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Get Writing: Paragraphs and Essays Chapter 6: Developing Paragraphs Using Narration

Prepared by: Dr. Mercedes Torres Almodvar

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Objectives

Understand the elements of narration. Use clear transitions.

Appreciate the use of dialogue in narration.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

What is Narration?
Narration tells a story or explains a chain of events. Second Edition Page 87 Third Edition Page 82

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Narrate one of the following events


The surprise ending of a favorite movie or TV show An event that led you to make a decision An incident that changed your opinion of someone or something

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

What is Narration?
Narration can be fiction or non-fiction.
-

Short stories Fables Screen plays Comedy routines Biographies Police reports History books Newspaper articles

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Writing Narration: Making a Point

Effective narration has a clear purpose. It does not only explain what happened it also explains WHY that event is important.

It does not always have a topic sentence but it DOES always have a controlling idea.
M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Tips for Making Points


1.

Guide your writing by keeping in mind the most important thing you want your reader to know. Delete minor details that do not support your main point.

2.

3.
4. 5.

Focus on conflict or contrast to create tension or drama.


Organize details to create strong impressions. Use concrete words rather than general or abstract terms to provide dramatic but M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres accurate depictions of events.
Almodvar

More Tips for Making Points


6.

Avoid Shifting point of view (from I to you or they) unless there is a clear change in focus. Use tense shifts to show logical changes between past and ongoing or current events.

7.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Making a Point p. 89 Second Edition Making a Point p. 84-85 Third Edition

Do exercise 1 in your notebook

Using the following subjects, narrow the topic and establish a controlling idea

An argument or scuffle you witnessed The most dramatic event that happened in high school or at your job A turning point in your life or the life of a friend An accident or medical emergency

Topic: The way someone delivered bad news Narrowed topic: The news about my fathers death Controlling idea: My husbands face projected distraught the day I was told about my fathers sudden death,

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

The six reporters questions are:


Who?
What? Where? When? Why?

How?
M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres

Writing Narration: Using Transitions

A narrative paragraph relates events over a period of time.


To prevent readers from becoming confused, signal shifts in time with transitional words or phrases.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Key Transitions for Narration

Before After After a while Next Following While Now Later Immediately

The following day In the meantime Then First Finally Suddenly Hours, days, weeks later That morning, afternoon

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Exercise 2 Identifying Transitions

Page 91 or Page 86

In the book!

Study the student paragraphs pp.94-97 (Second Edition) Study the student paragraphs pp.89-92 (Third Edition)

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Writing Narration: Using Dialogue


If you are explaining an event that involves people talking, using direct quotations can advance the story better than an indirect summary of a conversation. See page 93 (Second Edition) See Page 87 (Third Edition)

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Writing Narration: Using Dialogue


I was taking a nap on the patio when I heard Mrs. Gomez next door screaming for help. I woke up and jumped over a small hedge between our yards. I asked her what the problem was, and she said her son had fallen into their pool. Timmy was lying on the ground. His face was puffy and bluish white.

I was taking a nap on the patio when I heard Mrs. Gomez next door scream, Help me! Help! I jumped over the small hedge between our yards. Whats wrong? I asked. Timmy fell in the pool. I found him floating in the pool, she said, sitting next to Timmy, who was lying on the ground. His face was puffy and bluish M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres
Almodvar

Point to Remember

In writing dialogue, start a new paragraph each time a new person speaks. Because dialogue may include many short paragraphs, your essay may appear to be longer than the assigned length. Use a computer word count. A 3-page essay with dialogue is often no longer than 1 pages of description.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Steps to Writing a Narrative Paragraph


1.

Study your topic and use critical thinking by asking key questions. List your point or message as a topic sentence to guide your writing (the topic sentence does not have to appear in the finished paragraph). List supporting details that establish your point.

2.

3.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

More Steps to Writing a Narrative Paragraph


4.

Review your list, deleting minor details and highlighting significant ones. If people speak in your narrative, consider using dialogue rather than indirect summaries of conversations. Write a first draft of your paragraph.

5.

6.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

1 More Step to Writing a Narrative Paragraph


7. Read your paragraph out loud and consider these questions:

Does my paragraph make a clear point? Does it tell readers what I want them to know? Do I provide sufficient details? Are there unimportant details that could be deleted? Do I use concrete words, especially verbs, to create action? Do I avoid illogical shifts in point of view or tense? Do I provide clear transitions to advance the narrative and explain the passage of time?

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Points to Remember
1.

Narration paragraphs should make a clear point, not simply summarize events.

2.

Narratives can be written in 1st person (I), 2nd person (you), or 3rd person (they). Avoid illogical shifts. Narration can be stated in past or present tense. Avoid illogical shifts.

3.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

More Points to Remember


4.

Paragraphs should have clear transition statements to advance the narrative, indicate the passage of time, and prevent confusion. Dialogue direct quotations can be more effective than summaries of conversations. Remember to use quotation marks and to begin a new paragraph to indicate a shift in speakers.

5.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

Writing Assignment

Study carefully the steps to writing a narrative paragraph page 98 (second edition) or page 92 (third edition) Select a topic listed below and complete exercise 4. Write out your first draft, then submit final copy. SEE ASSIGNMENT IN MOODLE!

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar

References

Connelly, M. (2013). Get Writing: Paragraphs and Essays. Boston: Thomson Publishing Co.

M. Connelly 2013 adapted by M. Torres Almodvar