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Chapter 11

Outlining Your
Speech

Outlining Your Speech: Introduction


Outlining: Organizing the content of your
speech into a structured form
Helps you visually represent your ideas
Enables you to see if your speech flows
logically and covers your subject matter
adequately

Use your outlines to practice your speech.

Two Stages of Outlining


Working outline: Thorough outline used
to craft your speech; also called a detailed
or preparation outline
Contains all points written out in full
sentences or detailed phrases
Shows the hierarchy of ideas in your speech
May be reviewed by your instructor to
evaluate your preparation effort
Can serve as a reference when you begin to
practice your speech

Two Stages of Outlining (cont.)


Speaking outline: Shorter outline that
expresses your ideas in keywords or brief
phrases
Used when you actually deliver your speech
Facilitates extemporaneous delivery

Two Stages of Outlining (cont.)

Creating Your Working Outline


Outlining the
body of your
speech
Use proper
labeling and
indentation.
Include two to
four subpoints
for each main
point.

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Use full sentences or detailed phrases.
This will help you to practice and prepare and will
help your instructor evaluate you.

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Check for subordination.
Make sure each subpoint is relevant to its
corresponding main point, and each sub-subpoint
is relevant to its corresponding subpoint.
For each of your supporting materials, complete
the sentence This supports the point I am making
because. . .

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Include full information for citations,
quotations, and other evidence.

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Insert transitions:
Between the introduction and body
As you move from one main point to the next
Between the body and conclusion

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Outlining your introduction
The structure of the introduction should look
like the following:
INTRODUCTION
I.
Attention-getter
II.
Topic or thesis statement
III.
Connection with the audience
IV.
Speakers credibility
V.
Preview of main points

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Outlining your conclusion
Outline the conclusion after outlining your
introduction.
The structure should look like this in your
working outline:
CONCLUSION
I. Summary of main points
II. Clincher

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Creating a list of works cited
List the sources that you cited or used in
your speech.
Follow your instructors guidelines for an
MLA, APA, or Chicago Manual style of
documentation.
A works cited list is not a substitute for the
proper citation and quotation of evidence in
your outline or speech.

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)

Creating Your Working Outline


(cont.)
Inserting the title, specific purpose, and
thesis
Including these can help develop the main
and supporting points.
Indicate the title of your speech in large or
bold type at the top of your working outline.
Indicate your specific purpose and thesis at
the left margin.

A Sample Working Outline


Refer to the extensive sample working
outline in your textbook for Josh
Betancurs speech titled Invisibility:
Science Fiction No More!
The three main points of the speech are:
Invisibility requires transporting light around an
object.
Invisibility research is progressing well.
Invisibility technology has many practical
applications.

Creating Your Speaking Outline


To deliver the most effective
extemporaneous presentation possible,
youll need to transform your working
outline into a speaking outline.
The speaking outline provides:
Reminders of your main and supporting points
Guidelines for organizing them in case you
lose track

Creating Your Speaking Outline


(cont.)
Formatting your speaking outline
Use index cards or note paper.
Keep your points brief, using only keywords or
quick phrases.
Make it easy on the eyes for quick
referencing.
Use the same structure as the working
outline.
Number each card or page of your outline.

Creating Your Speaking Outline


(cont.)

Creating Your Speaking Outline


(cont.)
Elements of your speaking outline
Main points
Write each as a brief phrase or one to three
keywords.

Subpoints and sub-subpoints


Write just enough to remind you of the key idea.

Abbreviations
Use whenever possible to condense your outline.

Evidence
Include necessary citation information.

Creating Your Speaking Outline


(cont.)
Difficult words
Include words that are difficult to pronounce or
hard to remember.

Transitions
Include a brief reminder of each transition in your
speech.

Delivery notes
Consider jotting down delivery reminders in the
margin.

A Sample Speaking Outline


Refer to the sample speaking outline of
Josh Betancurs speech, Invisibility:
Science Fiction No More! in your
textbook.

A Sample Speaking Outline (cont.)