Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 20

MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

GENRATING ELECTRICITY FROM BACTERIA

Required Components
-

2 1l Plastic Containers
Cotton rope
Aluminum mesh
Paper clips
Copper wire
Alligator clips
Electrical tape
Glue gun
Glue sticks
Aquarium air pump

Duct tape
Sludge
Hand spade
Bucket
Water
Salt
Small Pot
Spoon
Voltmeter
Drill gun

Specifications of Sludge
Any organic waste material should be compatible
with the microbial fuel cell. As long as there is a
good enough balance of bacteria and organic
material, it should work.

Reaction Oxidation
Hydrogen Evolution Reaction
During the first (oxidation) reaction, which takes place in the
sludge-filled container on the anode, the bacteria consume
glucose for energy and water. They then yield carbon dioxide,
positive hydrogen ions, and electrons. The positive hydrogen
ions and the electrons are attracted to compounds in the
second container and will take part in a reduction reaction. The
electrons travel up through the aluminum mesh and copper
wire to the cathode in the second container. The positive
hydrogen ions make their way across the salt bridge to the
second container. This is where the second part of the redox
reaction takes place.

Precautions
Anaerobic bacteria should be exposed to as little
oxygen as possible.

Reaction Reduction
During the reduction reaction, the positive hydrogen ions
combine with the electrons leftover from the oxidation reaction
and oxygen from within the water to yield water. The
redoxreaction ends here. Therefore, the lifetime of the
microbial fuel cell is limited by the lifetime of the bacteria
within the sample of sludge.

Function of Aquarium
Pump
The aquarium pump provides extra oxygen to the
reaction yielding water.
Because the bacteria are not exposed to oxygen,
they produce carbon dioxide, protons, and
electrons instead of carbon dioxide and water.

Reaction Salt Bridge


The salt bridge allows for current to flow of hydrogen ions in a
circuit. If it did not exist, there would be a pileup of electrons, and
the current would stop, rendering the cell useless. The anode of
the microbial fuel cell depends on a potential that causes the
current to flow, and therefore, the oxidation reaction in its chamber
is also dependent on a potential. In this case, the potential
element is the cathode in the chamber filled with oxygenated
water, because it helps to complete a reduction reaction in that
chamber. Oxidation and reduction reactions always have to occur
together (called a redox reaction), and in a microbial fuel cell, they
are absolutely necessary. Electrons emitted by an oxidation
reaction must be accepted by atoms or ions of another substance.

THE SALT BRIDGE CAN ALSO BE CALLED AS PROTON


EXCHANGE MEMBRANE or PEM

Results
Through this Microbial Fuel Cell
we are expecting an
EMF of 100 300mV

Operating Conditions

Functions well in mild conditions

Temperature 70 100 F

Efficiency

The effective efficiency depends on the


substrate used.

Our expected efficiency is ~90%

References

http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Microbial-Fuel-Cell-easy/

http://www.instructables.com/id/Simple-Algae-Home-CO2-ScrubberPart-III-An-Algae/

Our Team
PRANAVCHENDUR T K | 15BCE1097
HIMANSHU AGARWAL | 15BCE1366
HRISHIKESH HANDIQUE | 15BCE1104
DEEPAM WADHWANI | 15BCE1109
YASH VERMA | 15BEE1221
SAHIL GUPTA | 15BCE1367

Thank You !!!