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Shade Selection
LOCAL ANESTHESIA
Preparation of the Operating Site
I SOLATION OF THE OPERATING FIELD
TOOTH PREPARATION
Pulpal Protection
Application of Bonding systems
Inserting the Composite
Contouring the Composite
Polishing the Composite
(1) conventional,
(2) beveled
conventional, (3)
modified,
(4) box only,
(5) slot preparation
designs.



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Preparation of the Operating
Site




Preparation of the Operatin


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- S1: 98,25%

Tavoillot J, 1989

Preparation of the Operating Site

5
LOCAL
ANESTHESIA
ISOLATION OF THE OPERATING FIELD


Opaldam

Opaldam (Ultradent)


Ultrapak
(Ultradent)


Class I Restorations

Restorations on Occlusal Surface of


Premolars and Molars.
line angles angles.
Line angles are
tooth preparation walls: faciopulpal(fp),
distofacial (df),
facial (f), distopulpal (dp),
distal(d), distolingual (dl),
linguopulpal (Ip),
lingual (I), mesiolingual(ml), mesiopulpal (mp),
mesial (m), mesiofacial(mf).

pulpal (p).
Point angles are

distofaciopulpal(dfp),
distolinguopulpal (dlp),
mesiolinguopulpal(mlp),
mesiofaciopulpal (mfp).
initial tooth preparation is the extension
and initial design of the external walls of the
preparation at a specified, limited depth so as to
provide access to the caries or defect, reach
sound tooth structure (except for later removal of
infected dentin on the pulpal or axial walls), resist
fracture of the tooth or restorative material from
masticatory forces principally directed with the
long axis of the tooth, and retain the restorative
material in the tooth
The steps in initial tooth preparation are:
(1) developing the outline form and initial
depth,
(2) establishing primary resistance form,
(3) establishing primary retention form,
(4) providing convenience form.
Step 1: Outline Form and Initial
Depth

The first step in initial tooth preparation is


determining and developing the outline form
while establishing the initial depth.
the outline form means:
placing the preparation margins
initialdepth of 0.2 to 0.8 mm pulpally of the
DEJ
Entry cut. Diamond
held parallel to long
axis of
crown. Initial pulpal
depth 1.5 mm from
central groove
all friable and/or weakened enamel should
be removed,
(2) all faults should be included,
(3) all margins should be placed in a position
to afford
good finishing of the margins of the restoration
Outline form and initial depth for
pit and fissure lesions.

1. the extent to which the enamel has been involved by


the carious process,
2) the extensions that must be made along the fissures
to achieve sound and smooth margins,
3) the limited bur depth related to the tooth's original
surface (real, or visualized if missing because
of disease or defect) while extending the preparation
to sound external walls that have a pulpal depth of
approximately 1.5 to 2 mm and usually a maximum
depth into dentin of 0.2 mm
Step 2: Primary Resistance
Form.

Primary resistance form may be defined as


that shape and placement of the preparation walls
that best enable both the restoration and the tooth
to withstand, without fracture, masticatory forces
delivered principally in the long axis of the tooth.
primary resistance form are
1) to use the box shape
with a relatively flat floor,
2) to restrict the
extension of the
external walls (keep as
small as possible)
3) to have a slight
rounding (coving) of
internal
line angles to reduce stress
concentrations in tooth
structure;
primary resistance form are
4) in extensive tooth preparations, to cap weak
cusps and envelope or include enough of a weakened
tooth within the restoration to prevent or resist
fracture of the tooth by forces both in the long axis
and obliquely (laterally) directed
5) to provide enough thickness of restorative
material
to prevent its fracture under load
6) to bond the material to tooth structure when
appropriate
Step 3: Primary Retention Form

Primary retention form is that shape or form


of
the conventional preparation that resists
displacement or removal of the restoration
from tipping or lifting forces.
Step 4: Convenience Form.

Convenience form is that


shape or form of the preparation that provides
for adequate observation, accessibility, and
ease of operation in preparing and restoring
the tooth.
FINAL TOOTH PREPARATION STAGE
Step 5: Removal of Any Remaining Enamel
Pit or
Fissure, Infected Dentin, and/or Old
Restorative Material,
if Indicated.
Step 6: Pulp Protection
using traditional liners or bases is to either
protect the pulp
liners is reserved for those volatile or aqueous suspensions
or dispersions of zinc oxide or calcium hydroxide that can
be applied to a tooth surface in a relatively thin films' and
are used to affect a particular pulpal response.

Bases are considered those cements commonly


used in thicker dimensions beneath permanent
restorations to provide for mechanical, chemical,
and thermal protection of the pulp.
Step 7: Secondary Resistance and
Retention Forms.
The secondary
retention and resistance forms are of two types: (1)
mechanical
preparation features and (2) treatments of the preparation
walls with etching, priming, and adhesive materials.



0,05-
2%
What problem have we got with
composite material?

?
Polymerization Shrinkage
Polymerization Shrinkage

Composite materials
shrink while hardening.
This is referred to as
polymerization
Shrinkage


Bonded
Surface
Free
Surface

Adhesion

Composite
Shrinkage

Adhesive

polymerization shrinkage
stress
The tooth structure
to accommodate
potential stress .

-

23103

10103

-

- 5,25 103
9 103
,

() .

- 4,4%

4,4%

- 13,8%

20,6%

; ;3-
5%
; 2,5-3%

1-3%
.

=

()
( )

:
-
: SOFT-,
.
-

-
1
-

Bonded
Surface
Free
Surface

Adhesion

Composite
Shrinkage

Adhesive
configuration factor

C-factors associated with


polymerization shrinkage
for different situations using dental
restorative materials.
-



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