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( Lobsters, Crabs, Barnacle, Shrimp, and Krill)

Phylum Arthropoda Subphylum Mandibulata Class Crustacea Subclass Malacostraca ("Soft Shell")
Order Decapoda (Ten Legs)

Order Amphipoda (Two Legs)


Order Isopoda (Same Legs)

Subclass Branchiopoda ("Gill Feet") Subclass Ostracoda (A shell") Subclass Copepoda ("Oar-Footed") Subclass Cirripedia ("feet with curls of hair")

Bilateral symmetry Two main body segments Cephalothorax Abdomen They filter feed, scavenge, or are predatory Use appendages for food getting and movement Found throughout the oceans of the world Are an important food source for other marine organisms They reproduce sexually, fertilize externally Have gills to breathe Eyes of two types: Median simple Compound eyes ommatidia Have statocysts and sensory hairs.

Is made of a tough fibrous material called chitin.

This gives the skeleton strength and flexibility.


There are several pairs (5 or more) of jointed appendages (movable arms and legs).

Molting is when the exoskeleton is shed as the organism outgrows it. Some types of molting are: Ecdysis shedding off of cuticula in most invertebrates. Sloughing Casting off dead tissue.

ECOLOGY
Marine

or freshwater environments Motile, although a few taxonomic units are parasitic and live attached to their hosts; and adult barnacles live a sessile life

LIFE CYCLE
Lobsters

LIFE CYCLE
Crabs

LIFE CYCLE
Barnacle

LIFE CYCLE
Shrimp

LIFE CYCLE
Krill

CONSUMPTION BY HUMANS
Many

crustaceans are consumed by humans, and nearly 10,700,000 tons were produced in 2007; the vast majority of this output is of decapod crustaceans: crabs, lobsters, shrimp, and prawns.

Did you know?


The

Woodlice is a crustacean despite living on land Live lobsters can be yellow, blue, orange and white but never red in color, they only turn red when they have been cooked! The Japanese spider crab (Macrocheira kaempferi) is the largest crustacean in the world The Stygotantulus stock is the smallest crustacean in the world, measuring less than 0.1mm in length!

Shrimps

move by walking slowly across the sea floor but when fleeing from a predator, they swim backwards quickly by curling and uncurling their abdomen. This is known as the caridoid escape reaction. Male fiddler crabs have one large claw, which they wave in the air to impress females when trying to find a mate and intimidate other males and predators. The waving of their claw is thought to resemble playing the fiddle!

Fin