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MODULO II

Dra. Andrea Mogni S.

ACTIONS

ACTIONS

Action verbs need s at the end with thirdperson, singular subjects.

He eats bread.
She walks to the station.
It floats on the sea.

NEGATIVES

Negative sentences need do not, does not, or


did not.
I do not eat bread.
He does not eat bread.
You did not walk to the station.
It does not float on the sea.

QUESTIONS

Interrogative sentences begin with do, does, or


did.
Do you eat bread?
Does he eat bread?
Does she walk to the station?
Did they finish it?

Affirmative Sentence

Negative Sentence

Interrogative Sentence

I sing a song.

I do not (don't) sing a song.

Do I sing a song?

You sing a song.

You do not (don't) sing a


song.

Do you sing a song?

He (she) sings a song.

He (she) does not (doesn't)


sing a song.

Does he (she) sing a song?

We sing a song.

We do not (don't) sing a


song.

Do we sing a song?

They sang a song.

They did not (didn't) sing a


song.

Did they sing a song?

ADJECTIVES

ADJECTIVES
Adjectives generally appear immediately before
the noun.
A pretty girl
Red flowers
A long stick
Heavy boxes
Warm weather

ADJECTIVES

Commonly, adjectives of opposite meaning are


formed by adding a prefix such as un, in, or dis.
clear unclear, important unimportant,
predictable unpredictable, believable
unbelievable, common uncommon, conventional
unconventional, certain uncertain
definite indefinite, correct incorrect,
comparable incomparable, complete
incomplete, evitable inevitable.

ADJECTIVES

When using a string of adjectives, they should


appear in a set order: size/shape + age + color
+ origin + material.

A big brown house


A small old English desk
A beautiful black Italian leather purse
Delicious Chinese food

ADJECTIVES

The + adjective describes a class or group of


people and acts as a noun.
the old, the young, the poor, the rich, the
oppressed, the homeless, etc.
This popular TV show is loved by the old.

COMPARATIVE AND
SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

Comparative adjectives compare two things. Superlative adjectives


compare more than two things
Commonly, adjectives that contain only one syllable or end in 'y' use 'er' to
form comparatives and 'est' to form superlatives. For adjectives ending in y,
change the 'y' to 'i' before adding the 'er' or 'est'.

old older oldest


young younger youngest
pretty prettier prettiest
long longer longest
short shorter shortest
bright brighter brightest
close closer closest
happy happier - happiest

COMPARATIVE AND
SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

Adjectives with two or more syllables do not


change but instead add more to form
comparatives and most to form superlatives.

respectable more respectable most


respectable
beautiful more beautiful most beautiful
preferable more preferable most preferable
hardworking more hardworking most
hardworking

COMPARATIVE AND
SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

Some adjectives have different forms of


comparatives and superlatives.
good better best
bad worse worst
little less least
much (many) more most

COMPARATIVE AND
SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

The word than typically appears in


comparative sentences.
Amy is smarter than Betty.
Chad is stronger than Dan.
Greg is more diligent than his brother.
I have more apples than he.
She likes him more than me.

SIMPLE TENSE

We Use Simple Present Tense :

To talk about things that happen regularly


He plays golf every day
To talk about facts
She comes from France
To talk about feeling and opinions
I dont want a cup of tea
To talk about thoughts
I think hes angry

THE FORMATION
POSITIVE SENTENCE
For the affirmative form of the simple present, we use
SUBJECT PREDICATE (verb) OBJECT ADVERB
when the subject is first or second person singular or when
the subject is plural subject.
Ex : I/you wake up at 5 a.m. every day.
They have breakfast every morning

But when the subject is a third person


singular, we add (e)s after the subject.
SUBJECT PREDICATE (verb+s/es)
OBJECT - ADVERB

Ex : He drinks every 1 hour.


She watches cartoon every night.

NEGATIVE SENTENCE

The present simple of lexical verbs has an


expanded form which use do or does as an
auxiliary verb

In negative sentence, when the subject is first or


second person singular or when the subject is
plural subject, we use SUBJECT DO NOT
PREDICATE (verb) OBJECT ADVERB

Ex : I do not wake up at 5 a.m. every day


They do not have breakfast every morning

But when the subject is a third person


singular, we use : SUBJECT DOES NOT
PREDICATE (verb) OBJECT ADVERB

Ex

: He does not drink every 1 hour


She does not watch cartoon every

night
If we use the word Does, we dont have to
add s/es after the verb.

INTERROGATIVE SENTENCE
In interrogative sentence, when the
subject is first or second person singular
or when the subject is plural subject, we
use
DO - SUBJECT PREDICATE (verb)
OBJECT ADVERB - ?

Ex: Do you wake up at 5 a.m. every day?


Do they have breakfast every
morning?

And if the subject is a third person singular,


we use : DOES - SUBJECT PREDICATE
(verb) OBJECT ADVERB - ?

Ex

: Does he drink every 1 hour?


Does she watch cartoon every night?

REMEMBER!
Same with the negative sentence, if we use
the word Does, we dont have to add
s/es after the verb