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Business Planning
Using Branding Tools to Strengthen Your Plan

2008 BrandSolutions, Inc.
Chuck Pettis (Author of TechnoBrands)
BrandSolutions, Inc.
6144 Wahl Road
360-331-6667
cpettis@brand.com
www.brand.com
www.earthsanctuary.org
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Agenda
Introduction to Branding & Brand Identity
The importance of emotion
NeuroBranding

Develop your Brand Identity Map
Organizing your customer knowledge

How to apply this to your business.



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What is a Brand?
A Trademark
A Trustmark


Perceptual alters
peoples perceptions
of reality
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Source: Dr. Thomas Robinson, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2007
Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine
Branding Alters Reality
Named
Taste
Test
Prefer McDonalds 60%
Prefer unbranded 22%
Equal 18%
Anything made by
McDonalds tastes
better to
preschoolers.

Kids perception of
taste is physically
altered by
branding.
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Blind
Taste
Test
Prefer Pepsi 51%
Prefer Coke 44%
Equal 5%
23%
65%
12%
Named
Taste
Test
Source: De Chernatony and Knox, Cranfield Management School
Branding Alters Reality
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Branding Benefits
More sales
Quicker close
Increased perceived value
Seen as better
Builds trust
Assure enduring profitable growth
Attract and retain high-quality managers and
employees
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NeuroBranding &
The Three Brains

Branding, market research, and advertising services
relating to the study of the nervous system (i.e. brain
and sense organs) and people's mental state and
reactions when exposed to brands, products,
advertising, and marketing messages and images.

Credit: http://www.mareshbrainsatwork.com/B2B/index.htm
NeuroBranding is a trademark of BrandSolutions, Inc.
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Levels of Consciousness
Basic life
regulation
Emotions
Feelings
Pain (punishment) & pleasure (reward)
Fear, anger, sadness,
disgust, surprise, happiness
(changes in blood chemistry)


Sensory images
Continuous thoughts
Alerts us to problems
emotions have
begun to solve
Drives & motivations
Conscious
problem
solving
Reasoning
Perceived
reality
Illusionary
Conditioning
SUBCONSCIOUS
UNCONSCIOUS


CONSCIOUS
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Male Female Differences
MEN

Make maximum kids
Compete
Soloist
One thing at a time
Spotlight vision
Better 3D space &
mechanical ability
See objects
Headline
Facts
Buyer
Good enough
Direct
WOMEN

Help max kids survive
Nurture
Ensemble
Multitask
Floodlight vision
More acute senses & intense
emotions
See the person
Complete article
Stories
Shopper
Perfect
Subtle
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The Amygdala
Small almond-shaped region in forebrain.
Center for fear, anger, social attraction and sexual
responses
Portal between the reptilian, limbic, and cortex brains.
The hub and center of emotional learning. Receives inputs
from the senses via the thalamus and the cortex.
Emotional responses (e.g., defense against danger, fear) can
be transmitted directly to the amygdala, bypassing the cortex.
The thalamus pathway to the amygdala is twice as fast as the
pathway through the cortex.
The information received by the amygdala from the thalamus is
archetypal, unfiltered and biased toward evoking responses.
Causes tense up of muscles, increased heart rate, release of
hormones and adrenaline.

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The Reptilian Brain
The oldest and smallest region in the evolving brain.
Found in all animals. Similar to brain of the reptiles
who preceded mammals, about 200 million years
ago.
Instinctive, fixed action and automatic behaviors.
No language. Instinctual and ritualistic.
The brains vital control center: facial
expressions, breathing, swallowing,
heart rate and pressure.
The center for aggression, courtship,
mating, and territorial defense:
Survival
Reproduction.
Credit: http://www.mareshbrainsatwork.com/B2B/index.htm
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Reptilian Hot Buttons
Reptilian hot button:
Instinct-like reaction.
A pressure to act.
Response to danger
or reproductive
moment.
Road rage
Checking your appearance
in a mirror
Flirting
Fighting
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The Limbic Brain
Common to all mammals.
Developed after the demise of the
dinosaurs.
The brains emotional factory.
Collects sensory information and
screens it for emotional relevance
Emotion increases retention of
information
Higher-level emotions

Nurturing children.
Rearing and caring.
Singing and communicating
Playing.
Limbic resonance: attunement of two
mammals to each others inner states.
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The Limbic Brain
Pictures of babies
and puppies will
always generate
attention and
generate positive
emotional feelings.
Credit: www.keepkidshealthy.com/baby.html
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The Cortex Brain
Unique to humans.
The largest of the three brains
5/6 of total brain mass.
The center for:
Conscious thought and logic.
Action and planning.
Reading, speaking, writing, and
reasoning.
The experience of our 5 senses.
Awareness.
Conscious motor control.
Credit: http://www.mareshbrainsatwork.com/
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Integrating the Three Brains
Our reptilian (instinctive/action) brain always wins.

Our reptilian (instinctive) brain is more powerful than
the limbic (emotional) brain, which in turn is more
powerful than the cortex (thinking) brain.
Credit: http://www.avln.org/resources/standards/i3brains.htm
When all parts of the brain are
in sync, we feel harmony. We
know where the pressure is
coming from (the reptilian brain),
we feel good about it (the limbic
brain), and we attain self-
actualization (the cortex brain).
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Applying the Three Brains
Find the Reptilian hot button
Coffee hot button = aroma.
Fear, survival, reproduction.
Rituals, fixed action patterns & behaviors.

Understand the logic of emotional seduction to turn
people on
Higher-level emotions
My children. My family.

Provide an intellectual alibi
Low price, numbers, facts
Because So Much is Riding on Your Tires
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From Marketing to Women by Marti Barletta
Before: by men After: by and for women
Example: Bank Advertisement
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Integrating the Three Brains
The PT Cruiser
Reptilian brain appeal:
Tough looking
Everything inside
is round, like being
in a womb.
Limbic brain appeal:
Juxtaposition of back of
red car with back of
woman



Intellectual alibi:
Starting at $17,985.


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Getting Your Brand Remembered
Consistent repetition of:
Your brand name
Your key purchase features
and purchase factors
Use of memorable,
emotional imagery that is
compelling, relevant and
credible to the target
audience.
The BrandSolutions
Branding Process
1. Define the clients problem and the questions to be answered.
2. Conduct strategic research to deeply understand the
customer, the organization, the competition and the product.
3. Create the brand identity. Identify brand archetype.
4. Develop alternative creative themes.
5. Test the alternative creative themes with customers &
employees.
6. Develop brand strategy and communications plan.
7. Implement the brand internally and externally.
8. Manage the brand to keep it on track.
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The Branding Process
Step One Problem Definition
1. Define the clients problem and the questions
to be answered
Who is the customer? What are their demographics and
aspirations? What will change their attitudes and opinions?
What are the most compelling features and benefits that
motivate people to buy your products and services?
What are the best images and messages for you to use in
your marketing communications?
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The Branding Process
Step Two Ask the customer!
2. Conduct strategic research to deeply
understand the customer, the organization,
the competition and the product
Guide your decision making
Know you are communicating the most
compelling and credible messages and images
Avoid internal politics and endless debates
internally, create list of options (i.e., category
descriptor, key selection factors, brand name,
logo, values, etc.) and let your most important
constituencies decide
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The Branding Process
Step Three Create the Brand
3. Create Your Brand Identity
Brand identity map your 3 minute topline story
Category descriptor
Positioning statement
Purchase factors and associated benefits

Compelling, emotional imagery

Brand name and logo

Now, lets cover each of these, in turn.
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Brand Identity Maps
Mind maps how our mind actually
remembers things
A one-page snapshot of who you are.
Your first five minutes in any conversation about
your organization.
Everybody in your organization says the same
things consistency.
The key question is: What Do You Want
Them To Say?
Category Descriptor Target Audience
Organization Brand Name
2006 BrandSolutions, Inc.
Purchase Factor (Feature) #1
Tangible Benefits
from PF #1
PF #1 Intangible
Emotional Appeal
How customers feel
Positioning Statement
Purchase Factor (Feature) #2
Tangible Benefits
from PF #2
PF #2 Intangible
Emotional Appeal
How customers feel
Brand Identity Map
Reptilian hot buttons
Limbic hot buttons
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What Is Your Target Audience?
Be precise
Company or individual
Demographics e.g., large, medium, small
Type of company e.g., SIC, industry type
Good segmentation:
Distinctive members are different than non-members
Actionable the definition should be one that marketing
programs can be directed at.
Self-referencing members identify with other members of
the group.
Homogeneous members share similar needs and buying
behavior
Keep male-female differences in mind...
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Are there Hot Buttons for Your Business?
Reptilian hot buttons
Survival
Territorial defense, strong versus weak
Reproduction, sex, mating
Fear
Rituals, fixed action patterns & behaviors
Aromas
Limbic hot buttons
Higher-level emotional feelings
Intuition
Our relationship with our children and our family
Our relationship with our community
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Category Descriptor
What is your category? What hook do customers
put you on?
Examples:
LaserJet printers
Soap
Cell phone accessories

Always link your brand name and the category
descriptor together:
HP LaserJet printers
Ivory soap

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Connect Features with Emotions
using Brand Ladders
Hierarchy of customer feelings, values, and motivations
connected with the purchase or support decision.
Feature
Tangible
Benefits
Emotional
Benefits
Functional
Causes switching
Aspirational
Drives loyalty
Source of copy &
messages
Choose imagery that
evokes the emotional
benefits
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What are the Most Important
Purchase Factors (Features)?
Examples of top-ranked features:
Reliability
Responsive, knowledgeable tech support
Security
Cleanliness
Convenience

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Create Brand Ladders
1. Identify top-two purchase factors.
2. For each of your purchase factors, ask:
What are the tangible benefits of each purchase
factor?
When the customer gets those benefits, how do
they feel? Emotion words.

3. Write answers in Brand Identity Map.
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Brand Ladder Example
Feature: Protect Water Quality in Watershed
Tangible benefits:
Long-term availability
Recreation
Fish and wildlife
Scenic beauty
Protect tourism
Emotional benefits (how do citizens feel?):
Proud
Safe
Blessed
Grateful
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Choose a Brand Name
Meaningful and descriptive
Easy to say and read (spoken as
spelled)
Memorable
Short
Tested with customers
No negative connotations
No acronyms! Harder to remember.
Available and trademark-able
Available as a domain name

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What is your Positioning Statement?
Positioning Statement:
Business or purpose
Benefit
Better
We are looking for:
A short phrase that can be remembered and used by
everyone inside and outside of your organization.
A phrase that will quickly and simply describe what you do
and your benefits, from the point of view of the target
audience.
Generic and descriptive, not a slogan or tagline.

Example: With the Intel Celeron processor you can expect an
affordable and reliable PC for your home or home office.

Category Descriptor Target Audience
Organization Brand Name
The positioning statement
associates the benefits
you offer with
your company identity.
2006 BrandSolutions, Inc.
Purchase Factor (Feature) #1
Tangible Benefits
from PF #1
PF #1 Intangible
Emotional Appeal
How customers feel
Positioning Statement
Purchase Factor (Feature) #2
Tangible Benefits
from PF #2
PF #2 Intangible
Emotional Appeal
How customers feel
Brand Identity Map
Reptilian hot buttons
Limbic hot buttons
Organization Brand Name
Short Mission & Benefit Statement
Northwest Entrepreneur Network Brand Identity Map
Version 1.5 June 11, 2001
2001 Brand-Solutions, Inc.
Benefits Emotional Appeal Benefits Emotional Appeal
Primary Customers
Northwest
Entrepreneur Network
Entrepreneurs
Helping Entrepreneurs
Succeed
Key Feature #1
Make Connections
Build your business
network
Mentoring, networking,
and helping one another
to create new
companies

Advisors &, teachers
who will help my
company grow
Knowledge & information
to make better business
& marketing decisions
Access to investors to
help grow the business
Credible experts
Key Feature #2
Access to Resources
Secondary Customers
Investors
Service
Providers
www.nwen.org
Domain
Sage Brand Personality
Expert, advisor, teacher
Creative, visionary, innovative
Credible, but willing to
experiment & take risk
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Repeated
Consistent Messages
of People Networking
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How to Use Your Brand Identity Map
Use the language in your brand identity map
repetitively and consistently in ALL communications.
Remember, repetition of your messages helps your target
audience remember what you stand for.
Link your Brand Identity Map to your operations.
Focus company resources on truly delivering on your top two
purchase factors.
Get it to everyone in your organization. Have them
post it by their phone so they can refer to it when
people call and ask What do you do?