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Identifying

Problem
Group 3

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IDENTIFICATION OF A
RESEARCH PROBLEM
A problem identified by the
researcher keeps him
focused throughout the
entire research process. It
is the basis of all
subsequent research
activities he is going to
undertake. It guides him to
the hypothesis, work plan,
interpretation of findings,
and finally, to the
conclusion.
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The importance of
identification of a
problem
The primary purpose
of a problem
statement is to focus
the attention of the
problem solving
team.
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Steps in writing a
problem statement
1. Construct the first
statement by describing a
goal or desired state of a
given situation,
phenomenon etc. This
will build the ideal
situation (what should be,
what is expected,
desired)

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Steps in writing a
problem statement
2. Describe a condition that
prevents the goal discussed
in step 1 from being
achieved or realized at the
present time. This will build
the reality, the situation as it
is and establish a gap
between what ought to be
and what is

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Steps in writing a
problem statement
3. Connect steps 1 and 2
using a term such as "but,"
"however, unfortunately,"
or "in spite of";

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Steps in writing a
problem statement
4. Using specific details
show how the situation in
step 2 contains little promise
of improvement unless
something is done. Then
emphasize the benefits of
research by projecting the
consequences of possible
solutions as well.

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Example

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Step 1

Pasig city
is close to
drowning
in trash.
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Step 2

No action
is taken
to clean
the city.
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Step 3
Pasig city is
close to
drowning in
trash, however,
no action is
taken to clean
the city.
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Step 4
Overfill has been a serious problem facing
our city waste facilities for the last decade.
By some estimations, our city dumps are,
on average, 30% above capacityan
unsanitary, unsafe, and unwise position for
our city to be in.
Several methods have been proposed in
order to combat this. Perhaps the most
popular of these is the simplest: building
two new landfills on the city outskirts.
Others have proposed stronger recycling
campaigns and larger per-bag waste
disposal costs as a way to lessen the
potential damage of our trash situation.
The people need to look further into this to
alleviate the burden.
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Different Types of
Questions
There are FOUR basic types
of questions that research
projects can address:
1.Literature Research
Questions
>> These questions can be
answered by locating answers
to questions in books and
articles, or on maps and
graphs, etc.
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Different Types of
Questions
2.Observation-Only
Questions
>> These questions can be
answered by observing things
around you.

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Different Types of
Questions
3. Demonstration Questions
>>These questions can be
answered by making a model
or performing a demonstration.
4. Investigation Questions
>>These questions can be
answered by testing a
hypothesis.

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Tips in identifying a
problem
Avoid jumping to
conclusions
Make sure you capture
every point raised in
brainstorming
Identifying the cause of
problems will help
prevent any wrong
assumptions or
conclusions being made
about the real causes
and problems
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Tips in identifying a
problem
Consider whether
further data needs to be
collected to fully verify a
cause
Ensure that the team
agree on the list of
verified causes before
moving on

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Quiz

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1.It is the basis of all subsequent research


activities.
2. These questions can be answered by locating
answers to questions in books and articles, or
on maps and graphs, etc.
3.These questions can be answered by
observing things around you.
4.These questions can be answered by making a
model or performing a demonstration
5.These questions can be answered by testing a
hypothesis, making observations, analyzing
your observations, and drawing conclusions.
6-10
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Answers
1.Problem Statement
2.Literature Research Questions
3.Observation-Only Questions
4.Demonstration Questions
5.Investigation Questions

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