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CM: Chapter 1

Introducing the Concept of Classroom Management

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium


INTASC standards identify

knowledge

skills
attitudes

for all educators.


M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

INTASC
Teachers must know about:

Learners and student development

Multiple instructional strategies


Creating a learning environment for all students

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Classroom Management Definition


Strategies for assuring physical and psychological safety Techniques for changing student misbehaviors and teaching self-discipline Methods of assuring an orderly progression of events Instructional techniques that contribute to students positive behaviors

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Classroom Management Problems


Challenge all teachers Differ in frequency and intensity Are similar in type

Goofing off Minor disruptions

Disturb teachers and students Negatively affect teaching/learning Hinder academic achievement

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Possible Causes of Violence


Growing up abused Lacking a nurturing family structure

Being influenced by

Gang presence and activity Hate-motivated behavior Drugs and alcohol

Experiencing bullying
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 2
Building the Foundation

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Managing the Classroom Environment


Develop routines for:

Collecting and distributing materials Keeping track of students Assigning jobs in the classroom Organizing groups Keeping track of attendance and grades Keeping records Establishing a daily agenda

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Improving Student Behavior Gordon


Teachers can improve student behavior by:

Using student ideas in instruction Using more discussions and dialogue Praising students when appropriate Tailoring instruction to individual students Placing emphasis on productivity and creativity Using cooperatively planned learning goals Using more real and genuine teacher talk

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Supporting Self-Control

Use signals:

Catching the eye of the student Frowning or smiling Shaking the head

Stand near a student and use proximity. Use humor, not sarcasm. Show interest in student work. Ignore minor misbehaviors. Understand reasons for misbehaviors.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Five Basic Psychological Needs Glasser


Need Need Need Need Need

for survival to belong for power for freedom for fun

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

CM: Chapter 3
Exploring the Theories of Assertive Discipline Lee Canter and Marlene Canter

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Key Concepts of Assertive Discipline

Rewards and punishments are effective. Both teachers and students have rights. Teachers create an optimal learning environment. Teachers apply rules and enforce consequences consistently without bias or discrimination. Teachers use a discipline hierarchy with the consequences appropriate for the grade level. Teachers are assertive, not nonassertive or hostile.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Response Styles

Nonassertive - Ive asked you repeatedly to stop talking, and you continue to do it. Please stop. Assertive - Justin, that is your warning for leaning back in the chair. Put the chair down now or you will face a loss of classroom privileges. Hostile - Put that comic book away or youll wish you had!

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Different types of rewards:

Social reinforcers

Words Smiles Gestures

Graphic reinforcers

Star Sticker Checkmark

Activity reinforcers

Free time Special game

Tangible reinforcers

Treat Pencils and other supplies Certificates


2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Basic Rights of Students


Students have the right to:

Have an optimal learning environment Have teachers who help them reduce inappropriate behavior Have teachers who provide appropriate support for appropriate behavior Have teachers who do not violate the students best interests Choose how to behave with the advance knowledge of the consequences that will consistently follow
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Basic Rights of Teachers


Teachers have the right to:

Maintain an optimal learning environment Expect appropriate behavior Expect help from administrators and parents Ensure students rights and responsibilities are met by a discipline plan that:

Clearly states expectations Consistently applies the consequences Does not violate the best interests of the students

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

CM: Chapter 4
Exploring the Theories of Democratic Teaching Rudolph Dreikurs

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Key Concepts of Dreikurss Theory

Mistaken goals

Attention-getting Power-seeking Revenge Helplessness (feelings of inadequacy) (Dreikurs, 1968; 1971)

Democratic (not permissive or autocratic) teaching Encouragement rather than praise Logical consequences

Classroom rules Implement logical consequences rather than punishments. Use punishment only when all logical consequences have been exhausted (Dreikurs and Grey, 1968).
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Logical Consequences
Behavior A student writes on a school desk.

Logical Consequence The student must clean the desk.

A student destroys anothers property.

The student (not the parent) must pay for the property. The student does the work during recess or before/after school.

A student refuses to complete assignments during class.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Identifying Logical Consequences


What consequences might be logical for these behaviors?

A student intentionally throws his books to the floor in a fit of anger. A student calls another student a racial slur. A student refuses to complete an assignment.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Praise or Encouragement

Praise: Youre a fine student! You finished your math in record time. Encouragement: I can tell youve been practicing your math drills and I hope you will continue. Praise: Youre a whiz with that computer program. Encouragement: I can tell you enjoy the challenges of learning to use a new computer program.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Developing Rules

Rules define:

What behavior the teacher expects What the students should do How the class is conducted or how the day is structured

Rules may also contain:


Consequences when rules are broken Rewards when rules are followed
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 5
Exploring the Theories of Congruent Communication Haim Ginott

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Congruent Communication

Congruent communication is:

Open Harmonious with students feelings about themselves and their situations Without sarcasm

Congruent communication sends sane messages about the situation, not the personality or character of the student.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

According to Ginott, teachers must:


Promote self-discipline for both teachers and students. Believe that the essence of discipline is finding effective alternatives to discipline (Ginott, 1972a , p. 147). Accept and acknowledge students without labeling, arguing, disputing, or belittling the individual. Avoid evaluative praise and use appreciative praise .
Avoid sending you messages and use I messages. Demonstrate their best behaviors. Invite rather than demand student cooperation.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Teachers Roles

Use positive, effective communication.

Provide a classroom environment that encourages good behavior.


Model behaviors that invite cooperation and positive behavior. Avoid autocratic behaviors. Seek alternatives to punishment.

Remain sensitive to the needs of students.


Promote cooperation with students and harmony in the classroom.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Evaluative and Appreciative Praise

Evaluative praise (destructive)


Example: Samal, you did a good job with the reading test. I like having you in my class.

Appreciative praise (productive)


Example: Samal, I can tell you really tried on the reading test.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Can you use Ginotts ideas?


Can you use:

clear communication? sane messages? guidance, rather than criticism?

refrain from using punishment? handle anger appropriately?


2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 6
Exploring the Theories of Instructional Management Jacob Kounin

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Kounins Key Concepts

Teacher Behavior Movement Management


Group Focus
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Avoiding Overdwelling

Journal writing Free choice reading from


the classroom book collection school library

Doing homework Prepared mini-lessons that take 10 minutes or less Teacher reads aloud

a poem short story

Listening to an audio book


2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Slowdowns

Overdwelling dwelling on corrective behavior longer than needed or on a lesson longer than required.

Fragmentation breaking an activity or behavior into subparts although the activity could be performed easily as a single unit or an uninterrupted sequence.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Dangles and Truncations

Dangle Starting an activity and then leaving it and beginning another activity. Later, resuming the original activity.
Truncation The same as a dangle, except not resuming the initiated, then dropped, activity.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Instructional Techniques to Promote Good Behavior

Establish clear procedures. Develop lessons on appropriate level. Focus on the entire class. Do not dwell too long on one or two students. Pace instruction to maintain student interest. Provide curricular content and instructional methods that interest and challenge learners. Demonstrate appropriate instructional behaviors:

withitness group alerting

Avoid dangles, fragmentation, and satiation.


2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 7
Exploring the Theories of Discipline with Dignity Richard Curwin and Allen Mendler

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Seven Basic Principles of Teacher Behavior


Teachers should: Work toward long-term behavior changes. Stop doing ineffective things. Be fair without treating everyone the same way. Make rules that make sense. Model what they expect. Believe that responsibility is more important than obedience. Treat students with dignity.
M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Avoiding Power Struggles

Lars, give me the comic book now or after class. Rosette, either move to the other desk now or stay in for recess. Trey, either stop talking to Sidney or take a time-out.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Short-Term and Long-Term Management Techniques


Rule Infraction: A student physically takes another students lunch.

Short-Term: Teacher angrily requires the student to write a sentence 100 times. Long-Term: Teacher treats the student with dignity while asking student to return the lunch box and explaining the importance of personal property in the classroom.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Short-Term and Long-Term Management Techniques


Rule Infraction: A student walks around the room, talks out of turn, and is bothersome to other students.

Short-Term: Tish, sit down and be quiet. How many times do I have to say the same thing? Long-Term: Meeting with Tish in private, the teacher says, Tish, the students and I are disturbed when you talk and walk around the room. Lets discuss why you do these things and see whether we can find something constructive for you to do.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Modeling Appropriate Behavior


Teachers can model appropriate behavior in the classroom by:

Speaking to students the same way they expect students to speak to them Refraining from critical or harsh remarks to correct student behavior Obeying the same classroom rules they expect students to obey Meeting all deadlines and due dates Being ready to begin class on time
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 8
Exploring the Theories of Positive Classroom Management Fredric Jones

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Misconceptions About Discipline


A good curriculum means teachers will not have discipline problems. Some teachers are born with a gift for good management. Some students are truly unmanageable. Discipline and rules thwart creativity and spontaneity. The longer teachers teach, the better their management will be. There are some teachers who do not need help with discipline. The only problem is with the class this year (Jones, 1987a). Students dislike and resent classroom rules.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Three Types of Students

The Self-Starters Listen to the directions, follow the instructions, and correctly complete work assignments.
The Most Needy Need help; they cannot work alone no matter how hard they try.

The Middle-of-the-Roaders Are comfortably falling into a C+ lifestyle; they are not pursuing excellence.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Fundamental Skills of Classroom Management


Developing classroom structures including rules, procedures, and physical arrangements Remaining calm and using body language to set limits Teaching students cooperation and responsibility Providing back-up systems

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Preferred Activity Time

Students have a resource for which they are responsible. They have control over the consumption of that resource. They must live with the consequences of the consumption of that resource.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

CM: Chapter 9
Exploring the Theories of Inner Discipline Barbara Coloroso

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Key Concepts of Inner Discipline


Treat students with respect and dignity. Teachers should follow the Golden Rule. Teachers are either brickwall, jellyfish, or backbone and their choice affects students and their behavior. Students should be taught Inner Discipline. Teachers must teach students to accept ownership of their problems. Teachers should

avoid punishments, rewards, and threats; use a four-step approach to discipline; and use assertive confrontation.

Restitution, resolution, and reconciliation are the three Rs of discipline.


2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Three Categories of Teachers

Brickwall
Jellyfish Backbone

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Seven Rules for a Fair Fight


Speak the message assertively. Tell the other person about your feelings. State your belief but avoid destructive words. Give direct feedback. State what you want. Be open to the other persons perspective. Negotiate an agreement.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

The Four Steps of Discipline

Show students what they should have done. Give them as much ownership of the problem as they are able to handle. Provide options for solving the problem. Leave their dignity intact.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Three Rs of Discipline

Restitution fixing what the student did; involves repairing the physical damage (if any) and the personal damage. Resolution determining a way not to let the behavior happen again. Reconciliation honoring the restitution plan and making a commitment to live up to the resolution.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 10
Exploring the Theories of Consistency Management Jerome Freiberg

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Five Themes of CMCD


Prevention Caring

Cooperation
Organization Community
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Create a Caring School Environment

Administrators actions allow students to see them as more than disciplinarians. Library media specialist features new displays of student work, hobbies, and interests.

Whole school celebrates events.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Learning Students Backgrounds


To develop skills for cross-cultural interaction, teachers must learn about:

Family background and structure Educational background Interpersonal relationships styles Use of discipline in the home and culture Cultural concepts of time and space Religious beliefs and restrictions Food customs and preferences Health and hygiene Traditions, history, and holidays of the culture
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Key Concepts of CMCD

School-wide continuity of actions and expectations and commitment to giving students consistent messages about self-discipline Person-centered classrooms (emphasizing caring, guidance, and cooperation) rather than teacher-centered classrooms Students who are citizens not tourists Teachers who support five themes: prevention, caring, cooperation, organization, and community

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

CM: Chapter 11
Exploring the Theories of Judicious Discipline Forrest Gathercoal

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Positive Ethical Practices


Educators should: Encourage and model an eagerness for learning and teaching. Model responsible professional behavior. Manifest appropriate personal behaviors. Focus on motivation, encouragement, and building students self-esteem. Accept the reality that students behave in ways they truly believe at that time are in their own best interests. Develop judicious rules and consequences. Feel challenged by the problems in education and be proud they are in a position to help students.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Teachers Roles and Responsibilities


Introduce students to the rights encompassed in the concepts of freedom, justice, and equality. Create an equitable learning environment in which every student has the opportunity to be successful. Teach students to be leaders. Develop democratic classrooms in which human rights are secure.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Teachers Who Practice Judicious Discipline


Experience less frustration and/or less work-related stress. Feel more respected. Perceive a sense of professionalism. Consider Judicious Discipline to be legally, ethically, and educationally sound. Believe their students are provided with a language of civility.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Judicious Discipline: Philosophical and Psychological Beliefs

Students have constitutional rights (especially 1st, 4th, and 14th Amendment rights) in classrooms. Students will behave better in democratic classrooms where they experience freedom and responsibility. Teachers transfer some power to the students. Decisions are made in democratic class meetings. Students are sufficiently developed and mature to handle the freedoms associated with their constitutional rights.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 12
Introducing Additional Theorists

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Additional Theorists

Linda Albert

Cooperative Discipline

Shared responsibility Encouragement Influence

Carolyn Evertson & Alene Harris

Managing LearningCentered Classrooms

Instructional management Behavior management

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Additional Theorists

David Johnson & Roger Johnson

Three Cs of School and Classroom Management


Cooperation Conflict resolution Civic values

Jane Nelsen, Lynn Lott, & Stephen Glenn

Positive Discipline

Respect Opportunities to learn life skills

Alfie Kohn

Beyond Discipline

Learner-centered Community

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Discipline Techniques That Backfire

Raise your voice or yell. Insist on having the last word. Use sarcasm. Attack a students character. Plead or bribe. Back a student into a corner. Use physical force. Act superior. Bring up unrelated events.
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Civic Values in a Classroom


Cooperation Respect for diversity Accountability Equal justice Equal opportunity Equal responsibility
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Evertson and Harris COMP

Specific student misbehaviors call for different types of interventions:


Minor Moderate Extensive

Teachers must determine quickly:

The severity of the behavior offense The needed intervention


2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

CM: Chapter 13
Creating Safe Classrooms and Safe Schools

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Bullying

Occurs once every seven minutes. Episode lasts 37 seconds. 15% of all children are regularly bullied. Occurs where there is little or no supervision. Boys bully both boys and girls; girls bully girls. Boys engage in more bullying behavior. Boys are victims more frequently than girls. Victims are often blamed for the treatment.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Causes of Violence

Gang presence and activity


Hate-motivated behavior Drugs

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Reducing Bullying
Teachers and students are warm, positive, and caring. Teachers set firm limits on acceptable behavior. Teachers are consistent in applying nonhostile and non-physical sanctions. Teachers are authoritative but not authoritarian.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

School Safety

All classrooms face the threat of some violence. The goal should be for classrooms and schools to be safe for all students and educators.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

CM: Chapter 14
Developing Your Personal Classroom Management Philosophy

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Comparing Theories and Models to Your Management Philosophy


Do I believe that I can manage students behaviors effectively and positively with this model or these practices? Would I feel comfortable using these ideas? Does this model expect me to control students behavior through rewards, punishments, bribes, and threats, and do I feel comfortable doing this? Would I have to ask administrators and parents to intervene in efforts to maintain proper behavior if I used these ideas? Would I have to use management techniques that I do not like? What impression would I give students if I used this model in my classroom?
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Examining Misbehaviors

What is the goal of the misbehavior? What is the result of the misbehavior? Does the misbehavior directly affect or annoy someone? Is a student being physically or psychologically harmed? Is the misbehavior temporary? Might other students copy the misbehavior? Is it a violation of a stated rule or should the student just know better? Will the correction of the misbehavior cause more disruption than the actual problem?
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Deciding Whether to Teach or Impose Discipline


Do I believe that because I am the teacher/adult, I have a responsibility to discipline them? Do I believe students have the ability and motivation to learn self-discipline? Could I teach students to discipline themselves even if I wanted to? Can I impose discipline (and therefore be an autocratic teacher) until students learn self-discipline? Will I be perceived as a jellyfish (Coloroso, 1994) if I try to avoid imposing discipline? Will I be perceived as a brickwall (Coloroso, 1994) if I try to impose discipline? Will students behavior grow worse during the process of moving from imposing to teaching discipline?
2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

Students Learn Best:


With a unified approach to positive disciplinary practices, with emphasis on early intervention Where school-wide and classroom academic and behavioral supports are routinely provided When discipline is addressed through instruction, with appropriate behavior taught in a routine and systematic manner Where administrative leadership fosters a school, home, and community partnership

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

CM: Chapter 15
Applying a Management Philosophy in Your Classroom

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Advice for Beginning Teachers


Respect your students. Develop a philosophy, but dont be afraid to adjust it over time. Make classroom management a number 1 priority. Consistency Teamwork Be fair and consistent with the rules. Do not hold grudges or show favoritism toward students. Be calm and talk to the students. Have a sense of humor. Admit when you are wrong and apologize. Do not be afraid to call parents for their support. Plan, plan, plan! Dont be afraid to ask other teachers for their advice.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Information for Parents/Guardian

Overall behavior goals of the school Specific behavior expectations for the class Consequences for misbehavior When an administrator will become involved When parents/guardian will be contacted Best times and places for the parents/guardian to contact the teacher Ways the parents/guardian can promote safe schools and well-managed classrooms

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Building a Community in the Classroom


Identify things the class can do together. Help each student identify his or her place within the class. Ensure that discussions are inclusionary. Provide everyone with opportunities to participate. Do not force a student to voice an opinion.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

Using Human Relations Skills


Convey warmth and positive feelings toward students. Model positive treatment of others. Accept students and their strengths and weaknesses. Convey appreciation of students differences. Offer constructive criticism. Encourage success in behavior. Avoid finding fault and blame. Provide students with hope and optimism. Disagree without being argumentative or blaming others.

M. Lee Manning and Katherine T. Bucher, Classroom Management, 2nd edition

2007 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All rights reserved.

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