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Curriculum & Material

Development
Lecturer:
Woro Hestiningsih, M.Pd.

3 rd Group

UNIVERSITAS INDRAPRASTA PGRI


Didin

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How Goals Become Realized Through Instructional Plans:
1. Translating General Goals into Syllabus Objectives:
a) A Curriculum Provides a Statement of Policy
b) The Link Between Goals and Objectives
c) Syllabuses Without a Curriculum
2. Language Content, Process and Product in Syllabus Design:
a) The Language Content Dimension
b) The Process Dimension
c) The Product Dimension
3. Selecting the Shape of the Syllabus
a) The Linear Format
b) The Modular Format
c) The Cyclical Format
d) The Matrix Format
e) The Story-line Format
4. The Place of Method

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How goals become instructional objectives
1. Translating General Goals into Syllabus Objectives
Since curriculum and syllabus present separate functions, there are
benefits in their minds as distinct entities. An offer of curriculum with abstracts, the The nature of
general purpose of the temporary syllabus is as a learning plan, guiding teachers and The nature of language
language
students in everyday problems. In fact, the main task for the compiler of the syllabus learning
is to change the objectives of the abstract curriculum into concrete goals in the L2
Curriculum
syllabus.
a) A Curriculum Provides a Statement of Policy: Regions that have an influence on
goals articulated through the curriculum: Theoretical and philosophical views: Educational
cultural
that mold (mould) the tone of the intellectual curriculum affecting the basis philosophy
for determining objectives in the three dimensions of the syllabus: content of
language, process or method and product or outcome.
b) The Link Between Goals and Objectives: The relationship between general
objectives at the curriculum level and specific objectives at the syllabus level is
clear in influencing the objectives of three important things about the syllabus, General goals
namely: the dimensions of language content, processes or methods, and
products or results. In general, curriculum objectives tend to place emphasis on
one or another of these dimensions. This linkage is displayed graphically in
diagram 4: : Theoretical and philosophical views:
c) Syllabuses Without a Curriculum: If the syllabus without a curriculum can be
Language
made, if the achievement of syllabus learning with the curriculum cannot be content Product/
separated, because the achievement of learning must be accompanied by Outcomes
methods and approaches. While the methods and approaches are explained in
the curriculum. Process/
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2. Language Content, Process and Product in Syllabus Designs.

Whether or not, there are basic objectives in the curriculum, vary according to what the language
program emphasizes (a) the contents of the language, or certain things that will be included; (b) processes, or
ways to learn the contents of the language; (c) products, or results such as language skills expected by
students.

a) The Language Content Dimension: Content generally includes three important subcomponents. Along
with language content, structure and grammar forms. Language programs have included thematic and
situational contents as well.
b) The Process Dimension: As used in developing syllabus, the process refers to how the instruction is
carried out and learning is achieved. Results are generated from three main areas:
 Preparation of language content that produces certain activities
 The role of teachers and students take during the learning process.
 Types of activities and tasks in which students are involved.
The process in the syllabus is strongly influenced by the views of language learning and the
concepts of education in general:
1. Organization
2. The role of the teacher
3. The role of the learner
c) The Product Dimension: Products in syllabus design refer to the specifications of the expected results of a
study program. This specification is used by various groups in different ways. Bellows College 5
3. Selecting the Shape of the Syllabus.
Subject matter that has been determined based on the syllabus models that are guided requires a formulation
and organization in the form of a written document or standard format. This is intended to clarify which subject matter
must be given to students before or after certain subject matter is given. Dubin and Olhstain introduced five language
syllabus formats that can be used:
a) The Linear Format: Linear format is a form of language syllabus that has long been known and used in language
classes, especially for materials that are sorted by the level of difficulty and complexity.
b) The Modular Format: Modular format is a language syllabus that selects and organizes subject matter that must be
given to students not based on the level of difficulty and complexity, but is based on the themes chosen and
determined based on the students' language needs.
c) The Cyclical Format: Cyclic format is a language syllabus that selects and organizes subject matter that must be
given to students based on the level of difficulty and complexity or language needs of students with several times
the occurrence of repetition.
d) The Matrix Format: Matrix format is a language syllabus that the selection and organization of lessons to be given
to students is not based on the level of difficulty and complexity, but is based on the themes or situations chosen
based on the language needs of students.
e) The Story-line Format: Story-line format is a language syllabus which the selection and organization of subject
matter that must be given to students is not based on the level of difficulty and complexity or language needs of
students, but is based on a story-line that is built during a certain learning period, such as one semester or one
quarterly
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4. The place of method.
The clearest definition addresses the method, and the one that
became widely adopted in the field, was proposed by Anthony (1963). In the
context of the prevailing audio-lingualism, he explained the method in
relation to two other terms, approaches and techniques. The approach
requires a theoretical view of language along with people who are related to
the psychological learners. Techniques are everyday classroom practices and
procedures. However, the Anthony model runs quite efficiently, to view
assumed language content in grammatical audio-lingual forms.

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CONCLUSIONS

The curriculum provides a statement about the policy, while


the syllabus is setting out the details of the contents of the learning.
Content, processes, and products are the three basic components of
the instructional plan. Dubin and Olhstain introduced five language
syllabus formats that can be used: linear format; modular format;
cyclic format; matrix format; and story format. The method relates to
two other terms, approaches and techniques.

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