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INTRODUCTION AND

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROCESS


Rafik El Daly, PMP

The

PMP does test

Your

Knowledge of all of the 5 phases of


the project, 47 PMI processes, their
Inputs, Outputs and Tools
Your understanding of the many
different terms that are used to
describe the processes
Your ability to apply key formulas to
scheduling, costing, estimating, etc..
Your ability to apply the 47 processes in
variety of situations
2

The

PMP does not test


Your Project Management Experience
Your common sense
Your knowledge of industry standards
Your knowledge of Software/Hardware
tools
What you learned in School
Your intelligence

200 Questions(25 pretest questions, not counted


toward score, 175 exam questions counted) Multiple
Choice
4 Hours
Need 110/175 to pass.
Required 35 hours of Project Management Education
Required Experience

High school diploma, associates degree

Minimum five years/60 months unique non-overlapping professional


project management experience during which at least 7,500 hours were
spent leading and directing project tasks

Bachelors degree

Minimum three years/36 months unique non-overlapping professional


project management experience during which at least 4,500 hours were
spent leading and directing project tasks

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Initiation Defined Scope, Project risks, Assisted
with developing Project charter and identified key
stakeholders
Planning Defined WBS and developed project
requirements, constraints and assumptions
Execution Flowcharted business processes for 5
different departments for user requirements,
verified compliance with end user requirements
Control Measured project performance and
ensured deliverables met approved QC standards
Closing Obtained final acceptance, documented
lessons learned, archived project data, created and
distributed final project report

MAINTAINING THE CERTIFICATION

Must obtain 60 Professional Development Units


(PDUs) in a three year period. The 3 year cycle
starts over again.
Professional Development Units
Take

classes
Teach Classes
Write books or articles
Attend the PMI meetings

Fail to maintain 60 PDUs you lose PMP


certification
Must retake a course
Must resubmit application
Must retake exam

ESSENTIAL TERMS

PMI PMBOK Definition

Progressive Elaboration

Collection of projects with a common goal. Managed by Program


Managers

Portfolio

brings together a set of tools and techniquesperformed by people to


describe, organize, and monitor the work of project activities.

Programs

The process of providing or discovering greater levels of detail as the


project moves toward completion. Rolling wave planning

Project Management

a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service.

This is a collection of projects or programs that meet a specific business


goal or objective.

Examples

Project- Constructing Electrical Substation


Program- Rail Road Improvement
Portfolio- New York City upgrade

Operations

Official Document that provided guidelines that must be followed

Standards

Lessons that were learned that should be shared with future projects

Regulation

Records that have been kept from previous projects

Lesson Learned

Original plan plus any approved changes. Used for scope, time, cost.

Historical Information

The Series of phases the project passes through from its initiation to its closure

Baseline

Not a project has no start and or end date

Life Cycle

ESSENTIAL TERMS CONT.

Document approved by a recognized body that provided guidelines. Compliance


with standards is not mandatory

System

Incorporates all formal procedures and tools put in place to manage

ESSENTIAL TERMS CONT.

Process

Inputs, Outputs and Tools/Techniques combined to execute a


specific purpose on the project

Input

Starting point for the process, the raw materials to begin the
execution

Tools and Techniques

The actions or methods that are used to transform the raw


materials into the output

Output

The end result of our efforts. The raw materials into a polished
stone

Could be the output of a previous process

Maybe the input into another process

Customer

The most important person in the project

STAKEHOLDERS

Individuals, businesses, or communities that have


a vested interest in the project's outcome.
Typically, project stakeholders are involved in the
project process and their expectations drive the
project requirements.
Key Stakeholders

Project manager Manages the project


Customer uses the project deliverable
Performing organization The organization hosting
the project
Project team The collection of individuals completing
the project work
Project Sponsor Authorizes the project work and
budget

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PROJECT ROLES

Project Manager
Empowered

to lead the project


Authorized to make decisions
Responsible for the success or failure of the project

Project Coordinator
Weaker

then the PM

May be authorized to make decisions

Project Expeditor
Weakest

role of the PM world

Very limited decision ability

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PROJECT ROLES

Senior Management

Functional Manager

Issues Strategic plans and goals, ensures companys


projects are aligned with company goals
Maybe called upon to resolve conflicts within the
organization.
Departmental Manager, i.e Manager of Engineering,
Vice President of Marketing, Director of IT

Project Office

Department that supports the PM in His/Her roles.


Defines best practices, defines standards, Maintains
Lesson Learned
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PROJECT ROLES

Sponsor

Internal

or External
Project Champion
Funding the project
Maybe used to resolve conflicts in the project

Program Manager
Senior

to Project Manager
Maybe responsible for several projects executing at
the same time
Maybe used to resolve conflicts in the project
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ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES

Functional Organizations
structure that groups staff members according to their area
of expertise (sales, marketing, construction, and so on).
Functional structures require the project team members to
report directly to the functional manager
Matrix Organizations
There are three matrix structures: weak, balanced, and
strong. The different structures are reflective of the project
manager's authority in relation to the functional manager's
authority.
Projectized Organizations
structure where the project manager has the greatest
amount of authority. The project team is assigned to the
project on a full-time basis. When the project is complete,
the project team members move on to other assignments
within the organization.

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ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES

Org Structure Functional


Project Char.
PM Authority

Weak Matrix

Balance Matrix

Strong Matrix

Projectized

Little/None

Low

Low to Mederate Moderate to High High/Total

Resource Avail.

Little/None

Low

Low to Mederate Moderate to High High/Total

Budget controls

Functional
Manger

Functional
Manger

Mixed

PM

PM

Pm Role

PT

PT

PT/FT

FT

FT

PM Staff

PT

PT

PT/FT

FT

FT

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PROJECT MANAGERS MANAGEMENT


SKILLS
Leading
Communicating
Negotiating
Problem Solving
Influencing
Jack of all Trades

16

e
op
Sc

Tim
e

TRIPLE CONSTRAINT

Cost or
Resources
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PROCESS GROUPS AND


KNOWLEDGE AREAS

47 Process organized into


5 Process Groups

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Initiation
Planning
Execution
Control
Closing

Knowledge Areas

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

10.

Integration Management
Scope Management
Time Management
Cost Management
Project Quality
Management
Human Resources
Management
Communications
Management
Risk Management
Procurement
Management
Stakeholder
Management

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PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROCESS


Initiating The project is authorized.
GROUPS

Planning Project objectives are determined, as well as


how to reach those objectives with the given
constraints.
Executing The project is executed utilizing acquired
resources.
Controlling Project Performance is monitored and
measured to ensure the project plan is being
implemented to design specifications and requirements.
Closing The project and its various phases are brought
to a formal end.

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INPUTS, TOOLS, TECHNIQUES, AND


OUTPUTS
600+
different Inputs, Tools, Techniques, and Outputs

Common Inputs

Project Management Plan

The Project Recipe

Enterprise Environmental Factors,


Your companys org. structure
Your Org. values and work ethic
Local laws and regulations
Your Org infrastructure
Your Org appetite for risk
Stakeholders willingness to accept risk
Market place conditions
Political climate
Project Management information system
Personnel administration
Government or industry standards

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INPUTS, TOOLS, TECHNIQUES, AND


OUTPUTS
600+
different Inputs, Tools, Techniques, and
Outputs

Common Inputs

Organization Process Assets,


Project Templates
Software tool
Historical information
Project closure guidelines
Risk control procedures
Change Control procedures
Issue and defect management procedures
Work Performance Information,
How the project team is performing, (data collected from controlling
processes)
How the product stacks up against quality standards
Work Performance Data

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Raw observations and measurements identified during the activities being
performed

INPUTS, TOOLS, TECHNIQUES, AND


600+
different Inputs, Tools, Techniques, and
OUTPUTS
Outputs

Common Tools

Expert Judgment,
Highly Favored, most commonly found in Planning process
Subject Manner Experts, PMO, Stakeholders, Consultants
Project Management Information Systems (PMIS),
Automated system to support the PM, by optimizing the
schedule and helping to collect and distribute information
Software used for configuration management

Meetings

(3 types) Info exchange, brainstorming/option evaluation/design,


decision making)
Well defined agenda, purpose, time frame, w/ minutes and
action items
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Face to Face, virtual, formal/informal

INPUTS, TOOLS, TECHNIQUES, AND


600+OUTPUTS
different Inputs, Tools, Techniques, and
Outputs

Common Tools

Analytical Techniques

Used to forecast potential outcomes based on project and /or


environmental variables

Common Outputs,

Change Request

Everything must be documented, and recorded and approved by the


PM, Change Control Board, Senior Management, etc.

Project Management Plan updates


Project Document updates

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INITIATING
13 % of the questions on the exam
2 Processes: Develop Project Charter, ID Stakeholders
Identifying Needs of the project
Creating a Feasibility Study
Creating a Product Description
Creating a Project Charter

Project charters authorize. When you think of the


project charter, think authority for the project
manager
Names the Project Manager
The First Step
The Most Important Step

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PLANNING

24 % of the questions on the exam


24 Processes: Develop PM Plan, Plan Scope Management, Collect

Requirements, Define Scope, Create WBS, Plan Schedule Management, Define


Activities, Sequence Activities, Est. Activity Resources, Est. Activity Durations,
Develop Schedule, Plan Cost Management, Est. Cost, Determine Budget, Plan
Quality, Plan HR Management, Plan Communications Management, Plan Risk
Management, Id Risks, Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis, Perform Quant.
Risk Analysis, Plan Risk Responses, Plan Procurement Management, Plan
Stakeholder Management

Creating a Scope Statement


Recruiting the Project Team
Creating the Work Breakdown Structure
Completing Risk Assessment
Creating the Network Diagram
Completing Estimates
Creating the Project Schedule
Completing the Project Budget
Creating a Quality Management Plan
Completing Stakeholder Analysis
Creating a Communications Plan
Completing the Project Plan

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EXECUTING

31 % of the questions on the exam


8 Processes: Direct and Manage Project Execution, Perform Quality

Assurance, Acquire Project Team, Develop Project Team, Manage Project


Team, Manage Communications, Conduct Procurements, Manage Stakeholder
Engagement

Authorizing the Project Work


Beginning Vendor Solicitation
Determining Vendor Source
Quality Assurance
Ensuring Team Development
Start working
Shovel in the ground
Opening the can of paint
Turning on the computer

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CONTROLLING PROCESSES

25% of the questions on the exam


11 Processes: Monitor and Control Project Work, Perform Integrated Change
Control, Validate Scope, Control Scope, Control Schedule, Control Costs, Quality
Control, Control Communications, Control Risks, Control Procurements, Control
Stakeholder Engagement

Ensuring Quality Control


Providing Scope Verification
Implementing Scope Change Control
Managing Cost Control
Enforcing Schedule Control
Monitoring Risk Response
Ensuring Performance Reporting
Double checking project work

More concerned about influencing future project work, and


not what happened in the past.
Understanding and fixing past errors

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CLOSING PROCESSES

7 % of the questions on the exam

2 Processes: Close Project, Close Procurements


Completing Scope Verification
Closing Vendor Contracts

Closing Administrative Duties

Updating and Archiving Project Records

Lessons Learned

Reassigning the Project Team Members


Celebrating!

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