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Region I

 Referred to as the Ilocos Region mainly because it


is home to a majority of Ilokanos and the seat of
the Ilokano culture, heritage and language.

 There are two distinct versions as to where the word


“Ilocos” originated In Isabelo de los Reyes
„Historia de Ilocos’ (1885), it evolved from the
word “ilog” (river). Ilocos means “people in the
river”, very much like the Tagalog‟s “taga-ilog”
which referred to the early settler‟s living along
riverbanks.
Region I
 Located on the northwestern coast of Luzon
island, it includes four (4) provinces:
Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, La Union,
Pangasinan

 The dialect or language that is use in this


region are Ilocano and Pangasinense.
 Tagalog and English are the medium of
instruction in schools.
 Ilocano is widely used by the majority
people while Pangasinense is spoken in the
central towns of Pangasinan.
LITERATURE OF
REGION 1
THE OTHER WOMAN
By: Virgilio R. Samonte
Virgilio R. Samonte
 He is from Laoag, Ilocos Norte. His selection, “The
Other Woman” won third prize in the Carlos Palanca
Memorial Awards for Literature in 1954-55.
 Samonte’s ‘’The Other Woman’’ revealed the love and care of an
aged wife too her ailing husband. At the end, another woman in
the name of Loida confirmed her love to the sick husband of Nana
Celing.
Characters

•Manuel-Cecilia’s husband
•Cecilia-Manuel’s wife
•Loida- the servant girl
1. Cecilia tried to pull away Manuel from Loida but she could not. Then
fiercely she struck her with successive resounding slaps, crying
insanely for her to release him.

2. Cecilia, the wife had taken Loida, the harelip as a househelp in a


desperate hope that she would repel him.

3. Loida screamed repeatedly. Her screams sent Cecilia back to the


room where she saw Loida holding the inert form of Manuel,
screaming while tears flowed down her face.

4. Now Manuel is dying, his appearance a far cry from the lusty man he
was once known to be and he has the ashen look of a corpse.
Cecilia cares for him and she seldom goes out his room.
Summary

Manuel possessed a vitality that was insatiable. His


healthy, younger years were marked by a succession of
mistresses. Even servant girls were prey to his desires.
Cecilia, the wife had taken Loida, the harelip as a
househelp in a desperate hope that she would repel
him. His philandering caused the state of penury in
which they existed.
So it was surprising how even with his intended
imperfections, Cecilia seemed to have loved him even
more. Loida had been with the couple since. She
possessed a face which to a stranger would most likely be
described as hideous. The cleft lip, with repulsively livid
gums went up in an angle to a flat nose framed in an
equally flat face as though it had been bashed in by
repeated fist blows.
Now Manuel is dying, his appearance a far cry from the lusty man he
was once known to be and he has the ashen look of a corpse. Cecilia cares
for him and she seldom goes out his room. For Cecilia, Manuel has finally
became hers. Loida on the other hand had adopted an unservantly
attitude. Suspicious of strangers and guests, she doesn't bother to hide her
bitterness at the thought of Cecilia alone caring for Manuel and sleeping
in a room with him.
She seems to bristle with suppressed anger and moves around doing her
chores in furious haste. In one of those rare times when Cecilia went out
of the room, Loida screamed repeatedly. Her screams sent Cecilia back to
the room where she saw Loida holding the inert form of Manuel,
screaming while tears flowed down her face.
Cecilia tried to pull away Manuel from Loida but she
could not. Then fiercely she struck her with successive
resounding slaps, crying insanely for her to release him.
The nasal twang in her voice crazier than ever, saliva flying
from her mouth saying “No! No! I will not! He is mine,
too! He loved me!

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