You are on page 1of 36

Harley-Davidson Motor Company

•Type Public­1984, NYSE­1987

•Founded 1903

•Founder William S. Harley
Arthur Davidson
Walter Davidson
William A. Davidson

•Headquarters Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA

•Key People James L. Ziemer (CEO)
Thomas E. Bergmann (CFO)
James A. McCaslin (COO)
Syed Naqvi (President, HDFS)

•Industry Recreational Vehicles 

•Revenue ▲  8.8 Billion USD (2008)

•Employees 9,700 (2006)

•Subsidiary Buell, HDFS
•Website www.harley­davidson.com 
 
                                          MISSION 
We inspire and fulfill dreams around the world through Harley­
Davidson motorcycling experiences.

 
             VISION 
Harley­Davidson, Inc. is a global leader in fulfilling dreams 
and providing extraordinary customer experiences through 
mutually beneficial relationships with our stakeholders.
 
 
         VALUES 
These are our values. They are the heart of how we run 
our business. They guide our actions and serve as the 
framework for the decisions and contributions our 
employees make at every level of the Company.
Tell the Truth.
Be Fair.
Keep Your Promises.
Respect the Individual.
Encourage Intellectual Curiosity.
DEMOGRAPHICS

GENDER
Male
Female 2007
88%
12% 2006
88%
12% 2005
88%
12% 2004
89%
11% 2003
89%
11%

MEDIAN AGE MEDIAN INCOME


HARLEY-DAVIDSON CUSTOMER PROFILE
2007 HDMC INDUSTRY
Median age 44.4 yrs. 32.6 yrs.
Median Household Income $80,700 $42,500
Male 95% 90%
Married 57% 49%
Occupation
Blue Collar 53% 55%
White Collar 40% 31%
Education
High School Graduate 90% 75%
College/Degree 44% 38%

52% Owned Harley-Davidson® motorcycle


previously at any point during lifetime
33% Owned a competitive motorcycle
previously
15% First motorcycle purchased
Competition !!!  BMW, Germany 02.3%
!  Daelim, S. Korea 02.6%
 Ducati, Italia 00.9%
 Honda, Japan 21.7%
 Kawasaki, USA 13.6%
 Polaris, Britain 01.5%
 Suzuki, Japan 12.6%
 Yamaha, Japan 10.0%
 HDMC, USA 34.8%
Strategic Direction and Marketing Objectives  

•HD has chosen the strategic direction of targeting a 
younger market that is technologically conscious in order 
to increase its share in the performance cruiser market 
space. 

•To target the younger market with the new product line, 
the company has adopted the following marketing 
objectives: to expand its current market (market 
expansion), diversify its product line (product 
diversification), and modify its marketing mix to target a 
younger demographic.

•During the 1970's, HD was facing a decline in market 
share due to increased competition with Japanese 
companies. By phasing out weak models, becoming more 
selective, and limiting sales and promotions, HD was able 
to carve out a niche in the marketplace which it enjoys 
today

Possible future strategies to increase market share :

•First, HD needs to expand its potential customer base to 
include enthusiasts and non­enthusiasts males in the 35­44 
age group

•, HD needs to position the V­Rod to also appeal to first time 
buyers of motorcycles. HD's strong brand identity can help 
pull in new clients. 

•Third, HD has to set an appropriate marketing mix that will 
help attract a younger consumer base. By using the low­end 
approach, which involves attracting a young audience to a 
brand name product with a low price tag (similar to what 
Jaguar and BMW have done), HD can expand its popularity 
to the domestic and international market. 
Marketing Mix Elements

•The product strategy is any decision that 
helps the company continue to develop new 
products around its signature American image 
and positions the company in the market as 
such. The main reason for the introduction of 
the V­Rod was the need to create a bike that 
would appeal to a younger demographic and 
attain a greater market share for the company. 
By using the low­end targeting method (as 
discussed previously) with the introduction of 
the V­Rod, this can be considered HD's first 
step toward implementing its strategic and 
marketing objectives.   
Product 
Motorcycles
Line

>$6,999 >$11,999 >$15,899 >$14,999


Accessories 
Men's  Womens Kids Gifts Items 
PRICE
As for the pricing strategy, HD must be careful to 
implement a pricing decision based on the low­end 
targeting method. Priced at $17,000 MSRP, HD's 
V­Rod has the second highest price tag in the 
performance cruiser market. Although HD does 
have a 22% share of the total market, HD's 
pricing strategy has three main factors that have 
influenced how it has priced the V­Rod: 1) the 
used motorcycle market, 2) lower priced 
motorcycles, and 3) HD's inability to keep up with 
demand4. In order for HD to attain a greater 
market share, the company must examine how 
these three factors will continually play a role in 
pricing and adjust accordingly. 
  
HARLEY DAVIDSON ON INDIAN ROADS
Model US $ Indian Rs
(approx)
Sportster® $6,999 5,97,000/-
Dyna® $11,999 10,23,000/-
Softtail® $15,899 13,55,000/-
VRSC® $14,999 12,80,000/-
Touring® $16,999 14,50,000/-

•Prices have been arrived at by calculating the various surcharges and


import duty amounting to 103% of original rate (www.thekneeslider.com)
•Exchange rate – US $ (in Rs.) 42.79/- as on 30/07/2008
•Price in US $ courtesy –www.harley-davidson.com
The Indian Connection
 Meeting with Mr. Kamal Nath (Minister of Commerce and
Industry) on April 2007

 13th April 07 relaxation of emission norms


 Quid-pro-Quo with American government


 Initial sales target 500 units for 3 years



PROMOTION
The Harley­Davidson Corporation has found multiple 
ways to implement its promotion strategy. HD's 
primary promotional tool since 1983 has been the 
HOG. The company's advertisements and 
commercials are focused around female images. Since 
93% of bikers are males, the HOG advertising 
campaign has been successful for decades5. HD also 
uses another strong promotional campaign through 
its cafes, located in most dealerships. HD has also 
developed an interactive website (www.harley­
davidson.com). The website gives the company the 
chance to expand its operations online. Finally, HD's 
most important promotional tool is the brand image 
of a truly American product. Such a tool appeals to 
the domestic market, and owning a Harley­Davidson 
bike fits well into supporting the national feelings of 
pride for America. 
 Although the company generated more than
$1.3 billion in revenues in 1995, it spent less
than $2 million in advertising. "We're not
dependent on advertising or other traditional
marketing techniques as automobile
companies or even our competitors are,"
says Schmidt. "They're selling
transportation. We're selling dreams and
lifestyle. There's a big difference."

EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN MANAGEMENT
BCG MATRIX

• RELATIVE MARKET SHARE:
48%
• GROWTH RATE: 13.029

STRATEGY: MARKET PENETRATION, MARKET DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, DIVESTITURE.


S W O T analysis
Strengths Weakness

•American company •Bad boy image


•Huge fan following •High cost

•Range of good products •Poor emission records

• •

Opportunity Threats

•Large untapped market •Competitors

•Booming tourism sector •Restrictive government policies

•Movement of customers towards •Time

high end products



Historical Ratio Analysis
Ratios Analysis
1992 1993 1994
Liquidity ratio
current ratio (times) 1.57 1.75 1.88
Quick ratio (times) 0.81 0.86 0.94

Leverage ratio
Debt ratio (%) 44.30% 68.93% 41.39%
Interest coverage (times) -19.79 -84.00 3643.34

Profitability ratio
Net Profit Margin (%) 4.87% -0.98% 6.76%
Return on asset (%) 10.30% -2.04% 14.11%
Return on equity (%) 16.04% -3.66% 24.07%

Activity ratio
Account receivable (times) 11.86 14.15 10.75
Average collection period (days) 30.77 25.79 33.95
Inventory turnover (times) 8.57 6.28 6.46
Average sale period (days) 42.61 58.11 56.50
Fixed asset turnover (times) 4.31 4.88 4.62
Total asset turnover (times) 2.12 2.09 2.09
Net Sales and Net Income

1994 1995F 1996F 1997F 1998F 1999F


Net sales (w /o recom m endation) 1,541,796 1,805,023 2,160,800 2,434,060 2,702,121 3,004,958
Net sales (w ith recom m endation) 1,541,796 1,805,023 2,143,024 2,014,925 2,368,204 2,787,186
Net sales (w ith pricing effect) 1,541,796 1,805,023 2,357,326 2,216,418 2,605,025 3,065,905
Net incom e (loss) (w /o recom m endation) 104,272 119,463 143,009 161,094 178,835 198,878
Net incom e (loss) (w ith recom m endation)104,272 119,463 164,334 171,638 220,677 268,081
Net incom e (loss) (w ith pricing effect) 104,272 119,463 378,637 373,131 457,498 546,800
Harley­Davidson announces leadership change at Financial Services unit
MILWAUKEE (January 8, 2009) ­ Harley­Davidson, Inc. (NYSE:HOG) announced today 
that its Chief Financial Officer, Tom Bergmann, will take on the added responsibility of 
interim President of Harley­Davidson Financial Services (HDFS), effective 
immediately.The appointment follows HDFS President Sy Naqvi’s personal decision to 
resign. Naqvi joined HDFS as President in February 2007. Bergmann will serve as interim 
HDFS President while the Company conducts a comprehensive external search.
“In the current economic environment, HDFS is an especially important priority for us and 
Tom has been highly involved in guiding that business,” said Jim Ziemer, Chief Executive 
Officer of Harley­Davidson, Inc. “I am confident Tom is the right person to lead HDFS 
through this transition.”  
Before joining Harley­Davidson as CFO in 2006, Bergmann was the CEO of USF 
Corporation, a $2.5 billion publicly traded transportation and logistics company. Bergmann 
also served as Corporate Controller and Vice President of Finance for Financial Services at 
Sears, Roebuck and Co., and in senior level positions at The St. Paul Companies, Inc. and 
Johnson & Johnson, among other executive positions he has held.
“HDFS has a strong leadership team and I am looking forward to working with them even 
more closely,” said Bergmann. “We wish Sy well in his future endeavors,” he said.
Harley­Davidson, Inc. is the parent company for the group of companies doing business as 
Harley­Davidson Motor Company (HDMC), Buell Motorcycle Company (Buell), MV Agusta 
and Harley­Davidson Financial Services (HDFS). Harley­Davidson Motor Company 
produces heavyweight custom, touring and cruiser motorcycles. Buell produces premium 
sport performance motorcycles. MV Agusta produces premium, high­performance sport 
motorcycles sold under the MV Agusta® brand and lightweight sport motorcycles sold 
under the Cagiva® brand. HDFS provides wholesale and retail financing and insurance 
programs primarily to Harley­Davidson and Buell dealers and customers.
Harley­Davidson creates special program to help riders share their passion
MILWAUKEE (January 13, 2009) ­ The Merriam­Webster dictionary defines mentor as a “trusted counselor or guide.”  Mentors 
can come from various backgrounds and ages, but all share a common goal of sharing their passion with others.  So as the nation 
celebrates National Mentoring Month, Harley­Davidson is encouraging riders to share their passion for the open road with others 
through a special mentoring program called Share Your Spark.Share Your Spark: A Guide to Mentoring is a tool kit the Motor 
Company developed for current and aspiring riders featuring information on how to be a resource and support system to others 
during their motorcycling journey. The mentoring kit includes information for both potential mentors and mentees, including a 
DVD showcasing tips on how to become or find a mentor, stories from successful mentoring experiences, a special Share Your 
Spark pin and a planning and reflection guide.
"The mentoring experiences is empowering for both parties involved," said Leslie Prevish, market outreach manager, Harley­
Davidson. "For the mentor, they get to share their passion with someone who aspires to live the same dream they do.  For the 
mentee, they learn through the collective experiences of their guide. Of course, the mentoring relationship also leads to many life­
lasting friendships.”  
Prevish adds that Share Your Spark is not just for women, but the Motor Company’s research indicates many women have 
expressed their desire to be – and find – a good riding mentor.

Over the past several years, women have increasingly embraced the sport of motorcycling – seeking the freedom and adventure 
associated with the open road, polished chrome and a sweet sounding engine. In fact, the number of women who have purchased 
new Harley­Davidson motorcycles has tripled over the past 20 years, with women now accounting for nearly 12 percent of new 
Harley­Davidson motorcycle purchases.
What Else Harley’s Doing to Inspire Women to Ride
Harley­Davidson’s We Ride is a comprehensive and inspirational overview on what a new rider or a woman interested in riding 
needs to know about getting into the sport. It features information on how and where women can learn to ride with details on the 
Rider’s Edge® New Rider Course, as well as the best way to fit a motorcycle for a woman’s ergonomic and functional needs. It also 
includes tips on getting involved and staying active with riding groups, including inspirational stories from real women who have 
answered the call of the open road. For more information, visit www.harley­davidson.com/womenriders.
Harley­Davidson dealerships across the country are also hosting women­only Garage Parties to encourage them to get involved in 
motorcycling. The Harley­Davidson Garage Party event provides a non­intimidating environment for women to learn more about 
motorcycling and meet others who are interested in riding.
For more information about Share Your Spark, visit your local Harley­Davidson dealership or visit 
www.harley­davidson.com/womenriders. 

Harley­Davidson Motor Company, the only major U.S.­ based motorcycle manufacturer, produces heavyweight motorcycles and a 
complete line of motorcycle parts, accessories and general merchandise. For more information, visit Harley­Davidson's Web site 
THE END