Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 27

Minilesson #2: Long & Short Vowels

Author: Dr. Diane Nettles PowerPoint Designed by: Dr. Christine Peterson

Minilesson #2: Vowels


There are five letters in the English alphabet that are always considered vowel letters, and they represent vowel sounds, or vowel phonemes. These letters are: a, e, i, o, and u. Complete the next few exercises to refresh your memory of the sounds these letters represent.

Minilesson #2: List #1


Look at the words below. Each of the words, or a derivative of the word, is in the reprint edition of the classic, The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter (1987). Say them out loud to yourself. All the words in each group have a phoneme in common. Discover this phoneme. Try to focus on the sound of the word.

tail
safe

gate

ate

frame

rake

tablespoonful

taken

straightaway
What vowel sound is common in the words above? Click here to find out.

Minilesson #2: List #2


What vowel sound is common in the list below?
Peter meet least tree knees speaking fields thief squeezed each tea beans three

peas

leaving underneath

sneezed

wheelbarrow

Click here to find out.

Minilesson #2: List #3


What vowel sound is common in the following list?

pie five might excitement hide tried


Click here to check your guess.

fright time alive night

Minilesson #2: List #4


What is the common vowel sound? scarecrow go rabbit-hole potatoes dose overheard clothes stone close hoeing
Click here to check your guess.

Minilesson #2: List #5


What vowel sound is common in the list below? cucumber beautiful cute
Click here to check your guess.

Self-quiz for Minilesson #2


In each of the following, which word does not belong? Click on the links to check your answer. 1. acorn able ate apple 2. sight sin hide line

Self-quiz for Minilesson #2


In each of the following, which word does not belong? Click on the link to check your answer.
3. ukulele unicorn under use 4. peach pet read sneeze

Self-quiz for Minilesson #2


In each of the following, which word contains a long vowel sound?
pain have car sat

fought

hog

mode

love

eat

when

sieve

egg

hit

height

igloo

itch

Review for Minilesson #2


In this lesson, you saw examples of long vowel phoneme in several words. Each of the vowels, a, e, i, o, u, can represent a phoneme that sounds just like the name of the vowel. A word that contains a long vowel phoneme can be spelled in several ways. For example, the words ate and eight both contain a long a vowel phoneme. You can remember these phonemes by associating a word or name with each of them. One helpful way for children to remember them is to remember storybook characters whose names contain this vowel phoneme; this may be a helpful way for you remember them, too.

Minilesson #3: List 1


To find out more about vowel sounds, look at the words below. Each of them is from the book, Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel by Virginia Lee Burton (1939). Say them out loud to yourself to discover the phoneme that these words have in common.

that landing faster had gasoline sad gravel added rather bang crash slam apple janitor caterpillars
Click here to check your guess.

Minilesson #3: List #2


What vowel sound is common in the words below? red never cellars betters seven electric left every them together well telegraph lessons telephone settled
Click here to check your guess.

Minilesson #3: List #3


What vowel sound is common in the words below? dig hills filled it cities pits big if in little this milkman thick listen didnt winter Kipperville
Click here to check your guess.

Minilesson #3: List #4


What vowel sound is common in the words below? stop jobs Popperville got doctor top Bopperville Kopperville not hot forgotten rocking
Click here to check your guess.

Minilesson #3: List #5


What vowel sound is common in the words below? Mulligan such dug cut trucks junk rust hundred sun up sundown much
Click here to check your guess.

Review for Minilesson #3


The short vowel phoneme is very common in childrens beginning reading materials, because short, three letter words, which are easy to recognize and remember, often contain this phoneme. For example, the letter a in the word cat represents the short vowel sound of a. Because of this, many teachers teach the short vowel phoneme early in the primary grades, usually in the first grade.

Self-quiz for Minilesson #3


In each of the following which word does not belong? 1. has bacon flat cask 2. city sick sin sign

Self-quiz for Minilesson #3


In each of the following which word does not belong? Click on the link to check your answer. 3. Ukraine utmost but hug 4. pest pen red meter

Self-quiz for Minilesson #3


In each of the following, which word contains a short vowel sound?
pain acorn car sat

fine

hog

goat

lake

eat

cheese

eel

egg

height

night

igloo

sky

Review for Minilesson #3


In this lesson, you saw examples of short vowel phoneme in several words. Each of the vowels, a, e, i, o, u, can represent a phoneme that has a different sound from the long vowel sound. These phonemes can be spelled in several ways. For example, the words plaid and pad each contain the short a vowel phoneme. Again, you can remember these phonemes by associating a word or name with each of them.

Minilesson #4: List #1


A letter that is most often associated with consonants can also be considered a vowel. Take a look at the exercises in Minilesson #4 to see how this happens. Read the words in List #1, which are taken from Tacky the Penguin by Helen Lester (1988). Pay close attention to the last syllable in each word.

Tacky Goodly Neatly Lovely icy quietly politely hearty splashy pretty only growly especially gracefully loudly dreadfully tightly

Minilesson #4: List #2


Look at the words below. What vowel phoneme is represented by the y?

shy

my

why

sky

Click here to check your guess.

Self-quiz for Minilesson #4


Which of the following words does not belong? Why? Click on the link to check your guess. 1. my yellow sly skylight 2. happy stinky beyond funny

Self-quiz for Minilesson #4


Which word contains the y serving as a vowel? Click on the link to check your guess.
yonder why yippee yes

yelp

canyon

only

yikes

Review for Minilesson #4


The letter y can serve as a vowel. When it is in the final position in the word, it represents either the /e/ phoneme (like in baby) or the /i/ phoneme (like in my). When it serves as a vowel in the middle of a word, it represents one of the sounds of i (as in gym or rhyme).

The minilessons were prepared using the following reference:


Nettles, D. (2005). Literacy instruction in

todays classrooms: Balancing the whole, the parts, and the heart. Boston, MA: Allyn &
Bacon.