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Auxiliary Views – An Overview

Definition - Auxiliary Views

An auxiliary view is an orthographic


projection of an angled surface on an
object, which appears foreshortened in
a typical multiview drawing.
Auxiliary views are used to show the
true size and shape of an angled
surface and its features.
Foreshortened Surfaces
Foreshortened
surfaces on
multiview drawings
do not give a clear foreshortened face
or accurate
representation of
size or shape and
should not be
dimensioned.
Foreshortened Surfaces
An auxiliary view
allows the viewer to
look perpendicular
to an angled surface
to witness the true
size and shape of
that surface and its
features (a hole in
this example).
Types of Auxiliary Views

There are three


types of ordinary
auxiliary views:
depth auxiliary,
height auxiliary,
& width auxiliary.
Types of Auxiliary Views
A depth auxiliary view is derived from a front
or back view of an object and will show true
depth.
A width auxiliary view is derived from a side
view of an object and will show true width.
A height auxiliary view is derived from the top
or bottom view of an object and will show true
height.
Creating Auxiliary Views

Step #1: Start with a multiview drawing of an


object that contains a canted surface. In
this case, the canted surface for which
the auxiliary view will be created is
shown as an angled edge in the front
view.
1

2
1 5,6 4
3
5
4,7
9 7 6
2,9 3,8
8
1,2 2 1

3,4 4
3

5 5

9 8,7 6 8,9 7 6
Creating Auxiliary Views
Step #2: Determine which true dimension will be
shown by the auxiliary view and identify
reference edges on the proper existing
view.
Draw appropriately spaced construction
lines where the auxiliary view will occur.
These construction lines will serve as
reference lines and must be parallel to
the angled edge in question.
Edge View of
Reference Plane
Creating Auxiliary Views

Step #3: Draw construction lines outward from


each corner on the view from which the
auxiliary view will be a 90° rotation. The
lines must be perpendicular to the
angled edge in question.
Identify the relationship between the
corners of the object and the
intersections of the construction lines.
1
1
2
1 5,6 4
3
2
4 5
4,7 5
3 7 6
9 9 7 6
2,9 3,8 8 8
1,2 2 1

3,4 4
3

5 5

9 8,7 6 8,9 7 6
Creating Auxiliary Views

Step #4: Draw object lines to connect corners


that share a visible edge.
1
1
2
1 5,6 4
3
2
4 5
4,7 5
3 7 6
9 9 7 6
2,9 3,8 8 8
1,2 2 1

3,4 4
3

5 5

9 8,7 6 8,9 7 6
This auxiliary view, as projected from
the front view, shows the true size
and true shape of one of the angled
surfaces. If a feature, such as a hole,
were located on this surface, it could
now be properly dimensioned.
Partial Views

Foreshortened object faces may have


complex shapes or curves that can be difficult
to draw.
Short break lines and partial views may be
used to remove the need to draw difficult
curves on foreshortened faces, while still
maintaining complete shape description
within a multiview drawing.
Partial Views
short break lines