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‡ Outdoor work in hot weather


‡ Foundry work or smelting
‡ Brick-firing, ceramics or glass
manufacture

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‡ Rubber manufacture
‡ Work in bakeries,
confectioneries, kitchens
‡ Laundry operations

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‡ Age, weight, physical fitness


‡ Metabolism, medications, alcohol or
drugs
‡ Water and caffeine consumption
‡ Medical conditions
‡ Acclimatization


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‡ Air temperature
‡ Humidity
‡ Radiant heat
‡ Conductive heat
sources
‡ Protective clothing
‡ PPE


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‡ Blood circulates to upper layers of skin


‡ Less blood for internal organs
‡ Performance declines
‡ Coordination and alertness decline

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‡ Rest in cool, shaded area


‡ Take heat-relief breaks
‡ Gradually adjust to working in heat

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‡ Results from the body¶s natural cooling


‡ Body releases heat through sweat
‡ Sweat ducts become plugged
‡ Skin inflammation develops
‡ Prickly rash is uncomfortable
‡ Rash can become infected

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‡ Rest in a cool area


‡ Wash the skin
‡ Allow skin to dry
‡ Seek medical attention, if
infected
‡ Regularly bathe and dry skin

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‡ Blood accumulates in
lower part of body
‡ Brain does not get
adequate blood supply
‡ Sudden loss of
consciousness

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‡ Rest in cool, shaded area


‡ Gradually adjust to working in heat
‡ Move around to circulate blood

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Occurs in tired muscles when the worker


sweats profusely and drinks large
quantities of water

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‡ Painful contractions in the muscle


‡ Uncomfortable and temporarily
disabling
‡ Low salt level can cause spasms
‡ Too much salt can cause cramps

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‡ Rest in cool, shaded area


‡ Drink about 5 to 7 ounces of fluids
every 15 to 20 minutes
‡ Avoid caffeinated beverages
or alcohol

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‡ Drink salted or carbohydrate


replacement liquids for recovery
‡ Gradually adjust to working in heat

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‡ Large amounts of fluid lost by sweating


‡ Symptoms resemble early heat stroke
‡ Physically weak, fatigued, or faint
‡ Giddy, irritable, or mentally confused
‡ Nauseous
‡ Headache, dizziness,
and/or lightheadedness

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‡ Person continues to sweat


‡ Skin is clammy and moist
‡ Body temperature remains normal
‡ Person may vomit or lose
consciousness

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‡ Rest in a cool, shaded area


‡ Drink about 5 to 7 ounces of fluids
every 15 to 20 minutes
‡ Lay person down
‡ Seek medical attention,
if severe

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‡ Life-threatening condition
‡ Body¶s temperature regulatory system
fails
‡ Sweating becomes inadequate

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‡ Person¶s skin is hot and dry


‡ Skin appears red in color
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‡ Body temperature is above 103 F
‡ Person is mentally confused or
delirious
‡ Person can have convulsions
or become unconscious

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‡ Get immediate medical attention


‡ Remove to cool, shaded area
‡ Soak clothing with cool water
‡ Fan body vigorously
‡ Never leave unattended

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‡ Heat index system


‡ Health and safety agency testing

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Work classifications:
‡ Light hand work
‡ Heavy hand work
‡ Heavy work with one arm
‡ Light work with two arms
‡ Moderate work with the body
‡ Heavy work with the body

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Engineering controls
‡ Shade
‡ Ventilation
‡ Air cooling
‡ Air circulation
‡ Shielding from radiant heat sources
‡ Insulating radiant heat sources
‡ Use of power assists and tools

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G

  

Personal protective equipment


‡ Ice vests
‡ Water-cooled garments
‡ Air supply systems
‡ Wet clothing, headbands, or bandanas

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G

  

Work practices
‡ Use intermittent rest periods
‡ Drink small quantities of water frequently
‡ Use relief workers
‡ Use the buddy system
‡ Pace the work
‡ Reduce physical demands
‡ Provide cool recovery or shaded rest areas
‡ Schedule work for cooler times of the day
‡ Wear light, loose-fitting, breathable clothing

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