Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 14

L

M
O
D
U
L
O
R
Bettisabel Lamelo
06-39774
THE MODULOR
is a scale of
proportions
developed by Le
Corbusier.

Le Modulor
Le Corbusier
created the
Modulor following
the steps of
Vitruvius,
Leonardo da
Vinci's Vitruvian
Man, the work of
Leone Battista
Alberti, and other
attempts to
discover
mathematical
proportions in the
human body and
then to use that
knowledge to
improve
architecture.

Vitruvian Man
This system is
based on three
aspects:

human
measurements

the Fibonacci
numbers

and the golden


ratio.
HUMAN
MEASUREMENTS

refers to the
measurement of
living human
individuals for the
purposes of
understanding
human physical
variation.

Human Measurements
THE FIBONACCI
NUMBERS

are a sequence of
numbers where
the first number
of the sequence
is 0, the second
number is 1, and
each subsequent
number is equal
to the sum of the
previous two
numbers of the
sequence itself.

Fibonacci Spiral
THE GOLDEN
RATIO
(1.62)

Two quantities
are in the golden
ratio if the ratio
between the sum
of those
quantities and the
larger one is the
same as the ratio
between the
larger one and
the smaller.

Golden Ratio
Le Corbusier
described the
Modulor as a
"range of
harmonious
measurements to
suit the human
scale, universally
applicable to
architecture and
to mechanical
things.“

He published the
first edition of Le
Modulor in 1948,
followed by
Modulor 2 in
1955.

Le Modulor
Le Corbusier
used his Modulor
scale in the
design of many
buildings,
including Notre
Dame du Haute
and buildings in
Chandigarh.

Notre Dame du Haute


In the entrance of
the first Unité Unité
d'Habitation d'Habitation
apartment entrance
building, in
Marseilles, Le
Corbusier
recreated a
version of Notre
Dame du Haute’s
interior, following
again the
principles of The
Modulor

Notre Dame du
Haute’s interior
GRAPHIC
REPRESENTATION ARM UPRAISED

The graphic
representation of
the Modulor is a
stylized human
figure with one
arm upraised
standing next to
two vertical
measurements.

VERTICAL MEASUREMENTS

Le Modulor
BASIC PLOT
Basic plot:
43
113, 70, 43 cm.

When these
quantities are
combined, they 70
provided other
measurements
related with the
modulor.

For example: 113


43+70=113,
113+70=183 and
113+70+43=223,
these three results
define the space
human body
occupies.

Le Modulor
According to the
quantities of 113
and 226, Le
Corbusier
developed two
vertical
measurements,
the red series and
the blue series,
which are
descending scales
related to the
height of the
human figure.

RED SERIES BLUE SERIES

Le Modulor
The most
significant building
where Le
Corbusier used
the Modulor is the
previously
mentioned Unité
d’Habitation in
Marseilles, where
the architect uses
over 15
measurements of
the Modulor to
accommodate this
building into
human scale.

Unité d’Habitation’s façade

Оценить