items to be removed from the
house.
That would have been a good
time to have told the council,
Geevers said. We werent told
what was going on.
JULY 11-17, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7
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LAND
Continued from page 1
please see RESIDENTS, page 9
Land currently used for farming
WEDNESDAY JULY 11
West Windsor Township Parking
Authority meeting: 8 p.m. To
confirm meeting time and for
more information, visit
www.westwindsornj.org.
Toddler Story Time & Craft: Ages 2
to 4. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Stories and
music followed by a craft. Siblings
welcome. No registration
required.
Kidcraft: Spaceships: Ages 6 to 8. 4
to 4:45 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Each child makes
a different craft. Children partici-
pate without a parent in order to
foster independence and self
confidence. Space limited. Weekly
registration required.
Comics: Ages 7 to 11. 6 to 6:45 p.m.
at West Windsor Branch Library.
An eight-week, nine-session com-
ic workshop to give children the
necessary skills to write and draw
their own comic book. Workshop
will also include history of comic
books as well as their unique
place in the greater American
history. Registration required.
THURSDAY JULY 12
West Windsor Environmental Com-
mission meeting: 8 p.m. To con-
firm meeting time and for more
information, visit www.westwind-
sornj.org.
Excel I: 1 to 2 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Learn the basics
of Excel through making a sam-
ple spreadsheet. Formatting,
using the autofill feature, using
formulas and making simple
charts are covered in this class.
To sign up, visit the reference
desk or call (609) 275-8901.
Excel II: 2 to 3 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Learn how to
change chart colors and back-
grounds. Also learn how to down-
load Excel compatible spread-
sheets from the Internet, filter
spreadsheets, add conditional
formatting to spreadsheets and
create a pivot table. To sign up,
visit the reference desk or call
(609) 275-8901.
PowerPoint: 3 to 4 p.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. This
class deals with the basics of
making presentations using Pow-
erPoint, including making basic
slides and putting them together
to make a slideshow, plus adding
animations, clipart and transi-
tions between slides. To sign up,
visit the reference desk or call
(609) 275-8901.
Picture Books & Craft: Ages 3 to 5.
10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Stories followed
by a craft. No registration
required.
DIY Art: Ages 6 to 11. 4 to 4:45 p.m.
at West Windsor Branch Library.
Various materials will be provid-
ed in this art program in order to
help the participant engage in
creative thinking. Parents must
stay out of the art room, but
remain in the library. No registra-
tion required.
Afternoon Nap with Yosi: Ages 2
and older. 3 to 3:45 p.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. Wear
pajamas. Bring favorite blanket
or stuffed animal. Settle down
and get comfortable. Listen to
Yosi play some music designed to
lead participants into dreamland.
No registration.
Lets Play Chess: Ages 6 to 8 is
from 6 to 7 p.m. Ages 9 to 11 is
from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Held at
West Windsor Branch Library.
Learn to play chess or improve
your game. Chess boards provid-
ed. Space is limited. Registration
required.
FRIDAY JULY 13
Sing & Play: All ages. 10:30 to 11 a.m.
at West Windsor Branch Library.
A sing-along program with guitar
and CD music. Action songs and
finger plays encourage audience
participation. No registration
required.
Walk-in Craft: Ages 3 and older. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Self-directed
craft activity. Caregiver must be
present. Attend any time during
the specified period. No registra-
tion necessary.
Crafty Tweens: Ages 9 to 11. 3:30 to
4:30 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Make giant tissue
paper flowers. Registration
required.
SATURDAY JULY 14
Word: 10 to 11:30 a.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Tour through
the Microsoft Word 2007 and
2010 toolbars. Learn how to
change font styles, bullet or num-
ber paragraphs, set margins,
insert graphics and more. To sign
up, visit the reference desk or call
(609) 275-8901.
Vehicle Day in the Library Parking
Lot: 10 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Meet firemen and
policemen. Climb into a fire truck
or police car. Check out a rescue
vehicle up close. Great photo
opportunity. No registration
required.
Bharat Natyam: Ages 6 and older.
10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Class meant
for beginners to Indian classical
dance. Held weekly through
August. Regular attendance rec-
ommended. Registration
required. Questions, call Kinnari
Hundiwala at (248) 686-6221.
Rubik Cube Program: Ages 7 to 14.
2 to 4 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Learn to solve
the Rubiks Cube and be part of
an historic event. West Windsor
and Plainsboro School District is
aiming to set a new world record
for the maximum number of peo-
ple solving the cube at the same
time by January 2013. Help the
district reach a target of 1,000.
Online registration required.
MONDAY JULY 16
Alphabet Hour: Ages 4 to 6. 6 to 7
p.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. Join Ms. Lisa for an hour
of fun and get to know the alpha-
bet. Every week children will
focus on one letter. Theyll hear
stories featuring the letter and do
a letter-related craft. Registration
required.
Books & Babies: Ages birth to 2.
10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Songs, rhymes,
movement and simple stories
designed to introduce children
and infants to the library. Pro-
gram is one-on-one with child.
Each child must be accompanied
by an adult. No registration
required.
TUESDAY JULY 17
Preschool Story & Craft: Ages 4 to
8. 4 to 4:45 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Mostly new pub-
lished picture books will be read.
Siblings welcome.
Mad Science presents Wacky Sci-
ence: Ages 3 and older. 4 to 5
p.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. This 45-minute special
event features several different
aspects of science, including
slime making, polymers, static
electricity and dry ice demonstra-
tions. No registration required.
Problem Solving: Grades two to
five. 5:30 to 7 p.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Solve prob-
lems, learn new problem-solving
tactics and work together. No
registration required.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JULY 11-17, 2012
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WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun,
108 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email:
news@westwindsorsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.westwindsorsun.com).
JULY 11-17, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 9
In a letter from Historical Soci-
ety of West Windsor President
Clifford Reed to the township
dated May 25, Reed said that us-
able items were taken from the
house such as fireplace mantles,
interior trim, interior and exteri-
or doors, the staircase, and some
floorboards. The letter states that
the Grover family was informed
prior to the removal.
At the May 29 council meeting,
Grover came forward to state he
was not told that items were
being removed from the house,
and said when he got to the house,
there was little left.
Photos taken of the interior of
the Grover house on May 15 by
West Windsor resident Pete Weale
show kitchen cabinets ripped
from the walls and lying on the
floor, and walls with the boards
torn from them. Grover called the
house desecrated during the
May 29 council meeting.
A number of residents have ex-
pressed anger over the removal of
the items from public property
without the notification of the
council or public. There has also
been concern about the legality of
the procedure because of the lack
of documentation of the items.
Open Public Records Act re-
quests made by Weale asking for
copies of correspondence granti-
ng permission to remove items
from the house, an inventory of
items removed, a list of the par-
ties by whom they were removed,
and the current location of the
items removed have not yet re-
ceived a response, he said.
When asked about the items,
Hsueh said the removal of items
from historical buildings has not
been documented in the past be-
cause the township trusts the his-
torical society and its use of the
items.
Nobody ever questioned any-
thing, he said. We never had to
do any of these things.
Hsueh said the township plans
to put together a list of what was
removed and acknowledged that
the public should be told what
was taken and by whom.
We are obligated to tell the
taxpayers who removed what, he
said.
Township attorney Michael
Herbert said that although there
may not have been the kind of
paper trail people would like to
see, he believed a very general
list of things taken from the
house had been made. However in
an interview, Maher said that as
of July 2 the council had received
no list of any kind.
During the first meeting of the
Grovers Farm Homestead
Restoration Community Commit-
tee on June 28, Geevers said coun-
cil was promised a list of the
items taken from the house by
June 29, but said that Reed of the
historical society has been out of
town, and that it may take longer
to get than originally supposed.
Hsueh said he didnt think the
removal of the items posed legal
issues.
Legally I dont think there are
any problems here, he said.
Hsueh said he didnt have a
problem with restoring the build-
ing, as long as taxpayers are not
required to pay for it.
Maher pointed out that very lit-
tle money would have had to be
spent restoring the house if the
administration had not allowed
the house to be gutted before the
question of the demolition came
before council this spring.
Grover Farm Homestead
Restoration Community Commit-
tee member Rocky Procaccini
said that taxpayer money has al-
ready been spent on the house,
since the Department of Public
Works spent two or three days
cleaning out the house in early
June, but Procaccini stressed that
he thinks the house can be saved
without any further expenditure
of taxpayer money.
Residents intent on saving the
Grover house argue that the
home and the Grover family
have a close connection with the
township and that the house is a
symbol of the farming history of
West Windsor. The Grover name
is a familiar one in West Windsor,
as the township has a Thomas
Grover Middle School, a Grovers
Mill Road, and Grovers Mill
Pond. During a June 11 council
meeting, West Windsor resident
Marshall Lerner pointed out that
the Grover Mill features on the of-
ficial seal of the township.
Thomas Grover, after whom the
middle school was named, was a
Vietnam veteran who received
two Purple Hearts as well as a Sil-
ver Star.
The Grover house itself is also
venerable. It boasts square nails
likely handmade beams using
tongue and groove construction,
and log beams in the basement.
Many beams in the house still
have bark on them.
But Hsueh is not convinced
that the house played a big
enough part in the townships his-
tory to be worth saving. Hsueh
suggested that although the
Grover name is prominent in the
township, other families were
more important to the townships
history.
Maher disagreed, citing the
many instances of the Grover
name in the township, and the
public outcry over the planned
demolition. The administrations
surprise at public sentiment,
Maher said, is proof that the ad-
ministration is out of touch with
the township.
The administrations agenda
isnt in sync with the desires of
the community, Maher said.
RESIDENTS
Continued from page 7
Residents say house is a symbol of towns farming history
ity of pantyhose. When shes not
in her own studio, she teaches
multi-media classes to children
and adults of all ages. More on
Truk is available at www.kati-
etruk.com
Sculptor and mixed media
artist Donna Payton, a resident of
Perrineville, has a knack for cre-
ating art from unexpected places.
From wood scraps and china
shards to flea market discoveries ,
Payton takes a no-holds barred
approach to the materials chosen
in her artwork. Payton trans-
forms discarded and unnoticed
items into works that range from
the sublimely ridiculous to the
neo-surreal. Her painting collec-
tion at the West Windsor Arts
Center Gallery is filled with rich-
ly-textured compositions which
match childhood playland fan-
tasies. Paytons entire collection
can be found at www.donnapay-
ton.com/index.htm.
West Windsor resident Zakia
Ahmeds paintings, which feature
vibrant colors and thick brush-
strokes of various scenes, give
the impression of fluidness and
universality. Variations of color
represent deep feelings in the
artist, ones that may not be so ap-
parent to the viewer upon first
glance. For example, Ahmeds
most compelling painting is a
deep retrospective of her
Bangladesh childhood memories
with her since-deceased sister.
The hazy background of black,
dark and light blue, pink and
white, are all associated with cer-
tain memories from their sister-
hood. A face - albeit faded - repre-
sents the sisters omnipresent
companionship in Ahmeds life.
Photographer Sebastiano
Stias work is an extension of an
illustrious career that has
spanned more than three
decades. His photographic stills
are aimed towards capturing na-
tures subtle beauty. His most
evoking photographs of moun-
tain-tops and canyons showcase
his appreciation for the earths
vast landscape.
Stia, a resident of West Wind-
sor, has over 19 years experience
teaching photography to students
both in the classroom and online.
Sebastianos belief in photogra-
phy stems from aspects of both
humanistic and intellectual ide-
alisms that he has experienced
and continues to experience in
everyday life. He tries to interpret
his surroundings in simplistic yet
definitive images to express his
personal vision encompassing
conventional and conceptual real-
ity. These beliefs also strengthen
his resolve of truth in images.
In an evolving digital realm, truth
in photography must be held to
its core, a conviction that Stia up-
holds in the teaching of this art.
Mickey Warings collection in-
cludes mask and puppet making,
jewelry design, watercolor, and
collage, which have been influ-
enced by a lifetime of travel in
Europe in the Middle East. War-
ing is a member of the Metuchen
Cultural Arts Commission, and
has been active in the Metuchen
arts community for over 22 years.
In addition, she works as a
teacher and freelance illustrator.
Teaching both children and
adults gives Waring the opportu-
nity to make connections with
others through her passion for
art.
I often feel like a gigantic
bumblebee that cross pollinates
ideas from one person or class-
room to the next, leaving me with
more honey that I could ever use,
drunk from all of the pollen, ex-
plained Waring.
Finally, Jeehee Paks artwork
features a variety of different
styles from sketches to watercol-
or to self-portraits. Viewers may
be most drawn to a composition
titled Bubble Gum, a surrealist
cartoon of women stretching and
gliding through a bubble world.
Pak, the chief instructor of J
art Studio in San Jose, California,
has over twenty years of experi-
ence teaching art to children and
high school students who want to
apply to art college. She has been
focusing on the interactive rela-
tionships of visual art intelli-
gence and other academic sub-
jects through visual discipline by
thinking, planning and refining
our talents. She holds a Bachelor
of Fine Arts and a Masters of De-
sign Principal Theory in Dogguk
University in Korea. She current-
ly teaches Figure drawing, Water-
color painting and Cartoon/Illus-
tration at the West Windsor Arts
Center.
EXHIBIT
Continued from page 2
Exhibit includes photography, mixed media, paintings and more
classified
T HE WE S T WI N DS O R S U N
JULY 11-17, 2012 PAGE 10
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
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