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STANDING WAVE

LECTURER NAME:
GROUP MEMBER NAME : 1) GEE ANAK AGOM
(D20161073931)

WHAT IS STANDING WAVE?

It produce whenever two waves of identical frequency


interfere with one another while traveling opposite direction
along the same medium.
All standing wave patterns consist of nodes and antinodes.
The nodes are points of no displacement caused by the
destructive interference of the two waves.
The antinodes results from the constructive interference of
the two waves and thus undergo maximun displacement from
the rest position.

ENGAGE

EMPOWER

Experiment : Standing Wave


Objective :

To find the relationship between frequency and number of


antinodes.

To find the relationships between frequency and tension

To find the relationship between frequency and the density of a


medium through which a wave propagates.

Apparatus :

Computer and interface

Mechanical Vibrator

Clip from vibrator to sing

Three string of different densities

Meter stick champed vertically to measure vibration


amplitudes
Weight set
Acculab digital scale

EXPERIMENT SET UP

1.

Turn on the signal interface and the computer.

2.

Call up Data Studio. Under Signal Output , double-click on Output. A Signal


Generator window appears. Move it to a convenient location on the screen.

3.

Note that a sine wave has already been selected. We will use only sine wave in this
experiment. Set the amplitude and frequency of the signal generator initially to
approximately +2 V and 20 Hz, respectively. Then click on. Adjust the frequency
to observe the multiple harmonics of the standing wave. Remember that you can
obtain frequency steps of various sizes by clicking on the + and keys, as
well as the arrows.

PROCEDURES

Part 1 : ( Relationship between frequency and number


antinodes)
1. Adjust the frequency until you obtain a nice standing wave
with two antinodes ( n = 2) . Record this frequency in the
Data section.
2. Obtain and record the frequencies for consecutive n values.
Take at least six measurements, starting with the fundamental
mode.
3. Calculate and record the wavelength, Eq (13) and wave speed,
(14), corresponding to each
n.
4. Plot a graph of frequency as a function of n . what is the
relationship between the two variables?

Part 2 : ( Relationship between frequency and


tension )
1. Choose one of the three strings. Measure and record the linear mass density ( =
M/L) of the string by obtaining its total mass M and total length L. Use the digital
scale to weight the string. Keep all units in the SI system ( kilograms and meters).
2. Using the 50-g mass hanger, measure and record the frequency for the n = 2 mode. (
NOTE = you may choose any integer fo n, but remember to keep n constant
throughout the rest of this section.)
3. Add masses in increment of 50 g, and adjust the frequency so that the same number
of nodes is obtained. Take and record measurements for at least six different
tensions.
4. The wave speed should be related to the tension F and linear mass density by v =
(F/)1/2
5. Calculate and record the wave speed in each case using Eq (14), and plot V 2 as a
function of F/ (you
have calculated V 2 from the measured tension and linear
mass density , these are the x-axis values. Be sure to covert the tension into units of
Newtons ).
6. Now plot : theoretical line V2 = F/. This is a straight line at 450 on your graph, if
you used the same scale on both axes.

Part 3 : relationship between frequency and the density of


a medium through which a wave propagates )
1. Measure the linear mass densities (= M/L ) of the two other
strings as describes above.
2. Keeping the tension and mode number constant at say, 100 g
and n = 2, measure and record the frequencies for the three
strings.
3. Calculated and record the experimental wave speed from the
frequency and wavelength for eachstring density.
4. Calculated and record the theoretical wave speed for each
string density from v = (F/)1/2 and compare these speeds
with the experimental values.

ENHANCE

As a musicians singer changes the length of the


vibrating string, the pitch produced by the guitar
changes. A longer vibrating string produces a lower note
and a shorter string, a higher note.

THANK YOU
BYE