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Recall how you felt when

you talked in public

Did you experience a


mental blackout?
Did your heart beat faster
than usual?
Did you feel your blood
rushing to your head and
to your cheeks?

Were you at loss for breath?


Were you perspiring more
than usual?

Were your hands cold?

Were your hands trembling?

Did you lose your voice?


When you finally found your
voice, did it quiver?

Was there a sensation of


butterflies flitting in your
stomach?

Anxiety
Anxiety is an unusual fearful

feeling that everyone goes through


when faced with an important task.

Speech anxiety
is an unusual feeling
experienced in anticipation
of the role as a speaker

Stage fright
is an anxiety over the
prospect of giving a speech
in front of an audience.

Developing
Self - Confidence

Self - Confidence
Refers

to the
persons ability to
predict the success
of what he wants to
do.

Harnessing
Speech Anxiety to an
Advantage

Action Step No. 1

Take

an objective look at
yourself.

Action Step No. 2

Discuss

your strengths
and weaknesses with your
teacher.

Action Step No. 3

Accept

speech anxiety as
an ally that will help you
meet the challenges of
public speaking.

Action Step No. 4

Develop

a desire to
communicate.

Action Step no. 5


Learn

about public
communication by
studying the theories
and principles of
effective public
speaking.

Action Step no. 6


Every

time you deliver a


speech, prepare very well
for it.

Developing Confidence: Your Speech Class


Survey to more than 2,500 Americans to list their
greatest fears
greatest fear
percentage
a party with strangers
74%
giving a speech
70%
asked personal questions in public
65%
meeting with a dates parents
59%
first day on a new job
59%
victim of a practical joke
56%
talking with someone in authority
53%
job interview
46%
formal dinner party
44%
blind date
42%

Nervousness is normal.
Carly Patterson
in 2004 Olympic Games in Athens
Im not usually too nervous on floor,
but I definitely was tonight because I was
going for gold.

Surveys show that 76 % of experienced


speakers have stage fright before taking
the floor.
A.R. Wylie (novelist and lecturer)
Now after many years of practice I
am. I suppose, really a practiced speaker.
But I rarely rise to my feet without a
throat constricted with terror and a
furiously thumping heart. When for some
reason, I am cool and self-assured, the
speech is always a failure.

adrenaline
is a hormone released into
the bloodstream in response to
physical and mental stress.
-

Dealing with Nervousness


Positive nervousness
- is controlled nervousness
that helps energize a speaker for her
or his presentation

6 ways of turning your


nervousness from a negative
force into a positive one

1. Acquire speaking experience.


fear

of the unknown

this

class provides knowledge and


experience

trial

and error

2. Prepare, prepare, prepare


Pick

speech topics you truly care


about

Preparation

to 75%

reduces stage fright up

3. Think positively.
Confidence

thinking

Counteract

is the power of positive

one negative thought


with at least five positive ones

Negative

thought

Positive

thought

1. I wish I didnt have


to give this speech.

1. This speech is a
chance for me to
share my ideas and
gain experience as a
speaker.

2. Im not a great
public speaker.

2. No one is perfect,
but Im getting better
with each speech I
give.

3. Im always nervous
when I give a
speech.

3. Everyones nervous.
If other people can
handle it, I can too.

4. No one will be
interested in what I
have to say.

4. I have a good topic


and Im fully
prepared. Of course
theyll be interested.

4. Use the power of visualization.


Is

the mental imaging in which a


speaker vividly pictures himself
giving a successful presentation

Imagine
Mental

sense of achievement

rehearsal

5. Know that most nervousness is


not visible.
Your

nervous system may be giving


you a thousand shocks, but the
viewers can see only a few of
them.

Act

cool and confident.

6. Dont expect perfection.


There

is no such thing as a perfect


speech.

If

you forget your line, just proceed


as if nothing happened.

A Sample Journal
Sept.3

I discovered today that I can


do something about my weak
voice. I took some exercises
in the book for improving the
volume of my voice. I shall
try doing these exercises so
that I can improve my voice.

Sept. 4
Our Mathematics teacher asked
me to discuss a theory. I noticed
that my voice had become louder. I
promise to work harder on my
discussion or speech. I promise to
read up on the principles of
speech-making so that my speech
will be more interesting next time.

Assignment
Closely monitor your improvement as
a speaker.
Copy the six action steps in your
journal notebook.
Write five entries about your
improvement (one entry per day).
Submit your journal notebook on
(September 13, 2013).