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The Boscombe Valley Mystery


Synopsis The Plot Theme Mood Main Characters - The Protagonist: Sherlock HolmesPrivate Detective - Dr Watson - Inspector Lestrade

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The Boscombe Valley Mystery


Minor Characters - Charles McCarthy (Deceased) - Alice Turner - John Turner/Black Jack of Ballarat (The Murderer) - James McCarthy - Mr Moran (GameKeeper) - Miss Patience Moran (14 yrs old) - Other very minor characters

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The Boscombe Valley Mystery


Setting Language Structure Literary Device - Literal Meaning - Implied Meaning

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The Boscombe Valley Mystery


Quality of Characters - Sherlock Holmes - Dr Watson - Inspector Lesterade - Charles McCarthy - John Turner - James McCarthy - Alice Turner

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The Boscombe Valley Mystery


Idioms Lessons and Moral Values

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Synopsis

A telegram for Dr Watson was sent by his friend Sherlock Holmes, inviting the good doctor to join him to investigate a murder in Boscombe valley, west of England.

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Synopsis

Two witnesses saw James McCarthy, (son of the deceased) in the vicinity where the murder took place.

The gamekeeper, Mr Moran saw James and his father both going on the path to Boscomb Pool and Patience Moran saw James arguing with Charles McCarthy (the deceased).
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Synopsis

A suspect was established based on the two witnesses statement and some circumstantial evidence.

Innocent or guilty the police arrested James McCarthy for the murder of Charles McCarthy. Miss Alice Turner, however believed James was innocent and had requested Sherlock Holmes to investigate.
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Synopsis

James Mc Carthys story at the trial is that on the day his father died he was on the way to shoot some rabbits and not to meet his father.

Further, Holmes remarked, he never left The crime vicinity.


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Synopsis An argument at Boscombe Pool did take place but it was only between a father and son, said James. His father was forcing him to do something which he did not want to do. Alice Turners story unraveled what Charles was trying to do to James. Charles wanted James to marry Alice. Mr Turner however did not like that idea.
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Synopsis

Holmes visits the Prisoner accompanied by Lestrade, to get, James version of the incident in more detail. He discovers that James wants to marry Alice Turner but the problem is that he is already married.

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Synopsis A lot of clues, were discovered as Holmes investigated the murder thoroughly. Firstly, it appeared that James could not marry Alice because he was married to a barmaid in Bristol. She, however, upon discovering that James was a murderer wanted a divorce. Secondly, Charles McCarthy knew his murderer.
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Synopsis

Thirdly, McCarthy cried cooee to call someone. Fourthly, Lestrade informs Holmes that the McCarthys and the Turners are old friends.
3

Fifthly, Watson discovers an extraordinary square toed footprint.


Holmes takes time to concentrate on the information gathered.
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Synopsis Who is the murderer? Holmes, with his deductive reasoning, states the following:

Hes a tall man, left handed, limps on his right leg, wears heavy work boots and a grey coat and smokes Indian cigars.
Holmes also hands over the murder weapon, a stone to Lesterade.
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Synopsis

Holmes does not help Lestrade further but advises him to catch the murderer. To Watson, however, Holmes explains in detail all the clues and how he concluded the case.
Watson then knew who the murderer is.
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Synopsis

A confession is what Holmes wanted and to avoid a scandal, he sent a letter to Mr Turner inviting him to Baker Street.

Mr Turner relates the story of how he knew Charles McCarthy in Australia, and his dark past as Black Jack of Ballarat.

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Synopsis
Blackmail, was the main reason Charles McCarthy was murdered. Charles was blackmailing Turner as he knew Turners past. Turner had rented out his farm with no fee, and had continued to give money to Charles whenever he demanded.

The thing which prompted Turner to kill Charles was when he discovered that Charles wanted James to marry Alice Turner.
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Synopsis

Holmes wanted a confession from Turner so that if James is not freed by the law as an innocent man then Holmes will use the confession to release James. Turner signed the confession and handed it to Holmes.

Sherlock Holmes promised Turner that he will not expose him unless necessary. Continue
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Synopsis

Seven months later Turner died and Alice and James got married. The confession was not used as James was declared innocent based on the new evidence Holmes exposed.

The confession document was burnt.

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The plot Exposition

Charles McCartney is murdered.


His son, James McCartney is accused of the murder and jailed. Alice Turner believes he is innocent and requests Sherlock Holmes to investigate.

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The plot Conflict

Sherlock Holmes does a thorough investigations and discovers so many clues that James is not the murderer.
He also discovers so many clues pointing towards another person as the actual murderer.
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The plot Climax

He faces Mr Turner and exposes him and requests him to confess. To save James, Turner confesses.

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The plot Resolution

James is freed.
Turner dies.

James marries Alice.


Sherlock Holmes burns the confession document. James and Alice never knew their demised fathers secrets.
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Theme

The main theme of the novel is how a murder can be unraveled using intelligence, deductive reasoning and diligent work. The sub themes are Good will always win over evil, love and loyalty.

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Mood
Stories regarding Sherlock Holmes are usually based on the unraveling of mysterious happenings.
It creates a sense of excitement, anxiety and eventually, relief. The suspense and the need to know as Sherlock Holmes unravels the clues is always breathtaking. Sherlock Holmes stories are always regarded as dont put down till you finish books. Thats the mood it creates.
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Main Characters
The Protagonist : Sherlock Holmes Private Detective

Sherlock Holmes was created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as a fictional private detective, who uses the power of deductive reasoning, thorough investigation, following every lead which surrounds the crime to solve fictional crimes.
In actual fact, the method used by Sherlock Holmes is used as the basis of all crime investigation todate (thanks to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle).
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Main Characters
The Protagonist : Sherlock Holmes Private Detective

Sherlock Holmes, is easily identified by his deer hunting cap and a pipe at the corner of his mouth.
His fictional address is 221B, Bakers Street, London.

(Now a museum) He is the worlds best known (fictional) detective.


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Main Characters
Dr Watson

A practising doctor, a good and loyal friend of Holmes, assists the detective in his usual undetective manner.
The author uses Dr Watson as an ordinary person asking ordinary question to which Holmes answers and unravels the story for the benefit of the readers.

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Main Characters
Inspector Lestrade

A detective from Scotland Yard (An official detective unit of United Kingdom until today).
This is the era before Sherlock Holmes and the methodology used by Scotland Yard was old and very crude lacking scientific methods in crime detection. (It was only after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was invited to Scotland Yard that the method changed).
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Main Characters
Inspector Lestrade

During those time, police could prosecute based on witnesses.


The thorough investigation method of Sherlock Holmes was unheard of. Inspector Lestrade is an example of the old method used by the police.

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Minor Characters
Charles McCarthy (Deceased)

Charles is murdered because he blackmails John Turner.


Charles is a widower and was the stagecoach driver when it was robbed while travelling from Ballarat to Melbourne, Australia. Charles gambles, and as a gambler, he frequently needs money. He blackmails John whenever he needs money as he knows Johns past secret.
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Minor Characters
Charles McCarthy (Deceased)

Even the farm he lives in, is obtained through blackmail.


Just before being murdered his intention was to get James to marry Johns daughter, Alice. This is when he is murdered as John is unable to tolerate Charles demands anymore.

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Minor Characters
Alice Turner

18 yrs old, she loves her father and takes care of him. She was the one who called Holmes to investigate the murder as she believed that James was innocent.

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Minor Characters
John Tuner / Black Jack of Ballarat (The Murderer)

John Turner is a widower and has a daughter, Alice Turner.


He is a wealthy estate owner in England. He was formally from Australia, where he was known as Black Jack, a robber.

He robbed a stagecoach driven by Charles and did not kill Charles as he regarded him as a coward.
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Minor Characters
John Tuner / Black Jack of Ballarat (The Murderer)

He paid dearly for that as Charles started blackmailing him in England when Charles met him by chance in London.
John limped slightly and wore heavy square toed boots, was left handed and smoked expensive Indian cigars. He had a heart disease and did not have long to live.
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Minor Characters
James McCarthy

18 yrs old married a barmaid but living apart. He regarded the imprisonment as his punishment for marrying the barmaid and not informing his father.
He also told Holmes that he is innocent.

He secretly likes Alice Turner.


He likes shooting rabbits.
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Minor Characters
Mr Moran (gamekeeper)

He is one of the main witness for the police case against James. He saw James walking the same path James father walked.

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Minor Characters
Miss Patience Moran (14 yrs old)

She witnessed the argument between James and Charles McCarthy, second witness of the police. (Underaged to be a reliable witness).
Mr Morans daughter.

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Minor Characters

Other very minor characters

Mrs Moran, Barmaid from Bristol, DinahMcCarthys servant, Mrs Watson, Dr Anstruther (Dr Watsons assistant), Sergeant, Judge, Prison warden and the people of Ross-on-Wye.

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Setting It is the Victorian era (1837-1901), and England was enjoying the wealth the colonies were sending back to the island. It was also creating social problems and the prisons were full. The government decided to transport the prisoners to the colonies especially Australia, hence the term transportation. (meaning to be sent to the colonies or new lands)
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Setting
1. 2. 3. 4.

Chapter 1 - Dr Watsons house - The Paddington Station - The train


Chapter 2 - The countryside, Boscombe Chapter 7 - The local hotel Chapter 8 - The Ross-on-Wye Prison - Dr Watsons and Holmes hotel room

5.
6.

Chapter 9 - Boscombe Pool


Chapter 10 - 221B, Baker Street

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Language Structure and Style

The novel is described in comic style pictures, which is able to express the story in simple, direct and easily comprehensible structure and style.

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Language Structure and Style

The direct speech made by the characters makes the message precise and to the point. There is no wavering of the ideas or story line. The conversational approach employed, one asking and the other answering in bubble form makes the story simple.
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Language Structure and Style

The narration keeps the story in line and provides the background information.

Finally, it should be noted that the language, structure and style is light and easy.

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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Murder (pg4) Literal Valley meaning Patient
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Meaning and Comment Taking a persons life (kill) with purpose. An area between two hills or mountain. Person who is receiving or to receive medical treatment.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

*Record/history/facts/information or document a professional Case person keeps. (pg5) *A box. Literal Unfortunate Unlucky meaning *A person who may have done something wrong or is guilty. (A) Suspect *Having an idea or feeling of a persons wrongdoing/guilty.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence


Guilty (pg6)

Meaning and Comment


Responsible for doing some wrong doing against the law. Complicated, Difficult to understand. *Property in the form of land in the countryside. *All the property left over by a dead person.
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Literal meaning

Complex

Estate

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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

*Man who is honorable and Gentleman courteous. *Man of wealth and social position.

Rather Literal meaning

Complicated, Difficult to understand.

A person who is more Introverted interested in his own thoughts (pg97) than things happening outside.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Joins any form of gathering, Sociable parties etc.


Literal meaning General talk usually Rumours unchecked/inaccurate, Gossip. Play a game of chance, take Gambled risk to win money etc.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment

Persons who were actually present at Witnesses the place or event where something happened/took place.

Literal Arrest meaning (pg13) Servant


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Put a stop to a persons liberty/ movement/freedom usually by the police. Person who works in a house for salary.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Gamekeeper (pg14)

Meaning and Comment Person employed to rare/breed/take care of rabbits/birds growing wild in the country estate property. Area of land covered with growing trees. Quarreling, shouting at each other, not physical fight.
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Literal meaning

Woods
Argument

(pg15)
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Raise Terribly (pg18) Meaning and Comment Carry/bring up/higher. Extreme, causing a great fear/fright.

Literal meaning

Not in a normal light way, in Seriously earnest, important because of a (pg20) possible danger.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment

Violently Using/showing great force. Weapon (pg21) Something made to/for fighting and harming.

Literal meaning

Innocent Not guilty, Not wrong, harmless. (pg24)


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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment

Police officer below the rank of Sergeant inspector. Literal meaning (pg25)
Surprised

Feeling caused by something sudden, without warning. Suffering or discomfort for wrongdoing.
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Punishment

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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Imagine (pg26) Literal Killed meaning Meaning and Comment Form a picture in ones mind.

To take the life of another.

Contrary Opposite. (pg27)


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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment

Evidence Proof of something in writing, (pg31) spoken, material things.

Strange Literal meaning


Trial (pg32)
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Not normal, different.


Testing, trying, proving, examining to prove whether a persons guilty or innocent.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment Place where law cases are heard with judge/magistrate officer of the court and lawyers arguing the case for their client (alleged innocent party, wrongdoers/the government /other parties)
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Literal Court meaning

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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment


Power or force seen as controlling events or happening in a way that cannot be resisted. An Uncontrollable happening /situation.

Fateful Literal meaning

Something serious or very high Important need.


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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence


Appointment

Meaning and Comment Arrangement to meet at a time and place. Common, seen/heard many times before.

Literal meaning

Familiar (pg36)

Usual
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Normally done/used.

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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Impossible Cannot be done. (pg37) Something done/said by two or a few person without getting others to be Private Literal involved, not for everyones meaning (pg39) knowledge only for a few peoples knowledge. Some information in the mind now, Remember able to bring back from the mind.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Interesting (pg45)

Meaning and Comment Making or increasing or arousing attention/liking.

Literal meaning Obviously Easily seen or understood.


Introduce

(pg46)
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To make another have knowledge or know the other.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Favour

Meaning and Comment

Supportive, willing to help/ protect etc.


Act of allowing, to give consent.

Literal meaning

Permission

(pg50)

Person kept in a room/closed/ Prisoner locked up place.


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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Ideas (pg51) Literal meaning Identity Awful (pg52)
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Meaning and Comment Feeling, thoughts in the mind which is probable/possible. Exact description/Information of a person. Horrible, Terrible.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Handsome

Meaning and Comment

Good looking (male).

Literal meaning Clever

Mentally smart, intelligent.

Mess (pg53)
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Not in a right orderly manner/Disorder/Dirty.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence Clues (pg56)

Meaning and Comment


Idea/ things/ thoughts which gives a mental picture, which gives an idea to a problem or happening.

Literal Woman who serves drinks at a meaning Barmaid bar. Union


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Join together, marriage.


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Literal Meaning Literary Textual device evidence Apart Literal meaning Reason

Meaning and Comment

Separate, not together.

Cause for something.

No chance of success/ Hopeless something.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Divorce

Meaning and Comment To make a marriage no more. To end a marriage legally. Making something bigger, stronger, advancement.

Literal Developments meaning (pg57) Particular (pg58)


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One special/exact one.

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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Shock Literal Rent meaning (pg59) Unusual
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Meaning and Comment Sudden disturbance to the feelings or mind. Monthly payment to the owner of a property. Not normal (abnormal). Different than the normal.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Focus/make the mind think only one Concentrate special thing/thoughts/subject matter.

Literal meaning

Limps (pg62)

Not a normal walk, walking unevenly, walking in a way when one leg is hurt.

Cigars
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Tobacco leaves rolled to form a pencil like or bigger like cigarette for smoking.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Solved (pg63)

Meaning and Comment Found the answer to a problem.

Literal Elementary meaning Simple (pg64) Know, be able to Recognized say/understand again.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Details Meaning and Comment Other small facts or items, full facts or items even the smallest information.

Literal meaning
Deduce (pg65)

Think in a way using normal rules or common sense reasoning out the facts with common practical rules.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment


Low growing plant with several stems. (Predominantly available in Australia and Africa.) May be available in other parts of the world too.
Powdery substance left over After something has burnt totally.
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Literal meaning

Bush

Ash
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Scandal (pg68)

Meaning and Comment Action or behavior which is shameful/ disgraceful. Supporting from the above letting the bottom parts free without any support. * Supported from above with a rope tied at the neck.
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Literal meaning

Hang (pg69)

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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Probably

Meaning and Comment Maybe, perhaps, not very sure but likely to happen.

Telling someone something in Literal meaning Confidence secret and believing expecting the person to keep the secret.
Present
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At the present moment, now. *Gifts


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Say agree or admit that one is Confession wrong. The quality of being real, Something which is real/true. Not imagination, not dream, a present happening. One who has/wishes/hate or wants to harm the other. Not friends, opposite of friends.
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Reality Literal meaning Enemies (pg70)


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Bad, wicked, a devil, Evil wrongdoer. A person who is in so bad a position/ situation and is Literal Desperate meaning willing to do anything/ even if dangerous. Debts
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Owing money.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Person in situation of embarrassment. Ashamed Feeling bad as done Literal something people will laugh, meaning make fun of. Different
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Separate not the same.

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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Horse drawn vehicle carrying passengers or goods/ materials. Stagecoach Vehicle made of wood with Literal horses pulling the 4 wheel meaning vehicle in the 1800s. Troopers (pg71)
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Soldiers, a group of uniformed persons.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence Waste


Coward

Meaning and Comment


Something which cannot be used anymore. Not brave, person unable to control his fear, scared.
Taking money or valuables or property from another unlawfully with some form of violence. (Contrast: Stealing is without violence.)
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Literal meaning Robbery

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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

Problems, difficulties, cause Troubles discomfort. Requesting/asking/demanding Blackmail for money for not making Literal meaning (pg76) known something bad/terrible About someone. Respectable Having respect/high regard/ (pg77) opinion in society.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Choice

Meaning and Comment

Choose, free to choose/decide /make a decision.


* Having a good opinion. Happy about oneself. Having proper pride and dignity. * Having a bad opinion. Arrogant. Having or showing too much pride.
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Literal meaning Proud (pg78)

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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment Not in a dangerous situation, in a peaceful situation. Put an end to things, break into pieces so that it cannot be used, to make it useless.
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Safe Literal meaning Destroy

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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Meaning and Comment

Literal meaning

The suffering or discomfort Punishment For doing something wrong (pg79) or bad.
Not nice, not good, Unpleasant something which is uncomfortable.
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Literal Meaning Literary device Textual evidence Shoot rabbits (pg13) Meaning and Comment

To hunt and kill the rabbits by shooting.

Implied On the path Walking on the way on a meaning (pg14) particular path to... In favour of (pg46)
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Favouring, siding.
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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Can you arrange it (pg50)

Meaning and Comment


Do the necessary (filling forms, making the official requests etc in dealing with government departments). A kind and nice person, A soft person.

Implied meaning Good heart (pg52)

Good heavens A phrase used to show (pg62) surprise.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence

Meaning and Comment

A person who uses his left hand for everything as in a right handed person who uses Left-handed his right hand to do everything Implied including writing. The dominant meaning hand is usually right or left.

Its up to (pg63)
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The person who decides, the decider, his discretion.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence
Big chance (pg70)

Meaning and Comment Good chance/opportunity To make a lot of money etc.

Waste a bullet Not worth shooting a person Implied on a coward who is a coward. meaning (pg71) There must be a mistake (pg76)
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Something is wrong, not true.


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Literal Meaning

Literary device

Textual evidence talk to Scotland Yard (pg77) Implied To give in meaning I dont want to hear about Australia again.

Meaning and Comment Inform the HQ of the England police department. Agree Did not want to discuss/ talk/ or hear the other person mention it any more.
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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Supporting information It requires intelligence to solve the murder case just with all the information available at the murder scene without being there during the crime. Sherlock Holmes solved the case with a handful of information.
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Intelligent

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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Supporting information
Sherlock Holmes worked persistently checking one by one every clue available, he did it consistently. He was able to solve the case as he was determined that James was not the murderer. ...the arrest was not immediate... ...boys strange words at his arrest. (pg31).
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Determined/ Persistent/ Dedicated/ Disciplined

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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Supporting information

Insightful

I have already some ideas about the identity of the murderer (pg51) is an example. Every action of Sherlock Homes is insightful.
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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Supporting information
Although James was regarded guilty by the law, Holmes loyalty to his client made him check every thing carefully to determine for himself that James may not be guilty. - even though Turner was a robber and a murderer Holmes kept his word as he is loyal to his promise to Turner.
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Loyal

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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics Supportive

Supporting information
Dont worry my boy, Im going to help you. (pg51) The case is important but after writing a letter to Mr Turner, Holmes waits for 3 days before Turner comes to see him. (pg68) Surely Holmes is a man of patience.
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Patience

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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Supporting information

...we can keep the information Accommodating private... (pg69) ...Im thinking of your innocent daughter and the boy she loves... (pg79)

Sympathetic

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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Supporting information I can also tell you what our murderer looks like... ...(The whole sentence)...indian cigars. Homes was so confident who the murderer was when he described the description of the murderer.
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Confident

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Quality of Characters
Sherlock Holmes

Characteristics

Talented

Supporting information A successful detective must be able to see all the details not merely look at the overall picture. Holmes discovered the stone (the murder weapon), the cigar ashes etc. This requires talent. (To see the wood from the trees).
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Quality of Characters
Dr Watson

Characteristics

Supporting information

Loyal

Although a doctor, detective work not being his business but his loyalty makes him leave his work and accompany Holmes.

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Quality of Characters
Dr Watson

Characteristics

Supporting information

Helpful/ Supportive

Holmes! over here! These other footprints are rather unusual... (pg59) The Doctor helps Homes to discover some important clues too.
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Quality of Characters
Dr Watson

Characteristics

Supporting information

Concerned

But about the case, Holmes? any new developments? (pg57) The Doctor was concerned about the case.
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Quality of Characters
Dr Watson

Characteristics

Supporting information

Ive only got half an hour (pg4) although he had such short time, Accommodating Dr Watson wanted to accommodate Holmes requirement.

Pessimistic

It seems a hopeless situation. (pg56)


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Quality of Characters
Inspector Lesterade

Characteristics
Narrow minded Unadventurous Judgemental

Supporting information Why? The boy is obviously guilty. (pg45) Does not want to accept otherwise. Do you want to see him Mr Holmes? (pg50) They...are old friends ... (pg59)
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Supportive/ Helpful
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Quality of Characters
Inspector Lesterade

Characteristics

Supporting information

Unappreciative Hah (pg51) /Sarcastic

Pessimistic

I cant arrest every man... (pg63)


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Quality of Characters
Charles McCarthy

Characteristics Cunning/ Shrewd/ Schemer

Supporting information ...I can talk to Scotland Yard... (pg77) ...Give me money or... (pg78) There are rumours that he gambled a lot. (pg7)
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Gambler

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Quality of Characters
Charles McCarthy

Characteristics Persistent Determined

Supporting information

I had no peace. He still blackmailed me. ...please dont shoot me (pg71)


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Coward

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Quality of Characters
John Turner

Characteristics

Supporting information
I was rich... (pg71), estate owner, had a farm which Charles and James lived in. Smoked expensive Indian Cigars. (pg62). I had no choice. He had to stop Charles at whatever cost.
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Rich

Determined/ Persistent
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Quality of Characters
John Turner

Characteristics Sympathetic/ Concerned

Supporting information I dont want James McCarthy to hang. (pg69) ...I dont want to hurt my daughter... (pg69) ...a dedicated father.
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Love/ Dedicated
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Quality of Characters
John Turner

Characteristics

Supporting information

All right McCarthy you win. You can live ... (pg77) Accommodating (Although forced to do so, he had a choice) Introvert Rather introverted. He hasnt got many friends and he isnt sociable...
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Quality of Characters
James McCarthy

Characteristics Kind

Supporting information

Hes a kind boy... (pg26) ...too kind... (pg46) He is young, handsome... (pg52)

Handsome

Not very clever ...not very clever. (pg52)


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Quality of Characters
James McCarthy

Characteristics Low esteem/ Sentimental

Supporting information

...This is my punishment... (pg25) Whats the matter? Who hurt you? (pg38)

Caring

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Quality of Characters
James McCarthy

Characteristics

Supporting information

Impatience

Please hurry, Mr Holmes, I cant stand this place. (pg52) Im innocent, Mr Holmes... (pg50)
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Confident

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Quality of Characters
Alice Turner

Characteristics Confident/ Determined Insightful/ Judgemental Optimistic

Supporting information

Hes innocent. (pg46) She is so confident of his innocence that she took the trouble to call Holmes to investigate.

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Quality of Characters
Alice Turner

Characteristics

Supporting information

Sympathetic/ Loyal/ Love Dedicated/ Compassionate

My father is very bad (ill) today - he needs me. (pg47)

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Quality of Characters
Alice Turner

Characteristics

Supporting information

Helpful

Yes. The argument was about me. (pg46) She was helpful by giving detailed information. It was she who invited Holmes. (another instance of helpful)
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Quality of Characters
Alice Turner

Characteristics

Supporting information

Supportive

He is too kind to hurt anyone. (pg46)

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Idioms

1.Crime does not pay

- Charles McCarthy was a criminal (blackmailing is a criminal offense). He died a violent death.

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Idioms

2.Never judge a book by its cover

- Charles was a honest man until he started blackmailing Turner. - Turner was once a robber but behaved as if a gentleman.

- James was innocent in appearance but had married a barmaid.


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Idioms

3.Health is wealth

- Turner had so much money but his health made him unable to enjoy it to the fullest.
4.Dont look a golden horse in its mouth

- Charles disturbed Turner too much, thus his death.


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Lessons and Moral Values

1. Responsibility means taking ownership of particular problems, actions, work and ensuring that it does go through its natural course. It is a trait which should be nurtured. Various kinds of responsibility traits runs in the story :

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Lessons and Moral Values


A. A parent to their children - Mr Turner to Alice

Mr Turner does not want his daughter to marry Charles son, as Charles is not highly regarded by Turner. As a responsible father he wants to make sure his daughter is married to a good husband and family.
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Lessons and Moral Values


B. The children to their parents - Alice to Turner

As Mr Turner is sick, Alice took the responsibility to take care of him.


C. A stranger to another - Holmes to Turner Although Turner is a robber and a murderer, Holmes made a promise to him and did not submit the confession to the police. He made a promise and acted as responsible person and kept the promise.
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Lessons and Moral Values


D. A lover to her lover - Alice to James

She was a responsible person (as a lover or an ordinary law abiding person) as she believed James is innocent and got Holmes to save James.

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Lessons and Moral Values


E. A person who is from the same locality - Mrs Moran to James

Mrs Moran behaved as an ordinary responsible person and quickly called the police and her husband to check and help Charles.

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Lessons and Moral Values 2. Man has many facets (features). What we see may only be one form of the same person. What the other forms are of the same person may not be easily seen by us. Thus we should be cautious and not regard people at face value.
A. Mr Turner, a wealthy land owner

-no one knew he was actually Black Jack, a robber and murderer.
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Lessons and Moral Values


B. Charles McCarthy

- was only a questionable gambler (not a criminal offence) - he blackmailed (a crime) Charles relentlessly.
C. James McCarthy

- was a kind and gentle soul and a good son. - but had married without his fathers knowledge.
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Lessons and Moral Values

3. Bad deeds or good deeds for that matter does come around. If we do some good deeds, we will receive some form of goodness, at the same time, if we do some bad deeds it will come back to us, that seems to be fate.
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Lessons and Moral Values


- Turner went to England to escape his bad deeds, surely he made many people suffer for his bad deed in Australia, fate, made him meet Charles, and Charles tormented Turner. In addition to that Turner was an introvert, did not socialise, and was worried his daughter would know his dark past. That was a highly stressful force to Turners Health. Turner did not have any peace. His heart problem is surely the result of his bad deeds.

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Lessons and Moral Values

- Charles on the other hand paid with his life for the torment he gave Turner.

- James regarded his arrest as a penalty for marrying the barmaid without his fathers knowledge.

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Lessons and Moral Values

4. One good turn deserves another.

For helping James escape the gallows Alice was reunited with her lover.

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Lessons and Moral Values

5. Thou shall not kill.

Its legally and morally wrong to kill. Turner killed many people but he was not able to live peacefully (see No 3 above).

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